Skip to main content

Full text of "Shakespeare-Lexicon : a complete dictionary of all the English words, phrases and constructions in the works of the poet"

_..._11 

IIII 

Presented 
tO 
the Centre for 
REFORMATION 
and 
RENAISSANCE 
STUDIES 

VICTORIA 
UNIVERSITY 

F. David Hoeniger 

0 



SHAKE SPEARE=LEXICON 

BAD I 
A-L 

BERLIN 1902 
DRUCK UND VERLAG VON GEORO REIIIER 



SHAKESPEARE-LEXICON 

A COMPLETE I)I(;TION,IY 

• " " " ' I lll,A8L8 A'I} COgsFRU( 

IN 

TIIE WORKS OF 'FIIE l'()ET 

ALEXANDER SCHMIDT, LL. D. 

TIIIRD EDITION 
REV.ISED AND ENLARGED 
BY 
GREGOR SARRAZIN 

VOLUME I 
A-L 

BERLIN 1902 
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY GEORG REIMER 



EF. & E. 



Prefiee to t, he First Vohnne of the Fil'st Editiol. 

The present Wol'k, as difl'eriug frolll the existing Shakespearian 
glossaries, the object of which has been ouly t.o explain what bas become 
obsolete and unintclligible in the writ.ings of the poet, is to cont.ain his 
whole vocabulary and sul,ject the sense and use of evel'y Wol'd of il to 
a ca.reful examination. 
As il was not intended to establish a crit.ical standard, but only 
to fl,rnish some of the necessary materials fo," criticism, it seelned con- 
renient to lay aside, tbr the present, the question of the authenticity of 
the works gencrally aSCl'ibed to Shakespeare, and to consider as genuine 
ail that has been commonlv printed together as Shakespeare's, namely 
the thirt.y-six plays oi" the first and second Folios, together with Pericles, 
and the so called Poems; but to disregard the apocryphal pieces of the latest 
Folios as well as those which the criticism of st.ill later limes has brought 
into connection with the naine of the poet. The stage-directions. 
too, even those of the ea,'liest cditions, have been left unnoticed, as il 
appeared more than doubt.flfl whether they were writtel by Shakespeare 
himsclf. 
In the present unsettled state of textual criticism it could not be 
decided, whether the Folios .or the extant Quartos deserved greater credit.. 
But fortunately the business of a lexicographer was, in this point al 
least, easier tlmn t.hat of an editor, who must lnake his choice between 



VI l'relate fo the First Volume of the First Edition. 
different lections, whereas the former my fairly contet himself with 
registering the occurring variations. These have indeed been collated 
with great tare wherever some auflaority could be att.ributed to the aneient 
text.s; exeluding, of course, those Qtmrtos which the editors of the 
first Folio ment when speaking of stole a,d so'rel;t#iots COla[es , iaimed 
«md dejbrmed by the fra«d« ad stealths of bjm'io«s 6l»osto's, namely the 
Quartos of t.he Merry Wives and Henl'y V, the 'First Pu't of fle Con- 
tention', file 'Truc Tragedy, and the eavliest impressions of Romco and 
Juliet (1597) and of Hamlct (1603). Their variations al'e, at the ]»est, 
of the saine weight as the conjectures of modevn emendators. 
The example and reasons of the Cambridge editors have been 
decisive for adopting the modern orthogralhy , those cases excepted when 
t.he difl'erent spelling of the o11 editions was evidently caused by a 
difference of pronmaciation. 
As for etymology, which ought to be the groundwork of every 
general dictionary, its importance seemed subordinate and somctimcs even 
doubtfid in ascertaining the sense of words in a particular period, -- a 
period especially in which the gelfiUs of the language broke new ways, 
now mad then even wifl some violence, to supply its increasing wants. 
Therefore the derivation of words has been ncglected on pnrpose, except 
when there was no other mea.ns of fiuding out thci" meaning. Accord- 
ingly, in a.rvanging the different significations of one and the saine word, 
a ha.rural and rational rather than an historical order has been observed, 
as it always seemed t.he safest way to study and explain the language 
of Shakespea.re by itself, calling in no other help as long as it could 
be donc without. In the definitions themselves as well as in their ar- 
rangement there will undoubtedly much be found to object against, but 
let it at the saine time be borne in mind that it is next to impossible to 
draw everywhere a strict line of demarcation, and flat, at any rate, the 
means of finding flac truth for himself have always been placed vithin 
the rea.ch of the reader. 
Originally a purpose was entertained of making the quotations 
absolutely complete, even with respect to the most common and con- 
stntly recurring parts and forms of speech. As, howevev, there arose 
some danger of impairing the utility of the book by hiding lnomentous 



l'rcfitce to the First Vohtme to the First Edition. V[I 

que,,.'tious under cuudrous deta.ils, copious use ha.s been ruade of the 
signs f. L and etc. by way of indicating that sufficicnt proof, if needed, 
was offered in every page of the poet. 
On t.he other hand, it was hot quite easy to rcsist the teml»tation 
to make t.his lexicon a gencral 'epert.ory and st.ove-house of Shakespearian 
love by collect.ing and gavuering up in it. ail that the industry of two 
eenturies had donc in this bra.nch ofliterat,,re. But, for once, first thoughts 
were best. Il, pursuing too vast a lwoject, the p'incipal design of the 
WOl'k was too likcly t.o have somctimes bcen lost. sight of. Following, 
thcretbl'e, the ohl maxim tlmt the half is more than thc wholc, and keeping 
within the p'oposcd bounds, the task was limitcd, in whatevcr reaehed 
beyond them, to the smallcst possillc eompass. Obscurities hot ol'iginating 
in the peculiav use of wovds, btlt in the poet's ri'aih of thought., have leen 
considered as quite out. of the question and entirely left to the com- 
ment.atol's. 
Eveu thus the wot'k wotdd remain extensive enough to make 
any SUl»erfluity a fault. Erroneous opilios and Wl'Ong conjectures 
of luode'n editors were hot admitted, unless they had become too 
populav to l»e altogether left tnmoticed. Obvious and evidenl things, 
tiret stood in no need of authovity, were left. to speak for themselves; 
and only in doublfid cases, or if there had been some partieular meril 
il finding the tl'uth, it seemed unfair hot to give every one lais due. 
But affet" all, truth cannot fare better than to be received as a mattev 
of course. 
Foreign and dialeetie words and phrases nsed by ,_hakespem'e 
will be eolleeted in an appendix to the second volume, for which are 
also veserved some gt'ammat.ical remarks designed fo prove the justness 
of several int.erpreta.tions which would else, perhaps, appear arbitrary 
and hazardous. They are fewer in number than was at firsl; anticipated, 
tbr the excellent Shakespearian Grammar of Me. Abbott, published in 
t.he lneantime, toget.her with Sidney Walker's Crit.ical Examination of the 
Texl of Sh., redueed the task to that of a gleaner following in the foot- 
steps of reapevs and pieking up a few negleeted ears. 
Of whal use the work will be, t.he evenl is to prove;- planned 
it was with a view to make çhe poet better understood than before;  



VIII l'reface to the Second Volumc of the First Edition. 
to la.y a firnler foundtion for the criticism of his text; to fimish 
reliable nmterials for English lexicography, which has, since the tilne 
of Samuel Johnson, increased in extent rat.her than in intrinsic value; 
-- to set right, although only one, yet certainly the most prolninent 
landlnark in the history of thc English language. 
While the general reader will look tbr assistance in thc definitions 
and explanations, seholm's and erities will be soonest p]cased, if satisfied 
by t.he exaetness of the quotations. Thcrefore eonmumieations coneerning 
errata will be extremely weleomc. 
Merely praetieal eonsiderations prevailed in ehoosing thc English 
language for the interpretations. No doubt the English of a Gcrman 
will often be fomd execptiolmble and try the indulgence a«d kindncss 
of the reader. But tlle anthor had no greater ambition,- if a lexieo- 
grapher may be allowed to be ambitions -- than to be uscfifi also to 
born Englishmen. 
Koenigsbcrg in Pr., Fcbr. 1874. 
A. SCIIM1DT. 

Prefi,ce to the Second Volume of the First Edition. 

The Appendix of this second volulne will contain, besides what 
has been promised in the preface of the first, a list of the Shakespcarian 
words forming the latter part in eolupositions, to meet a Wmlt hot Oldy 
felt by the author himself on many oeeasions, but intimated to him by 
some litenlry friends. In applying to it, it nmst a.lways be borne in 
lnind that it pretends to no higher claire than to be a supplemcnt to 
this dietionary, and has no other objeet than to eolnplete the quotations 
of the respective articles, by setting before the reader t.he whole range 



Prefaee to the Second Volume of the First Edition. IX 

of evidence to be found in the works of the poet. Fol" in very lnany 
cases the sense of silnple Wol'ds could hot be distinctly ascertained except 
ri'oto their COlnl»OUndS. Wherever the boundary line between English 
and Latin or French colnposition was hardly discel'nil,le, it was thought 
better to do too much than too little. 
One adva.ntage, at least, was gained by the new revision of thc 
wholc vocabnlary thus instituted. ]t led to thc dctcction of some words 
 indexed on the next following leaf  that had been overlooked by 
the compiler,  a fault which, if nobody else, those at least will bc 
inclined to pardon who evcr have bcen engaged in a similar labour. 
The recel)tion the first volulne has lnet with has been. in some 
respeets, bevond the lnost sanguine expeetations. The kind judgments 
passed on it I_,y the most eompetent crities were indeed the nlore grati- 
t3,ing, as they did hot, and eouhl not possibly, toueh the general design 
and tendency of the work, but turnod on details and the lnanner of 
treating partieular questions. The justness and soundness of a lnethod 
calmot be put to a better test than in its bearing on single points at 
issne. "Assurance noxv is ruade donble sure' that ranch that at first sight, 
and eonsidered by itself, eould not I,ut seem objeetionable, wiil be seen 
in another light, when in time the peculiar nature and the flmdamental 
lav of the whole will be fidly pereeived. 
To make the poet his own interpreter, l,y disearding all preeon- 
eeived opinions md subordinating all external means of information to 
those offel'ed by himselL was throughout the leading prineiple of the 
work. Vhat Aristarehus once did for Holner, and Galen for Hippoel'ates, 
was yet tobe done for S 
hakespeare. We beg to refer the reader to 
an extraet ff'oto Galen's praef, voe. Hippoer. quoted in Professor Lehrs' 
work "De Aristm'chi studiis Homerieis' p. 44:"Oaa rob'vu rSu 
i,, , 
,r roïs" adZm ' ' ' 3" ' " 
Œt,,], ,v,t ozoert eat b ra ' 
, ZO'O«s" . • . 
jd: o Z tro,og nqogeirat, ' " 
oaa iotaia 2oot, nau,uzovg, oetg ¢17tao._ eîa«. ot,.]] [ azo' ovoe.." ' 
[qaxvs" za rZ. ] xa; ,.azqd xa zatqos" za2 ovs""" xairot 



X Preface to the Second Volume of the First Edition. 
To this Prof. Lehrs observes: Ha.ce omni primus intellexig 
Homero eg praesgifig Aristarehus. Quare non seripsig 
eonfiuua poet.ae iugerpretafione accurat.issime versatus esg, in consuetis 
voeabulis, quorum et ad majorera Homerieorum locorum partem plerumque 
perfineg utilitas eg explietfio certior, plus etiam 
antiquitat.e obseura.tis operae ponens et ne «luid praetermittatur verl»um 
verbo reddens. Abjecig lilas doeh'inae sareinas, non tare existimans, ex 
aliis seriptoribus multt ad Homerum illustrandnm promi posse tluam 
caveudmn esse ne aliorum eonsuet.udine temere ad poetam t.ranslat im- 
prudent, es in vifia eg errores ineurr:tmus. 
Let us subjoin, for the use of Shakespea.rian texg-emendagors, a 
tw more eigations ri'oto the saine work: 
Galen (prae£ ad L. VI Epid.): noZb fl;Zo, "' «" ' 
ç " ' ' "' ' ' .......... 
Quintilian (Iusfig. orag. IX, 4, 39): QuaeOa in vegeribus libris 
repert tout,re imperifi soleng et., dura llbrariorum insecgari vohmt. 
insc.ienfiam, suam eonfit, eutur. 
Lehrs (p. 358): Ars crifiea prhnum elaborag ug scriptores, tlUOS 
pauei mss. eorruptos exhibeng, sine summa offensione legi possint: partira 
hnperfecta a.rs rouira non intelligig inscienti quae gollig ne quid relinl 
quatur quod absm'dum esse putaL Sed gl]seentibus st, udiis, eodicibus 
phribus parafis, rerum sermofisque seienti vulgaga, arte ingerpretandi 
exeulga, mulfis obsem'ioribus loeis per variorum tentamhm tandem reclusis. 
in reglores se fines congrahig, ci qlo magis primi magisgri peccaverunt, 
eo magis jam ipso coutradieendi studio ad fontes suos reverfihu-. 
Koenigsber« Pr., Oct. 1875. 



Prefitce to the Second Edition. 

This new edition of the Shakespeare Lexicon shoul,l ln'opcrly be 
ealled a lnere reiml)ression. The work being stereotyped, there was no 
seope for eomprehensive alterations and improvements. A eomplete 
reeonstruetion that would havê answered the many valuable suggestions 
of other Shakespeare students or even the eompiler's own ,dvaneed 
views -- espeeilly eoneerning the comparative authentieity of the Folios 
and Quartos  was quite out of the question. Ilis task was confined 
to thc correction of misprints and to some small additions for which 
room could be got by expunging what seenlcd lcss important. 
But, aftcr all, it is perhaps best as it is. Desirable as it lnay 
be to an author cntircly to remodel a wo,'k of the shorteomings of 
which he has become painfifily aware, there is no denying the fact that 
snch nexv editions altered and improved into Tfitc new books are, as a 
r,,le, an a.,moyance to the public. Nobody is so rich as hot to repine 
at being obligcd t,) buy the saine book thre or four times. Indeed, 
it ought to be a law in the relnll,lic of lettcrs that essential changes in 
books should be separately publishcd in the tb,'m of supplements and 
hot worked into the whole so as materially to change its fol'm and 
character. 
Besides. in snch a kind of book as this lexicon it is hot so much 
in the opinions of the author that its usefiflness consists as in the accu- 
racy with which the nccessary materials are brought together to enable 
those who consnlt it to forln an opinion of their own. And of this the 
readcr lnav be assured that in the rcvision of the work no pMns have 
been spared and that the correctness of the q,,otations will be round 
ail but absolute. 

Koenigsberg, Dee. 1885. 



Prehce t0 the Third Editi0n. 

The text of the third edition, publis]md aIter the Author's death, 
had to remain essentially unaltcl'cd, for reasons mentioncd in the 
t'OClncr prcfacc. Only VCl'y few slight mistakes in the quotations have 
1)ecn found and com'ected, and several short explanations addcd. Besicles, 
some asterisks wcre inserted, which refcv to the Supplemcut. A fcw 
additious to the Appendix (Quotations ri'oto t'oreign languages and Pco- 
vincialisms) have been indicated by bvackets. 
Thc Supplement contains a compilation of ncw interprctations of 
difllcnlt words and phrases, arrauged in all)habetical ol'der, selectcd ff'oto 
different modern annotatcd cditious and other books. As a rulc, thc 
opiuions of English scholars only havc becn repvoduced, who are thc 
most legitimate commentators of thc grcat English poet. With such 
iuterpvctcrs as Murray, Skeat, W. A. Wright, Furnivall, Dowden, Sidney 
Lce, Ellacombe, D. H. Madden, Wyndham, E. K. Chambcrs, Hcrfovd, 
Gollancz, Boas, among others, we nced scarcely look anywherc else for 
help. Iu a few cases, hovcver, somc interpretations given by American, 
Dutch, or Gcrman scholars (Furness, Grant Whitc, Hndson, Ch. Allen, 
Stoffel, Van Data, Brandl, Max Foerstcr, W. Franz, Khlge, Kopl)el. 
Schvoeel', Wetz, and a few others), or somc conjecturcs aud cxplauations 
of lny own have bcen added. 
Sincere thanks are due to Pvofessors Brandl, Focrstcr, Kluge, 
Wetz, and to Dr. Vordieck for- kiml advice and wthlable suggestions. 

Breslau, Dec. 1901. 

Gregor Savrazin. 



Ablwe via tions. 

Ado .... Much Ado about Nothing. 
All's or Ails. . . All's well that ends well. 
Aut ....... Antony and Cleopatra. 
A'g ....... Argument. 
As .... As )on like it. 
{'aes ..... . Julius Caesar. 
Chor. ...... Chorus. 
CompI ...... A Lover's Conplaiut. 
Cor ....... Coriolauus. 
Cymh ...... Cymbeline. 
Ded ....... Dedieation. 
Epil ....... Epilogue. 
Err ..... Comedy of Errors. 
FI ...... the Folio Edition of 1t;23. 
F ...... the Folio Edifion of 1;32. 
F ....... the Folio Edition of 1[3. 
F- ....... the Folio Edition of 1685. 
Ff ....... ail the fore" Folios, as differing 
from the existing Quarto 
Editions. 
Gent ....... the txo Gentlemen of Verona 
H4A .... First Part of Ilenry IV. 
tl4B . Second l'art of Henry IV. 
ti5 . . llenry V. 
H6A ...... First Part of Henry VI. 
H6B ...... Second Part of Henry VI. 
H6C ...... Third Part of Henry VI. 
H8 ....... tlenry VIII. 
IIml ....... Hamlet. 
Ind ....... Induction. 
John ...... King John. 
LLL ...... Love's Labour's Lost. 

' Lr.. . King Lear. 
Lner.. the Rape of Lucrece. 
Mcb.. Macbeth. 
Mess.. Measure for lXleasnre. 
M. Edd. lXlodern Editors. 
Mereh. the lXlerchant of Veniee. 
Mids.. . a llidsummer-uight's Dream. 
O. Edd. Old Editions (i. e. the Folios 
as well as the Quartos; or 
the Folios or Qnartos alone, 
if there are no other old 
editions extant). 
Oth ...... Othello. 
l'er ....... Pericles. 
Phoen ...... the Phoenix and the Turtle. 
Pilgr. ...... the Pasionate Pilgrim. 
Prol ....... Prologue. 
Qq ....... the old Quarto Editions as 
differing from the Folios. 
R2 ....... Richard II. 
113 ....... Richard I11. 
Rom ....... Romeo und Juliet. 
Shr ....... the Taming of the Shrew. 
8onn ....... Sonnets. 
Tim ....... Timon of Athens. 
Tir ....... Titus Andronicus. 
Tp ....... Tempest. 
Troil ....... Troilus and Cressida. 
Tw ....... Twelftll Night. 
Ven ....... Venus and Adonis. 
XVint ....... the Winter's Tale. 
Wiv ....... the llerry Wives of Windsor 

The different Quarto editions are designated in the saine manner as in the great Cambridge edition 
of lXlessrs. Clark and ,Vright. 
By the initiais the unchanged forms and words are meant, as they stand in the respective 
headings; inflected forms are denoted by their terluinations preceded by a dash; : i. under the article 
Grow g. means grow --s grows, --ing growing, etc. 
The quotations are from the Globe edition. 
Asterisks inserled behind some articles or qnotalions refer Io the Supplement. 
Names-of Authors quoled in the Snpplement indicate, as a rule, editions of Shakespeares 
Plays and Poems, or other well-known books connected with Shakespeare, f. i. Vyndham  Shake- 
speare's Poems by George Wyndham; D. H. lIadden  The Dim'y of Masser William Silence by 
D. H. lIadden; S. Lee : A Life of 8hakespeare by Siduey Lee. 



A, the first letter of the alphabet: LLL V, 1, 
50. 58. Tw. II, 5, 118 sq. 
A, a note in music: Shr. III: 1, 7-1. 
k or An, indef, art., the two forms differlng" as 
at present. An for a: an hair, Tp. I, 2, 30. an 
happy end, John III, 2, 10. an hast.y-wltted bod.y, 
Shr. V, 2, 40. an ttebrew Gent. II, 5 57. an he- 
relie, Wiv. IV, 4, 9. Wint. II, 3 114. John III, 
1, 175. H8 III, 2, 102. m hospital, LLL V, 2, 
881. an host, H6B III, 1, 342. Ant. II, 5, 87. 
an hostess, Troil. III, 3, 253. an househoht, H4B 
IVe 1, 95. an hundred, LLL IV, 2, 63. R2 IV, 
16. tt6B IV, 8, 59. H6C II, 5, 81. H8 V, 1 
172. Cor. IV, 5, 114. Caes. II, 2, 77. IV, 3 
175. Hml. Il, 2 383 (Qq. a hunred). Lr. I, 1 
135. an h.ypocrite, hIeas. V e 41. H4B II, 2 
64. Per. I, 1, 122. an eunuch, Tw. I, 2 56. YI6E 
IV, 2, 175. Cr. III, 2, 114. Tit. Il, 3, 128. Ant. 
Il, 5, 5. III, 7, 15. an humour, It5 Il, 1, 58. an 
union e Mids. III, 2, 210 (Ff a union), an universal, 
Troil. I, 3, 121. Caes. I, 1, 49. an urinal, Gent. 
II, 1, 41. an usurer, J.I, 1, 196. an usurper, II6B 
1. 3 188; cf. Oth. I, 3, 346. Before one generally 
a; f. i. Wiv. III, 3, 122. hleas. III 1, 71. Err. 
III, 2, 91. IV, 2, 23. Cor. III, 1, 105. Mcb. IV, 
3, 101; cf. Such-a-one. Twice such an one: hIcb. 
l-V, 3, 66. Ant. I, 2, 118. An before w: bave an 
wish, Per. IV, 4, 2. Of the original indiscriminate 
use of an belote consonants as well as vowels a 
trace is left in the pnn of lIrs Quickly: An fool's 
head, Wiv. I, 4, 134. 
Superfluons repetition of the ind. art. before 
adjectives: a blasting and a scandalous breath 
lleas. V, 122. a present and a dangerous courtes.y, 
IV, 2, 171. a virtuous and a reverend lady, Err. V, 
134. a dulcet and a heavenlff sound, 8hr. Ind. 1, 
51. a common and an outward man Ails III 1 11. 
a maiden and an innocent hand, John IV, 2, 252. a 
might. and a fearful head, tt4A III, 2, 167. a slobber.ç 
and a dirt. "farm, II5 III, 5, 13. a peaceful and a 
sweet retire, IV, 3, 86. a puissant and a might. 
power, tt6B IV, 9, 25. a weight.ç and a serious 
brow, H8 Prol. 2. a dismal and a .fatal end, Meb. 
III, 5, 21. a nipping and an eager air, Hml. I, 4, 
2. a t.çrannous and a damned light , II, 2, 482 (F 
and damned), a malignant and a turbaned Turk, 
Oth. V, 2, 352. o less before adjeetives plaeed 
after their substantives: a proper stripling and an 
a,norous, Shr. I, 2, 144. a goodl.ç portl.ç man and 
a corpulent, tt4A II, 4. 464. a goodl. dwelling and 
Schmidt, Shakes[eare Lexicon. 3. Ed. T.I. 

a rich, H4B V, 3, 6. an honest gentleman, and a 
courteous, and a kind, Rom. Il, 5, 56. a verg va- 
liant Briton and a good, Cymb. IV, 2, 369. 
As before hundred and thousand (q. v.) the art. 
is, though seldom, fonnd before other numerals: 
nerer a one of .çou, Tim. V, 1, 96. hot a one o.f 
them, Mcb. III, 4, 131. a "leven, lIerch. II, 2, 171 
(Q eleven), a fourteen, It4B III, 2, 53. Similarly 
before man.y, q. v. 
Its use after as, how, so and such is in general 
conformable to the now prevailing rule (f. i. sofair 
a bouse, Tp. I, 2, 458. as good a thing, V, 169. 
how high a pitch, R2 I, 1, 109), and the passage 
in H(JB IV, 9, 17: continue still in this so good a 
mind, cannot be called an exception; but there are 
a few instances of its omission: in so profound 
ab.sm, Sonn. 112, 9. as good deed, It4A Il, 1, 3 
(Ff as good a deed), with as big heart, Cor. III. 
2, 128. It seems to bave strayed from its place 
lu the following expressions: so rare a wondered 
father, Tp. IV, 123 ( so rarely wondered a father, 
i. e. a father endowed with such a rare power of 
working miracles). o fait an offered chain, Err. 
III, 2, 186. so new a fashioned robe, John IV, 2, 
27. cf. such a coloured periwig, Gent. IV, 4, 196; 
the phrases o rare a wonder e such a colour etc. 
being treated as simple wordse from which adject- 
ves in ed might be derived. 
Similarly placed between comparatives and their 
substantives: with more rame a tongue, lIeas. II, 2, 
46; especially when preceded by no: no better a 
muslcian, Merch. V e 106. no worse a naine, As I, 
3, 126. with no greater a run, Shr. IV, 1, 16. 
upon no better a ground, Cor. II, 2, 13. o worse 
a place, Oth. I, 1, 11. no worse a husband, Ant. 
II, 2, 131. 
Aeeording to eustom, the poet says: once a dag, 
a thousand pound a .çear (f. i. Tp. I, 2, 490. lIeas. 
I, 2, 50. II, 1, 12. IV, 2, 158. Err. IV, 1, 21), 
but also: once in a month, Tp. I, 2, 262. one dag 
in a week, LLL I, 1, 39. 
The art. omitted after ever and never (f. i. Tp. 
]:[I, 2, 30. Wiv. III, 5, 94. Err. Il, 2, 117. lIerch. 
Il, 1, 41), even belote the object: who never.çields 
us kind answer, Tp. I, 2, 309. never to speak to 
lady, hIerch. 17, 1, 41. I never gave 3ton kin9dom , 
Lr. III, 2, 17; cf. It4A Il, 4, 287. H6A III, 2, 
134. III, 4, 19. H6C I, 1, 217. Oth. IV, 1, 111 
(Qq a woman). V, 2, 61. Cymb. IV, 4, 39 etc. 
Keeping, however, its place, when never is bu 
1 



A 

emphatically used for wt: never a woman in Wind- 
sot I¢nows more of Ame's mind, Wiv. I, 4, 135. 
cf. Meas. IV, 2, 5. Ado I[, 1, 336. Merch. II, 2, 
166. As III, 3, 107. Shr. I. 1,240. I, 2, 80. H4A 
I, 2, 109. H, 1, 19. 31. H4B II, , 62. R3 III, 
4, 53. H8 Prol. 22. tI. I, 5, 123. Even in: there's 
ne'er a one of you, Tim. V, 1, 96. 
Its omiion in the predicate of rare occurrence: 
f you be mald or o, Tp. I, 2, 427. whlch would 
be 9reat impeachment to hls aye, Gent. I, 3, 15.  
I will return peoEect courtier, Alls I 1, 221. as 1 
ara truc knlçht, Tw. ]I, 3, 54. he is kniçht, III, 4, 
257. I ara dog at a catch, II, 3, 64. I ara courtier 
cap-a-pe Wint. IV, 4 761. turn truc man, H4A 
Il, 2, 24. I must be good angel to thee, Ill 3, 199. 
as thou art prlnce 166. $[arclus is chier enemy to 
the people Cr. I, 1 7. l'll turn craver, Per. Il, 1, 
92. to be beadle, 97. cf. H6A V 4, 170. Lr. I, 2 79. 
Often omitted in comparative sentences, and 
whenever the respective noun expresses the whole 
class: stone at rain relenteth, Ven. 200. as falcon 
to the lute awa she flles 1027. wlh thou be glass 
wherein it shll dlscn authorlty for sin? Lucr. 619. 
loathsome canker lires in sweetest bud Sonn. 35 4. 
22, 12. 55, 4. 85, 6. 7. Ieas. Il, 1, 269. Mids. l, 
1, 184. III, 2 101. V 401. As Il, 7, 52. 146. 148. 
IV, 3, 33. Alls IV ô, 369. Tw. I, 3, 66. Ill 1 131. 
H6B l, 4, 78. lll 2 63. H8 l, 1,158. lll 2 132. Troil. l, 
l 59. Il, 3 204. III, 2» 200. Tir. ll 3 302. IV, 2, 
172. Caes. V, 2, 5. Hml. l 3 76. Lr. ll 4, 270. V, 3 
10. Ant. I, 1, 17. Btt also in a pmicular sense: 
with coro,et of fresh and fi-agrant owers, Mids. 
IV 1 5. by ew act of parliament, H6Cll 2 91. 
in osture that acts m words Cmb. III, 3 95. In 
an apposition: doff this hblt, shame to our estate 
Shr. lll 2, 102. lnserted on the other hand con- 
trary to the common me: would he not a naughty 
man, let it sleep? Troil. IV, 2, 34. 
Used for one: he shall ot bave a cot of them, 
H4A I, 3 214. these foils bave all a length» Hml. 
V 2, 276. Ohenest in prepositional phrases: at a 
birth Oth. Il, 3, 212. at a blow, H6C V, 1 50. 
at a burde, Err. V, 343. Wint. IV, 4, 267. t an 
instant, Wiv. IV: 4, 4. H4A V 4 151. at a shot, 
Hml. V 2, 377. at a sitting Merch. lll 1 116. 
at a rime, Tp. III, 3, 102. they are both in a talc, 
Ado IV, 2 33. i, a tune As V, 3, 15. ina word, 
Gent. 11, 4, 71. Ierch. I, 1, 35. Troil. V, 10, 20. 
of an age Rom. l, 3, 20. of a blgness H4B ll 4 
265. an two men ride of a horse, Ado III, 5 40. 
of a mind Alls I, 3, 244. si on a cup, Wiv. Il, 
2 77. on a horse» As V 3, 16. on a stal, R3 lV 
3 12. with a breath, H8 I, 4 30. rosemar and 
Romeo begln with a letter Rom. Il, 4, 220. 
lnserted before names serving for war-cries: a 
Tlbot! a TalboH H6A I 1, 128. a Clbrd a 
Clbrd H6B IV 8, 55. a Helen, and a woe! 
Troil. Il, 2, 111. Before names peculiarly nsed as 
appellatives : as 1 ara an honest Puck, Mids. V 438. 
'tls a noble eidus» Ant. lll 2, 6. 
, a corruption of different particles and fo- 
ative syllables; 1) being a prefix to many words; 
c£ Abase, Abashed, Abed etc. 
2) preceding gernnds (most M. Edd. mang nse 
of the hyphen): o a bat-fowling, Tp. Il, 1, 185. 
sat a billlng Ven. $66. we'll a blrdig, Wiv. III, 

3, 247. 9oes a blrding, III, 5, 46. 131. he's a b£rd- 
ing, IV, 2, 8. lle a bleeding, Rom. 111, 1, 194. fell 
a bleeding, lIerch. 11, 5, 25. are a breeding, LLL 
!, 1, 97. a brewlng, lierch. I1, 5, 17. falls a ca- 
perig, Merch. I, 2, 66. a comlng, LLL V, 2, 589. 
fall a cursing, Hml. 11, 2, 615. it was a doing, Cor. IV, 
2, 5 ; cf. as lonç a dolng, R3111, 6, 7. fell a doting, Sonn. 
20,10. go a ducklng, Ant. III, 7, 65. a dylnç, R2 11, 1, 
90. a feastlng, "Wiv. 11, 3, 92. a going, H8 I, 3, 50. 
so lonç a çrowing, R3 11, 4, 19. was a hançin R thee, 
Lr. V, 3, 274. fell a hootlng, LLL IV, 2, 61. 
would bave hbn nine years a killing, Oth IV, 1, 188. 
a making, Mcb. 111, 4, 34. Hml. 1, 3, 119. a chirac 
a ntending, Troil. 1, 3, 159. still a repairin 9, LLL 
111, 193. a r'penlnç, H8 111, 2, 357. a rollin 9, V, 3, 
104. set a shaklng, Lucr. 452. fell a shoutlng, Caes. 
1, 2, 223. seems a sleeplng, Tire. 1, 2, 68. at gaming, 
a swearlng, IIml. 111, 3, 91 (Ff oto.), she has been 
too lon.q a tall:ing of .Ado 111, 2 107. fell a turn- 
ing, Pilgr. 100. 214. set me a weeting, H4B 11, 4, 
301. contes a wooing, Shr. I11, 1, 35. Oth. 111, 3, 71. 
3) before snbstantiçes; frequently changed to o', 
of and on, by M. Edd. Qq and Ff have almost al- 
ways .rive a clocl¢ etc. (f. i. Ado III, 4, 52. H4A 
1, 2, 139. 11, 1, 36.), I. Edd. thronghout o' clock 
(cf. Clock). The saine liberty they bave taken with 
most of the following passages, in which a is support- 
ed by ail or at least by the most authentic old texts: 
a) a for of: a mornings, Ado 111, 2, 42. a days, 
H4B I1, 4, 251. Tim. IV, 3, 294. a nights, Tw. l, 
3, 5. Tire. IV, 3, 292. Caes. l, 2, 193. Il, 2, 116. 
light a love, Ado III, 4, 47. cloth a gold, III, 4, 19. 
issue a my body, Alls !, 3, 27. out a friends, 42. 
a purifying a the song, 87. take leave a the king, 
Il, 4, 49. our Isbels a the country and out Isbels 
a the court, lll 2, 14. 15. out a the hand, IV, 3, 
227. no more a that, IV, 2, 13. a crow a the saine 
nest, IV, 3, 319. a commoner a the camp, V, 3, 194. 
all the spots a the world, V, 3, 206. what dish a 
poison, Tw. Il, 5, 123. inns a court, H4B III, 2, 14: 
(Ff of). John a Gaunt, R2 !, 3, 76. H4B III, 2, 
49. 344 (Ff of). the sweet a the night, V, 3, 53 (Ff 
of). be a good cheer, H5 Il, 3, 19. body a me, H8 
V, 2, 22. were a my mind, Troil Il, 3, 225 (Q of). 
loads a gravel, V, 1, 22. the sink a the body, Cor. 
1, 1, 126; cf. !, 6, 47. Il, 3, 79. V, 6, 83. 91.97. 
150. yond coin a the Capltol, V, 4, 1. time out a 
mind, Rom. !, 4, 69; cf. out a door and out a doors, 
Err. Il, 1, 11. H4B 11, 4 229. Cor. I 3, 120. Hml. 
Il, 1, 99. the maid is fab', a the youngest for a bride, 
Tire. I, 1, 126. what time a day is it? 265. the heels 
a the ass, 282 etc. 
b) for on: a _[onday, Hml. 11, 2, 406. a Wed- 
nesday, H4A V, 1,138. Cor. 1, 3 64. a Thursday, 
H4A lI, 4, 74 (Ff on). H4B 11, 4, 298 (Ff 
Rom. III, 4, 20. III, 5, 162. a Friday, Troil. 1, 1, 
78 (Ff on). a ,unday, Shr. 11, 318. a Sundays, Hml. 
:IV, 5, 182. I love a ballad in print a life, Wint. 
IV, 4, 264. a horsebacl¢, H4A Il, 3, 104. 11, 4, 378. 
:387. a my word, Shr. 1, 2, 108. H4B 11, 4 190 
(Ff on). Cor. I, 3, 62. Rom. I, 1, 1 (Qq on). stand 
a tiptoe, tt5 IV, 3, 42. heaved a hlgh, R3 IV, 4 86 
cf. look up a helght, Lr. IV, 6, 58. a ny troth, Cor. 
I, 3, 63. a plague a both your houses Rom. !!1, 
93. 111. a pox a drowning, Oth. !, 3, 366. a 
conscience, Per. IV, 2, 23. 



A 3 

e) for in: a God's harde, Shr. I. 2, 195. IV, 5, 1. 
I12 11, 1,251 (Ff o'). 111, 3, 146 (Ff o'). H6A I, 2, 
10L2. It6B Il, 3, 54. IV, 7, 115. 118 Il, 1, 78. 
a thls fasMon, Alls Il, 3, .'265. tlml. V, 1, 218 
(Ff o'). torn a pieeeJ, H8 V, 4, 80. l'Il sec the 
churc]i a y/our back, Shr. V, 1, 5. kept a coil, Ails Il, 
1, 27. 
Even this a before vowels sometimes changed to 
an: set an edçe, Wint. IV, 3, 7. H4A III, 1, 133. 
stand an end, Hml. I, 5, 19. III» 4, 122 (in H6B lII, 
_'2, 318 andlR3 1,3,304 Ff an end, Qqonend). an 
hungry/, Cor. 1, 1,209 (a soleeism formed in derision 
by Coriolanus). an't -- on't, i. e. of if, Ihnl. V, 1, .'26 
(file gravedigger's speech). 
A, corrupted from bave (cf. God-a-mercy/): she 
miglt a been a grandam, LLL V, 2, 17. so would I a 
donc, IIml. IV, 5, 64 (Ff 
A, a mutilation of thc pronoun/e, hOt only in flic 
language of common people (f. i. Ado III, 3, 28. 82. 
133. 140. 182. LLL IV, 1, 136. 148. Merch. Il, 2, 
56. Ails IV, 5, 41. II6B I, 3, 7. IV, 2, 58. 125) but of 
well-bred persons: a must Iceep peace, Ado Il, 3, .'201. 
a b,'ushes his bat, Ill, 2 41. a rubs hbnself witIi civet, 
50. is a ot approved a villain, IV l, 303. a slall 
wear othinç handsome, V, 4, 104. whoe'er a was, a 
showed a mounting mind, LLL IV, l, 4. a killed your 
sister, V 2 13. ira Iave no more man's blood, 697. 
a will make the man mad, Shr. IV, 5, 35. a means to 
co:en soraebody/, V, l 39. a will betray us, Ails IV, 
1, 102. otMng of me, lias a? IV, 3, 129. a was a 
botcler's prentice, 211. a pops me out, John I 68. 
an a may catch y/our bide, Il, 136. a were as good 
crack a fusty nut, Troil. II, 1, 111. a would Iave ten 
sares II 3, 230. brinçs a victory/ i Ms pocket? Cor. 
11, l, 135. a sall ot treadonme, V, 3, 127. asa 
lies asleep, 1Rom. I, 4. 80. a bears tle tlirdpart, Ant. 
II, 7, 96 etc. Few M. Edd. retain the ancient spelling, 
most change it to e. In many cases even O. Edd. 
differ, Qq having a, Ffle: Ado I, 1, 90. II, 1, 17. 
Il, 3, 178. LLL V, 2, 323. 528. 721. II6B Il, 2, 75. 
om. V, 1, 38. Hml. II l 58. IV» 5, 185. 190. V, 1, 
74 etc. In Alls I, 3, 90 (o in ten, quotl a 0 a seems, 
dt first sight, to be used for sle; but in fact there is 
no certain reference to any parficular person; cf. a! 
slrral quoth a, we shall do otlin but eat, H4B V, 
3, 17. /o! says a, there's mg cap, Ant. Il, 7, 141. 
A, a remnant of Anglosaxon suffixes, serving as 
an expletive void of sense to fill up the metre: and 
merrily/ hent tle stile-a Wint. IV, 3, 133. y/our sad 
rb-es in a mlle-a, 135. my/ dainty/ duck, mg dear-a, IV, 
4, 324. of te newest and 9qnest wear-a, 327. that 
dot utter all men's ware-a, 330. and a merr heart 
llves long-a, II4B V, 3, 50. down down, adown-a, Wiv. 
I. 4. 44. pou must sin adown, adown, an y/ou call 
adown-a, Hml. IV, 5 170. to contract, 0 t]e rime, 
for-a  beove, 0, qet]oug]t, t]ere-a was noting-a 
meet, Hml. V, 1, 71 (reading oïQq; Ff O me thought 
there was nothing meet), leave th drink and th whore, 
and keep in a door, Lr. I, 4, 138 (M. Edd. fn-a-door). 
It is needless to speak of the gibberish of Dr. Calus, 
who likes to prolong the words by .appending an a, 
f. i. Wiv. 1, 4, 47. 85 etc. 
Aaron, naine of the Moor in Tir. Il, 1, 12 etc. 
Abandon, 1) to leave: a. t]e soclety of tMs fe- 
raale, As V, 1, 52. 55. dt your --ed cave V, 4, 202. 
.l ]ave --ed -oy/, Troil. III, 3, 5. --ed ]er oly/ 9rot'es: 

Tit. 11, 3, 58. OE thou wouldst hot resgde but where one 
villain is, then him a. Tire. V, 1 114. 
2) fo desert, to forsake: left and--ed of Ms 
velvetfriends, As Il, 1, 50. --edfrom y/our bed, Sht. 
Ind. 2, 117 (forsaken and kept from your bed). --ed 
and despised, H6C I, 1, 188. 
3) to give up, to renounce: hehath--edhis 
phsiclans, Alls l, 1, 15. so --ed to ber sorrow, Tw. 
I, 4, 19. a. ail remorse, Oth. III, 3, 369. 
Al»ase, tO lower, to degrade:, a. our sight so 
low, I[6BI, 2, 15. a. her ey/es on me, R3 1,2, 247 
(Qq debase). 
Aas|ted, lnade ashamed: do y/ou with cheeks 
a. behold out works, Troil. I, 3, 18. 
Ahae, (cf. Bate) 1) tr. a) to beat down, to 
overthrow, to humble: most --d captives, Cor. 
llI, 3, 132. 
b) to weaken, to diminish: iir andwaterdo 
a. te.tire, Ven. 654. Tp. Iv, 56. Mids. 111, 2, 432 
(a. t]y ]o,ws, = shorten). Merch. V, 198. Shl-. Ind. 
I, 137. H5 III, 2, 24. Tit. I, 43. Rom. IV, 1, 120. 
Hml. IV, 7, 116. 
c) to blnnt, to take off the edge of: a. 
the ed9e of traitors, R3 V, 5, 35..from ]is metal was 
]is party/ steeled; wMc] once in im --d, all t]e rest 
tured on t]emselves, H4B I, 1,117. 
d) to reduce in estimation: I would a. er 
otMg, Cymb. 1, 4, 73. 
e) to deduct, to except: a. throw at novum, 
LLL V, 2, 547. 
f) to curtail, with of: she hath --d me of 
hal.fmy train, Lr. I[, 4, 161. 
2) intr. (ttsed by none but Pistol) to decrease: 
andfury sall a. H5 Il, 1, 70. 1V, 4, 50. 
Amemen, 1) diminution, debilitation: 
lirai. IV, 7, 121 (cf. 116). Lr. l, 4, 64. C.vmb. V, 4, 21. 
2) Iower estimation:f ails into a. and lozo 
prlce, Tw. I, 1, 13. 
A»bess, the governess of a nunnery: Err. 
V, 117. 133. 156. 166. 280. 
Ah»e.v, a convent governed by an abbot 
or abbess: Err. V, 122. 129. 155. 263. .'278. 
394. Johnl, 48. V, 3, 8. HSIV, 1,57 ( West- 
minster A.). IV, .'2, 18. 
Ahhey-gaie, the gate of an abbey: Err. V, 
165. 
?thhey-walL a wall enclosing an abbey: 
Gent. V, 1, 9. Err. V, 265. Rom. Il, 4 199. 
Abho«, the governor of a monastery: 
Jolm Ill, 3, 8. R2 V, 3, 137. V,6, 19. H8 IV, 2, 18.20. 
Abbreiae, to abridge, fo reduce fo a 
smaller form (used only by Holophernes): neigh- 
bout vocatur mbour, neigh --d ne, LLL V, 1, 26. 
A B {2, the alphabet, Gent. Il, 1, 23 (cf. 
Absey-book). 
A.l»ed, (0. Edd. hot hyphened) 1) in bed: As 
II, 26. Ails V, 3, 228. Tw. ll, 3, 1. H5 1v3,64. 
Cor. III, 1,261. Rom. III, 4, 7. hlcb. Il, 1, 12. Oth. 
III, 1, 33. IV, 1, 5 (Ff in bed). Cymb. III, 3 33. 
2) to bed: brou.qht a.  delivered, 'fit. IV, 2, 62. 
Alel, the second son of Adam slain by Cain: R, 
I, 1, 104. H6A I 3, 40. 
Alerganr, (O. Edd. Abur#any, M. Edd. Aber- 
#avenny), a naine: H8 1, 1 211. 1, 2, 137. 
Abel, to assist (in a bad sense), to insti- 
gare: Err. Il, 2 172. R2 lI 3 146. 
1" 



4 A 

Abettor, instigator: Lucr. 886. 
Abhominable, the correct spclling, in Holo- 
phernes' opinion, of abominable: LLL V, 1, 26 (quasi 
inhumau!), cf. Abominable. 
Abhor, 1) to detest to extremity, to 
loathe; with an accus.: Ven. 138. Lucr. 195. 349. 
8onn. 150, 11. 12. Pilgr. 165. Gent. IV, 3, 17. Wiv. 
Ill, 5, 16. hleas. Il, 2, 29. Ado il, 3, 101. LLL V, 
20. As II, 3, 28. Tw. Il, 5, 219. lll, 1,176. John 
3, 111. H8 il, 4, 236. Cor. I, 8, 3. Tire. I, 1, 60. 
3»398. V, 4,75. Oth. I, 1,6. il» 1,236. Cymb. V, 
5, 40. With an inf.: w]at I a. to naine» Mca. iii, 
102. mj heart --s to hem" him named» Rom. III, 
100. Cymb. IV» 2, 357. 
Part. --ed» adjectively, - detested, abomi- 
nable: fo act ber --ed commands, Tp. I, 2, 273. 
--ed slace, 351. Mcas. II, 4, 183. Ails IV» 3» 28. 
Wint. Il, 1» 43. John IV,2,224. Troil.¥,3, 17. Cor. 
I, 4» 32. V» 3, 14.q. Tit. il, 3, 98. Rom. V, 3, 104. 
Tire. IV, 3, 20. 183. V, 1, 63. hlcb. V, 7, 10. Lr. [, 
2» 81. V» 3, 210. Cymb. V, 5, 216. 
2) to protest against» to refuse as 
judge: I utterl/ a. you for myjudge, H8 il, 4, 81. 
Hence in comical imitation of the judicial language: 
she that dot£ call me husband» even mj soul doth for a 
wife a. Err. III, 2, 164. 
3) to fill with horror and loathing: 
ow --ed mj imagination is. t Hml. V, 1,206 (Qq and 
bi. Edd. how --ed in uy imagination if is!). if doth a. 
me now I speak the word, OflL IV, 2, 162. 
Abllorring, subst, abomination: ]latter be- 
neath a. Cor. I, 1, 172. blow me btto a. Aut. V, 2, 60. 
Abhorson, name of the executioner in lIeas. IV, 
2, 20. IV, 3, 41. 
Abide, (used only in the pres. and inf.) 1) intr. 
a) to st.ay for a rime: .fromfar where I a. Sonn. 
27, 5. wherever I a. 45, 2. Compl. 83. lleas. IV, 2, 
26. V, 252. 266. lereh. Iii, 4, 42. R3 IV, 2, 49. 
Tim. V, 1, 2. 5Ieb. III, 1, 140. IV, 2, 73. Ant. Il, 2, 
250. Cymb. IV, 2, 6. Per. 111, 4, 14. Distinguished 
from fo stay, as indicating a trausient residence : they 
eherlsh it to make it stay there» and !Aet if will no nore 
but a. Wint. IV, 3, 99. 
b) to remain, hOt to depart: sorrow--s 
and happiness takes his leave» Ado 1, 1, 102. out se- 
paration so --s and]lies, Ant. I, 3, 102. shall I a. 
in this d«ll world? IV, 15, 60. 
c) to continue in a state: blooduntabted 
still doth red a. Lucr. 1749. the ing, hls brother and 
yours, a. all three distracted, Tp. V» 12. 
d) to dwell, to be inherent, as a gift 
or quality: none (comfort) --s with me, H6B 11, 
4, 88. less splrit to curse --s in me, R3 IV, 4, 197. 
e) to stand one's ground, hot to flinch 
or fly: small llghts are soon blown out» huge jïres a. 
Lucr. 6tl. wilt thou hot a.? Troil. V, 6, 30. 
2) trans, a) to a:ait (cf.tay): a. the change 
of tlme, Cymb. Il, 4» 4. 
b) to endure, to undergo, to surfer: 
where thou wlth patience nust mj will a. Lucr. 486. 
to a. thy kbglj doom, R2 V, 6, 23. H6C 1, 4, 29. 11, 
5, 75. IV, 3, 58. Cymb. l, 1, 89. Oftener with a ne- 
gative, - hot fo bear, hot to endure: a rotten 
case --s no handling, H4B IV» 1» 161. would hot a. 
looking on, H5 V, 2, 338. Especially after cannot and 
could hot: wMch good natures could hot a. to be with, 

Tp. 1, 2, 360. I cannot a. the smell of hot meat, Wiv. 
1, 1. 297. 311. IV, 2, 87. ,leas. III, 2, 36. 1VIids. Iii, 
1, 12. hIereh. IV, 1, 54. H4B lI» 4» 117. III, 2, 215. 
H5 il, 3, 35. 
e) to meet in combat, tostand, todefy 
a. me if thou darest, lIids, ill, 2, 422. to a. a .Iîeld, 
H4B !!, 3, 36. will a. it with a prlnce's courage, Cymb. 
III, 4, 186. 
d) to answcr for, to stand the consc- 
quences of: lestthou a. if dear, Mids. III» 2, 175 
(Qt abj), let no man a. thls deed» but we the doers, 
Caes. Iii, 1» 9t. some will dear a. if, !!!» 2, 119. 
Ability, 1) power to perform: what poor a. 
is in me to do him 9ood? Meas. I, 4, 75. any thbtg 
that mj a. maj undergo, Wint. Il, 3, 164. V, 1, 143. 
Troil. !!!, 2, 92. Hml. V, 2,384. Plur: myendeavours 
jïled with my--les, I18 lil, 2, 171. your --ies are 
too infant-llke for doin 9 much alone, Cor. !1, 1, 40. 
lacks the --les that Rhodes is dressed in, Oth. I, 3, 
25 (means of resistanee). I will do ail mlA --les, 
III, 3, 2. 
2) eapaeity, skill: all out --les, 9ifts etc. 
Troil. !, 3, 179. he jïlls if up with 9reat a. Oth. Ill, 
3, 2t7. 
3) wealth, aneans, a state of being pro- 
vided with something: a. in means, Ado IV, 1, 
201. out of mj lean and loto a. l'll lend jou something, 
Tw. Iii, 4, 378. II4B I, 3, 45. Qnibbling in Ails I, 
3, 12. 
bjee, adj., mean, despicable: Err. IV, 4. 
106. Merch. IV, 1, 92. Shr. Ind. 2, 3t. H4B IV, 1, 
33. H6A V, 5,49. II6B il, 4, 11. IV, 1»105. V, 1, 
25. Troil. Iii, 3» 128. 162. hls eye reviled me as 
a.object, H8 l, 1,127, i. e. the object of his contempt. 
Abjèc, subst., a castavay: we are the queen's 
--s andmust obey, R3 I» 1, 106.* 
.,bjectly, basely: he that thlnks of me so a. 
Tit. il, 3, 4. 
Abjnre, 1) to renounce upon oath: tMs 
rough maglc Ihere a. Tp. V, 51. Mids. 1, 1, 65. Shr. 
I» 1,33. Tw. I, 2, 40. Lr. ll, 4, 211. 
2) to recant upon oath: Ihere a. thetaints 
and blames I lald upon mjself, lIcb. IV, 3, 123. 
Able, adj. 1) having the power ormeans: 
followed by an inf. expressed or understood: Gent. Il" 
3, 58. Wiv. I, 1, 5t. IV, 5, 111. V, 5, 142. 171. 
[, 2, 5. lIids. IV» 1, 218. IV, 2, 8. Meïch. I, 2, 88. 
IV, 1,208. As il, 4, 77. Shr. V, 1, 78. Alls [I, 1» 76. 
[I, 3, 49. Wint. Il, 3, 117. V, 2, 27. R2 iii, 2, 52. 
H4A 1, 2, 102. H4B I, 2, 9. 1, 3, 54. tI5 iii, 7, 85. 
H6A iii, 1» 12. IV» 1, 159. V, 5, 15. 51. H6B 1,3, 
220. il, 1, 145 11,3,78. IV, 2»50.60. IV, 7,47. V, 
1, 101. II6C III, 3, 154. IV, 8, 36. II8 I» 1,161. 1, 
2» 31. IV, 1, 62. V, 4, 66. Troil. Ili, 2» 92. Cor. I, 
6, 79. V»4,20. Tit. lI, 1,33. P, om.I, 1,33. V, 3, 
223. Tim. Ill, 2, 54. Per. IV, 6, 3. Comp. --r, Caes. 
IV, 3, 31. Irreg. expr.: what bj sea and land I can 
be a. fo front tMs present tbne» Ant. I, 4, 78. 
2) absol, a) vigorous, active: of as a. body 
as when he numbered thb'ty, Ails IV, 5» 86. his a. horse, 
H4B l, 1, 43. a weak nind and an a. bodj, ll, 4, 274. 
would it hot grleve an a. man fo leave so sweet a bed- 
fellow? H8 II, 2, 142. a. horses, Tire. lI, 1, 10. pro- 
vlded l be so a. as now, Hml. V, 2, 211. 
b) skilful, clever: every hjmn that a. spirk 
aff'ords, Sonn. 85, 7. 



A 5 

c) competent, sufficient, equal: as 3tour 
worth is a. Meas. I, 1, 9. be a. for thine enemyrather 
in power than use, Alls l, 1, 74. a. means, H8 IV, 
2, 153. 
Able, vb. (cf. bTares' Glossary) te warrant, te 
answer for: none does off`end, nolw, I say, none; 
lll a. them, Lr. IV, 6, 172. 
Cboard, 1) absol, a) in a ship: Tp. I, 1, 21. 
Gent. l, 1, 157. Err. IV, 4, 154. Shr. Iii, 2, 173. 
Wint. IV, 4, 826. b) into a ship: Gent. Il, 3, 36. 
Err. I, 1, 62. IV, 1, 86.88. IV, 4, 162. ÆIerch. Il, 6, 
65. Wint. III, 3, 7. 57. H5 Il, 2, 12. 71. Hml. I, 3, 
55. IV, 3, 56. Oth. V, 2, 370. Ant. Il, 6, 142. Cymb. 
!, 1, 178. I, 6, 199. Per. IV, 1, 96. 102. Per. V, 1,5. 
9. te lay knife a.  te board, te grapple: Rem. 11, 
4, 214. laying theprize a. tI6B IV, 1, 25 ( board- 
ing the conquered vessel). 
2) with an accus., always replying te the question 
"wMther': they hurried us a. a bark, Tp. l, 2, 144. 
Wint. IV, 4, 790. Ant. Il, 6, 82. Per. III, 1, 13. a. 
a person ---- a. his ship: I will bring these two tables 
a. h5», Wint. IV, 4, 868. I brought the old man and 
Ms son a. the prince, V, 2, 124. ber fortunes brought 
the maid a. us, Per. V, 3, 11 (Ff a. te us). 
Abode, subst., stay, continuance in a 
place: R3 I, 3, 169. Oth. lV, 2, 231. Ant. I, 2, 
182. your patience .for y long a. Merch. Il, 6, 21 
(for my being se latc), desb'e ny man's a. where I 
did l«ave film, Cymb. 1, 6, 53 (desire him te stay, te 
remain where etc.), te make a.  te dwell, te lire: 
Gent. IV, 3, 23. H6A V, 4, 88. Lr. l, 1, 136. where 
is thy a.? Shr. IV, 5, 38 (n(;,ç, ro 7t5ç;). 
Abode, rb. tr. te foreshow, in a bad sense: 
II6G V, 6, 45. H8 I, 1, 93. 
Abodemen¢, omen, in a bad sense: H6G iV 
7, 13. 
Abominable, (spelt throughout abombable in 
I"0 detestable, execrable: Tp. II, 2, 163. 
"Wiv. II, 2, 309. hIcas. III, 2, 25. LLL V, 1, 27. As 
IV, 1,6. H4AII, 4,508. H4B Il, 4, 151. H6A 1,3, 
87. H6B IV, 7, 44. H6C I 4, 133. Troil. V, 4, 3. V, 
10»23. Tir. II3,74. V 1,64. Lr. 1,2,83. Per. IV, 
6, 143. 
.Ibominably, detestably: Hml. III, 2» 39. 
Abomination, 1) detestableness: drunken 
.Desire must vomir his receipt, ere he can see his own 
a. Lucr. 704. 
2) any thing detestable: incest, that a. 
Lucr. 921. suer these --s, 1832. most large in his 
--s, Ant. III, 6, 94. (FI abtlominatons). 
Abortive, adj. 1) born before the due rime: 
why should Ijoy in any a. birth? LLL I, 1,104. 
2) monstrous, unnatural: alla3t tMs th3t a. 
prlde, H6B IV, 1, 60. if ever he bave child, a. be it, 
R3 I, 2, 21. i, 3, 228. 
Abortive, subst, monstrous birth: --s, pre- 
sages and tongues of hearen, John 1II, 4, 158. 
Abound, 1) te li'e in wealth and plenty: 
never they shall a. as formerly, H8 I, 1, 83. 
2) with in te be copiously stored with: 
a. in tears, Wint. II, 1 120. --est b all, Rora. III, 
3, 123. Mcb. IV, 3 95. 
3) te be in great plenty: dlsiasis de a. 
Mids. II, 1, 105. H5 Iii, 2, 7. IV, 3, 104 (Qq abund- 
ant). H6B lI, 4, 4. H8 Ill 2, 195. 
oebout, prepos. 1) round: clouds a. Ms golden 

head, Lucr. 777. that self chab a. Ms neck, Err. V, 
I0. 258. whb'l a. the globe, Tit. V, 2, 49. Tp. III, 
147. As III, 2, 191. Shr. l, 2, 141. II, 302. H5 V, 2, 
190. tI6CV, 1 108. H8V, 5,55. Oth. i, 2,89. !i, 
3, 99 etc. round a.: Lucr. 1586. Wiv. IV, 4, 31. 
Mcas. III, 1,125. Ado V, 3, 15. Mids. ll, 1, 175. Tir. 
III, 1, 125. 
2) near te a person: bang no nzore a. nze, Wiv. 
Il, 2, 17. he shall net conze a. ber, Wint. II, 1 59. II, 
3, 43. they are ail a. his majesty, John V, 6, 36. she 
bas nobody te de any thing a. ber, tI4B 11I, 2, 246. 
seine a. hbn bave wrested his nzeaning, IV, 2, 57. H6A 
III, 1, 38. H6B III, 1 26. IV, 7, 42. Ant. IV, 15 48. 
Cymb. II1, 5, 68. 
3) carried by, or appendant te, a peon: 
you bave net the book of riddles a. you, Wiv.l,l,209. 
you cannot see a white spot a. ber, IV, 5, 116. Ms face 
is the worst thing a. hinz, 1Mcas. I!, 1, 163. 229. what 
prvy marks I had a. nze, Err. 1II, 2, 146. bave you 
the cham a. Uou? 1V, 1, 42. if haif thy outward graces 
ad been placed a. thy thoughts, Ado IV, 1, 103. 
old naine isfresh a. me, II8 1V, 1, 99 (is net yet ob- 
solete ith me). perce every sense a. thee, Lr. I, 4, 
323. Ado IV, 2, 89. V, 4, 105. lIids. III, 1, 71. As 
ili, 2, 400. Alls II, ô, 214. Wint. IV, 4, 260. H4B 
I, 2, 208. H5 I1, 1, 2.1. V, 2, 315. 1-3 I, 3, 244. Lr. 
Il, 4, 42. Cymb. II," 4, 119 etc. 
4) anywhere, here or there within a certain 
locality: walk a. the town Err. l, 2, 22. where lles 
thy pain? aH a. the breast, LLL 1V, 3, 173. he is a. 
tÆe bouse, Tw. II, 4, 13 (anywhere in the house). 
Mids. III, 2, 5. 94. H4A V, 4, 32. II4B III, 2, 329. 
Caes. 1I, 2, 24. V, 3, 22. V, 4,3. Hml. III, 1, 19. 
round a.  throughout: proclabn it round a. the cit3t, 
Meas. V, 514. look round a. the wicked streets of tome, 
'rit. v 2, 98. she throws her eyes a. the painting round, 
Lucr. 1499. cf. l'll leadyou a. a round Mids. III, 1, 
109, i. e. through thick and thin. 
5) near in size, quantity, or rime: a. 
stature, Gent. IV, 4, 163. 169. a. the very heur, V, 1, 
2. Wiv. V, 1, 12. Err. Iii, 1, 96. LLL 1,1,238. H4A 
II, 4, 60. ti6(]IV, 5, 10. II3V, 3,70.77. H81V, 2, 
26. Caes. 1I, 4, 23 etc. 
6) in a state of being engaged in, orin- 
tent on: I wll tell you what I ara a. Wiv. I, 3, 43. 
I ara a. no waste, 46. the prince is about a plece of 
iniquity, Wint. IV, 4, 693. it is unlawful business I 
ara a. V, 3, 97. I was employed in passing te and fro, 
a. relieving of the sentnels, H6A Il, 1, 70. look with 
care a. the town, Oth. [I, 3, 255 (watch ail the town 
carefully), he is a. it  he is doing it, lIcb. II, 2, 4. 
Oth. lI, l 126. Iwill a. if, Wiv. II, 2,327 (= I will 
fall te work). Meas. I, 4, 85. Ails III, 6, 79. let's a. 
it, Iii, 7, 48. H6A I, 2, 149. H6C IV, 6, 102. shall 
we a. it? H5 III, 7 167. a. thy business, Dary, H4B 
V, 1 39. sound t]e trumpets, and a. out task, H6C 
II, 1,200. a. 3tour busbess straght, R3 I, 3, 355. at 
gandng, swearing, or a. seine act that bas no relish qf 
salvation, Hml. III, 3, 91. a. hint, fairies! Wiv. V, 
95 ( at him! take him te msk!), a. it! Gent. III, 
2, 95. 98. Tw. III, 2, 52. R3 IV, 2, 59. Lr. V, 3, 35. 
Oth. IV, 2, 250. te go a. sth.  te jet one's self ready 
for, te be going te de: Merch. Il, 4, 25. As I, 1,180. 
Ails III, 6, 85. H6A I, 1, 166. H8 I, 1,131. Cor.III, 
2, 98. III, 3, 24. IV, 6, 9. Lr. IV, 4, 24. lll roundly 
go a. her Shr. IV, 4, 108 (I'll resolutclv try my 



6 A 

fortune with ber). e is very buT a. it, Ado 1» 2, 3. 
.]lortimer dotli stlr a. liis title, H4A II, 3, 85. else 
sall you hot ave any hand a. is funeral Caes. III, 
1,249. cf. Cor. l, I, 131. Lr. I, 5, 37. 
7) concerning, relating to, with regard 
to: we ave some secrets to confer a. Gent. IIl 1, 2. 
.ce ]ave lingered a. a znatc, Wiv. III, 2, 58. IV, 5 
35.47. LLL I, 1,138. lIerch. Il, 2, 88. V, 141. As 
11 7, 172. R2 Il, 1, 168. H6A IV, 1, 95. H6C1, 2, 
7. H8 IlI 2, 406. Cor. V 2, 74 etc. 
8) on account of: e is mad a. Ms trowlng 
into t]e water, Wiv. IV, 1, 5. I corne a. mg broter, 
Meas. IV, 1 48. you ave rated me a. mymoneys, 
Merch. l, 3, 109. an old lord rated me in tIe street a. 
you, H4A !, 2, 96. strlking lim a. Bardolp, H4B l, 
2 63. stop l|rilliam's wages a. te sack e lost V, 1, 
25. V, 4, 7. H5 Il, 3, 38. It6A IV, 1, 91. II6B IV, 1, 
31. R3 1, 1, 39. Cr. Il, 3, 17. 
Transposed: tle Iouse a. : a. the house Per. III, 
!'fol. 2 (Gower's speech). 
lboue, adv. 1) round, circularly: do hot 
turn me a.; my stomac]i is hot constante Tp. 11, 2 118. 
burn Mm, and turn hbn a. Wiv. V, 5, 105. he turned 
me a. with Ms dïnger, Cor. IV, 5, 160. 
2) round, on everyside: compasstheea. Tp. 
V, 180. encircle hbn a. Wiv. IV, 4, 56. I, 3, 46. John 
Il» 217. H6C IV, 2, 15. R3 I 4, 59. Hml. l, 5 71. 
round a.: the gentle day, before the wheels of Poebus, 
round a. dapples the drowsy east with spots of grey, 
Ado V, 3, 26. Troil. V, 7, 5. Tir. IV, 2, 18. Caes. V, 
, 28. Oth. III, 3, 464. to look a. : a) to look on 
ail sides, or in different directions: ltow 
it looks a.! Tp. I, 2, 410. b) to be on the watch: 
look a., Davy, H4B V, 1, 59. be wary, look a. Rom. 
III» 5 40. 'ris time to look a. Lr. IV, 7, 93. 
3) by a circuitous way: to wheel three or 
four mlles a. Cor. I, 6, 20. his horses go a. Mcb. Ill, 
3, 11. my purposes do draw me much a. Ant. Il, 4,8. 
Metaphorically. go hot a. Alls l, 3, 194 (do hot 
shuffle, nse no quibbling), sometMng a., a little from 
the rlght, John I, 170. why do you go a. to recover tac 
wlnd of me? Hml. !Il, 2, 361. cf. R3 IV, 4, 461. 
4) here and there, up and down: a. he 
valks, Lucr. 367. Sonn. 113, 2. Tp. I, 2, 417. Err. 
V, 187. LLL V, 1, 72. Troil. V, 10, 56 etc. you 
nHgttt bave lteard it else proclaimed a. Shr. IV, 2, 87, 
i. e. here and there, in divers places. 
5) to a certain point, to an appointed 
or desired place: I will brlng tlle doctor a. by tlle 
.fields, Wiv. Il, 3, 81 (i. e. to the appointed place). 
brought a. the annual reckoning, LLL V, 2, 888 (ac- 
complished), tac wind is corne a. hlerch. Il, 6 64 
(bas become favourable), how a jest shall corne a. 
Rom. I, 3, 45 (corne to pass, be effected), how these 
tMngs cante a. Hml. V 2, 391. 
6) upon the point, ready, going: I was 
a. toprotest, Ado IV, 1,286. As Il, 3, 21. Alls IV, 
5 73. Wint. Il, 1, 65. H4A l 3 22. H8 11, 4, 70. 
Hml. l 1, 147. Il, 1, 50 etc. what is a. to be? Cor. 
llI 1, 189 ( what will become of this?) to go a. 
 to be going, to bave in hand, to make it one's 
task: Ms testy toaster goeth a. to take Mm, Ven. 319. 
who went a. from tMs fait throne to heare tac owner 
out Lucr. 412. sec how he goes a. to abuse me[ Meas. 
!Il, 2 215. that thou goest a. to apply a moral medi- 
clne to a mortifylng miscMe Ado I, 3, 12. haee qone 

'a. to link »y friend to a common stale, IV, 1, 65. 
Mids. IV, 1,212. Merch. Il, 9, 31. Wint. IV, 4, 219. 
720. H5 IV, 1, 212. H6B Il, 1,146. I wiil go a. witli 
Mm (= I will go to work with him, he shall final 
match in me) Ado IV, 2, 28. to set a. -- to prepare, 
to arrange: sIall we set a. some revels? Tw. l, 3,145. 
About! =to work! be hot idle! a., a.; search Wind- 
sot castle, elves witMn and out, Wiv. V 5, 59. re- 
venge! a.! seek! burn! Caes. lll, 2,208. a., my brabt! 
Hml. Il, 2, 617. and a would a. and a. H4B III, 2, 
302 (he would go on with a vengeance). 
lbove, adv. 1) in a higher place, over- 
hcad; a) in heaven: by alla.,these blenchesgave 
nyheart another .outh, Sonn. 110, 6. Tp. I, 1, 71. 
Wiv. I, 4, 154. Meas. V, 115. Ado V, 2, 27. As llI 
2, 3. Alls Il, 3, 261. Tw. V, 140. H6A l, 2, 114. V, 
4, 39. H6C Il, 3, 29. R3 III, 7, 109. Troil. l 2, 83. 
111,2,165. Tim. lV 3, 191. Hml. lIl3, 60. Lr. IV,2,78. 
b) upstairs: nymaid's aunt bas a gown a. Wiv. 
IV 2, 78. Err. Il, 2, 209. H4A Il, 4, 550. 
2) b e s i d e s (when joined to more and over) : 
stand indebted, over and a., in loce and service to .Cou, 
Merch. IV, 1, 413. thls ltatI ray daughter sIown me, 
and more a., ltatI his sollcitlngs ail given to mine car, 
Hml. Il, 2, 126. 
.bo*e, prepos. 1) in or to a higher place; 
a) over: Iave not your worsMp a u'art a. your eye? 
Wiv. I, 4, 157. l'Il be sure to keep Mm a. deck, II, 1, 
94. forty thousand fathorn a. water, Wint. IV, 4, 
281. l'll stay a. the Mil, H6C III, 1, 5. ralse Ms car 
a. tIe border, IV, 7, 81. thls foul deed shall sntell a. 
the earth, Caes. III, 1, 274. thouglt wornen ail a. (riz 
the waist) Lr. 1V, 6, 127. ail the hab's a. thee, Cymbo 
I1, 3, 140 (on thy head). 
b) overhead: whicI llke a cherubln a. tIern ho- 
vered, Compl. 319. I Iear it now a. me, Tp. I, 2,407. 
t]le sky that hangs a. our ]eads, John I[, 397. 
c) comparatively higher, in a proper and 
figurative sense: sweet a. compare, Ven. 8. to write 
a. a mortal pitch, Sonn. 86, 6. lest it should burn a. 
te bounds of reason, Gent. ll 7 23. soar a. tlte morn- 
ing lark, Shr. Ind. 2, 46. policy sits a. conscience, 
Tire. III, 2, 94. Tp. l 2 168. LLL IV» 3 332. V 2, 
259. 446. Merch. IV, 1, 193. 285. Tw. [, 3, 116. I, 
5, 140. Il, 5, 156. John V 6 38. H6A l, 1, 121. 
H6B I, 2, 46. Il, 1, 6. 12. 15. I{6C Il, 5, 94. H8 III, 
1, 123. Rom. III, 5, 238. Cymb. Il, 4, 113. a. tl, e 
test  above all (which expression is yet unknowu 
to Sh.): Sonn. 91, 6. Gent. Iv, 1, 60. Lr. IV, 1, 50. 
2) more than: which shail a. that idle rank re- 
main beyond ail dater Sonn. 122, 3. one tIat, a. all 
otIer strlfes contended especially to know IirnselJ, 
Meas. III, 2,246. murther I tortured a. the felon H6B 
lll 1, 132. hot a. once, tIml. Il, 2 455. 5Ierch. lll 
4, 76. Troil. I, 2, 111 (riz Paris). Cymb. I[, 2, 29. 
over and a.  besides: over and a. that you bave 
suffered, Wiv. V, 5, 177. 
¢braham, 1) the patriarch: R2 IV 104. 1{3 IV, 
3, 38. 2) Christian name of Mr. Slender: Wiv. l, 1, 
57. 239. 3) young A. Cupid, Rom. Il, 1, 13, in deri- 
sion of the eternal boyhood of Cupid, though, in facr, 
he was at least as old as father Abraham ; cf. LLL 
III, 182 and V, 2, 10. ),I. Edd. quite preposterously : 
young Adarn Cupid. 
.,bram,  Abraham in the langnage of Shyloek: 
Merch. l, 3 73. 162. 



A 7 

Abreast, in a line, equally advanced, 
side by side: H5 1V, 6, 17. H6C 1, 1, 7. Troil. 
II[, 3, 155. 
Abridge, 1) fo shorten (used of rime): Gent. 
111, 1, 245. tt4B 1I, 4, 211. Caes. 111, 1, 104. 
2) Withfront, to cut off from, to curtail 
 f: to be --dfrom suc] a noble rate, Merch. 1, 1,126. 
.J»ridgement, 1) a summary, short ac- 
count, abstract: riais brief a. of ny will I make, 
Lucr. 1198. t]en brook a. H5 V, Chor. 44. tnisfierce 
a. ]at] to it cfrcumstantial branc]es, Cymb.V, 5,382. 
2) that wh|ch makes rime short, pas- 
time: what a. |cave you for tMs evening Mids. V, 
39. look w]ere ny a. cones, Hml. 1I, 2, 439. (that 
wh|ch is my pastime and makes me be brief. Ff--s 
eoHte). 
.,|roah; to set {2.  to cause, in a bad sense: 
H4B IV, 2, 14. R3 1, 3, 325. Rom. !, 1, 111. 
Alroad, 1) at lare, in ail directions: 
te [vind [vHl 61ow tnese sands a. Tit. IV, 1, 106. 
2) vithout a eertaiu eoufine, whleh may 
be coueeived very differeutly; a) opposed to one's 
person: like fools t]at in t/e i»tagination set tne 
goodly objects wnich a. they find, Compl. 137 (= in 
the world around them), ail ny offences tnat a. /ou 
sec, 183 (committed against other people), his nauds 
a. displayed, H6B 111, 2, 172 (hOt kept close to the 
body, but stretched out and displayed), tItere's none 
(air) a. so wnolesome as tnat /ou vent, Cymb. !, 2, 4 
(none without you, out of the precincts of yotu- body). 
.our means a., /ou nave ne, rlch, 111, 4, 180 (those 
besides the resources of your own mind). 
b) opposed to aty habitation: tMs cell is ,/ 
court: here bave I few attendants, and sttbjects none 
a., Tp. V, 167 (without it, out of it). how features 
are a. 111, 1, 52 (out of this island), to corne a. wlth 
nim, Merch. Ill, 3, 10 (to leave the prison-bouse). 
I ara glad to sec /our lordsnip a. H4B 1, 2, 108. 109 
(hot confined to your chamber by illness), tain witnin 
doors, and none a. IV, 5, 9. ifsCu stir a. H6C V, 1, 
96 (without the fortress), is ne ready to cone a. 
H8 111, 2, 83 (to leave his closet), but to tne sport a. 
Troil. !, 1, 118 (out of the town), théWspirit waiks a. 
Caes. V, 3, 95 (iustead of keepiug his confines), no 
spirit dates stlr a. Hml. !, 1, 161. no corpanies a. 
Cymb. IV, 2, 101 (iu the neighbonrhood of out cell). 
what compan.] discover /ou a.? 130. to go a. = to go 
out: R2 111, 2, 39. H8 I, 4, 5. Rom. I, 1,127. 111, 1, 
2. Caes. lll, 2, 256. Lr. !, 2, 186. 
c) opposed to one's own conntry, = in or to 
foreign countries: Geut. !, 1, 6. Merch. !, 1, 
17. Shr. I, 2, 58. Wint. IV, 2, 6. H5 !, 2, 178. H6C 
III, 3, 70. Tire. 111, 5, 47. Mcb.V, 8, 66. Ant. I, 4, 36. 
3) here and there, rouud about in the 
wide world: orner ventures he bas, squadered a. 
]VIerch. !, 3, 22. so nuch feared a. H6A 11: 3, 16. 
tltere are cozeners a. Wint. IV» 4, 257 (: in the 
world); cf. as knaves be such a. Oth. IV, 1, 25. wnat 
news a.? (= what news in the world?): Meas. III, 
2, 87. 234. John IV, 2, 160. V, 6, 16. tt4A lI, 4, 
ô67. H6C 11, 1, 95. R3 !, 1, 134. 11, 3, 3. H8 III, 2, 
391. Lr. 11, 1, 8. ail-tellingfane doth noise a. LLL 
11,22. H4B Ind. 29. H6C V, 6, 86. R3 IV, 2, 51. 
Mcb. V, 1, 79. wh/shouid I carry lies a. Wint. IV, 
4, 275 (spread them among the people), it is thought 
a. Oth. 1, 3, 393. w]at shouid it be that the.y so shriek 

a. Rom. V, 3, 190 (so publicly, so within every- 
body's hearing, instead of "speaking within door", as 
Iago says in Oth. IV, 2, 144). and set a. new business 
for you ail. Tir. 1, 192 (to trouble all the people with 
business that should be the care of one only or a 
few. F3. 4 abroac]), t]ere's villanya. LLL !, 1,189 
( on foot), t]ere's toys a. John !, 232. 
Abrogate, to abolish: LLL IV, 2, 55 (Sir 
Içathaniel's speech). 
Abroolt, rb. to brook, to endure: H6B Il, 
4, 10. 
Abrupf, sudden, withou uotice to pre- 
pare the mind for the event: H6A !!, 3, 30. 
Abrupon, br eaking o ff (in speaking): Troil. 
!I!, 2, 70. 
Abruptly, hastily, without the de forms 
of preparation: As Il, 4, 41. 
Absence, 1) the state of ot being at a 
place: Compl. 245. Wiv. III, 3, 117. Meas. l, 1, 
19. llI, 2, 101. LLL V, 2, 225. ?,Iids. III, 2, 244 
IMerch. l, 2, 121. III, 4, 4. As I|. 4, 85. Tw. l, 5, 4. 
[ Wint. !, 2, 12. 194. III, 2, 79. 1V, 4, 542. V, 2, 120. 
John !, 1, 102. R3 11I, 4, 25. II4A IV, 1, 73. 76. IV, 
4, 16. I15 IV, 1,302. R3 1I!, 4, .'25. tI8 il, 3, 106. 
Cor. 1, 3, 4. 93. iii, 2, 95. Tire. IV, 3, 346. Ant. 1. 
2, 179. IV, 15, 61. Cymb. lll, 5, 57. IV, 3, 2. V, 5, 
57. Per. !, 2, 112. II, 4, 46. our substitutes in a. 
H4BIV, 4, 6. in a. of: Gent. l, 1, 59. Merch. V, 128. 
R211, 1, 219. H5 1,2, 172. in tne a. of: Meas. V, 
331. Cor. IV, 1, 44. 
2) separation from one beloved, and in 
general the state of being far from a per- 
s on: 0 a., wnat a forment wotddst tnou prove, Sonn. 
39, 9. nor tnink t]e bltterness of a. sour, 57, 7. t]e 
imprlsoned a. of your iiberty, 58, 6. ]mw like a wnter 
]at] ny a. been from t]ee, 97 1. a. seemed ny flane 
fo qualify, 109, 2. Err. I, 1, 45. R2 l, 3, 258. Troil. 
IV, 5, 289. Caes. IV, 3, 152, _)th. l, 3, 260. II!, 4, 
179. 182. Cymb. III, 6, 74. 
3) Euphemistically,  death: w]wse a. is 
less naterial to ne t]an is Ms.fatner' s, Mcb. 111,1,135. 
4) Used for absent by SirHtgh and Mrs Quickly: 
Viv. !, 1,273. 11, 2, 86. 
bscnt, adj. 1)hot present: Icas. 111, 1, 
209. III, 2, 123. 129. IV, 2, 136. IV, 3, 150. Ado Il, 
2, 48. Merch. V, 285. As 1I, 2: 18. 11|, 1, 3. Ails 11, 
3, 189. 111, 7, 34. Tw. I 5, 18. Wint. !1, 3, 199. 
John III, 4, 93. R2 1, 3, 259. H4A 1V 3, 86. V, 1, 
49. H6C 11, 2, 74. H8 Il, 4 231. Caes. IV, 3, 156. 
Oth. 111, 3, 17. Cymb. III» 4, 109. t]e a. rime  tine 
of absence, R2 11, 3, 79; cf. Oth. |IL 4, 174. Vith 
from: Sonn. 41, 2. 89, 9. 98, 1. Ails !, 3, 240. a. 
]ence, Merch. V, 120. 
2) separated: tney ]ave see»ed to be to9etner , 
tnouy/] a. Wint. [, 1, 32. loyers" a. nours, Oth. Ill, 
4, 174. 
Altsënt, rb. refl. to keep far, to abstain: 
t)at I snould yet o. e from yotr bed, Shr. Ind. 2. 
125. a. tneefromfellcily awnile, Hml. V, 2, 358. 
Absey-boolt, a primer, wh|ch sometimes in- 
cluded a catechism: John !, 196. 
Absolue, 1) unconditional, complete, 
perfect: no pe:fecHon is so a. Lucr. 853. ]te needs 
will be a. 3111an, Tp. !, 2, 109 (uot only in naine, or 
partly, but perfectly). 1 ]ave dellvered to Lord Atgeio 
ny a. power and place nere i Vettaa» Meas. I, 3, 1 



8 A 

(without rest6ction), pardon a. for tourself, H4A 
IV, 3, 50. upon such large terres and so a. H4B IV, 
1, 186 (unlimited e unconditional), there the people 
hadmore a. power, Cor. III, 1, 116. Tire. V, le 165. 
Lr. V, 3, 300. on whom I built an a. trust, blcb. l, 4, 
14. 1 speak hot as in a. fear of tou , lV, 3, 38 (in 
unqualified fear, unallayed by the hope that you may 
be honest), n:7 soul hath ber content so a. Oth. I1, 1, 
193. I do love ler, hot out of a. lust, but partly led to 
diet m i revee, 301. by sea he is an a. toaster, Ant. 
II, 2, 166. nade her of lower Syria a. queen, III, 6, 
11 (no more a vassal, but a sovereiga), to gon the 
tribmes he commends his a. commission, Cymb. III e 7, 
10 (with full authority), not a. mad»ess could so far 
have raved, IV, 2, 135. 
2) positive, certain, decided, notdoubt- 
fui: a) of persons: be a. for death, Meas. III, 1, ,5 
(expect it with certainty, be sttre to receive no par- 
don). tou are too a. Cor. III, 2, 39.*how a. the knave 
is! Hml. V, 1,148. I ara a. 'twas very Cloten, Cymb. 
IV, 2, 106. how a. she's in if, Per. Il, 5, 19.- b) of 
things: mark you his a. Shall? Cor. 111 e 1, 90. with 
an a. "Si'r, not I', Mcb. III e 6, 40. I bave an a. holoe , 
Ant. IV, 3, 10. 
3) highly accomplished, faultless, per- 
fect: thou wouldst make an a. courtier, Wiv. III, 3, 
66. as grave, as just, as a. as Angelo, Meas. V, 54. 
a most a. and excellent horse, H5 III, 7, 27. an a. 
gentleman, Hml. V, 2, 111. the a. soldiership tou 
bave bg land, Ant. III, 7, 43. a. 21[arina, Per. lV. 
Prol. 31. Preceded by most, it serres as an appella- 
tion expressing the highest veneration: nost a. Sir, 
Cor. IV, 5, 142. raost a. lord, Ant. IV, 14, 117. Jest- 
ingly: abnost most a. Alexas, Ant. I, 2, 2. 
Asolutely, completely, uncondition- 
illy, . without restriction: this shall a. re- 
solve tou, Meas. IV, 2, 225. to hear and a. to deter- 
mine of what conditions we shall stand upon, H4_B 
IV, 1, 164. 
Asolulion, remission of sins: Luer. 354. 
bsole, to ferait (a sln)e to pardon (a sin- 
ner): the n, illingest sin I ever yet cornmitted may be 
--d in English, I-I8 111, 1, 50. --d him witfi an axe, 
111, 2, 264. to rnake confession a»d to be--d, Rom. 
ilI e 5, 233. 
bsler, in Sin-absolver, q.v. 
Abstain, to refrain from indulgence: 
Luer. 130. Vith from: R 11, 1, 76. 
lstemious, abstinent tempe.rate: Tp. 
IV, 53. 
Abstinence, the refraining from the gra- 
tification of desire: Meas. 1, 3, 12. IV, 2, 84. 
LLL IV. 3, 295. Hml. 111, 4, 167. 
Ahstraet, subst. 1) a summary, epitome, 
abbreviation: by an a. ofsuccess, Ails IV, 3, 99 
(by a successful summary proceeding; cf. Of). this 
little a. doth contain that large which died in Geffrey, 
John II, 101 (Prince Arthnr being, as it were, a copy 
of his father Geffl-ey in miniature), brlef a. and re- 
cord of tedious days, R3 IV, 4, 28. they are the a. 
and brief chronicles of the rime, Hml. II, 2, 548 
(Ff --s). a mmz who is the a. of all faults, Ant. I, 4, 
9 (a microcosm of sinfulness). 1 begged his pardon 
]o» return, which soon he granted, being an a. 'tween 
Ms lust and him, 111, 6, 61 (the shortest way for him 
and his desires, the readiest opportunity to encom- 

pass his wishes; cf. 13etween and 'Tween. M. Edd. ob- 
struct, an unheard of substantive !). 
2) a short catalogue, an inventory: he 
bath an a. for the remembrance of such places, Wiv. 
IV, 2, 63. 
Absdrd, (as for the accent, see App. I, 1) c o n- 
trary to reason, insipid: H6A V, 4, 137. ttmL 
111, 2, 65. Ant. V, 2, 226. afault to nature e to reason 
most a. Hm]. 1, 2, 103. 
Absyrtus, Medea's brother, killed and dismem- 
bered by her: H6B V, 2, 59. 
Abndance, great plenty: Sonn. I e 7.23, 4. 
37, 11. Tp. I1, 1, 163. Ails I, 1, 12. John 11, 14.. 
H4A II, le 63. H4B I, 2, 52. IV, 4, 108. Cor. 1, 1, 
22. in a.: Sonn. 135, 10. 5Ierch. I e 2, 4. Cor. II, 1, 
19. Per. I, 4, 36. 
Abundant, plentifnl: Sonn. 97, 9. R2 I, 3, 
257. V, 3, 65. Adverbially: Troil. 11, 3, 16. 
Abndatly, pi enti fully : tho«gh a. they lack 
discretione Cor. 1, 1,206. 
Abuse, vb. 1) to putto a wronguse, mis- 
apply: w£y dost thou a. t£e bounteous largess given 
thee fo give  $onn. 4, 5. their gross painting mlght be 
better used where cheeks need blood, in thee t is --d, 
82, 14. LLL II, 227. f tour lass interpretation should 
a. Wint. lV, 4, 364 (misinterpret your behaviour). 
. 2) to put to a bad use: who presently a. it 
(their inherited gold) Lucr. 864. 994. 1529. As Iii, 
2, 378. H4B IV, 2, 13. H6B V, 1,172. Cor. V, 6, 86. 
Ant. III, 6, 33. 
3) to use iii, to maltreat: formysake even 
so doth slte a. me, Soun. 42, 7. who cannot a. a body 
dead? Lucr. 1267. he shall hot a. Robert Shallow, 
Wiv. I, 1, 3. l, 4, 5. Me,as. III, 2, 215. Err. V, 199. 
Mids. II, 2, 134. Shr. V, 1, 111. Tw. lV, 2, 51.95. 
R2 11, 3, 137. H5 I11, 6, 117. IV, 8, 52. R3 I, 3, 52. 
H8 I, 3, 28.Lr. 11,2, 156. lli, 7e 91. IV, 7 15.53. Oth. 
111, 3, 336. Ant. 111 e 6, 86. 
4) to deface, to disfigure: thy face is 
much --d wlth tears, Rom. IV, 1, 29. ]VIetaphorically: 
a. him to the $[oor in the tank garb, Oth. 11, 1,315 
(calumniate him with the Moor as incontinent). 
5) to offend, insult: do hot a. mg masteï's 
bounty by the undoing of yourself, Ant. V, 2, 43. you 
bave --d me: "Irismeanest garment' ! Cymb. 11, 3, 154. 
6) to disgrace, dishonour: mg bed shallbe 
--d, qv. I1, 2, 306. this lord, who bath --d me, Ails 
V, 3, 299. shallflig£t a. /our name tt6A IV 5, 41. 
Oth. IV, 2 e 14. Per. 1, 1, 126. 
7) to revile: £ang him, he'lla, us, Tire. 11, 2, 
49. I ara of lire as honest as /ou that thus a. me, Oth. 
V, 1,123. 
8) to corrupt, to pervert: to drawforthgour 
noble ancestrj from the corruption of --ing tlme, R3 
111, 7, 199. wicked dreams a. the curtained sleep, Mcb. 
11, 1, 50 (or  deceive?), charms by wMch the pro- 
perteWof gouth and maidhood may be --d, Oth. I, 1, 
174.1,2, 74.m sis a. mg divination, Cymb. IV, 2,351. 
9) to deceive: some enchanted trifle to a. me, 
Tp. V, 112. the prince and Claudio bave been mightily 
--d, Ado V, 2, 100. As 111, 5, 80. IV, 1, 218. Tw. 
I11, 1, 124. V, 22. Wint. II, 1, 141. Cor. 111, 1, 58. 
Tit. I1, 3, 87. Hm]. I1, 2, 632. Lr. IV, 1, 24. IV, 7, 
77. V, 1, 11. Oth. IV, 2, 139. Cymb. I, 6, 131. 111, 
4, 105. 123. /ou are --d  you are mistaken Cymb. 
I, 4, 124. 



Passages which may be asslgned fo the 1 st as 
well as the 8 th and 9 Ih definitions: I have heardour 
rwjal ear -- lIeasÇV 139. she doth a. out ears, 
AIls V, 3,295. dreams a. the curtalned sleep Mcb. 11, 
1, 50. the whole ear of JDenmark is rankbj --d, Hml. 
1, 5, 38. apt to bave hls ear --d, Lr. 11, 4, 310. fo a. 
Othello's ear, 0th. 1, 3, 401. In all these cases the 
idea of deception is more or less predominant. 
.lmse, subst. 1) application to a wrong 
or bad purpose: things growing to themselves are 
growtli's a. Ven. 166. Rom. 11, 3 20. Caes. I1 1, 18. 
2) iii treatment: so him 
vnkind a. Sonn. 134, 12. rejolce at the a. of Falstqff; 
Wiv. V, 3, 8. wh/ hast thon broken faith witl me, know- 
ing how hardl/ I can brook a.? H6B V, 1, 92. I let 
pass the a. done fo my nleee, H6C111 3 188. thet 'll 
take no offence at our a. IV, 1, 13. 
3) deeeption: this is a strange a. Meas. V, 
205. is it some a., and no such thlng? Hml. IV, 7 51. 
cf. raff stran9e and self-a, is the initlate fear that 
wants hard use, llcb. 111, 4, 142. 
4) offence, insult, in jury: tofindout this 
a. whence 'ris derived, Meas. V, 247. how the villabi 
would close now after his treasonable --s, 347. I shall 
drive you to confess the wilful a. H4B 11 4 339. 340. 
43 etc. answer tht a. H6B 11, 1, 41. 
5) eorrupt praetiee or eustom: reason 
the bawd to lust's a. Ven. 792. do nothlng but use theb" , 
--s in common bouses, lleas. 11, 1, 43. the poor 
of the rime want countenance, H4A 1, 2, 174. cries out 
upon--s, IV, 3, 81. the tlme's a. Ces. 11, 1, 115 (thc 
psent state of things eontrary fo law and reason). 
6) offence, crime: poor wretches bave re- 
morse in poor--s, Lucr. 269. this false 
1075. 1259. 1315. 1655. pardon m!/ a. H6A 11, 3 
67. frite Mm. chastisement for this a. IV 1, 69. nor 
tears nor pra/ers shall purchase out --s, Rom. 111 
1 198. 
7) fault: thej that level at m/--s reekon ufl 
their own, Sonn. 121, 10. tm'n their own perfection fo 
a. to seem like hbn, H4B 11, 3, 27. it is m!/ natnre's 
l)laffue to spff into --s, 0th. 111, 3, 147. 
Abuser, eorrupter, depraver: an a. of tle 
world, 0th. 1, 2, 78; cf. 74. 
_kbut, fo be eontiguons, to meet: whose 
hlgh upreared and--ing.]ronts the perilous narrow 
ocean parts asunder, H5 Prol. 21. the leaf. shelter 
that--s against the islaners side, Per. V, 1, 51 
(doubtful passage). 
_1, to pay.. to atone, to answer: lest 
thou a. it dear, Mids. 111, 2, 175. 335 (Ff abide). 
Abysm, abyss, depth without a visible 
bottom: Sonn. 112 9. Tp. 1, 2, 50. Ant. 1II, 
13, 147. 
Academe,(O.Edd.Achademe) academy, school 
of philosophers: LLL 1, 1, 13. IV, 3,303. 352. 
Accent, subst. 1)modulation of the voice 
in speaking: ]ou find not the apostraphas, and so 
miss the a. LLL IV, 2, 124. action and a. did they 
teacll hlm, V, 2, 99. well spoken, with good a. and 
ood discreHon, Hml. 11, 2, 489. 
2) sound of the voice: a terrible oath, with 
a swaggering a. sharpl/twanged o.ff' Tw. Iii, 4, 197. 
the a. of ]frs tongue a.ffècteth him, John 1, 86. R2 V, 
1, 47. R3 IV, 4, 158. Troil. 1, 3, 53. Lr. I, 4, 1. in 
second a. of his ordnance, H5 Il, 4, 126 (echo). 

3)a modification of thevoice express- 
ive of sentiments: till af ter many --s and de- 
lays she utters this, Lucr. 1719. prophesyfng wfth--s 
terrible, Mcb. 11» 3, 62. with tfmorous a. and dire yell 
0th. I, 1 75. 
4) pronunciation: /our accent is sometMng 
finer, As III 2, 359. speaking thick became the --s 
of the valiant, H4B il, 3, 25. neither havinff the a. o. 
Christlans nor the galt of Chrlstians, Hml. lll 2, 35. 
5) word, expression: those saine tonffues 
that frire thee se thine own in other--s do this praise 
confound, Sonn. 69, 7. any a. breakng fi'om thy tongue, 
John V, 6, 14. breathe short-winded--s of new 
broils, H4A !, 1, 3. do hot take his rougher--s for 
mallcious sounds, Cor. II1 3 55. these new tuners of 
--s, Rom. 11, 4, 30 (eoiners of words). 
6) speech, language: midst the sentence so 
ber a. breaks, Luer. 566. throttle their practlsed a. in 
thelr fears, llids. V, 97. in states unborn and --s /et 
unknown, Ces. 111, 1, 113. beffuiled /ou in a plain a. 
Lr. 11, 2, 117. 
Accept, rb. fo receive of one's own ac- 
cord, not to refuse; followed by an accus.: 
Mcrch. i, 2, 101 (cf. H6C 111, 3, 249). IV, 2, 9. V, 
197. Shr. Iad. I, 82. il, 83. 102. Wint. 11, 1, 131. 
1{2 11, 3, 162. II4A V, 1, 115. H6A III, 1, 149. 111, 
3, 82. IV, 1, 120. V, 4,151. H6BI, 3,216. V, 1,15. 
H6C III, 3, 249. R3 III, 7, 214. 221. iV, 4, 310. 
Tmil. V, 2, 189. Cor. V, 3, 15. V, 4, 62. Tit. 1, 222. 
Tim. I, 1, 156. 1, 2, 177. 190. IV, 3, 495. Per. I)rol. 
"12. I, 4, 107. -- "With of: Shr. Il, 59. IV, 2, 111. 
H4A IV, 3, 112. H6A V, 3, 80. Titn. I, 1,135. 
--ed -- agreeable, welcome: in most --ed pain, 
Troil. III, 3, 30. 
Accelt, subst, acceptance: pass our a. H5 
V, 2, ,82 (declare out acceptance).* 
Acceltable, to be received with content 
and pleasure: what a. audit canst thou leave? 
Sonn. 4, 12. 
Acceptance, free and favourable recep- 
tion; 1) act.  accepting: I leave him to /our 
gracious a. Merch. IV, 1, 165. poured it to ber a. 
Wint. IV, 4, 362. H5 1, 1, 83. Cor. 11, 3, 9. 0th. III, 
3, 470. 2) pass. being accepted: shall will in 
others seem right ffracious, and in m!/ will no fair a. 
shine . Sonn. 135, 8. makes it assured of a. Lucr. 
Ded. 3. theb" kind a. weepingl/ beseeched, Compl. 
207. for their sake let this a. take, H5 Epil. 14. 
Arrëss (iceess in Hml. 11, 1, 110), admit- 
tance: Gent. 111, 2, 60. IV, 2, 4. Shr. 11, 98. Tw. 1, 
4, 16. Wint. V, 2, 119. Rom. 11 Chor. 9. lIcb. I, 5, 
45. Vith pers. pron.: Shr. 1, 2, 269. Cor. V, 2, 85. 
Hml. 11, 1, 110. With of: Shr. I, 2 261. Wint. 11, 
2, 11. With to or unto: Gent. 111, 1, 109. lleas. 1I 
2, 19. 11 4, 18. As 1 1, 98. Shr. I 1, 119. 1, 2, 127. 
Wint. V 1, 87. H4B IV, 1, 78. H8 111, 2, 17. Cor. 
V, 2 85. Hml. 11, 1, 110. Oth. I11, 1, 38. Ier. II, 5, 7. 
Açressary, adj. guilty, participating in 
guilt: incllned to a. yieldings, Lucr. 1658. fo both 
their deaths thou shalt be a. R3 I, 2 192. 
A«ressary, subst, aecompliee: an a. to all 
sbs, Lacr. 922. I an a. needs must be fo that sweet 
thief Sonn. 35, 13. I ara /our a. Ails I1, 1 35 
/krressible, to be arrived at approaeh- 
able: a. is none but filford way Cymb. 111, 
2, 84. 



Accidence, a book containing the rudi- 2) to perform, to fulfil: oeitli ionourabla 
ments of grammar: Wiv. lV, 1, 16. I action, sucli as Aie liatli observed la noble ladles unto 
Accident, 1) casualty, chance: Sonu. 115, dtelr lords, b.9 dtem --ed, Shr. Ind. l, 112. wliicliliol.9 
5. 124, 5. Compl. 247. Tp. 1, 2, 178. Meas. IV, 3,1 undertakinç slie --ed, Ails IV, 3, 60. all rite number 
81. Merch. V, 278. Wint. IV, 4, 19. 549. TroiL lll,I of lilsfalr demands sliall be --ed, R2111, 3, 124. to a. 
3, 83. IV, 5, 262. Rom. V, 3, 251. tIml. III, 1, 30. IV,I liis projects, Cor. V, 6» 34. tlie vision is --ed» Cymb. 
7» 69.122. Ant.lV, 14» 84. V» 2 6. Cvllkb. V» 5, 76. 278- [ V» 5» 470. 
2) incident, event: tlieseappened--s, Tp.[ 3) to gain, to obtain (cf. Acliieve): to a. 
V, 250. tlie stor.9 of m.9 lire and tlie particular --s [ twent.9 golden crowns, H6C Ill, 2, 152. wliat .ym 
9one b.9 , 305. tliis is aa a. of liourl.9 p«oof, Ado ll, 1,  cannot as .you would acht'eve, .you musc perforce a. as 
188. Mids. IV, 1» 73. Tw. IV» 3, 11. H4A l, 2» 231. tm mail» 'rit. Il, 1, 107. 

H6A V, 3, 4. Rom. V, 2, 27. Hml. 111, 2, 209. Oth. 
V» 2, 231. V» 1» 94. 
3) mischance, misfortune: forced by need 
and a. Wint.V» 1, 92. disma.y hot at dtis a. H6A 111, 
3, 1. b.9 some unlookedfor a. ctt off, R3 1, 3, 214. 
liis a. is hot uulike mg dream, Oth. 1, 1, 143. novinç 
--s, 1, 3, 135. te sliot of a. nor dart of cliance, IV, 
1, 278. all olemn tliinçs sliould answer solemn --s, 
Cymb. IV, 2, 192. witli mortal--s opprest, V, 4, 99. 
Xœeœeidentai, 1) casual» fortuitous: Caes. 
W, 3, 146. Hlnl. V, 2» 393. 
2) incidental, occasional: tlie doors, tle 
wbd, dte 91ove, tlat did dela.9 liim, Aie takes for a. 
tlibçs of trlal, Lucr. 326 (not inherent to che like 
undertakings, but occasionally happening), ty sin's 
hot a., but a trade, Meas. III, 1, 149. 
A¢cid¢ntaily, by accident, fortuitously: 
ET. V, 361. LLL IV, 2, 143. Cor. IV, 3, 40. 
Accile, to cite, to summon: we will a. our 
state, H4B V, 2, 141. Aie b.9 tlie senate is--d liome» 
Tit. I, 27. Misprinted for excite: H4B Il» 2, 64. 
Acclamation, shouts of applause: Lucr. 
Arg. 25. Cor. 1, 9, 51. 
Aceommodate, ( er. Unaccommodated), t o 
supply with eonvenienees: a soldier is better 
--d (Qq a.) chan with a wife, H4B 111, 2, 72 (where 
Shallow's and Bardolph's remarks prove that the 
word was hot yct in daily use, but rather affected). 
tlie saler sense will ne'er a. Ails toaster dus, Lr. IV, 
6, 81. --d by cite place, Cymb. V, 3, 32 (favoured). 
Accommodation, supply of convenien- 
ces» comfort: all cite --s tliat tliou bearest are 
nursed b.9 baseness, Meas. 111, 1, 14. witli sucli a. and 
besort as levels witli lier breeding» Oth. 1, 3, 239. 
Attompany, (the pass. always followed by 
witli, never by by), to keep company, to attend, 
hot only on a walk orjourney: Lucr. Arg. 4. 18. 
Shr. 1, 2, 106. Wint. IV, 2, 53. Tit. 1, 333. Il, 3, 78. 
Tire. 1, 1» 89. Cor. IV, 3, 41. But also in a state of 
test: joy and fresli days of loce a. your liearts, Mids. 
V, 30. liow tliou art--ed, H4A ll, 4, 440 (in what 
company thou livest). 111, 2, 16. H4B IV, 4, 15. 52. 
1:{3 III, 5, 99. H8 IV» 1, 25. Cor. III, 3, 6. Tit. !, 
358. Mcb. V, 3, 24. 
l¢¢ompli¢e, co-operator, fellow in arms: 
success unto our valiant general, and happbess to his 
--si H6A V, 2, 9 (cf. Complice). 
Aecomplish, 1) to make complete, to 
furnish with what is wanting: --edwith that 
we lack, Merch. II1 4, 61. --ed with the number of 
thff hours, R2 11, 1, 177 (of thy .age). the armourers 
in the kmçhts, H5 lV Chor. 12. well --ed, quite - 
aceomplished, in the modern sense, Gent. IV, 3, 13o 
--ed, absol.  perfect: Compl. 116. Tw. 111» 1, 95° 
Cmb. I, 4, 101. 103. 

Accomplishment, performance, work: 
ho thls a. so hotly chased, Luer. 716. turnblç the a. 
of manif .years into an hourflass» H5 Prol. 30. 
Accompt, see Account. 
Accomptant, see Accountant. 
Avcord, subst. 1) harmony of sounds: 
gamut I ara, the ground of all a. Shr. 111, 1, 73. 
2) eoneord, harmony of minds: be at a. 
As 1, 1, 67. neiffhbourhoed and christian-llke a. H5 
V, 2, 381. 
3) just eorrespondence of one thing 
with another: how ean I grace my talk, wanting a 
hand to give it that a.? Tit. V, 2, 18 (Ff to give 
action). 
4) consent: let our will attend on their 
En'. 11, 1, 25 (do hot desire but what they consent 
to). on mbe own a. Wint. Ii, 3 63. with full a. to 
our demands, H5 V, 2, 71. this a. of Hamlet sits smi- 
ling to n heart, Hml. 1, 2, 123. 
5) assent: theff hace galls, good arms, strong 
joints, true swords, and Jove's a., nothlng so full of 
heart, Troil. 1, 3, 238 (Jove's assent that nothing is 
so fttll of heart. M. Edd. and, Jove's aceord)  
Accord, rb. to agree: raff consent and fab 
ing voice, Rom. 1, 2, 19. Followed by to: Gent. 
3, 90. As V, 4, 139. By with: H6B 111, 1,269. 
111» 2, 77. By au inf.: Compl. 3. H5 11, 2, 86. 
Accordatt, of the saine mind, well in- 
clined: 'hefoundher a. Ado I, 2» 14. 
According, 1) agreeably, in proportion; 
with to: and was, a. to his estate, ro#allff entertained, 
Lucr. Arg. 14. Gent. 1, 2, 8. 11, 4, 83. 111, 2, 12. IV, 
3, 8. Wi'. 1, 1, 162. Me. IV, 3, 83. V, 510. Err. 
1, 2, 6. Mids. 1, 1, 44. 1, 2, 3. II1, 1, 78. Merch. 1, 
41. 11, 2, 65. 1V, 1, 235. As V, 4, 67. 181. Shr. 
3, 95. Tw. IV, 3, 31. Wint. I11, 3, 30. John V, 
118. R2 !, 1,2. H4AIlI, 1,71. H4BV, 5,73. H5 
11, 2, 35. V, 2, 36. H6B 11, 4, 95. 99. H6C 11, 
152. Cor. 11, 1, 4. Caes. 111, 1, 295. V, 5, 76. Meb. 
111, 1, 97. V, 6, 6. Hnl. 11, 1, 47. I1 2, 552. Cymb 
11, 3, 63. With as: a. as marriage binds, As V, 4, 59. 
a. as our ladffship desb'ed, H6A 11, 8, 12. H6B 111, 
2, 12. Caes. I, 2, 261. 
2) aecordingly, eonformably: andsqua- 
rest thy le a. Meas. V, 487. 
Accordingly, aceording to it, eonform- 
ably: Me. 11, 3, 8. Ado 111, 2, 125. ohn 11, 
231. H4A1, 3, 3. H6All, 2, 60. Ant. l, 2,78. I11, 
9, 4. Cub. 1, 0, 24. he is 'er# great in knowled#e 
and a. valiant, Ails 11, 5, 9 (= as valian 0. 
Accost, to board, to make up to, to 
address: Tw. I, 3, 52 (hOt understood by Sir 
drew). 111 2 28. As for Troil.lV,5,59 sec 6t, vb? 
Accourir, subst. On FI 13 rimes accompt, 
rimes account) 1) reekoning: tell o'er the sad a. o] 



A 11 

fore-bemoaned moan, Sonn. 80, 11. upon remabder oj 
a dear a. R2 I, 1, 130. H4B I, I, 167. H5 t'roi. 17 
H6B IV, 2,98 (tocasta.) R8 V 8 11. Roln. l»  
120. Tiln. 11 2 142. a beçarl a. of empt boxes 
Roln. V, 1 45 (= store). 
2) computation: at our hand the a. of hours 
to crave 8onn. 58 8 (c£ clef. 4). then in th number 
let me pass untold» thouyh b t@ stores' a. I one must 
be, 186, 10. our compeHed sbs stad more for umber 
thanfor a. 5Ieas. 11» 4 58 (are rather numbered than 
put to our score; c£ der. 4). out dulff is so rich so 
bnite, that we ma do it still without a. LLL V, 2, 
200. b* virtues, beauties, livbçs, fi'iends, exeeed a. 
Merch. 111 2, 159. Wint. 11, 3, 198. H4A 111 2 176. 
H6Ç 111,1,35. H8 111,2,210. Tire. Il, 2, 3. Oth. 1,3,5. 
8) estimation: w truth ofsuch a. Sonn. 62, 6. 
to stand hiçh in çour a. Merch. 111, 2, 157. when ou 
were in place and b* a. nothin# so stro» and fortunate 
as , H4A V, I, 87. his achievements of no less a. 
H6A 11, 3, 8. make Mh a. offfou R8 111 2 71. tto 
dearer in m a. Lr. 1 1, 21. 
4) explanation given to a superior, an- 
swering for couduct @ee above Sonn. 58, 8 and 
Me. 11, 4, 58): fo make an a. of ber le to ..., 
Ado 11, 1, 65 (Ff fo make a.). to tender an a. IV, 1, 
388. m a.  well maç #ive, Wint. IV, 8, 21. when the 
last a. ' twixt heaven ad earth is tobe ruade, gohn IV, 
2, 216. I will call hbn to so strict a. tI4A 111, 2,149. 
he shall corne to his a. Cor. IV, 7, 18. whene'er we corne 
fo our a. 26. uone can call our power to a. Mcb. V, 
1, 43. sent to ȍ a. IIml. I, 5 78. 
.recourut, vb. (never accompt), 1) tr. with a double 
accus., to estoem, to think: Ia.mseoEhohlprab 
sed, Vert. Ded. 8. Lucr. 1245. eas. 111 2, 208. LLL 
IV, I 25. Merch. IV, 1 417. Shr. IV, 3, 183. Tw. 11 
1, 27. Wint. I, 2, 347. gohn 111, 4, 122. H4A V, 1, 
93. H6A 11» 4, 120. H6Ç 111, 2, 169. R3 V, 3, 108. 
Cor. l 1, 15.43. Tire. Il, 2,110. Mcb. l, 7,39. IV,2,77. 
Hml. 111 2 105. the a. his head upon the bride, R8111, 
2, 72 (i. e. in their opinion his head is already set ou 
London bridge, and consequently in a high position). 
Cymb. 1, 6, 80 (read: aecount 's). 
2) intr. with o a)to judge, to estimate: la. 
of them as jewels purchased at an eas price, Tir. 111, 
1, 198. he that otherwise s of me, Per. 11, 5, 63. 
b) to make account, to esteen: Ia.ofher beauté, 
Gent. 1I I, 66. 
In Per. Prol. 30 the pass. pro't, is dissyll. ; O. Edd. 
accourir'd, M. Edd. accourir. 
.tccouutaut, (O. Edd. accountant and accompt- 
ant), adj. liable to penalty, punishable, ob- 
noxious to justice: his offece is so, as it appears 
a. to the law upon that pain, hier. lI» 4» 86. I stand 
a. for as çreat a sin, Oth. 1I, I, 302. 
Accoutered, fully dressed, fully eqnipped: 
when we are both a. like youç men, Merch. 11I, 4, 68 
(Q1 apparelled), a. as Iw, I lunçed in, Caes. 1, 2,105. 
Accoutrement, dress, equipage: not onl# b 
the simple office of love, but in aH the a, complement 
and ceremon of it, Wir. 1, 2, 5. polnt-device in our 
--s, As 111, 2, 402. I can chançe these poor --s, Shr. 
111 2, 121. in habit and device exterior form outward 
a. John I 211. 
.recrue, to grow, to be earned:profits willa. 
H5 11, 1, 117 (Pistol's speech). 
ccumulate, t o h e ap: on just proof surmise a. 

Sonn. 117,10 (add suspicion to what has been plainly 
proved), what piles of wealth bath he --d! H8 III, 2, 
107. on horror's head horrors a. Oth. III, 3, 370. 
Accumulation, amassing, plentiful acqui- 
sition: quick a. ofrenown, Ant. 111, I, 19. 
.,¢¢ursed, (trisyll.), cursed, doomed to mi- 
sery and destruction: a. tower, a..fatal hand! 
H6A 1, 4, 76. thou foul a. minister ofhell, V, 4, 98. 
the brat of this a. dt&e, HEC 1, 8, 4. their a. line, 82. 
a. and unquiet wrmgliag days, R8 1I, 4, 55. 0 my a. 
womb, IV, 1, 54. IV, 4, 138. my a. sons, Tit.ll,3,290. 
III, 1, 66. this a. devil, V, 8, 5. this a. deed, 64. Tim. 
l, l, 268. stand aye a. in the calendar, Mcb. IV, 1,134. 
' a. be that tongue, V, 8, 17. 
.tccursed (dissyll.) or .,ccurst (cf. Cursed and 
CursO, I) cursed, doomed to misery: Otime most 
a. Gent. V, 4, 71. a. be he that seeks to make them 
foes, H6C l, 1,205. thou art the cause, and most a. 
effect, R3 [, 2, 120. l'g, I, 72. Tir. IV, 2, 79. Rom. 
IV, 5, 43. Tire. IV, 3, 34. 5Icb. III, 6, 49. IV, 3, 107. 
Cynb. V, 5, 154. 
2) unhappy, miserablc: the more ara la. Ven. 
1120. how a. la being so blest, Wint. II, 1, 38. most a. 
ara I to be e»joined to this, 111, 3, 52. 0 thoughts of 
men a.l past and to corne seems best, thbgs present 
worst, H4B 1, 3, 107. H5 IV 3, 65. H6.k V, 2, 18. 
Tire. IV, 2, 42. Hml. 111, 2, 189. 
Only twice occurring in prose: security enough to 
make fellowships a. Meas. 111, 2, 242. I ara a. to rob 
in that thiefs company, H4A 11, 2, 10 (il; is my iii luck 
to etc.) 
.¢eusatiott, 1) the act ofcharging one with 
a crime or offence: be you constant in the a. Ado 
11, 2, 55. with public a. IV, 1,807. Wint. 111, 2, 82. 
H4A 1, 3, 68. H8 111, 1, 54. Cor. 111, 1, 127. 
2) that which constitutes the charge: to 
produce more a. Wint. 11, 3, 117. read these --s and 
tltese 9rievous crbnes, R2 IV, 228. roar these --s forth, 
H6A. 11I, I, 40. Çor. 1, 1, 46. 111, 2, 140. his a. ---- a) 
the charge b,'ought by him: Meas. 11, 4, 157. 111, 1, 
201. Ado IV, I, 235. V, 1, 249. H6B I, 3, 206. 
Ant. III, 6, 23. b) the charge bronght against him: 
which contradicts my a. Wint. III, 2, 24. fo his I s he 
»leaded still hot guilty, H8 Il, I, 12. 
.g,¢¢usati'e, the objective case in grammar: 
vhat is your a. case? Wiv. IV, 1, 45. 
• refuse, subst., accnsation: York byfalse a. 
doth level ai rny lire, H6B III, 1, 160. 
• t¢¢use, vb., to charge with a fault or crime; 
followed by a simple accus.: Sonn. 117, I, Meas. IV, 
3, 145. l'g, 6, 2. V, 140. 160. 305. 309. Ado IV, l, 
179. 217. 234. IV, 2, 40. 50. V, 2, 99. V, 4, 2. 5Ierch. 
IV, 1, 129. Ails I, 1, 149..V, 3, 289. Wint. I, 1, 17. 
Il,3,204. R2 I, 1,47. V, 2, 13. H4B IV, 5, 166.H6A V, 4, 
81.H6B 1,3. 192.[11, 1,103.R31,2,85.1,3,27. [,4, 139. 
III, 2, 95. H8 Il, I, 24. Il, 4, 122. V, 3, 50. 56. Cor. 
l, 1, I00. III, 2, 143. V, 6, 5. Tir. V, 1, 130. Tire. 
IV, 3, 334. Lr. III, 7, 39. Ant. III, 6, 23. Oymb. Il, 
3, 115. V, 4, 95. Per. IV, 2, 76. the led  the --d 
person, R2 l, 1, 17. With of: Sonn. 58, 8. 152, 5. 
BIeas. V, 195. Wint. III, 2, 13. H6B I, 3, 180. 185. 
0or. I, I, 92. H_ml. III, 1, 124. knt. III, 5, 10. l'g, 6, 
19. Cymb. III, 4, 49. what man is he .ou are --d of:z 
do IV, 1, 178, in the same sense as: lolixenes wit, 
whom [ ara --d, Wint. III, 2, 63. Followed by in: a. 
him in his intent towards out wlves, Wiv'. Il, l, 180. 



12 

--d in fornication, lIeas. II, 1, 82. h thls which jou a. 
ber, Wint. 11, 1, 133 (the prepos, belonging to both 
pronouns). Peeuliar tmaas of expression : beb# --d a 
crafty mu,de,er, H6B 111,1,254. doth amj one a. York 
for a traltor¢. I, 3, 182 (er. For). Absol.» at least in 
appearance: /f thou canst «., or aught intendest to la,.L unto rny charge, H6A 111, 1, 3. 
Accuser, one who accuses: Ado IV, 2, 37. R2 
1, 1, 17. H6B I, 3, 201. R3 1, 3, 26. H8 II, 1, 104. 
V, 1, 120. V, 3, 46. Cor. 1, 1» 132. Lr. IV» 6, 174. 
Cymb. III, 2, 2 (O. Edd. what monsters ber accuse, I. 
Edd. what monster's ber accuser). 
A¢¢ustomed, customary (used of things only): 
ber a. crossness, Ado 11, 3, 184. the a. sight of 
death, As 1II, 5, 4. your a. diligence, H6A V, 3, 9. 
a. health, R3 I, 3, 2. an old a. feast, Rom. I, 2, 20. an 
a. action with ber, Mcb. ¥, 1, 32. 
A¢e, a single point on a die: Mids. V, 312 
(quibbling with ass). Cymb. 1I, 3, 3. 
A¢erb, harsh to the taste: as a. as coloquintlda, 
Oth. 1, 3, 355 (only in Qb the other O. Edd. bitter). 
&che, subst, pain, espeeially a chronieal pain 
eaused by inveterate ills: Meas. 11I, 1,130.AdoV, 1,26. 
H4B V, 1, 93. Troil. V, 3, 105. Pronounced like the 
naine of theletter H, Ado 111, 4, 56, and therefore dissyll. 
in the plural: Tp. 1, 2, 370. Tire. 1, 1, 257. V, 1,202. 
A¢he, rb. (in O. Edd. ake, and rhyming to brake 
and sake, Ven. 875. Er,. 111, 1, 58), to pain, to 
smart: whose swellin.q dugs do a. Ven.875. doth make 
the wound a. Lncr. 1116. Tp. 111, 3, 2. Err. 11I, 1, 58. 
John IV, 1, 41. H8 V, 4, 92. Troil. V, 10, 35. 51. 
Cor. II1, I 108. Rom. 1I, 5, 26.49. 65. Hml. V, 
101. Oth. 111, 4 146. With at: mg wounds a. at .lOU, 
Tire. 11I, 5 96. the sense --s at thee» Oth. IV, 2, 69. 
A¢laerott, the infernal river, supposed by Sh. to 
be a bnrning lake: Mids. 111 2, 357. Tir. IV, 3, 44. 
Mcb. I11, 5, 15. (cf. H4B 11 4» 170. H6B 1, 4 42. 
Lr. 11I 6 8). 
Aehieve, 1) absol, to make an end, to per- 
form what is intended: and does a. as soon as 
draw his sword, Cor. IV, 7, 23. 
2) trans, a) to perform, to execute: whlch they 
shall bave no sooner --d but we'll set upon them, H4A 
!» 2, 193. 
b) to kill, to finish: bid them a. rae H5 IV, 
3, 91. 
c) to gain, to obtain, 1) as the result of exer- 
tion: experience is bj industrJ --d, Gent. I, 3, 22. 
Shr. I, 1 20. 161. 184. 224. I, 2, 268. Ails I, 1, 52. 
Tw. II, 5» 157. 111, 4, 47. V» 378. R2 11, 1, 254. IV, 
217. H5 Epil. 7. Cor. I, 9, 33. Tir. II, 1, 80. 106. 
Ant. III, 1, 20. Per. V, 1, 117. 2) without the notion 
of exertion: that sin bj him advanta#e should a. Sonn. 
67, 3. jourfortune --d ber mistress, Merch. I11, 2» 210. 
John IV» 2, 105. H6B V, 2, 46. Oth. 11, 1, 61. 
Aehiœevement, 1) exploit: and for a. offer us 
his ransom, H5 III, 5, 60. his --s of no less account, 
H6A 11, 3, 8. Troil. 1, 3, 181. Hml. 1, 4, 21. 
2) acquisition: all the soli of the a. (riz of the 
crown) #oes wlth me into the earth, H4B IV, 5» 190. 
a. is command; un#ained, beseech, Troil. 1, 2, 319 
(when we bave obtained what we wished for, we play 
the masters; if not, the humble suitors), how mg 
mock me, IV, 2» 71. 
A¢hiever, gainer: a victorj is twice itself when 
the a. brinqs home full numbers» Ado 1 1 8. 

Achiiles, the Greek hero: Lucr. 1424. LLL V, 
2, 635. Troil. I, 2,268 (and passim), like fo --' spear 
H6B V, 1, 100 (alluding to Telephus cured by the 
rust scraped from Achilles' spear, by which he had 
been wounded). 
Achitol»hei, the counsellor of Absalom, cursed 
by David: H4B 1, .'2, 41. 
Acknovledge, to appropriate to one's know- 
ledge; 1)to claire acquaintance of: Imay hot 
evermore a. thee, lest ra. bewailed gult should do thee 
sharae, Sonn. 36, 9. 
2) to allow the sovereignty or superiority 
o f: willa.you and Jessica, Merch. 111, 4, 38. a. the king, 
John 11, 269. Christ, H4A 111, 2, 111. Ant. 111» 13, 97. 
3) to own, to avow, to eonfess to, the 
knowledge of a thillg or person: Ant. V, 2, 180. 
Err. V, 322. Wint. 1, 2, 401. IV, 4, 430. tt5 IV» I, 
225. Rom. 111, 5, 195. Lr. 1, 1, 10. as a guilt or fault: 
Wint. 11I, 2, 62. H4B 11, 2, 6. as a truth or right: 
Ado I, 2, 13. Ails 1I, 4, 43. to own with gratitude: 
Lr. IV, 7, 4. -- With a double ace.: this thing of 
darktess I a. mine, Tp. V, 276. Tire. 1, 2, 130. Lr. 
I, 1, 216. With an inf.: a. it to be the hand of heaven, 
Ails II, 3, 35. Reflectively: if the encounter a. itself, 
Meas.lll, 1,262, i. e. if the consequences of the meet- 
ing be such as to tender denying impossible. 
.t.ckno-iedg»en, owning of a benefit re- 
ceived: H5 IV, 8, 124. 
Ackno'n, knowing, acquainted: be hot a. 
on't, Oth.llI» 3, 319 (do hot confess to the knowledge 
of it). 
&-¢oid, having the sensation ofcold: Lr. 
III» 4, 59.85. 152. 
A«otitltt, the poisonous plant A co nitum or 
wolf's-bane: H4B IV» 4, 48. 
A«orn, the fruit of the oak: Tp. I, 2, 464. 
Mids. ll 1, 31. III, 2 330. As III, 2, 248. 
A¢qainl to make to know» to impart 
knowledge; with of: fo a. ber ofit Ado III, 1, 40. 
Vint. Il, 2, 48. IV, 4, 423. R3 I, 3, 106 (Qq with). 
Rom. III» 4 16. Cymb. I, 6, 149. With with: Brutus 
--ed the people wlth the doer, Lucr. Arg. 23. Tp. I[, 
2, 41. Wi'. IV, 6, 8. lIeas, l 2 184. Ado I, 2, 22. 
LLL V, 1 122. Merch. l, 2, 110. IV, 1, 154. As I, 
1, 128. 138. Ails I, 3» 124. Il» 3, 304. Wint. IV» 4, 
696. John V, 2, 89. V 6, 25. R3 IlI 5» 65. IV, 4 
329. Tir. II 1 122. Mcb. III» 1, 130. Hral. 1, 1 172. 
Lr. l 2, 110. l 5» 2. Ant. III, 6, 58. --ed with: Sonn. 
20, 3. 88, 5. Gent. IV, 4 25. Wiv. Il, 1, 90. lb 2, 
151. 189. III, 1, 68. lleas. I1» 1, 214. IV, 1» 51. Err. 
IV» 3» 91. Mereh. IV» 1» 171. As III, 2» 288. IV, 1» 2. 
Shr. 1¥, 1, 155. IV» 4» 26. Ails III, 7 5. IV, 1, 10. 
V, 3, 106. H4B Il, 1, 120. iii, 2, 353. R3 IV, 4» 269. 
H8 V æ 1, 170. Troil. Il, 3, 122. Tim. III, 3 38. Caes. 
II, 1, 256. Oth. III, 3, 99. Per. IV, 6» 210. Followed 
by a clause: --ed each other how they loved me Wiv. 
il, 2, 114. to acquaint his grace Æou are gone Ails III, 
6, 84. a. .you that [ bave receiçed» H4B IV» 1» 7. shall 
be --ed for what Æou corne, H8 Il» 2, 108. 
The partic, absol. : I ara as well--ed here as I 
was in our house Meas. IV» 3» 1. what need she be 
--ed? Err. III, 2 15 (what need she know it?). be 
better--ed, Cymb. b 4, 132 (i. e. with each other; 
cf. Kiss Know, Love See etc.). Once = well known: 
that war or peace, or both at once may be as things 
---cd and familiar fo us. H4B V» 2» 139. 



Aequaintanee, 1) the state of being kn own 
to each other, of bcing acquaintcd with a 
thing or person: Sonn. 89, 8. 1.'2. Tp. V, 186. 
Wiv. 1» 1, 255. Il, 2» 168. 279. Ado V, 1,341. Mids. 
III» 1, 185. 193. 200. As V, 2, 1. 7. Tw. I, 3» 56. V, 
91. John V» 6, 13. H4B lil, 2, 314. H8 III, 1, 161.' 
Troil. fil, 3, 9. Cor. V, 1» 10. Rom. fil, 3» 5. Lr. IV»i 
3, 56. Oth. IV, 2, 192 (Q| acqulttance). Cymb. I, 4, 
25. Per. IV, 6, 206. to lave a. witl, As I, 3, 50. to 
old g a. witl, Ails Il, 3» 240. to old a. witl 
vaves, Tw. I, 2, 16. to take a.: tlou sholt gqnd tlose' 
children nursed, delivered from th# braln, to take a new 
a. of th# ndnd, Sonn. 77, 12 ; i. e. flty mind will be- 
corne anew acquainted with its own thoughts, which 
had been quite lost from its memory and now seem 
new to it. 
2) a person well known: what, old a.! II4A 
V, 4, 102. Oftener collectively, persons well known, 
or acquainted with each other: both stoodlike old a. 
Lucr. 1595. Merch. Ii, 2» 181. Shr. I, 1, 34. Tw. 
5» 176. H4AI, I, 16. H4B Iil, 2» 38. H8 1,2,47. 
Ot]l. Ii, 1, 205. 
In the language of Evans : acquaintcd: Wiv. 1, 
Aequil-e, to gain; either by exertion: Ails IV, 
3, 80. Troil. I1» 3» 201. Hml. iii, 2, 8. An,. 111» 1, 
IV, 15, 28. Or without it: po»q», tlte which to le«ve 
more bi, ter than 'ris sweet at first to a. H8 II, 3» 9. 
Acquisitiol, that which is acquired: Tp. 
IV, 1» 13. 
Acquit, 1) to make full payment for: till 
llfe to deatlt a. n#.forced offence, Lucr. 1071, i. e, till 
life make to death full payment for my offence, till 
I atone for it by dying; or perhaps: till life, donc to 
death, killed, atone for my offence. 
2) to set free, to relcase from a debt, ob- 
ligation, or penalty: I will a..ou, Tw. Iii, 4, 
285. --ed bg a truc substanti«I forn, H4B iV, 1, 178. 
if .y ton#ue cmmot entreat .you to a. e, V, 5, 133. 
With front: ma.y an.y terres a. me front tlis chance? 
Lucr. 1706. With of: --ed of grlevous pe,al, les, 
Merch. iV, 1,409. V» 138. God a. tlem ofthelrprac- 
tices, H5 il, 2, 144. 
Refl., to clear one's self: pra# God le ma# a. 
Mm of susplcion, H6B III, 2, 25. of tlese supposed evils 
to a. nlgself R3 I, 2, 77. 
3) to t. one's selfwell: to do good work: As 
I, 1, 134. R3 V, 5, 3. 
Partie. a. for--ed R3 V, 5, 3 ; in the sense of 
delivered, rid of: I ara #lad I ara so a. of this tlnder- 
box» Wiv. I, 3, 27. 
A¢quittan¢e, subst. 1) a writing which is 
evidence of a discharge: #ou tan produce 
for such a surn, LLL ii, 161. Cymb. V, 4, 174. 
2) acquit,al, discharge: now must.your con- 
science mg a. seal» Hml. IV» 7, 1. 
3) payment, retribution: conlforts ofsudden 
respect and a. Oth. iV, 2, 192 (only in Qt; the res, of 
O. Edd. acquaintance). 
Aequittanee, rb. to acquit, to clear: a. 
from all the impure blots, R3 Iii, 7, 233. 
Acre, 1)a ploughed or sowed field within 
c e r t a i n 1 i m i t s : ni.y bosk.y --s and mg unslirubbed: 
down, Tp. IV, 81. between the --s of the r.ye, As V, 3, 
28. over whose --s walked those blessed feet, H4A I, 
1, 25. searchever$ a. in the hiqh-9rown gqdd » Lr. IV»4, 7. 

2) a certain quantity of land (160 square 
rods): an a. of barren ground, Tp. 1, 1, 70. ere with 
spur we heat an a. Vint. I, 2, 96. throw ndllions 
--s on us, HmL V, 1, 304. 
Aeross, adv. 1) athwart,from side to side; 
in the phrase to break one's h ead or pare a. : Err. II, 1, 
78. Tw. V, 178. IIml. ii, 2, 599. In Alls II, 1, 70 it 
must be rcmembered that in tilting it was thought 
disgraceful to break the spear across the body of the 
advcrsary, instead ofby the push of the point; cf. Cross 
and 7"raverse. 
2) fo 1 d e d (of arms): Lucr. 1662. Caes. II, I» 240. 
Across, prep. athwart: rnade her.fli#ht a. th.y 
father's ground, Wint. IV, 4, 15. 
Aet, subst. 1)deed, action: th.y brother wasa 
.furthcrer in the a. Tp. V, 73. the t.yrannous and blood.y 
a. is done, R3 IV,3, 1 (Qq deed), hleas. V, 456. Merch. 
IV, 1, 19. Ails II, 1, 155. II, 8, 143. Iii, 7, 7.46. T. 
IV, 3, 35 (cf. Rom. I1, 6, 1). Wint. Ii, 1, 181. Iii, 
52. Jobn ill, 4, 149. IV, 2, 18. IV, 3, 135. R2 IV, 
138. H4B Chor. 5. ii, 8, 21. IV, 2, 117. H5 l, 2, 281. 
H6A II, 2 35. II6B I, I, 194. Iii, 2, 118. R3 IV, 4, 
280. H8 I, , 85. Troil. I, 8, 348. ii, 2, 119. Iii, 8, 
131. Cor. i, 2,5. V, 2, 15. 834. Caes.lll, 1,166.Tit. 
1, 64. Rom. III, 3, 110. Mcb. i, 7» 40. IV, 1, 149. 
Itnll. i 5, 84. i11, 3, 91. Iii, 4, 40. 51. V, 1» 11. V, 
2, 392. Lr. il, 4, 114. iii, 4» 90. iii, 7 87. IV, 2» 74. 
Oth. Iii, 3» 134. IV, 2, 163. V, 2» 190. 203. 211. Ant. 
I, 2, 148. iii, 1, 13 (ake). IV, 8, 12. V, 1, 22. V, 
288. 834. Cymb. Il, 1» 66. iii, 2, 2 I. Iii, 8, 58. III, 4» 94. 
Per. i, 1, 73. i, 2, 18. V, 1,140.*Used of cohabitation: 
te a.of lust, Luer. 1636. te «. o f fornication, Meas.V, 
70. tle a. of sport, Oth. II, 1, 230. And simply te a.: 
Lucr. 199.350. 1637. 1704. 1824. Sonn. 152, 3. Meas. 
Il, 8 26. Troil. iii, 2, 90. 
2) doing, performing, being active: age 
wore us ont of a. Ails I, 2, 30. all gour --s are queens, 
Vint. IV, 4, 146. sers if in a. and use, H4B IV, 3, 126. 
tle lononr of i, does pag tle a. of i,, H8 Iii, 2, 182. 
hls partlcular a. and place, Hml. l, 3, 26 (i. e. the 
peculiar line of conduet prescribed to him by his rank. 
F.fsect and.force). Ails IV, 8, 55. John iil, 3, 57. 
V, 1, 45. It5 I, 2, 189. H6B V, 3, 10. Troil. III, 
2, 96. Cor. I, 9, 19. Tire. V, 1, 26. Ant. Il, 2, 46. 
149. I1, 7, 84. Cymb. V, 3, 29. to be orstandln a. or 
in the a.  to go forward: lkierch, l» 8 84. Oth. I. 
1, 152. 
8) agency, operation: esteem no a. but tat qf 
ltand, Troil. 1, 8, 199. distilled almost to jellg witlt 
a. of fear, Hml. i, 2, 205. the native a. and figure 
edrt, Oth. I, 1, 62. poisons wic wlth a lit,le a. upon 
the blood burn like ..., 111 8, 828. ottr conditions, so 
differing in tlteir --s, Ant. II, 2, 116. appl# alla#ments 
to tlteir a. C)anb. I, 5» 22. 
4) execution: the ber,er a. of purposes dstook 
is to ndstake again, John III» 1 274. doig the execu- 
tion and the a. for which we bave assenbled then, H5 
11, 2, 17.91ve t.,u thoughts no ton9ue , nor an# unpropor- 
tioned tltougltt ltis a. Hml. I, 8, 60. 
5) ev en t: to tlte state this lteavg a. wltlt lteavg heart 
relate, Oth. V, 2, 371. lakest thou me a dullard in 
a.f Cymb. V, 5, 265; but cf. def. 6. 
6) part of a play: this dumb pla# had Ms acts 
ruade plain wlth tears, Ven. 359. As Il, 7, 148. H4B 
I» 1, 156. H8 Epil. 3. Mcb. I, 3, 128. Hml. III, 2, 83. 
V, 2, 846. A play og the word: Tp. Il, 1, 252. Tw. 



14 A 

V, 254. Wint. V, "2, 86. John II, 376. R3 II, 2, 39. 
Mcb. I[. 4, 5. 
7) decree, law, edict: Meas. I, 2, 174. I, 4, 
64. R2 IV, 213. H6C I, 1,245.249. Il, 2, 91. Cor. 
1, 1, 85.  the record containing a law or dctermina- 
tion: thselfshalt see the a. Merch. IV, 1, 314. 
Aet, rb. 1) absol, to perform the proper 
fnnctions, to work, to be in action: we do hot 
a. that oftenjest, Wiv. IV, 2,108 (in a lascivious sense ; 
cf. 39o and the subst. Act). the resolute --ing of .your 
blood, Meas. II, 1, 12. fo a. in safety, llcb. III, 1, 54. 
Hml. V, 1, 12. 
2) tf. a) to perform, exeeute: I dld but a., 
he's author of thy slander, Ven. 1006. fo a. ber com- 
mauds, Tp. I, 2,273. Wiv. II, 1,101. lYleas. II, 2, 104. 
Tw. V, 348. John IV, 2, 240. Rom. IV, 1, 1'2_0. Caes. 
II, 1, 63. Mcb. III, 4, 140. IV, 3, 97. Hml. III, 1,129. 
II1, 4, 108. IV, 5, 125. Lr. II, 1, 20. Oth. I, 1, 172. 
Per. I, 1, 92. 
b) to set to work, to put in action: here is 
a hand fo hold a sceptre up and with the saine to a. con- 
trolling laws, II6B V, 1, 103. till strange love, grown 
bold, think true love --ed simple radesty, Rom. 1II, 2, 
16. let the world see Ms nobleness well --ed, Ant. V, 
2, 45. 
e) to represent, to perform (as a player): 
Pilgr. 152. Gent. IV, 4, 174. Wk'. III, 3, 40. Tw. I, 
4, 26. Wint. V, 2, 88. tt4B IV, 5, 99. H5 Prol. 3. 
H6C V, 6, 10. H8 I, 2, 195. Troil. 1, 3, 158. Cor. II, 
2» 100. 149. Rom. IV, 3, 19. Caes. III, 1, 112. Hml. 
II, 2, 455. Cymb. III, 3, 95. III, 4, 26. 
Ac|aen, the Theban prince transformed fo a 
stag by Diana: Tit. II, 3, 63. IIii horns a prototype 
of enekoldom: Wiv. Il, 1, 122. III, 2 44. 
Action, 1) the state or manner of being 
active, aetivity: the expense of spirlt in a wastel 
of shame is lust in a. Sonn. 129, 2. the rater a. is in 
virtue than in vengeance, OEp. V, 27. more reasons for 
this a. shall I reuder .ou. hIeas, l, 3, 48. strong reasons 
make stron 9 --s, John III, 4» 182. imitate the a. of the 
tiger, H5 III, 1, 6. a gentle business, and becoming the 
a. of good women, H8 II, 3, 55. holdin 9 them, in human 
a. and capacity, of no rore soul than camels, Cor. Il, 
1, 265. vice sometimes b a. dignified  Rom. Il, 3, 22. 
be what if is, the a. of rny lire is like it, Cymb. V, 4, 
150. Partieularly when aetivity is attended by exer- 
tion: divide the a. o f thelr bodies from their souls, H4B 
I, 1, 195. the man of a. II 4, 406 (the active, 'deed- 
aehieving' man). they bave used their dearest a. in the 
teuted field, Oth. I, 3, 85. to lock it (lire) from a. and 
adventure, Cymb. IV, 4, 3. Espeeially warlike oeen- 
pation: in han and hope o fa. Me.I, 4, 52. a., henee 
borne out, rnay waste the rnemorg of the former days, 
H4B IV, 5, 215. H5 I, 2 114. IV, 2, 27. Cor. I, 3, 
28. IV, 3, 53. Cymb. III, 7» . H4B l, 3 37. 
2) exertion, manifestation of vigonr 
strong exercise: beauté, whose a. is no stron9er 
than a flower, Sonn. 65, 4. motion and long-during a. 
rires the traveller, LLL IV, 3,307. do hOt fret .yourself 
too rnuch in the a. llids. IV, 1 14. a man no rnightler 
than thself or me in personal a. Caes. I, 3, 77. the 
violence of a. bath rnade you teck, Çymb. I, 2, 2. wh 
hast thou abused ... mine a. and thine own? III, 4,107. 
they with eontinual a. are as good as rotten, Per. IV, 2» 9. 
3) the thing donc, deed: his --s show rnuch 
like to rnadness Meas. IV, 4, 4. As II, 4, 30. IV: 1, 

141. Ails IV, 3, 28. Wint. III, 2, 0. 8. John IV 
3, 58. V, 2, 67. H8 IV, 2, 70. Cr. II, 2, 33. Mc. 
IV, 2, 3. Oth. 1, 2, 98. Il, 3, 146 etc. 
4) enterprise: what dangerous a. would I hot 
undergo! Gent. V, 4, 41. in what particular a. to tr. 
him, Ails III, 6, 18. Especially a warlike enterprise: 
when.ou went onward on this ended a. Ado I, 1, 299. 
John II, 233. III, 4, 14. V, 2, 99. H4A II, 3, 23.36. 
III, 3, 2. H4B I, 1, 177. IV, 1,172. Troil. Il, 3, 140. 
145. Cr. I, 1, 283. II, 1, 150. IV, 7, 5. Ant. II1, 7, 
69*etc. Jestingly used of a feat of drinking: FI4A 
II, 4, 23. 
5) a fight, in battle as well as in single combat: 
how rnan. gentlernen bave .ou lost in thls a. ? Ado I, 1, 
6. H6B V, 2, 26. Troil. IV, 5, 113. 
6) theatrical representation: we will do it 
n a. as we will do it belote the duke, llids. III, 1, 5. 
I nill relate, a. ma. the rest conve., Per. III Prol.55. 
V Prol. 23. Similarly the sight offered to the speeta- 
for of a pageant, in eontradistinetion to a mere reei- 
tal : the tract of every thing would by a good discourser 
lose some llfe, which --'s self was tongue to, H8 I 
1, 42. 
7) gesticulation, the motions of the body 
aeeompanying words spoken- or the feelings of the 
mind: rnakbi 9 such sober a. with his hand, Luer. 1403. 
1433 (quibbling in 1323). Wiv. 1, 3, 50. IV, 5, 121. 
Meas. IV, 1, 40. LLL V, 2, 99. As IV, 3, 9. Shr. Ind. 
1, 110. 132. Tw. 1, 5, 311. Wint. V, 3, 104. John 
IV, 2, 191. H6B V, 1, 8. R3 I, 3, 66. Troil. I, 3, 149. 
Çor. II1, 2, 76. 122. Tit. III, 2, 40. ¥, 2, 18. Caes. 
III, .'2, 226. Mcb. V, 1, 32. Hml. I, 2, 84. I, 4, 60. 
Il, 2, 318. III, 2, 19. Oth. I, 1, 61. Ant. 111, 12, 35. 
Cymb. 11, 4, 102. 
8) a law-suit: a. of batter., lIeas. Il, 1, 187 i 
Tw. IV, 1, 36; Hml. V, 1, 111. a. ofslander, lIeas. 
II, 1, 190. l'll bring mine a. on the proudest he, Shr. 
lIl 2, 236. upon some a. Tw. V, 282. this a. I now go 
on, Wint. II, 1, 121. have.ou entered the a.? H4B lI 
1, 2. draw the a. 162. four terres or two --s, ¥ 1 
90. though our proper son stood in .your a. Oth. I 3 
70. let hot a leaner a. rend us, Ant. II, 2, 19 (a moot- 
point of less consequence), rnake it an a. Cymb. II, 
3, 156. 
Trisyll. in the middle of the verse in Oth. II 3 
146. 
&ctio-takig, resenting an injnry by a 
law-suit instead of fighting it out like a man of 
honour: Ll-. II 2, 18. 
/Ictium, the promontory at which the dêcisive 
battle between Antony and Octavius was fonght: Ant. 
I11, 7, 52 (F Action). 
&clive, of an agile and vigorous body 
(Germ. riistig): a decrepit father takes delight fo 
see his a. ehild do deeds of gouth, Sonn. 37, 2. Ado 
V, 1, 75. H4B IV, 3 24. tt5 III, 7, 105. H6B IV, 7» 
68. In eontradistinetion to qualities of the mind: 
'twixt his mental and his a. parts kbigdomed Achilles 
in commotion rages, Troil. II, 3, 184. my speculative 
and a. instruments, Oth. I, 3, 271 (Ff officed). 
&ctiel.v, with youthfnl vigour brlskly 
(cf. Aetivity): sbce frost itself as a. doth burn as 
flaming .youth, Hml. 1II, 4, 87. 
&ctive-valiant, strennous and brave: tt4. a, 
V 1, 90 (in O. Edd. not hyphened). 
&«tivity» fitness for strenuous exertion; 



A 15 

always used in an obscene, or at least ambiguous 
sense: doing is a., and he will still be doing, H5 111, 7, 
107 (cf. 19o). if she call your a. in question æ Troil. III, 
2 60. that your a. may defeat and quell the source of 
all evil, Tim. IV, 3, 163. 
Artçr, 1) d oer: she revealedthe a. Lncr.Arg. 20. 
no outrayeous t]ing.frorn vassal--s can be wiped away, 
Lucr. 60S. Meas. 11, 2, 37. 41. Alls Il, 3, 28. Ant. 
Il, 5.9. 
2) stage-player: Sonn. '2_3, 1. Tp. IV, 148. 
LLL V, 2, 501. Mils. 1, _'2, 9.1G. Iii, 1.82. IV, 2, 43. 
¥, 116. As III, 4,62. R.2V, 2, 24. H6C Il, 3, 28. 
Troil. Prol. 24. Cor. V, 3, 40. Caes. Il, I, 226. Hml. 
Il. 2, 410. 411. 414. 415. III, o, 106. 
Actual, consisting in doing something, in 
contradistinction to thoughts or words: ber walki»g 
and other a. performances, Mcb. V, 1, 13. in discourse 
of thought or a. deed, Oth. IV, _'2, 1.53. 
Aeure, the performing of a respective 
act: with a. thçç rna 9 be, where neither part 9 is nor truc 
nor ki»d, Compl. 185 (i. e. such my do the works of 
love as are void of love ; cf. Actlri(/). 
Aeule, highly refined, witty; uscd only by 
Armado and Holophernes, and, it should seem, with 
intendcd impropriety: a most a. juvenal, LLL III, 67. 
the gft is good in those in whorn it is a. IV, 2, 73. 
Aeuiel.v, wittily; used only by Parolles: I 
can»ot answer thee a. Ails I, 1, '2I. 
Adage, proverb: II6C 1, 4, 1'2-6. Mcb. 1, 7,45. 
Adallas, name of a Thrackm king: Ant. III, 
6 71. 
Adam, 1) the progenitor of the human race: Ado 
Il, 1, 66. 2.59. LLL IV, 2, 40. V, 2, 322. As Il, 1, 5. 
R2 III, 4, 73. H4A lI, 4, 106. III, 3, 186. A. wasa 
gardener, II6B IV, 2, 142; cf. R2 III, 4, 73 and Hnd. 
V, 1, 35. 42. the picture qf old ll. En'. IV, 3, 13 
(meaning the bailiff, because, as the commentators 
will bave it, the buff he wore resembled the native 
buff of Adam). Used as the symbol of human frailty: 
H5 I, 1, 29. 
2) Adarn Bell, a îamous archer, mueh êelebrated 
in popnlar songs and grown proverbial for his skill: 
Ado I, 1, 261. Therefore -ubstituted for Abraharn 
q. v., by M. Edd. in Rom. Il, 1, 13. 
3) naine of servants : As 1,1, 1.29 etc. Shr. IV, 1,139. 
Aaman, 1) a stone of impenetrable 
hardness: spur in pieces posts of a. H6A I, 4, 52. 
2) the loadstone: tou dc«w me, you hard- 
hearted a. Mids. IL 1, 195. Troil HI, 2, 186. 
Add, 1) to join tothatwhiehwas before; 
followed by a depending elanse: they that a. he's drunk 
nightl., Tw. 1, 3,38. I1, 2, 7. John Iii, 1, 153. R2 IV, 
18. Troil. 11, 3, 141 etc. By an aeeus.: --in 9 one rhin 9 
to mypurpose nothlnq, Sonn. 20, 12. 103, 4. LLL II, 
252. III, 87. V 1, 52. Troil. IV, 5, 145. Ant. III, 12, 
28 etc. :By an aee. and dat. : tain --ed to a river, Ven. 
71. to your blessings a. a curse, Sonn. 84, 13.85, 10. 
135, 11. Pilgr. 206. Meas. Il, 4, 72. Ado lV, 1 174. 
Iereh. V, 186. Shr. III, 2, 130. V, 2, 112. Ails 111, 
7, 35. Tw. V, 83. John lI, 34:7. IV, 2, 13. R2 I, 1, 
24. III. 4, 16. II5 iii, 6, 142. IV, 8, 88. H6C !1, 1, 
105. H8 Il, 3, 65. Rom. I, 1, 139. Meb. IV, 1, 33 etc. 
By a dat. and a clause: --in 9 thereto that she would 
wedrne LLL V, 2, 446. Wint. II, 1, 67. 
2) ,Vith to,  to inerease, to enrieh: the 
lett. streams a. to hls flow, Lner. 651. the sea --eth 

to his store, Sonn. 135, 10. death's a great dlsgulser, 
and you may a. to it. Meas. lV 2, 187. that art wMch 
--s to nature, Wint. IV, 4, 91. H4B III, 1 105. tt6A 
I, 1 103. Troil. II, 2, 106. Tim. IH, 1, 54. Caes. Il, 
1,267. Lr. I, 4, 292. Similarly fo a. more of a 
to --- to increase the force or quantity of a thing: to 
a. a more rejoicing to the prie, Lucr. 332 (--- to in- 
crease the rejoicing of the prime), which to £er ora- 
tory --s more grace, 564. to out perjury to a. more 
terror, LLL V, 2, 470. a. more feathers to ourwigs, 
II5 I, 2, 306. to a. more rneasure to your woes, H6C 
1, 105. Ineed hot a. more fuel to your fire» V, 4, 70. 
a. more coals to Cancer, Troil. I1 3, 206. And witbout 
more: thine eyes bave --ed feathers to the learnears 
wlng, Sonn. 78, 7. till another Caesar bave -ed 
slauyhter to the sword o.f traitors, Caes. V, 1, 55. a. 
water to the sea, H6C V, 4, 8. Hence the following 
peculiarities: I can a. colours to the charneleon, H6C 
I11, 2, 191 (i. e. I bave more eolours than the cha- 
meleon; er. Ven. 398). the enem.y corne on re.[reshed, 
new --ed, Caes. IV, 3, 209 (strengthened, reinforeed; 
some M. Edd. aided). 
3) SVith to to bestow on: she--s honours 
to his hate.ful narne, Ven. 994. their thoughts to thy fair 
Jtower a. the tank srnell of weeds, Sonn. 69, 12. it 
a precfous seebg to the e'ge, LLL IV. 3, 333. a. proof 
unto mine arrnour with thy prayers, R2 1, 3, 73. and to 
thy worth will a. rlyht worthy gains, V, 6, 12. thou wilt 
but a. increase unto my wrath, H6B 111, 2, 292. tou 
bave --ed worth unto it and lustre, Tire. I» 2. 154. 
Cyrnb. I, 1, 142. to such proceedi» 9 who ever but his 
approbation --ed, Per. IV,3, 26. SVithout fo: the words 
wonld a. more anguish than the wounds, II6C 11, 1, 99 
(cf. the German zu3ïlgen ). 
4) tomakeoutbyarithmeticaladdition: 
untll the goose carne ont of door and sta.qed the odds by 
--ing.four, LLL I11, 93; cf. multiply in Wint. 1, 2.7 
Adder, a venomous shake: Vert. 878. Lucr. 
871. Tp. 11, 2. 13. Mids. lr. 2, 71.72. 73. Shr. IV, 
3, 179. Wint. lV, 4, 268. R2111, .'2.20. H6CI 4,112. 
R3 1, 2, 19. q_'it. 1I, 3, 35. Tire. IV, 3, 181. Caes. lL 
1, 14. Mcb. IV, 1 16. Hml. 111, 4, 203. Lr. V, 1, 57. 
Cymb. IV, 2, 90. Snpposed to be deaf: my--'s sense 
to critic and to flatterer stopped are, Sonn. 112 10. 
H6B 111, 2, 76. Troil. 11, 2, 172. 
Addi«t., rb. refl. to devote, to dedieat, e 
o n e's s e ! f: to a. thernselves to sack, H4B IV, 3, 135. 
Partie. 1) --ed  inclined, devoted: Tw. I1, 5, 222. 
Hml. 1I, 1, 19. 2) addlct: a. to vice Pilgr. 415. 
lddi?lion, inclination: fils a. was to courses 
vain, H5 I, 1,54. to what sport and revels hls a. leads 
hlrn, Oth. II, 2, 6 (f QI addition). 
Addition, 1) the summing up oînnmbers: 
pareel the surn of rny disgraces by a. of hls ency, Ant. 
V 2, 164. 
2) the aet of adding, opposed to diminution: 
to thy sweet will rnakb 9 a. thus, Sonn. 135, 4. 
3) the thing added: and by a. me of thee 
de.[eated, Soun. 20, 11. take unrnin91ed thenee that drop 
a9ain , without a. Err. il, 2, 130. and this a. more, full 
thirty thousand marks, John I1, 529. H4A 1I 4, 29. 
Caes. IV, 3, 172. Lr. 111, 6, 3. V, 3, 301. 
4) augmentation, enhancement: allaids 
came for --s, Compl. 118. it is no a. to ber wlt, Ado 
II, 3 242. titled 9oddess, and worth it, with a. Ails I¥ 
2, 3. truly to speak, and wlth no a. Hml. IV, 4, 17. 



16 h 

5) mark of distinction, denomination, 
ti t 1 e: devils' --s, the names offiends, Wiv. II, 2,312. 
where great --s swelf s, and vU'tue noue, 2Llls II, 3, 
134. H5 V, 2, 367. Troil. I, 2, 20. Il, 3, 258. Cr. 
I, 9,66.7-'2. Mcb. I, 3, 106. III, 1, 100. Hml.I, 4,"90. 
Il, 1, 47. Lr. Il, 2, 26. V, 3, 68 (Qq advancement). 
Oth. IV, 1, 105. IV, 2, 163. 
6) outward honour: we will hot naine desert 
be.[ore his bb'th, and being born, hls a. shall be humble, 
Troil. I11, '2., 102. bear hence a great a. earned in thg 
death, IV, 5, 141. the naine and all the --s to a klng, 
Lr. I, 1, 138. think it no a. nor mg wish, to bave him 
sec me womaned, Oth. III, 4, 194. 
Addle, in a morbid state; originally applied 
to eggs, aud then to a weak brain : if.you love an a. 
egg as well as gou love an idle head, Troil. I, 2, 145. 
thg head bath been beaten as a. as an egg, Rom. 111, 
1, 26. 
&ddress, rb. 1) tr. a) to direct: towardlhat 
shade I might behold --ed the king, LLL V, 2, 9'2,. a. 
.your love and mlght to honour Itelen, Mids. Il, 2, 143. 
a. thj gak unto ber, Tw. I, 4, 15. unto your grace I a. 
the substance of ray speech, H4B IV, 1, 31. 
b) to prepare, to make ready: JDuke Frede- 
rlck --ed a raighty power, As V, 4» 162. all imminence 
that gods and men a. theb" dangers in, Troil. V, 10,14. 
ia .your armours, as .you are --ed» l'er. 11, 3, 94 (or  
dress?). Pro'tic. --ed  l-eady: --ed to answer hls 
desire» Lucr. 1606. LLL Il, 83. Mids. V, 107. H4B 
lV, 4, 5. It5 III» 3, 58. Cacs. III, 1, 29. Reflectively 
--- to make one's self ready: I will then a. me to n»y 
appolntment, Wiv. fil, 5, 135. Merch. Il, 9, 19. Alls 
Ill, 6, 103. Viut. IV, 4» 53. H6B V, 2, 27. lXIcb, lin 
2» 24. Hml. 1, 2, 216. 
2) intr. a) to direct one's speech to: wefirst 
a. towards you, Lr.l, 1,193. b) to get ready: let us 
a. to tend on Hector's heels, Troil. IV, 4» 148. 
• dltere, to be in accordance: theydo no more 
a. and keep place together than ... Wiv. lin 1, 62. 
eve thing --s together, Tw. III, 4 86. nor rime non 
place did then a. Mcb. I, 7, 5'2,. Vith to: a shepherd's 
daughter, and what to ber --s, Wint. IV, 1, ?,8 (what is 
in accordance with ber condition), two men there are hot 
living to whom he more --s, Hml. II, 2, 21 (to whom 
his mind is more congenial, who, as v. 1'2, expresses 
it, are tmore neighboured to his youth and ha'iour'). ' 
ldieu, farewell; oftener used and in a more 
familiar way than at present: Ven. 537. Gent. I, 1,11. 
53. III, 1, 50. Wiv. I, 3, 20. Il, 1, 139. Il, 3, 84. 111» 
5, 139. IV, 1, 86. V»3,6. Meas. I4,90. III, 2, 80. 
Ado III, 1, 109. III, 3, 100. LLL I, 1, 110. I, 2,187. 
11, 213. fil, 135. IV, 2, 148. V, 2» '2,26.629. Mids. I 
1,224. I, 2, 112. V, 354. Merch. I, 3, 170. II, 3, 10. 
11,7,76. Il, 9, 77. As I11,2,311. IV, 1,20°,. V, 4, 
127. Shr. Il, 323. IV, 4, 102. 2Llls IV, 2, 64. Tw.llI, 
1, 173. lV, 2, 141. Wint. II, 1» lO,2. IV, 4, 673. Johu 
I, 180. III, 1, 3'2,6. R2 I, 3, 306. V, 1, 102. FI4A V, 
4, 99. H5 Il, 3, 64. IV, 3, 10. H6A IV, 4, 45. IV, 7, 
31. R3 I11, 5, 97. IV, 1, 88. 91. V, 3, 102. Troil. I, 
2, 303. Cor. Il, 3, 87. lV, 1, 20. Rom. Il, 2, 136. 
fil, 5, 59. Mcb. Il, 4» 37. III, 1, 34. Hml. I, 5, 91. 
Oth. I, 3, 292. 380. Ant. V, 2, 189. 190. Cymb. I, 1, 
108 etc. fo bid a. : Sonn. 57, 8. LLL V, 2, 241. H6C 
IV, 8, 29 (cf. Bic O. Substantively: twent.y--s» LLL 
V, 2, 265. Ails Il» 1, 53. IV, 3» 101. Troil. lV, 4, 48. 
Ant. lV» 5» 14. 

Adiacen, contiguous: Rom. 11, 1, 20. Ant. 
II, 2, 218. 
Adjoin, 1) tr. to join, to tic to: to whose huge 
spokes ten thousand lesser things are mortised and 
--ed, Hml. III, 3, 20. 
2) intr. to be eontiguous: thehills--ing to the 
citg, Ant. IV, 10, 5. 
ldjurn, to defer, to delay: H8 I1» 4» 9-32. 
Cymb. V, 4, 78. 
ldjntlge, 1) to adjudieate, to ordain: to 
whom the heavens --d an olive branch, H6C IV, 6, 34. 
'2,) to eondemn: he --d gour brother, Meas. V» 
408. With to : thou art--d to the death» Err. I» 1,147. 
--d to death» H6B IL 3, 4. To omitted: to be --d 
some direful death, Tit. V, 3» 144. 
djunet, adj. attending, consequent: though 
death be a. Lucr. 133. eve humour bath his a. plea- 
sure, Sonn. 91, 5. though that m.y death were a. to 
acl, John III, 3, 57. 
Atljun¢t, subst, attendant: to keep an a. to 
remember thee, Sonn. 127,» 13. learning is but an a. to 
ourself, LLL IV, 3, 314. 
Administer, to cause to take: to keep the oath 
lhat we a. R2 1, 3, 182. 
Administration, d i r e c t i o n, m a n a g e m e n t : 
in the a. of his law, H4B V, _'2, 75. 
Admirable, 1)deserving the highest praise» 
wonderful, delightful: ofa. discourse, Wiv. Il, 
2, 234. a. pleasures, IV, 4, 80 (Evans' speech), mg a. 
dexlerilg, IV, 5, 120. brave wŒErs, most a. Ails I1, 1, 
26. the knighl's in a. fooling, Tw. II, 3, 85. "twill be 
a. 186. an a. conceited fellow, AVint. IV, 4, 203 (the 
clown's speeeh). 0 a. gouth, Troil. I, '2,,255.258. a.: 
how this grace speaks his own standing, Tim. 1, 1, 30. 
in form and movi»g how express and a. Hml. 11, 2, 318. 
an a. evasion, Lr. I, 2, 137. an a. musician, Oth. IV, 
1, 199. with a. rich words to it, Cytub. II, 3, 19. 
2) to be wondered at: strange and a. Mids. 
V, 27. 
Admiral, 1) commander of a fleet: H5 IV, 
8, 98. H6C 11I, 3, 252 (high a.). I{3 IV, 4, 437. 
2) the ship which carries the commander: 
H4A III, 3, 28. Aut. III, 10, 2. 
ldmiralion, 1) wonder lningled with ve- 
neration: with more than a. he admb'ed ber azure 
veins, Lucr. 418. Tp. III, 1, 38. H8 V, 5» 43. Cymb. 
I, 4, 5. IV, 2, 232. 
2) wonder, astonishment, emotion exei- 
t e d b y a n y t h i n g s t r a n g e : the changes Iperceived 
in the king and Camillo were ve T notes o.[ a. Wint. V, 
2, 12. working so grossl.y in a natural cause, that a. 
did hot whoop at them, H5 I1, .9, 108. IV, 1, 66 (Fluellen's 
speech), season gour a. for a while, Hml. I, 2, 192. 
struck ber into amazement and a. 111, .9, 339.34"2. this 
a. is much o'the favour of other your new pranks, Lr. 
I, 4, '2.58. what makesgour a.? Cymb. I, 6, 38. 
The abstr, for the concr.: bring in the a. Ails 
1, 91. 
Admire, 1) to regard with wonder and de- 
light; absol.i Sonn. 59, 14. Wint. V, 3, 41. H4A 
1II, 2, 80. H5 I, 1, 39. Cor. I» 9, 5. With an aceus.: 
Lucr. 39.9. 418. Sonn. 84, 1.9.1.93, 5. Pilgr. 66. Gent. 
IV, 2, 43. LLL I, 1, 141. IV, .'2, 118. Mids. I, 1, 231. 
As 111, 2» 412. Shr. I» 1, 29. Wint. IV, 4, 625. H4B 
I, 3» 105. H5 111, 6, 13.9. H6A II» .9, 39. H6B III, 
1, 1.'2. H6C I, 4, 130. Rom. I, 2, 89. Tim. V, 1, 54. 



A 1'7 

Ant. I, l, 51. Ili» 7, 24. Cymb. i» 1, 32. 1)ero ¥ 
lrol. 4. 
2) to wonder, to be surprised: wonder 
nor a. hot in thy mind, Tw. 111» 4, 165 (letter of Sir 
Andrew). With at: these lords at this encounter do so 
much a. Tp. V» 154. 
lm-tic. --d adjectively: 1) admirable: --d 
]'[iranda! Tp. 111, 1» 37. --d Octavia» Ant. 11, 2» 121. 
2) to be wondered at, strange: with most 
disorder» Mcb. Iii, 4» 110. 
Admirer, one who admires: tI8 i, 1, 3. 
Admiringly, with admiration: Alls i, 1» 33. 
V» 3, 44. 
Admission, in Self-admlssion, q. v. 
Adroit, 1) to suïfer to enter: hls car ber 
prayers --s» Lucr. 558. and will is --ed there, Sonn. 
136» 3. let ber be --ed, Mens. 11, 2, 22. Merch. IV, 1, 
146. AllslV, 5,94. Tw.i, 1,24. 1,4, 20. H511, 
156. R3 I, 3, 343. IV, 4, 38. Tire. l, 2, 127. Hml. 
ll, 2, 144. Ant. ii, 2, 75. Iii, 13, 40. With to: 
to his sight, Mens. IV, 3,125. to your council, H6B lll, 
1, 27. leculiar expressions: the prince --s hbn» H4B 
Il, 4, 274 (has intercourse, converses with him). hot 
ferry thlngs --ed, Ant. V, 2, 140 (regstered). 
2) to allow» to permit; with an accus: Tp. 
1, 149. Mens. I, 1» 63. Err. l, 1, 15. Tw. ], 2» 45. 
H4B ], 3, 24. IV, 1, 159. V, 1, 6. V, 2, 24. H5 l|l, 
3, 2. V Chor. 3. Troil. |V, 4,9. V» 2, 151. Cor. V, 3, 
6. V, 6, 20. 69.96. Hnd. ll|, 1, 108. With dat. and 
acc.: a. hbn entrance, It8 lV» 2, 107. With au inf.: 
they will hot a. any good part to intermingle with them» 
Ado V, 2, 63. 
3) to be for, to declare for, to choose: 
whose party do the townsmen .yet a.? John Il, 361. the 
people do a..you, Cor. Il, 3, 151. thepeople will accept 
whom he --s. "rit. I, 222. 
4)to allow» to acknowledge» to grant: 
let me hot to the marrlage of truc minàs a. impedlments, 
Sonn. 116» 2. he --s hlm hot for his counsellor» Wiv. 
IX, 1» 5. a. no other way to save hls lire, Mens. ||, 4, 
88 (suppose that there were no other way). hear them 
speak whose tltle they a. John ll, 200. a. me Chorus to 
thls history, H5 Prol. 32. we must needs a. the means 
how tings are perfecteà, |» 1, 68. 
Admittanee, permission to enter» recep- 
tion: what a.? LLL ll, 80 (what reception did you 
meet with?), to give a. to a thought of fear, H4B IV, 
1» 153. crave a. to your majesty, H5 ||, 4, 66. Tire. 
I, 2» 122. 134. Hml. l|, 2, 51. Cymb. I, 
73. Peculiar expressions: ay tlre of Venetian a. Wiv. 
Il|» 3» 61 (received, in fashion at Venice). ofgreat 
a. ll» 2, 235 (admitted to the company and converse 
of great peons). 
Admonish, 1) to exhort» to warn: --ing that 
we should dress us fairlyfor out end, H5 IV, 1, 9. -- 
2) to instruet, to guide: ye cholce spirits that a. 
me» H6A ¥, 3, 3 (cf. Epistle to the Hebr. Viii» 5). 
Admonishment, 1) warning: to stop Ms ears 
against a. Troil. V, 3, 2.- 2) instruction, in- 
stru ctive comm uni c ation: thygrave --sprevail 
with me, H6A Il, 5, 98. 
Adtttonilion, warning: Mens. III» 2, 205. R2 
Il, 1, 117. 
Ado, 1) to do, to deal: no court, no father nor 
no more a. wlth that simple notMng, Cymb. III, 4, 134. 
2) bustle, troublesome business (cf.to do 
$chmidt, Shak¢sp¢are Lexlcon. 3. Ed. T.I. 

in Hml. ii, 2, 369): let us follow, to sec the end of this 
a. Shr. V, i, 147. here's a., to lock up honesty» Wint. 
11, 2, 9. here's such a. 19. cf. the title of the eomedy 
2[uch ado. 
3) more tumult and show of businessthart 
the affair is worth: he makes me no more a. but 
whlps me out of the chamber, Gent. lV, 4, 31. show the 
inside of your purse, and no more a. Wiut. IV» 4, 834. 
H4A 11, 4, 223. H6A 111, 2, 101. H6C lV» 5, 27. H8 
V, 3, 159. Tit. 11» 1» 98 OMs a.). IV, 3» 102. Rom. 
111» 4, 23. 
4) pains, diffieulty: till they have singled with 
much a. the cold fault cleanly out, Ven. 694. what a. 
here is to bring you together, Wiv. IV, 5, 128. blereh. 
i, 1» 7. Wint. 1, 2, 213. R2 V, 5, 74. Lr. IV, 5, 2. 
do», abbreviation of Adonis: Vert. 769. 1070. 
Pilgr. 76. 120. 
Adonis, a youth loved by Venus and killed by a 
boar: Vert. 3.68. 179 etc. Sonn. 53, 5. Pilgr. 44.74 
122. 143. Shr. Ind. 2, 52. thy promises are like  
gardens that one dag bloomed and fruitful were the 
ne»t. H6A i, 6, 6 (perhaps eoufounded witb the gm-den 
of King Alcinous» but sec 1)liny XIX, 19» 1)2 
Adoor; outa.out of door: Err. 11, 1,11. Cor. 
1» 3, 120. As to keep in adoor, Lr. 1, 4, 138, sec A. 
Adoors; outa.  out of doors: H4B 11,4,229. 
]Iml. 11, 1, 99. Oth. 11, 1, 110 (only in Q0- 1I. Edd. 
out of door and doors. 
Adopt, 1)to receive to the place of a ehild: 
Oth. 1, 3, 191. Joiued with heir: to be --ed heir to 
Frederlck, As I, 2» 246. R2 IV» 109. H6C I, 1» 135. 
i, 4, 98. 11, 2, 88. 
2) to reeeive as one's own what is hot so 
naturally: a tomannow --ed, Tir. i, 463. an--ed 
name H4A V»2,18. whlch you a. your polio.y, Cor. III, 
2» 48. new --ed to our hate» Lr. l, 1, 206. 
Adopledly, on the ground of adoption; 
used of a naine given in tenderness (cf. Adoption and 
!Adoptions): is she your cousin? a. Mens. I, 4, 47. 
Adoplion, 1) thc taking and treating a 
stranger as a child of one's own: a. striveswith 
natu. re, Ails !, 3» 151 (adopted children are no less 
loved than those given by nature), to work ber son 
into the a. of the crown, Cymb. V, 5, 56 (into the right 
of an adopted heir to the crown). 
2) the receiving or choosingsomething 
as one's own: stand under the a. of abominable terres» 
Wiv. il, 2, 309. those friends thon hast, and their a. 
tried, Hml. i, 3» 62. 
Adptius, hot properly belonging, but 
assumed in tenderness: pretty»fond, a. chrlsten- 
dores» Ails I» 1, 188. 
Adoration, worship, homage: As ¥» 2» 102 
Tw. 1, 5» 274. H5 IV» 1» 262. 
),dot'e, 1) to pay divine honours, to wor- 
ship: Lucr. 1835. Tp. Il, 2» 143. Gent. 11, 6, 9. IV. 
2, 131. Alls 1, 3, 211. Tir. I, 42. Il, 1» 61. V, 1» 83. 
Tire. IV, 3» 35. Lr. I, 4» 312. Cymb. III, 3» 3. Per. 
Il» 4» 11. 
2) fo love in the highest degree: Lucr. 85. 
Sonn. 7 7. Pilgr. 165. LLLV, 2,673. Tw.lI» 1,48. 
Il» 3, 196. 197. Il, 5, 115. R3 1» 2, 177. Ant. III» 2, 
8. Ill, 13» 114. Gent. IV, 4, 204. 
Adorer, worshipper: Cymb. i, 4, 74. 
Adorn, 1) tr. to deck, to decorate: Lncr. 399. 



18 

A 

Wint. l, 2, 39-'2. R2 V, 1, 79. H6A V, 4, 134. R3 l, 
2 258. Tit. l, 388. 
2) intr. to put on ornainents: whose men and 
dames sa jetted and --ed, t'er. I, 4, 26. 
Adorninss, o r n a in e n t s: ]er gentlewomen tended 
]er ït]ie eyes, and ruade t]elr bends a. Ant. 11, 2, 213; 
i. e. regarded her with such veneration as to reflect 
beauty on her, to Inake her Inore beautiful» by their 
looks. 
Adornment, ornainent: Cymb. 1I, 2, 26. I11, 
5, 140. 
A.4oting, in love: fcll a. Soun. 20, 10. 
,4owna, burden of a sang: Wiv.1, 4, 44; sec A. 
Adramadio, rite nmne given by Costard to Ar- 
Inado: LLL IV, 3, 199. 
Adrian, a naine: Tp. Il, 1, 28. Cor. IV, 3, 
Adriana, female naine: Err. II, 2, 114. I¥, 1, 
102. 109. 
Adrlano, a naine: LLLI, 1, 280. IV, 1, 89. V, 1, 9. 
.Idriatic, adj. concerning the sea east of 
Italy: te swelllng A. sens, Shr. I, 2, 74. 
.dulation, flattery: H5 IV, 1,271. 
Adnlerate, rb. to coininit fornication: 
she (riz Fortune) --s ]ourly with t5e uncle, John 
III, 1, 56. 
Adnlterate, adj. 1) unfaithful to the mar- 
riage bed: Lucr. 1645. Err. lI, 2,142. Hml. l, 5,4. 
2) unchaste, lcwd: w]j s]ould others' false a. 
eyes glve sahtatlon to mg Tortive blood? Sonn. 121, 
5. Ms foul a. heart, Coinpl. 175. t]ie a. ttastings, 
IV, 4, 69. 
Aduiterer, a fo r n i c a t o r (or a Inan unfaithful 
ri) his wife?): Lr. l, 2, 135. 
Adulteress, (trisyll. ; quadrisyll, in Tir.), a mar- 
ried woinan faithless to ber husband: Wint. 
Il, 1, 78.88. Il, 3, 4. Tir. Il, 3, 109. Lr. Il, 4, 134. 
Adulterous, nnchaste, lewd: Angelo is an a. 
tMef, Mens. V, 40 (a secret fornicator). Ant. III, 6, 94. 
Adnltery, 1) violation of the Inarriage 
bed: Mens. Il, 1, 82. Wint. III, 
1. V, 4, 33. V, 5, 186. 
2) fornication: Lr. IV, 6, 112. Blunderingly 
used by hirs Quickly: H5 Il, 1, 40. 
Advance, vb. 1) tr. a) to bring forward, to 
In a k e t o g o o n: your eyes a. straight bacl to France, 
YI5 V Char. 44. towards whlch a. the war, Mcb. V, 4, 21. 
b) to lift, to raise: a. that phraseless hand» 
Coinpl. 225. the fringed curtans of thlne eye a. Tp. 1, 
2, 408. a. their eyellds, IV, 177. iww he.ts under 
--d plumes, Tw. 11, 5, 36. never war a. his bleedlng 
sword» H5 V, 2, 382. lïf6A 11, 2, 5. R3 1, 2, 40. Troil. 
IV, 5 188. Cor. 1, 6, 61. II, 1, 178. Tit. 11, 1, 125. 
Roin. 11, 3, 5. Used of standards,  t o w a v e: I must 
a. the colours of my love, Viv. 111, 4, 85. a. your 
standards, LLL IV, 3, 367. these flags of France, 
that are --d here, John 11, 207. lïf5 11, 2, 19 9. H6A 
I, 6,1. H6B IV, 1, 98. R3V, 3,264, 348. Rare. V, 3, 96. 
c) toraiseto ahigherworthanddignity: 
mg low-decllned honour to a. Lucr. 1705. thon art all 
y art and dost a. as high as learnlng mg rude igno- 
rance, Sonn. 78, 13. Tp. l, 2, 80. Ails IV 5, 6. Tw. 
l, 4, 2. H4_B l, 3, 7. IV, 5, 207. H6A III, 1, 31. H8 
III, 2, 417. Cor. Il, 2, 60. Tir. I 238. 330. 393. Il, 
1, 4. IV, 2, 34. 157. Rare. IV, 5, 72. Tire. l, 2, 176. 
Hnfl. III, 2,215. Lr. V, 3, 28. Per. l, 1 154. IV, 4, 14. 
d) to bring to view to show: a. t]eirpride 

agalnst that power, Ado III, 1, 10. every one Ms love- 
feat will a. unto hls znlstress LLL V, 2, 123. y/ou da 
a. your cunning more and more, Mids. 111, 2, 128. 
2) intr. to march forward: Cor. I, 4, 25. 
Advancemen,proinotion to a big her place 
and dignity: Tp. Ii, 1, 268. int. IV, 4, 867. H4B 
V, 5,74. 84. H6AII, 5,69. 131,3,75. IV, 4, -°41. 
o  (Ff 
Hml. II1, 2, 62. 654. Lr. II, 4, _0. V, 3 68 
addition). 
Advantage, snbst, any îavourable condition or 
circumstance; 1) profit, gain: that sln by hlm a. 
should achleve, Sonn. 67, 3.for his a. Meas. 11, 4, 120. 
IV, 1, 24. lIerch. Il, 7, 19. Ails I, 1, 17. John Il, 
_o06. 577. IV, 2, 60. R21, 4, 41. H4AI, 1, 27. III. 
l, 109. YI5 IV, 1, 190. H6A IV, 6, 44. H6B III, 1, 
_'25. H8 I, 1, 193. Troil. Il, 2, 204. Lr. 111, 5, 13. to 
nale a. of to profit by: Gent. 11, 4, 68. to tale a. 
of, in the saine sense: Ven. Ded. 3. Wiv. 111, 3, 116. 
John I, 102. Il, 297. R2 Il, 3, 79. R3 IV, 1,49. Cor. 
II, 3, 206. l'er. l, 4, 66. to tale a. on= Vert. 405. 
2) condition favonrable to success: refer 
y/ourself to thls a.,first that y/our stay/ with hlm nay hot 
i be long, Meas. III, 1,255. for a. Ails l, 1, 215. 
herself, without other a. may lawfully/ 
106. the plots of best --s, John Il, 40. Tll use the a. 
ofmypower, R2 111, 3, 4. H4A IV, 3, 2. IV, 4, 28. 
78. V, 1, 55. H5 1, -0, 139. H6A 1, 4, 1-0. IV, 4, 19. 
Troil. V, 2, 130. Cor. IV, 1, 43. Caes. IV, 3, 210. 
Hml. 1, 2, 21. Lr. Il, 1, -')4. Oth. III, 1, 55. IV, 
179. Ant. IV, 11, 4. Cymb. I, 4, 140. IV, 1, 12. V, 
2, 11. V, 3, 15. 
3) favo urable opp ortunity: malte use oftime 
let hot a. slip Ven. 129. a maid of l)ian's this a. 
round, Sonn. 153, 2. all ]ind of arguments for his a 
still dld wae and sleep, Coinpl. 123 (according as he 
wanted); cf. I can change shapes 
H6C III, 2, 192 (according as it serres mg turn). 
the next a. will we take througMy, Tp. III, 3, 13. Wiç. 
III, 2, 36. Mids. III, 2, 16. Ails l, 1, 215. John III, 
4, 151. V, 7, 62,. H4A Il, 4, 594. H5 III, 6, 127. 
H6A Il, 5, 129. H6B l, 1, 242. R3 III, 5, 74. V, 3, 
92. Troil. III, 3, 2. Mcb. V, 4, 11. Oth. l. 3, 298. Il, 
1, 248. III, 3, 312. 
4) superiority: I have seen the hungrj ocean 
gain a. on te ]ingdom of the shore Sonn. 64, 6. a. 
feeds him fat, while men delay, H4A III, , 180. having 
saine a. on Octavlus» Caes. V, 3, 6. Ant. 1V, 7, 11. 
5) interest upon money: nelther lend nor 
borrow upon a. Merch. l, 3, 71. pald bacI with a. 
H4A Il, 4, 599. Metaphorically: with a. means topay 
thy love, John III, 3, 22. he'll remember with --s what 
feats he did that dag, H5 IV, 3, 50. 
Adanage, rb. 1) to yield profit, to bene- 
fit: out own doth little a. Tp. 1, 1,34. With an accus: 
what may a heavy groan a. thee? Ven. 950. Gent. III, 
2, 42. Mens. III, 1, 265. Tw. 1¥, 2, 119. H5 IV, 1, 
301. Tit. V, 1, 56. Caes. III, 1. 242. 
2) to increase by interest: --5g their love 
wlth interest of ten tlmes double gain of happiness 
IV, 4, 323 (M. Edd. --ing their loan). 
Advanageable, profitable, convenient: 
H5 V, 2, 88. 
Advantageons, nseful: every thing a. to lire, 
Tp. 11, 1, 49. a. care withdrew zne Troil. V, 4, 22 
' (perhaps a care to spy advantages; cf. Ails 1, 1, 215) 
AdvenCnre, subst. 1) hazard, chance, risk: 



A 19 

to tr.y the fa;r a. of to-morrow, John V, 5, 0-2. ai a. ---- 
at random: spoke ai a. H4B 1, 1, 59 (Q ai a venter; 
some M. Edd. ai a venture), ai all --s : at ail 
zards, eome what may: Err. 11, .'2,218. H5 IV, 1,121. 
by hard a. --- unfortunately: As 11, 4, 45. a. of: risk 
of: the a. ofherperson, Wint. ¥, 1, 156. 
2) hazardous and striking enterprise: 
As 1, 2, 187. II4A I, 1, 93. I, 2, 169. V, , 96. H6A 
1V, 4, 7. H6C IV, 2'2, 18. R3 V, 3, 319 (M. Edd. vert- 
turcs). Cymb. 111, 1, 82. IV, 4, 3. Ier. 1, 1, 22. 
3, 83. 
.¢dventure, rb. 1) to hazard, to risk: lwill 
hot a. my discretion so weakhj, Tp. 11, 1,187. bj 
both I oft found both, lIerch. I, 1» 143. 
2) to run the hazard: lwilla, fo be banished 
myself, H6B 111» _'2, 350. I dare a. fo be sent fo the 
Tower, R3 1, 3, 116. 
3) fo date; with an acc.: Zeander would a. 
Gent. II1, 1, 12'20. l'll a. the borrow of a week, Wint. 
1, 2, 38. what will jou a.? II, 3, 11;2. With an iuf.: 
wouldst a. fo mingle faith wùh him, Wint. IV, 4, 470. 
Pom. ¥, 3, 11. Cymb. I, 6, 172. 
4) intr. to try the chance, to ruu all ha- 
zards: I would a. for such merchandize, Rom. I1, 2, 
84. though peril ... on't, I would a. Cymb. Iii, 4, 156. 
With on,  to dare: then will thej a. on the explok, 
114A 1, 2, 192. 
_dvelllurous, daring, bold: H4A I, 3, 191. 
Tir.v, 3,112. Hml.ll, 2'2,333. Per. 1, 1,35. 11, 4, 51. 
dventurousl.v, daringly, boldly: H5 IV, 
4» 79. 
Adversary, 1) opponent, antagonist; in a 
suit at law: lIereh. IV, 1, 4. Shr. 1, .'2, .'278. In single 
combat: R2 I, 3, 92. H6A V, 5, 33. Lr. V, 3, 123. 
2) enemy: Ails 1/I, 6, 28. IV, l, 17. R2 1, 1, 
101. H4.tk lll, 2, 83. V, 5, 31. R3 I, 1, 11. 1, 3» 1"..)3. 
I11, 1, 182. IV, 4, 4 (Ff enemies). V, 3, 112. 166. 
Cor. IV, 3» 45. Rom. I, 1, 113. 
Misapplied by Mm Quickly: Wiv. 11, 3, 98. 
Fluellen pronounces athversary: H5 II!» 2» 65. 111, 6, 
98. 103. 
/kdverse (as for the acceut, sec Appendix 
1, 1) 1) opposed; in a law-suit: thj a. party 
is th.q advocate, Sonn. 35 10. on the a. side, lIeas. IV, 
6, 6. In single combat: tluj a. pernicious enemy æ R2 
I, 3, 82. 
2) hostile: fo adroit no traffic to out a. towns, 
Err. !, 1, 15. though tbne seem so a. Alls V, 1, 26. 
this a. town, Tw. V, 87. John 11 57. IV, .'2, 172. H6A 
I, 1, 54. R3 IV, 4, 190. V 3» 13. 
3) eontrary to one's wishes: grow this fo 
what a. issue if can, Ado 11, 2, 52. 
Adversely, offensively: if the dHnk /ou gh, e 
ne touch mj palate a. Cr. 11, 1» 61. 
.tdvers.it.v, misfortune, calamity: Gent.IV» 
1, 12. Err.ll, 1,34. 1V,4» 21. As 1I, 1, 12. H6AIV, 
4, 14. H6C III, 1, 24. Rom. II1, 3, 55. Oth. I, 3,274 
(--ies). Abstr. pro eoncr.: well said, a.! Troil. V» 1, 
14, i. e. mischievous and offensive creature. 
Advertise (advértise) 1) to inform: please it 
your grace to be --d the duke o.f York is newly corne 
from Ireland, tI6B IV, 9, 23. I-I6C 11, 1, 116. IV» 5, 
9. ¥__3, 18. R3 IV, 4, 501. Troil. I1, 2, 211. 
) 
to instruet, to assist with eounsel: 1 
do bend my speech fo one that tan my part in him a. 
Meas. 1» l, 42 (who is able to instruct me about the 

part I have to bear to him, or what I have to say to 
him). I u, as then --ing and holy fo your business, V, 
388. he mi.qht the king a. whether our daughter were 
legitimate, H8 I1, 4, 178. 
Advertisement, (advértisement) 1 ) i n t ci li- 
genee, i nformati on: thls a. is five days old, H4A 
111, 2, 172. 
2) instruction, advice: my griefs are louder 
than a. Ado V, 1, 32. that is an a. to a proper maid 
b Florence, fo take heed, Alls IV, 3, 240. yet doth he 
give us bold a. V4A IV, 1, 36. 
Adv|¢e, 1) counsel: Lucr. 1409. Compl. 160. 
Tp. V, 191. Gent. 111, 2, 89.94. Meas. 1 1, 6. IV, 1, 
8. V, 113 (bj whose a.). Alls I, 1, 224. 11, 1, 3. 
Wint. 11, 1, 168. IV, 4, 516. H6B I, 2, 72. R3 IV, 
2, 3. Troil. 1, 3, 388. Tir. 1, 228 (by my a.). IV, _'2, 
130. Meb. I11, 1, 21. IV, .'2, 68. Hml. 11, 1, 67. II, 2, 
145. Lr. 11, 1, 123. Oth. il, 3, 343. Ant. I, 3, 68. 
Per. I, 1, 62. by my a.  ifI may advise you, ifyou 
will be ruled by me: by my a., all humbled on y/out 
knees, you shall ask pardon of hls majesty, Tir. 1, 472. 
by mj a. let us impart what we bave seen fo Hamlet, 
Hnd. I, 1, 168. Dcnoting medical advice and attend- 
ance: a. is sportb».q while 5!fection breeds, Lucr. 907. 
I hope jour lordship goes abroad bj a. It4B 1, ? 109. 
111, 1, 43. Spiritual counsel: he wants a. lleas, lV 
2, 154.-- O. Edd. contound advice and advise. 
2) deliberite consideration: sohot aspeed 
with such a. disposed, John 111, 4, 11. that's hot sud- 
denly to be performed, but with a. and silent secrecj, 
H6B 11, 2, 68. she will file out engbes with a. Tit. 
11, 1, 123. Gent. 11, 4, 208. Alls 11I, 4, 19. Tit. IV, 
1,9:2. Cymb. 1, 1, 156. on a., on more a. : on re- 
flectiou, on better eonsideration: Gent. 111, 1, 73. 
Merch. IV, 2» 6. Shr. !, 1,117. Tir. I, 379. upon good 
a. R2 !, 3, 233. after more a. Meas. V. 469. with 
more a. Gent. 11, 4, ".-)07. on his more a. H5 11, 2, 43. 
ldvise, 1) to counsel; absol.: well hast thou 
--d, Gent. I» 3, 34. Shr. 1, 1, 41. Per. IV, 3, 51. to 
a. one: Meas. 11, 1, 259. II!, 1,260. IV, 6, 3. LLL 
V, 2, 300. Shr. !, 2, 44. IV, 4, 11. Alls 11, 3, 311. 
Tw. 11, 5, 165. Wint. 1, 2, 339. 350. H4B 1, , 153. 
H8 1, 1, 10.'2. 135. II, 4, 55. Tire. IV, 3, 457. Lr. IV, 
5, 29. Oth. 11, 3, 332. Cymb. I, 2, 1. 11, 3» 13. 111, 
2, 46. Per. 1, 1, 39. to a. one to sth. : that well might 
a. him to a caution» Mcb. 111, 6» 44. 1 a. you fo the 
best, Lr. 1, _'2, 188. a. the duke fo a most festinate pre- 
paration, 111, 7, 9. Vith for: a. the emperor for his 
good, Tir. 1, 464 (i. e. concerning his good, lais ad- 
vantage); cf. you shall a. me in all for Cleopatra, 
Ant. V, _'2, 137 (concerniug the affairs of C.). fo a. a 
thing: if you a. it, iXleas. IV, 1, 67. that rock that I a. 
ffour shunning, HS 1, 1, 114. With a double act.: this 
I will a. you, Shr. IV, .'2» 92. Used of spiritual adviee: 
--d Mm for the entertainment of death, Meas. 111, 2, 
225. a. him for a better place, IV, 2, 223. I ara corne 
fo a. you, IV, 3, 55. fi'iar, a. him, V, 490. 
2) to prevail on b y eounsel, to persuade, 
to fuie: let the friar a. you, Ado IV, 1, 246. he is 
---d by aught fo change the course, Lr. V, 1, 2. Par- 
ticularly in the imperative of the pass.,  take my 
advice, be ruled by me, take heed: Ven. 615. LLL 
1¥, 3, 368. Mids. 1, 1, 46. lIerch. 11, 1, 4?,. V, 234. 
Wint. IV, 4, 492. H4A IV, 3, 5. FI6B 1I, 4, 36. 118 
I, 1» 139. 145. Oth. I» 2 55. cf. R3 11, 1,107. 
3) to inform, to instruct: a. me where 1 
2* 



20 A 

ma`y ave such a ladder, Gent.III, 1 122. a. Mm, Ails 
1,1,81 (be his teacher). Hml. IV, 7, 54. 1 ope I need hot 
to a. `youfart]er, 11I, 5, 27. H8 1, 2, 107. Cor. V, 3, 
197. Mcb. 111, 1, 129. Lr. I, 3, 23. are`you --d? Shr. 
1, 1, 191 (did you hear? do you understand?). H6B 
Il, 1, 47. `you were --d lis ftes] was capable of wounds, 
H4B I, 1,172 (you knew very well, were well aware). 
bids `you be --d t]ere's nought in France t£at can be 
wit a nimble galliard won, H5 l, 2, 251. With of, -- 
to inform one of: --d b`y good intelligence of t]is pre- 
paration, H5 Il Chor. 12. 
4) refl. to consider: a. `you w]at `you sa`y, Tw. 
IV, 2, 102. bid th`y toaster well a. Mnself H5 III, 6, 
168. Tit. IV, 2, 129. Lr. Il, 1, 29. 
5) absol, in the saine sensc: la.y ad on leart, a. 
Rom. III, 5, 192. 
Advised, adj. (cf. AcisecO, considerate, de- 
li b erate, used of persous as well as things: t]e a. 
hcad defends itself, H5 I, , 179. t]e silver liver`y of a. 
age, H6B V, 2, 47. bade me be a. R3 Il, 1, 107. w]en 
t]e`y ]ad sworn to riais a. doom, Lucr. 1849. b`y a. re- 
spects, Sonn. 49, 4. wR] more a. watc], Merch. l, 1, 
142. more upon ]umour than a. respect, John IV, 2, 
214. wit] a. purpose, R2 1, 3, 188. Sometimes -- in 
one's sound senses, hot mad: I ara a. w]at 1sa`y, Err. 
V, 214. Preceded by well: mad or well a. Err. Il, 2, 
215. LLL V, 2, 434. John III, I, 5. R3 I, 3, 318. 
IV, 4, 518. Tir. IV, 2, I0. 
Advisedly, deliberately: Ven. 457. Lucr. 
180. 1527. 1816. Merch. V, 253. H4A V, 1, 114. 
Ad»-ising, subst, advice, counsel:fasten`your 
ear on n`y --s, hleas. III, 1, 203. 
Adocate, one who pleads the cause of 
nother: Sonn. 35,10. Tp.l, 2,477. Err. I, 1, 146. 
Vint. Il, 2, 39. IV, 4, 766. 768. V, 1, 221. R3 l, 3, 
87. Cymb. I, 1, 76. 
Advoeatiott, pleading: Oth. III, 4, 123. 
Aeacides, descendant of Aeacus: Shr. III, 1, 52. 
cf. H6B I, 4, 65. 
Aedile, title of a high officer in ancient Rome, 
represented by Sh. as a police-officer: Cor. III, 1,. 
173. 183. 214. 319. 
Aegeon, naine in Err. I, 1, 141. 158. V, 337. 341. 
Aegle (O. Edd. Eaglcs), a mistress of Theseus' : 
Mids. Il, 1, 79. 
Aentilia, wife of Aegeon: Err. V, 342. 345. 346. 
Aemilius (O. Edd. Emilius and .Emilllus), naine 
in Tir. IV, 4, 61. 104. V, 1, 155. 
Aeneas, the Trojan hero: Tp. I1, 1, 79. H6B V, 
2, 62. Troil. l, 1, 111. IV, 1, 2 (and passim). Tir. 
fil, _'2, 27. Caes. I, 2, 112. Hml. Il, 2, 468. Ant. IV, 
14, 53. Cymb. III, 4, 60. Alluded to in Tir. Il, 3, 22 
and V, 3, 80. 
Aenigma, see .Enig»m. 
Aeolus, the God of the winds: H6B III, , 92. 
Aeriai (Ff eriall, Qq a`yre all), e t h e r i a 1 : t]e a. 
blue, Oth. Il, 1, 39. 
Aery, the brood of an eagle: John V, 2, 149. 
R3 I, 3, 264. 270. there is az a. of cildren Hml. Il, 
2, 354 (alluding to a company of young actors, 
chiefly the children of Paul's and the children of the 
Revels, who at that rime were highly applauded). 
Aesculaplus, the God of physicians: Per. III, 2, 
111. Dr. Caius called so in jest: Wiv. Il, 3, 29. 
Aeson, father of Jason, restored to youth by 
Medea: Merch. V, 14. 

Aesop, the fabulIst, supposed to bave been hunch- 
backcd: H6C V, 5, 25. 
Aetna, the volcano in Sicily: Lucr. 1042. Wiv. 
III, 5, 129. Tit. III, l, 242. 
Açar, at a great distance: ma.y read te 
mot a. Lucr. 830. c]ase tlzee a. be]gnd Sonn. 143, 10. 
in strands a. remote, H4A 1, 1, 4. a. o.ff  1) at 
great distance: saw a. off" in t]e orc]ard riais 
a»iable encounte% Ado III, 3, 160. 2) indirectly: 
a kind of tender» nade a. off`b.y Sir Hug], Wiv. 1, 1, 
216. e w]o s]all speak for ]er is a. o.ff'guilt`y but t]at 
]e speaks, Wint. Il, 1, 104 (cf. Far-off`). 
Afeard, (Ff af raid in LLL V, 2, 582. ]Ierch. 1, 
2, 47. Troil. IV, 4, 84), afraid, being in fear: 
Tp. Il, 2, 106. III, 2, 142. 144. Wiv. III, 4, 2S. Shr. 
V, 2, 17. Wint. IV, 4, 453. 474. H4A 1I, 4, 402. 
]lcb. V, 1, 41. Cymb. IV, o, 94. to maAce a.: Mids. 
III, 1, 116. H6A IV, 7, 93. An inf. following: a. fo 
scratcI ]er foe, Lucr. 1035. John IV, :, 135. Caes. 
Il, 2, 67. Mcb. 1, 7, 39. Ant. Il, 5, 81. III, 3, 1. A 
clause following: a. se will do a desterate outrage 
Ado Il, 3, 158. Merch. Il, 9, 96. Alls V, 3, 153. HO 
IV, 1, 148. Rom. Il, 2, 19. Hml. V, 2 310. With 
at: H6B Il, 4, 89. With of  1) fearing: a. of 
.your four legs» Tp. 11 2, 62. 148. ]ids. 111, 1, 28. 
Shr. V, 2, 19. Mcb. l, 3, 96. 2) anxious about: 
fo be a. of n`y deserving, Mcrch. Il, 7, 29. 
/kffability, k i n d n e s s: ]er a. andbas]fulmodest`y 
Shr. Il, 49. `you do zot use me wit] t]at a. H5 III, -0, 
139. ide it in smiles and a. Caes. Il, 1 82. 
Affable, kind: t]at a. famillar g]ost, Sonn. 86, 
9. an a. and courteous gentleman, Shr. l,  98. 
gentle cooEerence, sort and a. Il, 253. wondrous a. and 
as bountiful as izines of India, H4A III, 1, 168. e 
was nild and a. H6B III, 1, 9. a. wolves» nee]c bears» 
Tim. III, 6, 105. 
Ail'air, any thing that is to be done, or in 
which a person or community is occupied 
orconcerned: Sonn. 57, 10. 151, 1- °. Lucr. 45. 
Gent. 1I, 4, 119. 185. III, 1, 59. Wiv. Il, 1 114. 
Meas. III, l, 56. l, 4, 87. Iii, 1, 159. Ado Il, l, 183. 
Mids. III, 2, ôT. Merch. Il, 6, 22. As Il, 7, 99. IV,. 
1, 47. Ails III, 2, 99. HB Il, 3, 2. H6A IV 1, 181. 
H6B 1, 3, 157. III, 1, 224. 320. tt6C IV, 6, 58. 
1, 3, 1-°2. IV, 4, 398 (Qq atternpt). H8 V, 1, 13. Troil. 
1, 3, 247. Cor. V, _'2, 88. Caes. III, 1, 135. hcb. 
3, 21. Hml. 1, 2, 16. 174. III, -0, 321. V, -0»379. Ant. 
III, 6, 63. IV, 6, 13. Cymb. III, -0, 52 etc. 
Affec¢, subst, inclination: ever.y man with 
--s is born LLL l, 1, 152. to banis] t]eir --s with 
Mm, R2 I, 4, 30. t]e .young--s Oth. l, 3, 264 (the 
desires of youth). 
,lre«t, vb. 1) to love: a lad`y w]om I a. Gent.. 
III, 1, 82. Wiv. Il, l, 115. IV. 4, 87. Meas. l, 1, 4. 
73. Ado I, 1 298. LLL l, 2, 92. 172. Shr. I, 1, 40. 
II, 14. Tw. Il, 5, -08. H4B IV, 5, 145. tt6A V, 5, 57. 
H6B III, 1, 375. H8 l, 1, 39. Il, 3, 29. Troil. Il» _'2, 
59. 60. 195. Tir. 11, 1, 28. Tim. I, 2, 30. 221. Lr. 
l, 1, 1. Cymb. ¥, 5, 38. 
2) to like, to be pleased with; absol, ma/ring 
peace or war as t]ou --est, Ant. 1, 3, 71 (-- as thou 
pleasest), trans.: I will sometldng a. tIe letter, LLL IV, 
2, 56 (delight in its iteration, by pïactising allitera- 
tion). ]ow dot `your grace a. teir motion H6A V, 
1, 7. noclc hot t]at I a. t]e untraded oat], Troil. IV, 
5,178. hot to a. man`y proposed matc]es» Oth.lll 3 229. 



A 

21 

3) fo aire at: --est a sheep-book Wint. IV, I 
4, 431. bave I--ed wealth or honour? H6B IV, 7, 
104. to a. the rnalice and displeasure of the people, 
Cor. II, 9., 94.. --s tyrannlcal_ power, III, 3, .1. 
one sole throne, IV, 6, 32. --ed the fine strams of bo- 
njour, V, 3, 149. stratagera rnust do that .you a. Tir. Il 
1, 105. 
4) to imitate in a eonstrained manner: 
lest if be rather thouht .you a. a sorrow than bave 
Ails I, 1, 60. 62. thou dost a. rn.y rnanners, Tire. IV, 
3, 199. a. a sauc.y roughness, Lr. II, 2, 102. Pro-tic. 
--ing, absol.,  full of affectation, given to false 
show: a drawllng--ing rogue, Wiv. 11, 1,145. llsplng 
--ing.fantasticoes, Rom. II, 4, 29. 
b) to resemble: the accent of Ms tongue --eth 
hlrn, John I, 86. 
..ffe¢ta|ion, artifieial show of what is hot 
natural: Wiv. I, 1, lb2 (Evans' speeeh). LLL V, 
1, 4 (Qq Ft affection). V, 2, 407 (O. Edd. affection, 
though it rh)nnes fo ostentation). Hml. II, 2, 464 (Qq 
ffection). 
.ffeeted. adj. (derived partly from the subst., 
partly from the verb affect) 1) absol, a) disposed: 
as I find ber, so ara I a. Wiv. III, 4, 95. I ara in all 
a. as.your self, Shr. I, 1, 26. no rnarvel, then, though 
he were ill a. Lr. II, 1, 100. -- b) assuming an 
artifieial appearanee: he is too picked, too 
spruce, too a. LLL V 1, lb.- e) in love: LLL 
II, 232. 
.'2) 'ith to æ  a) i n 1 o v e w i th : s tMne own heart 
fo thine own .face a.? Vert. 157. I stand a. fo ber, 
Gent. Il, 1, 90. -- b) inclined, disposed: how 
stand jou a. to his wish? Gent. l, 3, 60. that rnost 
are a. to these, LLL III, 26. how he doth stand a. to 
ourpurpose, I3 III, 1, 171. 
.Al'e¢|¢dly, Iovingly, with tender care: 
letters with sleided silk feat and a. enswathed, Compl. 
48. 
.¢ffe¢tion, 1) bent of mind, disposition: 
what warrath is there in .your a. towards an. of these 
suitors ? hIereh. I, 2, 37. level ai rny a. 41. the a. of 
obleness whlch nature shows above ber breeding, Wint. 
V, 2, 40. there grows in rny rnost ill-coraposed a. such 
a stachless avarice, ilcb. IV, 3, 77. Chiefly a feeling 
or natural impulse aeting upon, and swaying the mind : 
not one . . who rny a. put to the smallest teen Compl. 
192. b.y the a. that now guides e most, Meas. II, 4, 
168. thou hast neither heat, a., limb, nor beauty, I11, 1, 
37. with a. wondrous sensible he wrung JBassanio's 
hand, Merch. II, 8, 48. a., toaster of passion, IV, 1, 
50 (natural instinct, on which the disposition of the 
mind depends), a., thy intention stabs the centre, Wint. 
I, 2, 138 (natural propensity, thy powcr rules the 
inmost thoughts of men). with the least a. of a wel- 
corne  H4B IV, 5, 173./f this law of nature be corrupted 
through a. Troil. 11, 2, 177. doth a. breed it? Oth. 
IV, 3, 99. Plur. --s --- feelings, passions: threw 
--s in Ms power, Compl. 146..your --s would becorae 
tender, Tp. V, 18. in the working of .your own 
5Ieas. Il, 1, 10. bas he --s in hira? fil, 1, 108. war 
affanst .your own --s, LLL I, 1, 9. lierch. I, 1, 16. 
III, 1. 62. V, 87. Shr. IV, 4, 4?,. Wint. V, 1, 220. 
John V, _'2, 41. H4B IV, 4, 65. H5 IV, 1, 110. Rom. 
l, 1, 153. Il, 5, 12. Caes. Il, 1, 20. Oth. Il, 1, 45 
(Ff a.) IV, 3, 101. Ant. I, 5, 12. 17. 
2) love: a. is a coal that raust be cooled» Vcn. 

387. 569. 650. Lucr. 500. 1060. Tp. I, 2, 448. Gent. 
I, 1, 3. il, 1, 91. Wiv. Il, 2, 248. IV, 6, 10. Meas. 
I, 4, 48. III, 1, 249. Err. V, 51. Ado II, 1, 175. 382. 
Il, 3, 106. 127. 236. III, 1, 4. 55. LLL I, -% 63. 
IV, 3, 290. Mids. I, 1, 197. III 2, 230. llerch. Il, 1, 
22. As l, 2, 22. IV, 1, 212. -°15. Shr. I, 1, 165. fil, 
1, 76. Ails I, 3, 196. Tw. Il, 4, 38. Wint. l, 1, 26. 
IV, 4, 390. 492. V, 2, 111. H4B IV, 4, 22. V, 5, 17. 
H6A V, 1, 47. Troil. IV. 4, 6. Cor. V, 3, 24. Rom. 
Il Chor. 2. III, 1, 182. Tim. l, 2, 20-2. Caes. IV, 3, 
205. Hml. I, 3, 100. IV, 7, 19. Lr. l, 1, 223. I, 4, 
63. Oth. I, 1, 36. Ant. 11, 6, 139. I11, 9, 67.1[I, 13, 
7. Cymb. I, 6, 138. With to: ber a. unto .Benedick, 
Ado V, 4, 90. Shr. IV, 2, 23. H8 III, 2, 35. Lr. I, 2, 
94. Personified and masc.: a. is mg captaln, and he 
leadeth, Lucr. 271. Pire'al: rnade old offences of --s 
new Sonn. 110, 4. all these trophies of--s hot, 
CompL 218. fait encounter qf two raost rare --s, Tp. 
Ill, 1, 75. Err.l[, 1, 94. Ado Il, 3,231. As l, 3,-Ol. H8 
III, 1,129. Oth. l, 3,112.. Cymb. l, 1,82. Pet.Il, 5,77. 
3) inclination, tendeucy, wish: whatever 
cornes athwart his a. Ado Il, 2, 7. if is the king's rnost 
sweet pleasure and a. LLL V, 1, 93. hot rernoves ---'s 
edge in me, Shr. I, 2, 73. rainister unto the ppeHte 
and a. coraraon of the whole body, Cor. I, 1, 107. keep 
.you in the rear of .your a. IIml. I, 3, 34. Plut.: nice 
--s wavering stood in doubt if best were as à was, 
Compl. 97. r.y --s are rnost hurable, Tp. I, 2, 481. 
when the rlch golden shaft bath killed the flock of all 
--s else, Tw. I, 1, 36. let me wonder ai th.y --s, H4A 
I11, 2, 30. in speech, in gait, in diet, in --s of delight, 
H4B II, 3, 29. in his torab lie rny --s, V, 2, 124. H5 
V, 1, .'26. Cor. I, 1, 181. 11, 3, 239. Rom. I, 1, 133. 
Hml. III, 1, 170. 
4) affectation: wltt.y without a. LLL V, 1, 4 
(F.z.4 affectation). V, 2, 407 (where the rhyme de- 
mands affectation). Hml. 1I, 2, 464 (Ff affectation). 
Used by Evans as a verb: Wiv. I, 1, 234. 
Affectionate, loving, fond: Lr. IV, 6, 276. 
.&ffeetionalely, lovingly, Troil. III, l, 74. 
ffeelioned, full of affectation: Tw. II, 
3, 160. 
fl'eered, confirmed, sanctioned: Icb. IV, 
ô, 34.* 
.flianve. confidence: H5 II, 2, 127. H6B fil, 
1, 74. Cymb. l, 6, 163. 
.&flianced, betrothed: a. to ber by oalh, Meas. fil, 
1, 222. I ara a. th[s rnan's wife, V, 227. 
fliued, 1) related, joined by affinity: 
then the bold a»d coward seera all a. and kin, Troil. l, 
3, 25. 
2) bound by any ti e: bejude.ourselfwhether 
I in an. just terra ara a. to love the 3[oor, Oth. I, 1, 
89. if partiall. a., or leagued in office, thou dost de- 
liver more or less than truth, II, 3, 215. 
.ffinity, relation, or perhaps connexion 
ofany kind: of great farae in Cgprus and çreat a. 
Oth. III, 1, 49. 
.ffirm, to say Yes to, to maintain as true: 
their own authors a. that the lad Saliue is in Ger- 
man.y, H51,2,43. I raust hot blush to a. it, V, 2, 117. 
renege, a. Lr. II, 2, 84. I a. it is the woraan's part, 
Cymb. II, 5, 21. 
Affirmation, the act of affirming: upon 
warrant ofbloody a. Cymb. I, 4, 63 (of sealing the 
truth with his blood). 



22 A 

Affirmative, subst, the contrary to a negafive: 
four negatives rnake two --s, Tw. V, 24. 
Afflict, to give bodily or mental pain, to 
distress, to grieve, to mortify: Lucr. 975. 
Wiv. IV, 2, 233. Meas. III, 1, 11. As III, 5, 33. H6A 
!11, 1, 106. H6B II, 1, 18°. H6C I, 4, 38. R3 V, 
179. Cr. 1, 1, 20. Tir. I, 441. IV, 3, 62. lV, 4, 11. 
I{om. 11, 4, 34. Tire. IV, 3, 337. IIml. II, 1, 106. II, 
2, 17. Lr. I, 4, 313. Ant. 111, 6, 78. Cymb. IV, 
40. Wint.V, 3,75. --ed  distresed, unhappy, 
wretched: this--edfancy, Compl. 61. the--ed 
spù'its in the prison here, Meas. Il, 3,4. the vile prison 
of --ed breath, John III, 4, 19. he looks rnuch --ed, 
1-I8 II, 2, 63. 
&flli¢tion, 1) any painful sensation: man's 
nature eannot carry the a. nor the fear, Lr. Ill, 2, 49 
(the horrors of the thunderstorm). 
2) great suffering of the mind, misery: 
Tp.V, 22. 115. Wiv. V, 5, 178. LLL I, 1,316. Wint. 
111, 2, 224. IV, 4, 586. V, 3, 76. 1/613 III, 2, 301. 
lï[8 III, 1, 88. Rom. III, 3, 2. Tim. !11, 2 62. IV, 
44. V, 1, 213. ilcb. 11I, 2, 18. Hml. Ill, 1, 36. 
2, 324. IV, 5, 188. Lr. IV, 6, 36.75. Oth. IV, 2, 48. 
Cymb. Ili, 6, 10. V, 4, 108. Abstr. pro eoncr.: 0 
fa5" a. John III, 4, 36 (-- afflicted lady). 
fford, to yield, to graut, to offer; with 
an accus. : sornetime if (ber grief) is mad and too much 
talk --s, Luer. 1106. a. sorne present speed, 1305. 
every hymn that able spirlt --s, Sonn. 85, 7. 105, 12. 
ElX. Ill, 1, 24. LLL V, 2, 223. Shr. Ind. 1, 104. 
2, 13.14. R2 I, 1, 177. 1/4A III, 2, 78. H6A Ili, 1, 
148. H6BI, 1,30. 1/6CI, 3,37. 111, 2, 147. R31, 
2, 246. Ill, 5, 102. 1V, 4, 31. V, 3, 80. 118 1, 4, 18. 
Tir. III, 1, 44. 55. Iom. III, 1, 63. III, 4, 8. lV 
125. V, 1, 73. Vith a dat. and ace. : he can a. 
praise fo thee, Sonn. 79, 11. this commendation I can 
a. ber, Ado I, 1, 176. LLL IV, 1, 39. V, 2, 246. 
Wint. IV, 4, 16. H6C 111, 2, 165. R3 !, 4, 51. Tir. 
V, 2, 86. Tim. III, 2, 82. IV, 3, '2.53. Oth. I, 3, 114. 
we canot a. you so ( you shall hot corne off so 
cheap) Ails IV, 1, 53. 
. ffray, t o fr i g h t e n: Rom. Il I, 5, 33 (rhyming). 
&ffright, to terrify; tr.: Lucr. 971. 1138. 
ilids. V, 142. Wint. Ill, 3, 37. John IV, 2, 172. 114A 
I, 3, 104. H5 Prol. 14. 116A I, 4, 43. H6B III, 
47. IV, 1,33. V, 1,207. 1/6ClV, 7, 13. R31,3, 
227. 1,4,64. V, 3,308. Cor. l, 1, 172. Rom. V, 3, 
61. Caes. III, 1 82. Itml. II, 1 75. Oth. II, 3, 276. 
V, 2, 100. Per. I, 1, 29. Absol.: does death a.? 11613 
lV 1, 32. 
Affront, subst, fo 9ive the a.  to face the 
enemy: Cymb. V, 3, 87. 
Alfront, vb. to meet, to encouuter: a. hs 
eye, Wint. V, 1 75. --ed wlth the match and welght 
of such a winnowed purity in love, Troil. lll, 2, 174. 
that he may here a. Ophelia, Hml. lll, 1,31. your pre- 
paration can a. no less than what you hear of Cymb. 
IV, 3, °9. 
Affy, 1) to confide: I do a. in thy upri9htness , 
Tir. I, 47. 
2) to betroth: we be --ed, Shr. lV, 4, 49. to a. 
a mightylord unto the dau#hter of a worthless king,, 
11613 IV, 1, 80. 
.-field, (O. Edd. hot hyphened) in the field: 
keep m!l lambs a. H6A V, 4, 30. -- i n the fiel d o f 
battle: Troil. I, 1, 108. Ill, 1, 147. V 3» 67. 

Alire, ou fire, bnrning: Tp. I, 2, 212. Cor. 
V, 3, 181. Rom.lll, 3, 133. (o:]ïre in Wint. lV, 4, 60). 
Alloat, borne by the water, hot sinking: 
Sonn. 80, 9. Caes. IV, 3, 222. 
Afoot, 1) on foot: walked ten rnile a. Ado II, 
3, 17. R2 I, 1,63. H4AII, o, 13. '2.7. ô8.50. II, 3, 
87. II, 4,387. H6B V, .'2, 8. H6C V, 7, 18. Troil. V, 
5, 21. 
2) concerniug infantry: of what strength 
thcy are a. Ails lV, 3, 181. 
3) inmotion and action: the matlerbein#a. 
Mcas. IV, 5, 3. the garne is a. H4A I, 3, 278 0aunted 
np, started); cf. H5 III, 1, 32. these rebels now a. 
1/413 lV, 4, 9. H5 I, 2, 11. Cr. I, 2, °5. Caes. III, 
2, -065. Mcb. IV, 3, 185. Hml. I!I, 2, 83. Lr. IV, 3, 
51. to keep base lfe a. Lr. !I, 4, 218 (to sustaln). 
well a.  in good hcalth: Tit. 1¥, 2, 29. 
lfore, prep. 1) before; of place as well as 
rime: drive all thy subjects a. thee, H4A II 4, 152. 
with a renifler a. ber eles, H5 III, 6, ô2. something's 
a. if, Cymb. 111, 4, 81. a fortnlght a. Jl[ichaelmas, 
Wiv. !, 1, 212. I shall be there a. you, Lr. 1,5, 5 
(Qq before). 
2) in presence of, in the face of: here» a. 
heaven, I ratify tMs my rich gift Tp. IV, 1, 7. she 
rnakes out profession fo stlnk a. the face of the gods, 
l'er. IV, 6, 145. a. God!-- by God! R2 II, l, 200. 
238. Rom. ll, 4, 170. IV, o, 31. a. me! by my 
life, by my sonl: a. me, if is so late 12om. III, 4, 34. 
a. me, a handsorne fellow, l'er. 11, 1, 84 (cf Before 
 and Fore). 
fore, adr. before: if he have nevcr drunk wine 
a. Tp. II, 2, 78 (Stephano speaking). 
. fore, conj. b e f o r e: l'll forswear keepln# bouse, 
a. l'll be in these tirrits, H4_B II, 4,0-20 (Mrs Quickly's 
speech). 
lforehad, b eforehand, previously: know- 
ing a. of out merriment, LLL V, 2, 461. 
.foresaid (used ouly by Armado, Launcelot 
and Thersites), mentioned before: LLL I, 1, 
277. as a.  as I said belote : Merch. II , 8. Troil. 
II, 3, 64. 
lfraid, full of fear, in fear: Ven. 898. 
Pilgr..074. Wiv. l, 1, 304. lV, 1, 20. lIids. III» 1, 
1-07. III, 2, 321. Tw. III, 1, 142. John I¥. 3 5. 
H4A Il, 4, 406. 1/6B II, 3, 69. R3 I, 2, 43. l, 4, 65. 
111. Troil. IV, 4, 84 (Qqafeard). Caes. II, 2, 101. 
Oth. ¥, 2, 266. With of: Tp. I¥, 91. Err. lV, 4, 151. 
Tw. Il, 5, 156. III, 4, 42. John 1V, 1, 21. H4A ¥, 4, 
123. H6A I, 1, 26. R3 ¥, 3 215. hicb. V, 3 59. 
Hml. II, o, 359. With an inf. - fering, no 
having the courage: we are less a. to be 
drowned than thou» Tp.l, 1,47. a. fo speak» LLL¥,- °, 
582 (Qq afeard), not that I arn a. fo die, Alls lV, 3, 
°71. 11613 II, 3, 57. Rom. V, 3, 10. Mcb. II, o 51. 
lV, 3 165. V, 7 5. Aut. II, 3, 29. to be a., followed 
by a depending clause, -- to fear, to apprehend: 
I ara a. he will chastise me, Tp. V, 262. /r ara a. he 
will bave need of washlng, Wiv. III, 3, 193. I am much 
a. his rnother played false, lierch, l, 2, 47 (Qq afeard). 
I ara a. his thinkings are below the moon, H8 III, 2, 
133. Ado II, 3,158. Shr. V, 2,88. Alls II, 3, 95. Tw. 
lV, 1, 14. H4A III, 1, 145. V, 4, 126. Mcb. II, 2 10. 
Pecnliar expression: be hot of rny holy vows a. 
Compl. 179, i. e. be hot anxious or dista-ustful about 
my vows; cf. Fear» and Afeard. 



A 23 

Afresh, anew: Scnn. 30, 7. Shr. !, 1, 143. 
Wint. IV, 2, 28. V, 1, 149. 13 I, 2, 56. 
Afri¢, file continent to the scnth of the Mediter- 
ranean: Tp. 11, 1, 69. Cor. I, 8, 3. Cymb. I, 1, 167. 
Adjectively: parch in A. sun, Trcil. 1, 3, 370 (cf. 
Britain court Lethe whar.f, Rome gates, Tiber banks 
etc.). 
Al'rien, the saine: H4B V, 3, 104 (Pistol's speech). 
• ,fri¢an, subst, inhabitant of Afriea: Tp. 
II 1, 125. 
,-front, in front, direetly opposed: H4A 
II, 4, 222. 
Al'ter, prep. 1) behind, foIIowing, in pur- 
suit of: Venus' eye which a. him she darts, Ven. 
817. fly a. summer, Tp. V, 92. sent a. thee, Gent. I, 
3, 74. send a. the duke and appeal to him, lVleas. I, 2, 
178. a. him! IV, 3, 69. shut doors a..ou, Mereh. 1I, 
5, 53. IV, 1,396. V 216. Ails 11, 1,58. R2 V, 6, 
52 etc. Implying the notion of desire: he a. honour 
hunts, I a. love, Gent. I, 1, 63. will the# yet look a. 
thee Wiv. 1I, 2, 146. is lechery so looked a. lVleas. 
I, 2, 148. inquisitive a. one, Err. I, 1, 127. fo hearken 
a. the flesh, LLL I, 1, 2-90 (Costard's speeeh), hope 
hot a. it, As I11, 5, 45. look a. him, Tw. l, 5, 144 
(take eare of him). II6B 111, 1, 219. hlcb. V, 1 83. 
2) under, next to: a. God, thou set'st me free, 
H6C IV, 6, 16. 
3) la!er, posterior to: a. two days, Tp. l, 2, 
298. III, 2, 93. 148. Gent. Il, 1, 30. Il, 7, 37. III, -9, 
$2. 96. Meas. I, 2, 40 etc. a. alltMsfoollny, Iwould 
no! ]ave il so, hleas. I, 2, 71 (i. e. thongh this fooling 
may bave amnsed us). a. well entered soldiers Ails. 
11 ], 6 (quite a Latinism: afler having well entered 
npon out soldiership). 
4) according to, conformable to: infftated 
a. $ou, Sonn.53, 6. drawn a..ou, 98,12. e does no! 
talk a. t]e wisest, Tp. Il, 2, 76. ty complexion sMfts 
fo stranffe e.ffècts, a. the moon, lleas. III, 1, 25. hot 
ruade a. this downriyht way of creatlon, I!!, 2, 112. 
Ado !, 1, 69. LLL !11, 21. IV 2, 17. Tw. III, 4, 85. 
Wint. IV, 4, 183. 547. H4_B V, 2, 129. tt8 I, 3, 14. 
Troil. I11, 2, 209. Cor. I1, 3, 234. 238. V, 1, 46. V, 
6, 58. Tit. IV, 1, 70. Rom. I, 4, 8. IIml. II, 2, 555. 
V, 2, 187. Lr.l, 2, 107. Oth. 1, 3, 69. Cymb. l, 1, 
71. 11, 3, 5. IV, 2, 334 etc. Pompey says: l'll rent 
the fairest bouse a. three pence a bay, lVleas. II, 1, 255 
i. e. aeeording to, or at, the rate of three pente. 
Al'ter, adv. 1) behind, following, in pur- 
suit: and a. bite me, Tp. II, 2, 10. and a. do out 
work, 111, 2, 158. to post a. Gent. II, 3, 37. I must 
a. 11, 4, 176. l'il a. 111, 1,394. V, "2, 51.folloms a. 
Wint.iv, 1,28. H4A I, 3, 126. H6C 1I, 5, 136. Troil. 
V, 1, 105. Hml. I, 4, 89. IV, 4, 37 etc. a., a.! R2 
V, 2, 111. R3 I11, 5, 72. ttml. IV, 2, 33. 
2) in or at a later time: Luer. 1522. Wiv. 
III, 3, 246. bIeas. II, 2, 102. V, 168. 513. Ado I, 1, 
328. I, 2, 220. 12 II1, 1, 44. H6A III, 4, 45 etc. 
ever a. Tp. I, 2, 184. never a. Ven. Ded. 5. shortly 
a. Lucr. Arg. 14. a 9reat rime a. Tp. 111 3, 105. 
strai9ht a. Err. IV, 4, 143 etc. 
3) behind: lookinq belote and a. ttml. IV, 4, 37. 
Al'ter, eonj. subsequently to the rime 
when: a. they closed in earnest, they parted in jest, 
Gent. 11, 5, 13. Wiv. III, 5, 74. Err. V, .'261 etc. 
Followed by a present: a. myflame lacks oil, Ails I, 
2, 59. a. he scores, IV, 3, 253. ,4. that, see That. 

Af!er, adj. : an a. fleet, Oth. I, 3,35 (a fleet sent 
af ter). 
After-debts, debts called in at a later 
time? /re ne'er pays a., take il belote, Alls IV, 3 
255. But probably the hyphen is but a misprint. 
fler-diner, the rime just after dinner: 
an --'s sleep, bleas. III, 1, 33. an --'s breath, Troil. 
II, , 121. 
After-enquiry, see Afler-inqub'j. 
After-eye, vb. to look after: fo a. hbn, Cymb. 
I, 3, 16. 
&fl.er-hours, later limes: R31V,4,293. lom. 
11, 6, 2. 
After-inquiry, investigation: Cymb. V, 4, 
189. 
Al'ter-loss, a la!er Ioss, a future grief: 
Sonn. 90, 4. 
Al'ter-love, future love: Gent. III 1, 95. R2 
V, 3, 35. 
After-meeiing, later or second meeting: 
Cor. !I, 2, 43. 
.If|er-noon, the tine from the mcridian 
to the evening: Tp. 1II, 2, 96. Meas. IV, 2, 125. 
133. IV, 3, 87. Elï'. V, 47. LLL 111, 156. 163. IV, 3, 
376. V, 1, 95.98. lXIerch. I, 2, 93. II, 5, 27. Sln'. I, 
2, 278. IV, 4, 100. Ails V, 3, 66. John V, 7, 94. 
H4A III, 3, 224. H4B I, 2, 211. H6A IV, 5, 53. 
Cor. 1, 3, 76. IV, 5, 230. Rom. I, 1, 107. II, 4, 19_ 9. 
197. Mcb. I11, 1, 19. Hml. I, 5, 60. Figlu'afively: in 
the a. of ber best da!s, R3 I11, 7, 186. 
After-notlrisitment, 1 a t er fo o d : Per. I, 2, 13. 
After-supper, the time af ter supper: Mids. 
V, 34.* 
After-|imes, sncceeding times: H4B IV, 
2, 51. 
Aflervard, in snbsequent time: Gent. 111, 
2, 97. Meas. V, 478. Err. 1, 2, -98. Ado V, 4, 122. 
lXIerch. 1I, 1, 41. Alls !, 3, 121. 123 111, 7, 181. Cymb. 
1, 5, 39. 
,iferwrds, the saine: Sonn. 115, 4. V¢ir. I, 1, 
147. IV, 2, 91. Meas. IV, 3, 35. Ado 11I, 2, -95. IV, 
1, 3. P2 V, 3, 112. R3 I11, 1, 199. Troil. I1, 1, 123. 
IV, 5, 272. Tit. V, 3, 203. Caes. !I, 1, 164. Mcb. V, 
1, 7. Hml. 11, 2, 364. Ant. 11, 7, 85. Cymb. I11, 
1, 80. 
Afer-wrh (hot hyphened in O. Edd.)ange r 
breaking out at a later time: Ant. V 2, 290. 
Agaitl, 1) once more, a second time: they 
bave met a. Tp. I, 2, 233. il begins a. 395. I ne'er a. 
shall see her, 11, 1, 111 etc. etc. Absol.: !et a.! Tp. 
I, 1, 41. 111, -9, 38. --- tell it once more: H4B 1, 1, 
48. -- go once more : Cymb. IV, 3, 1. as lon 9 a. - 
twice as long: H6B IV, 3, 7. once a. - once more: 
Ven. 499. Tp. 111, 2, 44. IV, 1, 4. Gent. V, 4, 78. 
1-98. Wiv. IV, 4, 14. Meas. V, 270. Err. V, 130. Shr. 
Ind. 2, 77. John II, 389. IV, -9, 1. V, 4, 2. R2 I11, 
2, 5. H4AI, 3, 141. III, 1, 37. H5 I11,3, 7. V, 1, 
13. H6A 11I, 2, 19. H6B IV, 4, 14. H6C 1, 4, 44. 
11, 1, 183. 185. IV, 8, 53. H8 I, 4, 107. IV, 1, 1. 
Troil, Il, 2, 2. V, 2, 49. I{ml. 1, 1, 31 etc. 
-9) to the previons state; implying hot so 
ranch repetifion of an action as restitution to what 
w before: a torment which Sycorax could hot a. 
undo, Tp. 1, 2,291. we all were sea-swallowed, thouyh 
some cast a. I1, 1, 251 etc. Henee  baek: pa. a. 
Sonn. 79 8. Err. I, -9, 85. Mereh. I, _° r 87. fo yive a. 



24 A 

Tp. V, 168. Meas. II, 1, 107. bring a. Meas. IV, 1, 
5. As II, 2, 21. take a. Gent. Il, 1, 1-°4. Err. II e 
129. H6C V, 1, 37. haste.you a. Ails Il, 2, 74. she 
will speed ber .foot a. III, 4, 37. call the queen a. 
Wint. II, 1, 1-°6. Ant. II, 5e 79. ask a. John IV, 1, 
44. hie thee a. Ant. V, 2, 194. bear a. Cymb. V, 3, 82. 
Peculiar expr. : corne a. when you rnay e Err. III e le 41 
(i. e. this rime I ara not ai your service), nay, corne 
a., good Katee I ara a gentleman e Shr. Il, 217 (go, go, 
you are mistaken in me). Joined to back: call ber 
back a. Gent. I, 2, 51. I brought hirn back a. IV, 4, 
57. go back a. Err. II, 1, 75. Mids. I, 1,251. till 
ttarr!/'s back-return a. fo France, H5 Chor. 41. 
3) in return: who did not whet his teeth ai 
a. Ven. 1113. sitting on a bank, weeping a. the kng 
rny father's wreck, this music crept by me, Tp. I, 
• 390 (while I was answering with tears)Y could hot a. 
reply, Gent. II, I e 17_'2. curse a. Mids. V, 184. woobtg 
her until I sweat a. /Ierch. III, 2, 205 (in return, in 
eonsequenee of it). and I a., in Henr.y's royal narne, 
give thee ber hand, H6A V, 3, 160. the winds shall 
Mss ai thee a. H6B IV, 1, 78. Joined with back: 
Tp. I, 2, 150. cf. FI4B 111, 2, 187. Troil. IV, 4, 19. 
4) in one's turn, on the other hand, on 
the contrary: the one is my soverelgn e the other a. 
is rny kfisman, R2 II, 2, 113. and now a. of him that 
did hot ask, but rnock, bestow .your sued-for tongues, 
Cor. II, 3, 214. 
5) moreover, besicles, further: a., ifany 
SyracuMan born etc. Err. I, 1, 19. and a., sir, shall 
we sow the headland wlth wheat? H4B V e 1, 15. H8 
III, 2, 101. ?roil. I, 3, 64. Oth. I, 3, 21. 
Agailtst (Ci'. 'Gainst), prep. 1) towards, to; 
denoting a direction in general, with or without 
contrariety; a) used of place: a. rny heart he set 
sword, Lucr. 1640. the cry did knock a. rny ver heart, 
'p. I, 2, 9. she is too bright fo be looked a. Wiv. Il, 
2, 254. spurred hls horse a. the steep uprising of the 
bill, LLL IV, 1, 2. thou a. the senseless winds shalt 
grln b vab, H6B IV, 1,77. casts his eye a. the rnoon, 
I:I8 III, 2, 118. rn.y duty, as doth a rock a. the chidin 
flood, should the approach of this wild rlver break, 
197. just a. thy heart make thou a hole, Tir. III, 2, 17. 
the leafy shelter that abuts a. the island's side, t'er. 
V, 1, 51. Hence almost  at, before: as soon de- 
cayed and done as is the dew a. the splendour of the 
sun, Lucr. 25. a. love's tire fear's 'ost hath disso- 
lution, 355. if att9ht in me worthy pernsal stand a. 
th.y sight, Sonn. 38, 6. boughs which shake a. the cold, . 
73, 3. rnake water a. a wornan'sfarthingale, Gent. IV, 
4, 41. beauty is a witch, a. whose charrns faith rnelteth 
into blood, Ado II, 1, 187. till I break rny shins a. 
As II, 4, 60. he shall be set a. a brickwall, Vint. IV, 
4, 818. a. thls fire do I shrink up, JohnV, 7,33. lean 
thy back a. rn.y arm, H6A Il e 5, 43. set your knee a. 
rn.yfoot, III, 1, 169 (kneel down ai my feet), a. the 
Capitol I met a lion, Caes. I, 3, 20. sinein his pate 
a. the burnbg zone, Hml. V, 1, 305. stood a. mg fire, 
Lr. IV, 7, 38. cf. Cor. 1, 9, 30. Oth. II, 3, 382. 
b) nsed of time, --- s h o r t I y b e fo r e, and nsually 
in expectation of: nore clarnorous than a parrot 
a. tain, As IV', 1, 152. every one doth so a. a chanqe» 
R2 III, 4, 28. a. ill chances rnen are ever merry, tt4B 
IV, 2, 81. l'Il spring up in his tears an 'twere a nettle 
a. lI[ay Troil. I, 2, 191. rnen shut thelr doors a. a 
setting sun Tim. I, 2, 150 (quibbling). to disfurnish 

rnyself a. such a good time, III, 2, 50. a. sorne storrn, 
a silence h the heavens Hml. II, 2, 505. with tristful 
visage, as a. the doom, III, 4, 50. As denoting provi- 
sion and care taken in expectation of an event,  
fo r: a. this corning end.you should prepare Sonn. 13, 
3. a. that tlme do I ensconce me here, 49, 1. 5. 9. I 
must ernplo.y you in some business a. out nuptial, Mids. 
I, 1, 125. bave toiled thelr rnernories a. your nuptial, 
V, 75. I was prornised them a. the feast, Wint. IV, 4, 
237. prepare ber a. this wedding-day, Rom. III, 4, 
32. fo prepare hirn up a. to-rnorrow, IV, 2, 46. 
e) in a moral sense,  towards, to: rny love 
and duty a. .your sacred person, II8 II, 4, 41. it is 
hypocrlsy a. the devil, Oth. IV, 1, 6. 
2) in opposition or repngnanee to: Tp. I, 
1, 62. I, 2, 158. II, 1, 106. I11, 1,31. III, 3 e 75. IV e 
141. 202. Gent. I, 2, 43. 111. I, 3, 83. 1II, 1, 247. 
III, 2, 26. 41 etc. etc. the doors are ruade a. you, 
Err. III, 1, 93. IV, 3, 90. Tw. V, 404. Tire. I, 2, 
150. Meb. I, 7, 15. La', II, 4, 180. l'll stop mine ears 
a. the rnermaiars song, Err. III, 2, 169. Troil. V, 3, 2. 
Cor. V, 3, 6. shut his bosorn a. out praers, Ails III, 
1, 9. a. the blown rose rnay they stop their nose Ant. 
III, 13, 39. we rnust do good a. evil, Ails II, 5, 53. 
let there be wdghed your lad#'s love a. some other 
rnald, Rom. I, 2, 102. rnysel.f, a. whom 1 know rnost 
faulls, Aslll, 2, 298 (i. e. against whom 1 know most 
faults fo object), er. Cor. III, 1, 10. 
Against, conj., in expectation of, andpro- 
vision for the rime when: a. my love shall be 
with time's injurious hand crushed... Sonn. 63, 1. 
1"Il charm his eyes a. she do appear, Mids. III, 2, 99. 
bid the priest be ready fo corne a. you corne, Shr. IV, 
4, 104. I would be ail, a. the worst rnay happen, H8 
III, 1, 25. and see them ready a. their rnother cornes, 
Tit. V, 2, 206 (Ff .qainst). in the rnean tirne, a. thou 
shalt awake, shall Romeo by rn.y letters know out drljT, 
Rom. IV, 1, 113. 
Agamemnon, the leader of the Greeks before 
Troy: H4B II, 4, 237. H5 III, 6 e 7. tt6C II, 2 e 148. 
Troil. 1, 2, 267 (and offert). 
Agate, a stone of the flint kind, often worn 
in rings, with little figures cut in it: hls heart, like 
an a., with your print impress'd, LLL Il e 236. Serving 
as a symbol of smallness: Ado III, 1, 65. H4B I, 
2, 19. 
Agate-rig: II4A 11, 4, 78. 
Agate-stone: Rom. I, 4, 55. 
Agazed, furnished, as it were, with gazes, 
gazing, lookingwith amazement: allthewhole 
arrny stood a. on hirn, H6A I, 1, 126. 
Age, the period of rime assigned to sth., 
lifetime, duration in general:peaceprocla5ns 
olives of endless a. Sonn. 107, 8. the stretching of a 
span buckles in his surn of a. As III, 2, 140. an a. of 
dlscord, H6A V, 5, 63. we shall hardly in out --s 
see, Cor. III, 1, 7. wkhin rn.y a. ( during my lifetime) 
IV, 6, 51. 
2) a generation of men, a partieular 
period of time, as distinguished from others: this 
pattern of the worn-out a. Luer. 1350. the golden a. 
Lucr. 60. Tp. Il, 1, 168. the old a. Sonn. 127, 1. 
Tw. II, 4, 49. the a. to corne, Sonn. 17, 7. 32, 10. 
101, 12. 10t, 13. Wiv. I e 3, 9- ° . IVe 4, 37. Ado V, 2. 
80. As fil. 2, 240. John I, 213. H4B IV, 4, 46. lïi6A 
II, 2, 10. Il, 5 6. R3 III, 1, 73. Yiml. III, 2, 26 etc. 



A 2 

Coming near the sense of ce»tut.y: one poor retlrin.q 
tninute in an a. Lucr. 96'2-. some three --s since, LLL 
I, 2, 117. this long a. of thrce hours» Mids.¥, 33. how 
manif --s hence, Caes. III, 1, 111. 
3) the period of life, ai which a person is 
arrived: stro»# youth in hls nffddle a. Sonn. 7, 6. as 
wlth a. his bod.y u#lier #rows, Tp. IV, 191. to clothe 
mine a. with an#el-like perfection, Geatl. I1, 4, 66. ail 
--s, Meas. Il, 2, 5. Wint. IV, 4, 740. hot be manif 
hours of a. more, R°, ¥, 1, 57. sixteen years of a. 
Cymb. IV, 2, 199 etc. 
4) a stage of lire: his acts beln# seven --s, As 
1I, 7, 143. 
5) the period when a person is enabled 
to do certain aets for hinself: he beb# ofa. 
to #orern: tI6B I, 1, 166. 1 ara of age to keep nffne 
own, Tit. IV, 2,104. to corne to a.  to corne to one's 
majority. II4A I, 3, 253. II6B I¥, 2, 1,53. Rom. I, 
3, 56. 
6) an advanced peïiod of ]iïe: nor wronff 
»fine c. {,as elder brother) with thls indignit.y, Tir. I, 8. 
thy prbne of manhood darlng, thg a. confirm'd, proud, 
subtle, R3 IV, 4, 171. Mostly the latter part of life, 
oldness: Ven. 941. 1148. Lucr. 14.'2. 275. 603. Sonu. 
3, I1. 11.6.6.'2, 14. 63, 5. 108,10. 138, 12. Compl. 
14. 70. Yilgr. 1,57. Tp. I, 2, -'258. Gentl. I, 3, 15. 11I, 
1, 16.74. Meas. III, 1, 32. 130. Err. II, 1» 89. ¥, 329. 
Ado II, 3, 248. III, 5» 37. LLL IV, 3, 244. Merch. 
IV. 1. '2-71. Wint. IV, 4, 78 (out--s). II6A II, 5, 1. 
H8 IV, _'2» 67. Tire. III, 5, 80 etc. 0/d a. Lucr. 1759. 
H5 IV, 3, 44. V, ,'2, _'248. 
Abstr. pro coner.: a., thou hast lost thy labour 
(= old man), Wint. IV, 4, 787. let me embrace thine 
a. Tp. V, 121. 
Used as a mase.: Sonn. 63, 10. 
Aged, old, of things as well as persons: Lucr. 
855. Meas. III, 1, 35. Wint. V, 3, 29. R2 II, 1, 7.'2. 
, 74. H6A II, 5, 6.43. It8 V, 5, 58. Cor. III, 1,178. 
Tir. I!I, 1, -'23. 59 (Q2 Ff noble). IV, 4, 96. V, 2, 130. 
Tire. V, 1, 175. V, 3, 8. Lr. lV, 2, 41. IV, 4, .'28. 
Cymb. I. 1, 157. out a. = our old men, Tire. V, 1, 
179. et. thin.qs. Lucr. 941. a. ears, LLL II, 74. a. custora, 
Cor. II. 3, 176. fo be a. in an S kind of course --- to 
adhere to old customs, Meas. III, 2,238, er. Tim.V, 3, 8. 
A. cramps  cramps such as old people are wont 
to surfer, Tp. IV, 61 (cf. Lucr. 855, and Old). mg 
a. eloquence  the eloquence of my age, Gentl. III, 
1» 83. a. honour  honour in age, All's I, 3, -'216. a. 
contusions, H6B V, 3» 3. a. night  night of old age» 
R3 IV, 4, 16.*a. wrlnkles, Tir. III, 1, 7. a. t.yrann.y, 
Lr. I, 2, 59. a. patience, Per. II, 4, 48. 
Agenor, the father of Europa, Shr. I, 1, 173. 
gent., 1) he by whom somethiug is ef- 
fected: this entertalnment may well become the a. 
Wint. I, 2, 114. niht's black --s to thelr pre.ys do 
rouse, ,lcb. III» .'2, 53. 
2) the instrument by whose help something is 
effected: beln# the --s, or base second rneans, H4A 
I, 3» 165. as the a. of out cardinal, fo second all 
plot, 1-18 III» 2, 59. thus is the poor a. despised, Troil. 
V, 10» 36. cf. H6B III, 2, 115. Cymb. I, 5, 76. Used 

Aggravate, 1) to make greater: to a. th.y 
store, Sonn. 146, 10. I will a. m. voice, Mids. I, 
84 (Bottom speaking). 2) to make worse: 1 will 
a. his style, Wiv. II, 2, 296. th« more to a. the note, 
R2 I, 1, 43. Used wrongly by Mrs. Qnickly, H4B I1, 
4, 175. 
Aggrieved (Fluellen pronounces a##rlefed), 
pained, offended: I15 IV, 7, 170. 
Agile, nimble: his a. arm, Rom. III, 1, 171. 
Agineor|, the battlefield of Henry V: H5 Prol 
14. IV Cor. 52. IV, 7, 92. 
Agilation. emotion, disturbance: in this 
slumbery a. Mcb. V, 1, 1. -- Launcelot uses it for 
co9itation , Merch. III, 5, 5. 
Aglet, tag of a point or lace, pin; some- 
times with a hcad formcd into a small figure: rnarryl 
hbn fo a pnppet or an aglet-baby, Shr. l, 2, 79, i. e. 
such a small figure on a pin. 
Agnize, to own with pridc, to enjoy: 
I do a. a natural and prompt alacrit!/, Oth. I, 3, 232. 
=o, past, gone, reckoning rime from the 
prescrit:four days a. LLL I, 1, 1'2-2. As II, 7, 24. Shr. 
III, 1, 69. IV, 4, 4. Tw. I, .'2, 31. I. 5, 282. ¥, °,22 (but 
so laie a.). 414. Wint. l, 9,451. IV, 4, 300. JohnV, 8, 
11. R2V, 1,42. II4AI, 1,_96. II, 3,69. II, 4,346. H4B 
II, 4, 93. III, .'2, _°24. H6C 1I, 1, 104. R3 V, 8, 279. 
H8 III, 1, 120. Tir. IV, 2, 28. Rom. I, 5, 42. I11, 4, 
7. Tim. 1II, 2, 12. IIml. I!I, .'2, 138. Lr. II, 2, 31. 
Oth. IV, 1, 8E. Cymb. V, 4, 154. how long is if a.. 
H4A I1, 4, 360. Cymb. I, 1, 61. 
Agotte -- ago: lon a. Gentl. III, 1, 85. an hour 
a. Tw. V, -004. 
Agony, pangs of death: charm ache with ai:', 
and a. wlth words, Ado ¥, 1, 26. LLL ¥, _'2, 867. 
H6C ¥, 5, 39. R3 I, 4, 42. IV, 4, 163. H8 II, 1, 33. 
Agood, heaïtily: I rnade ber weep a. Geufl. 
IV, 4, 170. 
Agree, 1) to be in concord: f music 
sweet poeoy a. Pilgr. 108. LLL II, _°25. Merch. II. 
2, 107. H4A I, 2 1.'26. II6B IV, 2, 81. Heuce to 
be consistent, to be of one mind, not to 
diffcr: our jarrin# notes a. Shr ¥, 2, 1. how can 
these conrarietles a.. H6A II, 8, 59. Cor. II, 1,228. 
Caes. I¥» 8, 176. Followed by wlth: --in# with the 
proclamation, Meas. I, 2, 80. Err. II, 2, 170. Shr. 
2, 168. Wint. I, 1, 41. tI4B V, 5, 189. H6B I, 1, 
11_'2. Tir. I, 306. V, 3, 165. Rom. III, 2, 10. 
2) to become of one mind, to come to 
o n e o p i n i o n: a. whose hand shall #o alonff, "fit. 
I!I, 1, 17,5. Followed by upon: ere we eau a. upon the 
first place, Tire. III. 6, 76. heard if --d upon that the 
prince should woo lero, Ado I, 3, 64. Transitively 
in the passive ( to stipulate): if is thus --d that 
peaceful truce shall be proclaimed, H6A V, 4, 116. 
H6B I, 1, 43. 57. if stands --d b.y all voices, H8 
3, 87. fo be --d  to have corne to a compromise: 
I ara--d, Shr. I, 1, 147. conclude and be --d R2 
1» 1,56. the traitors are --d, H5 II Chor. 33. are flou 
all --d? H8 ¥, 3, 91. thus we are --d, Ant. II, 6, 57. 
are lou--d? Meas.IV, 2,51. how--d? I¥, 1»65. --d! 
( donc!) tt6AII, 1,33. Cor. I, 4,2. Cymb. I, 4, 182. 

of the organs of the body: his other --s aire at like 3) to yield assent: unwillin# I--d, Err. I, 1, 
dell#ht, Yen. 400. Cr. I» 1, 1.'26. Mcb. I, 7, 80. I 61. I-I6B I, 1, 218. H6C III, 3, 241. tt8 13fol. 10 
3) the substitnte, deputy: here is ber hand, I Rom. I, 2, 18. Followed by fo: a. to any covenants 
the a. of ber hearG Gentl. I, 3» 46. tMs un#enltured H6A ¥, 5, 88. By with: a. with h;s demands fo thé 
a. Meas. Ill, 2» 184. Ado II» 1» 17. John II» 87. point, Meas. III, 1, 254. 



26 A 

4) to suit, to be appropriate: if --s well, I 
Wiv. 1, 1, 20. druqs fit, and rime --ing, Hml.! 
III, 2, 266. nothinq else with Ms proud slght --s, Yen. 
288. his mood wth nought --s, Lucr. 1095. jour 
appetites do hot a. wlth it, H5 V, 1, 28. 
Agreement, 1) union of mind, consent: 
such assurance as shall with elther part's a. stand, 
Shr. IV, 4, 50. 
2) compact, stipulation: upon a. Jrom us 
to his likbg, 8hr. I, 2, 183, i. e. if he is pleased with 
what we stipulate, upon some a. IV, 4, 33 upon a. 
H4A I, 3, 103. 
Agrippa, 1) llenenius A. Cor. !, 1, 52. 
Vipsanius A. Ant. II, 2, 17. 119. IV, 6, 1 and passim. 
Aground, on the ground, stranded: we 
run ourselves a. Tp. I, 1, 4. 
Ague, eold lits of lever: burnlng revers, 
--s pale andfabtt, Ven. 739. Tp. I!, 2, 68.97. 139. 
Mereh. I, 1, 23. John !!!, 4, 85. R2 I!, 1 116. 1:I8 
I, 1, 4. Troil. III, 3, 232. Caes. !!, 2, 113. The a. 
Meb. V, 5, 4. Plurah Ven. 739. II4A I!I, 1, 69. IV, 
1, 112. Tire. IV, 3, 137. 
• t.guecheel% naine: ,Sir Andrew A. Tw. I, 3, 18. 
III, 4, 210. 187. 
Agued, struek with an ague, ehilly: pale 
with flight and a. fear, Cor. I, 4, 88. 
P, guefa¢e for A#uecheek: Tw. I, 3, 46. 
Ague-fit, a paroxysm of eold: thls a. of 
fear, R2 111, 2, 190. 
Ague-proof, able fo resist the causes 
whieh produee agues: Lr. IV, 6, 107. 
Ah, an interjection expressive of vm'ious af- 
fections, except that of unqualified joy and satàs- 
faction, llostly an exclamation of mental suffering, 
of pity, of complaint, of painful surprise: Sonn. 9, 3. 
34, 13. 44, 9. 67, 1. 104, 9. 139, 9. Compl. 155. 
lilgr. 391. Genfl. II, I, 5. Err. II, 2, 126. IV, 2, I. 
LLL IV, 2, 110. A]l's III, 4, 18. John III, 3, 54. 
H6B II, 4, 23. 27. 58. III, 1, 74. 189. III, 3, 5. IV, 4, 
41. H6CI, I, 167. 1,3, I. V, 2,5. R3 IV, 4,9etc. 
etc. Sometimes of entreaty and deslre: Sonn. 90, 5. 
Pilgr. 155. Mids. I, 2,55 etc. Or, on the other hand, 
of contempt, anger and threat: Pilgr. 56. Tw. II, 5, 
41. H6A II, 4, 104. H6B IV, 7, 27. IV, I0, 28. Hml. 
I, 2, 135 (ahfie!). Ant. III, 13, 89. In R3 I, 3, Il. 
II, 2, 27.34. 72 Ff ah, Qqoh; in R2 II, I, 163 Ff oh, 
Qq ah. In Ado I!I, 5, 26 (all thg tediousness on 
ah?) it is the modern Eh. Ah mel Rom. V, 1, 10 (as 
M. Edd. generally a-ite for A.y me! which is the 
usual reading of O. Edd.) 
Ah ha! expresses triumph nlixed with some con- 
tempt: Wiv. I!, 2, 158. Tw. I!I, 4, 104. R3 III, 7, 71. 
H8 1, 2, 186. Rom. !, 5, 20. Hml. !, 5, 150. Ant. II, 
5, 15. In Troil. IV, 2, 82 Qq bave ah ah! Ff less 
aptly ah ha! In Ado III 3, 90 Dogberry ejaculates 
tta ah ha! 
A-height, to the height, up: look up a. 
IV, 6, 58. 
A-high, the saine: one heaved a. R3 IV, 4, 86. 
A-hold, a nautieal terre: lay ber a.! Tp. I, 1, 52. 
evidently purporting an order to keep elear of the 
land.* 
A-hungry, for hungry, nsed by Slender, Wiv. 
I, 1, 280, and Sir Andrew, Tw. II, 3, 136; Mareius 
even says an hunçr.y, Cor. I, 1, 209, in imitation of 
the populace. But er. St. lIark !I, -05. 

Aid, subst., assistance of any kind, suc- 
cour: Sonn. 86, 8. Lucr. 1696. Ails I, 2, 7. Wint. 
IV4,638. R2 II, 3, 150. H6A I, 1,143. IV, 4,23. 
29. H6B IV, 5, 7. H6C lll 1, 43. III, 3, 148. 2.'20. 
R3 V, 3, 173. HS I 2, 114. Ant. !!, 2,88. Cyrnb. V, 
4, 43. for a. -- to seek assistance: H6A IV, 4, 11. 
H6CIll, 1,28. Tit. IV 3, 15. in a. Ant. V, 2, 27. 
the good a. All's I11, 7, 11. raislng of more a. ( 
assistants) Err. V, 153. with a. ofsoldlers H6C il, 1, 
147. II6B IV 5 4. Hml. IV 1, 33. 
A. of one or sth. either -- the assistance given by 
one or sth.: expecting the a. of Buckingham: R3 IV, 
4, 438. a lack of Tbnon's a. Tire. V, 1, 150. with the 
a. of use, hIcb. I, 3, 146. b whose a. Ven. 1190. Tp. 
V 40. keep them f,'om th.y a. Lucr. 912. onn. 79, 
1. Tp.V, 143. All'sl, 3, 24- ° • V3,329. John il, 
584. H4A V, 1, 46. II6A !, _'2, 82. IV, 3, 12. H6C 
!!!3,32. R3 IV, 5, 5. Cor. V, 1,33. Cymb. V, 4, 
43. l'er. III, 2, 35. Or the assistance given fo one or 
sth. : in a. whereof we will raise a mlght.y sure» I:I5 I, 
2, 132. in his poor heart's a. Lucr. 1784. be mj a. 
Tw.I, 2,53. the.y will be ai Ms a. H6AIV, 4, 41. 
flock to their a. R3 IV, 4, 507. to out a. Cor. I 7, 3. 
upon his a. Mcb. lll 6, 30. 
Phtrah surmlse of--s incertab b H4B I, 3, 24. 
all --s, themselves ruade fab'er b.y the& place, Compl. 
117, i. e. things serving to set off his person." 
Aid, rb., to assist: to a. me with th.y counsel, 
Gentl. I!, 4, 185. Wiv. II!, 5, 150. All's V, 1, 20. 
Wint. III, 2, 21. tI6A IV, 3, 44. V, 3, 7. H6C !!, 5, 
76. R3 !!, 2, 63. V» 3, 93. Cor. I, 6, 66. 
Absolutely: heaven --ing, Ails IV, 4, 12. dem d ber 
--ing hand, R3 1, 3, 96. With an inf.: --ed to expose 
the child, Wint. V, 2, 77. 
Aidanee, assistance: when it is barr'd the a. 
of the tongue, Ven. 330. attracts the saine for a. '#abst 
the encre.y, H6B !11, 2, 165. 
.ridant, helpfuh be a. and remedlate in the 
good man's distress Lr. iV, 4, 17. 
Aidless, unassisted: Cor. II, 2, 116. 
Aicr, v. Aery. 
Aigre, sour: like a. &'oppings {nto milk H_ml. 
I, 5, 69 (Qq and 1I. Ed. eager). 
Ail, to feel iii, to feel pain: what does she 
a.? All's II, 4, 6. what --est thon? Wint. !II» 3, 83. 
Aire, subst. 1) the direction of a missile 
or of any thing conlpared with if: in the a. 
and very flash of lt, Caes. I, 3, 52. I will watch the 
a. lIerch. !, 1,150.jTy wlthfalse a. AIFs !!I, 2 113. 
out safest way is to avold the a. Mcb. I!, 8, 149. 
2) the point, to which the thing throwu 
is directed, the butt: mlstakes that a. Ven.942. 
the a. of all is but ... Lucr. 141. 143. I miss'd my 
a. H6A I, 4, 4. the Parthian darts Iost a. Ant. IV, 
14, 71. the --s and ends of burning /outh, lleas. I, 3, 
5. the a. ofevery shot, R3 IV, 4, 90. Err. III, _9., 63. 
H4B I, 1, 123. H5 1,2, 186. H8V, 3, 118. ber that 
gave a. fo all thy oaths, Gentl.V,4,101, i.e. to whom 
ail thy oaths were addressed..But, gentle people, gire 
me a. awhile, Tir. V, 3, 149 (explained by the follow- 
ing stand all aloof)---give room and scope fo my 
thoughts. 
To cry abri, an expression borrowed from archery, 
---- to encourage the m'che by crying out alto, hen 
they were about to shoot, and then in a general sense 
to applaud» to encourage with eheers: it ill beseems 



A 27 

Hffs presence to erg aire to these ill-tuned repetitmns,, 
John !!, 196. to these violent proceediugs all mg 
neighbours s]all erg a. 'Viv. 111, 2, 45. Vcry dnbious 
in Wiv. II, 3, 93: cried I a.f said I well? (Qq Ff 
cried gaine and cride-game), cf. Gaine. 
3) the pointing of a missile and of what is 
similar to it: end thg ill a. belote thg soot be ended 
Lncr. 579. te ]iail of Ms all-hnrting a. Compl. 310. 
a certain a. ]e too]c at... Mids. II, 1,157. t]«tfrom 
te unter's a. had ta'en a urG As 1I, 1, 34. H4B 
111, 2, 285. Troil. I, 3, 15. Hence  intention: we 
s]all be s]orten'd in out a. Col'. I, 2, 23. proclabn 
mgsel.f agaist t]ie level of g a. All's II, 1, 159. 
4) gness, conjectnre: a man may proplesy 
with a near a. H4B 111, 1, 83. w]at you would wor]c 
me to I ave some a.» Caes. I, 2, 163. in t]iese cases, 
were t]e a. reports, Oth. I, 3, 6. Gentl. III, 1, 28. 
Ado IV, 1, 239. 
tim, vb. 1)to point or direct a weapon; 
a) absolutely: here stand we bot, and a. we ai te 
best, H6C III, 1, 8. I a. a ile begond te oon, Tit. 
IV, 3, 65. 
b) trans.: net were I ]tad --'d tliem (my arrows) 
Hml. IV, 7, 24. figuratively: seine apparent danger 
---ed ai gour ]iig]iness, R2 I, 1, 14. it is exceedizgly 
well--ed, H4A I, 3, 282. 
c) intr., followed by ai: dits bird glou --ed ai, 
Shr. V, 2, 50. figurafively  te endeavour te obtain: 
--ing ai Silvia, Gcntl. II, 6, 30. Riclimond--s ai 
goung Elisabetli, R3 I¥, 3, 40. tlie riclies of tliyself 
I a. ai, Wiv. III, 4, 18. Ven. 400. H4B I, 1, 124. 
H6C III, 2, 68. IV, 1, 15. R3 III, .'2, 45. tt8 III, 1, 
138. 2, 448. Cor. I, 1, 267. Oth. III, 3, 223. Fol- 
lowed by the inf. : tlie ]tead wliæli princes a. te ]tir, H4B 
I I, 149. Ia. te lie wit]t tliee, H6C III, 2, 69. 
2) te guess: tliou --est all awT, H6B II, 4, 
58. if1 a. arig]it, H6C I11, 2, 68. well--'d of sucli 
agoung one, Shr. II, 237. I--'dso near, Rem. !, 1, 
211. Followed by arête suspect: tliat mg disco- 
verg be net --ed at, Gentl. III, 1, 45. --ing at gour 
interior liatred, R3 1, 3, 65. And = te make conjec- 
tures about sth.: tey a. at if, Hnfi. IV, 5, 9. a. ber- 
ter ai me bg tliat I new will manif est, Ado III, 2, 99, 
i. e. ferre a better opinion of me. 
Te aire one, instead of at oe, tests only npon a 
conjecture of M. Edd. in Err. III, 2, 66 (0. Edd. I 
ara t]tee). 
,ir, subst., the element which we breathe: 
Ven. 64. 654. 1085. Lucr. 778. 1042. 1805. Sonn. 
2], 8 (]teaven's a.) Tp. I, 2, 222. 387. Il, 1, 46. IV, 
172. 266. V, 21. 102. Gentl. 11, 4, 28. IV, 4, 159. 
Meas. II, 4, 25. LLL I, 1, 236. Wint. V, 3, 78 (= 
a dranght of a., a breath). H6B 1II, 2, 287. IV, 10, 
54 etc. etc. Plural: Hml. I, 4, 41. 
Particular characteristlcs: tlie wanto a. Pilgr. 
230 and LLL IV, 3, 104. Rem. II, 6, 19. tlie a., a 
cliartered libertine, H5 I, 1, 48. as.false as a. Troil. 
111, 2, 199. as sort as a. Ant. V 2, 314. A. and water 
rnoist elements, Troil. I, 3, 41; cf. Vert. 654. A. and 
tire finer and quicker e]ements, in contradistinction 
te the duller and grosser nature of earth and water: 
Sonn. 45, 1. H5 III, 7, 22. Ant. V, 2, .092. 
Proverbial: build tliere, carpenter, tlie a. ;s sweet, 
Troil. !II, 2, 54; cf. H4B V, 3, 9. And figurativcly: 
wlto builds ]ils hopes in a. of your good looks, R3 III, 
4, I00. 

Sometimes --- the open and unconfined air: bring 
your music fortlt into tlie a. Merch. V, 53. bear 
out of tlie air, Oth. V, l, 104. will gou wallc out of t£e 
a. IIml. 11, 2, 209 (here within the palace). And 
then  the wide world: as te be cast fgrt£ in the cern- 
mon a. R2 I, 3, 157. let it .fort te seek te empty, 
vast and wanderlng a. R3 I, 4, 39. a dcdicated begçar 
te t£e a. Tire. IV, 2, 13. we nmst all part into tMs sea 
of a. 22. t£ou unsubstantial a. tat I embrace, Lr. lV, 
1, 7. Hence te take a.  te gct public: lest t£e devœeee 
take a. and taint, Tw. III, 4, 145. 
Used as the symbol of nnsubstantiality: melted 
lute a. Tp. IV, 150. ow all te oter passions fleet te 
a. erch. III, 2, 108. se would moc me lute a. Ado 
III, 1, 75. Troi1.111.3,225. John ll, 387.feed on te a. 
Gentl. II, 1, 179. eating t£e a. on promise f supply. 
H4B I, 3, 8. Ieat thea. Hnfl. III, ?, 99. c£arm ace 
wk a. i. e. with mere words, zkdo V, 1, 26. 
lir, subst, peculiar look and habits: seest 
thou net the a. of t£e court h t£ese enfoldings Wint. 
IV, 4, 755. yonrfat£cr's bage, Ms very a. V, 1 128. 
promising is t£e very a. o't£c tbnc, Tire V, 1, 25. 
tir, subst., a piece of music, played or sung, 
and cbiefly ont adapted te words: a wondeul eet 
a., wk admirable ric words te if, Cymb. Il, 3, 19. 
this music.., wk k.ç sweet a., Tp. I, 2 393. V, 58. 
Ado Il, 3, 60. LLL III, 4. Mids. I, 1, 183 (your 
tongue's sweet a.) any a. of music, Merch. V, 76. 
Plural: Tp. I» , 422. IIl, , 145. Tw. Il, 4, 5. 
lit, vb. 1) te expose te the air, te draw 
forth: I beg but leave te a. tMs jewel; see! and nom 
'ris up again Cymb. Il, 4, 96. died sortly after t£is 
world had 'd tem, IlS 11, 4, 193. te a. one's self 
 te take fresh air: t£y sea-maye, w£ere tou 
dost a. Tp. IV, 70. te purge elanc£oly and a. 
se, Wint. IV, 4, 790. riding fort te a. yourse. 
: Cymb. I, 1, 110. 
2) te lead forth, te lead about: tough I 
' have for the most part been --ed abroad, ïnt. IV, 
lir-hraing, defying the influence of the 
air: a. towers, II6A IV, 2, 13. 
ir-dra**-u, drawn in air, visionary: the 
a. dagger, Mcb. III, 4, 62. 
lirless, wanting fresh air: a. dunge, 
Caes. I, 3, 94. 
lir, 1) consisting of air: the a. region 
Relu. Il, 2 21. Echo's a. fougue, 163. you a. toys, 
Wiv. V 5, 46. your a. wings, R3 IV, 4, 13.2) dwell- 
ing in the air: like an a. spirit Mids. llI 1, 164. 
seine a. decil John III, , 2. 3) wrought by spi- 
rits of the air: this a. «harm Tp. V, 54. 4) un- 
substantial: a. nothing, Mids. V, 16. the a. s«ale 
of praise» Compl. 226. a. succeeders of intestatejoys 
(i. e. words) R3 IV, 4, 128. Ms a. faine, Troil. I, 3, 
1. an a. word, Rem. I, 1 96. of se a. and llght a 
quality, Hml. Il, 2, 67. 
ax, e Greek bore, son of Telamon: Lucr. 
1394. 1398. LLL IV, 3, 7 (as mad as A.). Aea«ides 
was A. S. Ill, 1, 53. like A. Telamonius, on sheep 
or oxen ould I spend  fury, H6B V, 1, 26. the 
Greeks upon advice did bury A. that slew himsel 
Tit. I, 379. A. is theb" fool (i. e. a fool te them) Lr. 
Il, 2 132. the seven-fold sMeld of A. Ant. IV, 14, 
38. Cb. IV, 2, 252. Troil. I, 2, 14 (and passim). 
A quibble wi a jakes: your lion that hoMs his pol!- 



oxe sitting on a close-stool, will be glven fo A. LLL 
V, 2, 581; and perhaps Troil. II 1, 70. 
.l«e, v. acle. 
.a.lallaster, (h. Edd. alabaster), a klnd of 
gypsum: ivor.y in an a. hand, Ven. 363. ber a. 
Lucr. 419. cut in a. hlcrch. I, 1, 84. a. arrns R3 
1V, 3.. 11. srnootl as monumental a. Oth. V, 2, 5. 
.a.lae], interj, expressive of sorrow: Lucr. 1156. 
Sonn. 65 9. 103, 1. Pilgr. 133. 239. Tp. 1, .o, 151. 
Meas. IV, 2, 175. IV 4 3. LLL II, 186. hlids. 1I 
'2. 153. V, 173. hlerch. I1, 3 16. As D', o, 5. Wint. 
IV, 3, 57. John lI, 118. 111, l 305. II4B IV, 2, 14. 
IV. 5 -'29. R3 I, 1,4ï. V, 3 187. Cor. I, 1, 76. 
Rom. I11 5, 211. Ant. 111, 10, 24. Cymb. 
102 etc. a.forpit.9! Tp. I ,132. a.,for rnercy! 436. 
a..for woe! LLL IV, 1, 15. R. llL 3 70. a. the da.g! 
Pilgr. 227. LLL IV, 3, 101. Mcrch. 11, _o., 73. Rom. 
III, o, 39. IV, 5, o- 
_ o. Lr. IV, 6 185. a. the heay dag! 
lï2 III, 3, 8. IV 257. 
.ilacriiy, cheerful proml)titnde: I lace 
ot tat er. ofspirit, R3 V, 3, 73. Troil. IV, 4, 147. 
Oth. I, 3, 233. Comically uscd by Falstaff: I lave 
a ]'ind of a. in sinlcing, Wiv. III, 5, 13. 
A-land, 1) on land: Per. Il, 1, 31. 2) to land: 
III, "2, 69. 
llarbs, cldest son of Tamora, Tir. I, 133. 143. 
larm, subst. (never rb.) 1) a SUlUmOns to 
arms notice of approaching danger: Jea- 
lous.].., gives false --s Ven. 651. in a n(qht a. 
Troil. [, 3 171. Hml. II, 2, 50, (Ff alarurn). 
10. i.e if hot an a. fo love? Oth. [I, 3 27 (Ff alarurn). 
2) State of war hostile attack: rernove 
jour siege frorn rn.y un.yielding leart; fo love's 
wili hot ope the gare, Ven. 4'2.4. the reason of tMs rasl 
a. fo know Lucr. 473. thelr deerr causes would fo tle 
bleeding and tle grlrn a. excite tle rnorti.fied rnan lIcb. 
V. 2 4. Lastly, disturbance, broil in gencral: 
tese )ome --s R2 l, 1 205. 
.Sklarun. subst., a call to arms, to an attack: 
onon tlteir (the dogs') loud --s he (the hare) dotl lear» 
Ven. 700. anon Ms beating heart, a. strlking glves 
the hot charge, Lucr. 433. sound, sound a. ! we will 
rush on them, H6A l, 2, 18. l, 4, 99. Il, 1, 42. H6B 
Il. 3, 95. V, 2, 3. R3 I, 1, 7. Cor. II 2, 80. Then a 
loud noise in general: fo endure ler loud 
,_hr. l, 1. lol. what new a. s tltls sarne? H5 IV 6 
35. strike a., drurns! R3 IV, 4, 148 (sc. to dro,n the 
curses of the ,«omen). Lastly, combat, conten- 
t i o n: such tierce --s botlt of lwpe and fear, tI6A 
V. 5, 85. In Hml. Il, 2 532 and Oth. 11, 3 27 Qq 
alarrn, Ff alartrn. 
tlarum, vb. to call to arms, to the com- 
bat: witlter'd rnurder, --'d bi/ ltls sentlnel tle wol.f 
hlcb. II, 1, 53. le saw rny best --'d spirlts roused fo 
te encounter, Lr. ll 1, 55. 
tlarum-bell, a bell that gives notice of 
danger and combat: ring the a.! hIcb. Il, 3, 79. 
V, 5, 51. 
las interj, expressive of sorrow or pity: Ven. 
631. 1075. Lucr. 832. 16.'24. Sonu. 110, 1. 115 9. 
Pilgr. 217. Tp. l 2 115. II 2, 39. III, 1, 15. Gent. 
Il, 2, .'21. lI, 7 8. IV, 4, 81. 96. 178. V¢iv. I, 4 37.' 
120. Il, 2 92. lI 3 15. III, 3, 55. llI 4, 3. 90. V 
5. 34. iIeas. I 4 75. 77. Il, 1, 6. 279. ll 2, 3. 72. 
llI 1 133 etc. etc. a. tIe day! Wiv. III, 5 39. IV, 
2 70. As lII 2 231. Tw. Il, 1 5. Il, 2, 39. H4B  

11, 1, 14. Troil. III, 2, 50. Rom. I11, o, 7. Mcb. 1I, 
4, .'23. Oth. Ill 4, 158. lV,  124. a. the ]eavy 
Oth. IV, 2, 4. a. te wlile! Merch. H, 1, 31. Fre- 
quently joined to out; v. Out. 
late of late: metlffnks .you are too rnuch a. 
i' tl, e 'own Lr. I, 4, 208 (Ff of laie). 
l,»an, (O. Edd. Albon and Albone), Saint A., 
naine of a saint: ai Saint --'s slrlne, H6B lI, 1 63. 
I thank God and S. A. 108. S. A. lere lath donc a 
miracle, 131. 
tllans, (O. Edd. Albons and Albones; only in 
II4B Il, 2, 185 Ff Albans). Saint A., a town in 
England: H4A IV, 2, 50. H4B H, 2, 185. It6B 
57.83. I, 4, 76. H, 1, 135. ¥, 2 68. V, 3, 30. H6C 
lI 1 114. 120. Il, 2, 103. IH  1. R3 l 3 130. 
Allany: the duke of A. (i. e. Scofland): Lr. I, 
1 2 and passim. 
Al»eit (in John V, 2, 9 of three, everywhere else 
of two syllables), although: Wiv. III, 4, 13. Err. 
V, 217. Merch. l, 3, 62 (Ql althouglO. Il, 6, 27, As 
I, 1, 53. I, 2 274. Tw. III, 3, 31. John V, 2, 9. H4A 
I, 3, 128 (Ff altlougl O. V, 1, 10,'2. H4B II, 2, 43. 
R3 III, 7, 226. IV, 3, 6 (Qq altlmglO. Troil. III, 
142. Oth. V 2, 349. Cnb. Il, 3, 61. 
tlion, naine of England: H5 III. 5 14. H6B 
I, 3, 48. III, 2, 113. H6C III, 3, 7.49. Lr. III, 2 91. 
Al'ce, for Alice: Shr. Ind. 2, 112. 
il¢lemist, one who practises alchemy: 
the sun plays the a., turning the earth fo gold, John 
III, 1, 78..you are an a.; nalce gold of that Tire. 
I 117. 
Aleleny, the art of making gold: the 
morning ... gilding pale streams with eavenl.y a. 
Sonn. 33, 4..your love taugIt it tIis a., fo malte of 
monster's cIerublns, 114, 4. Caes. I 3, 159. 
lci»iades, the Athenian general: Tim.I, 1,250. 
2, 74 etc. 
Aleides, Hercules: hlcrch. 1I. 1, 35. II1, 2, 55. 
Shr. l, 2 .'260. John 11, 144. H6A IV, 7 60. Tir. 
IV, 2 95. Ant. IV, 12, 44. 
hler-liefest, dearest: H6B I, 1, 8. 
.a-14ecman, memb er of a city corporation: 
an --'s tlmmb-ring, H4A I1, 4 364. an agate-stone 
on te foretinger of an a. Rom. 1, 4 56. Alderrnen: 
R3 llI, 7, 66 (Qq citizens). 
Aie. a liqnor made by an infusion of 
ruait and fermentation: Site brews good a. And 
tlzereof cornes the proverb: Blessing of 9our lzeart, you 
brew good a. Gentl. lIl 1, 304. hlids, lI, 1, 50. Shr. 
Iud. I, 32. 2 1 (srnall a.). 5 (sleer a., i. e. nnmixed 
a.). 76. Tw. Il, 3, 125 (cakes and a.). Wint. IV, 3, 
8. H4AI, 3, 233. H5 lIl, 2 13. IV, 7,40. H8 V, 
4, 11 (a. and cakes). To go to the a. ---- to the 
alehouse, Gentl. II, 5, 61; in allusion perhaps to a 
Christian festival called so (cf. ttoly-ales). 
tleeo, oue of the thrce Furies: H4B V, 5, 39. 
&ehouse, a bouse whcre aie is sold: Gentl. 
II, 59.56. Ado I11,3,45. Tw. 11,3,96. R2V 1, 
15. H5 IlI 2 12. H6B III, 2 81. Tit IV, 2, 98. Oth. 
II 1, 139. Unchanged in the genit.: H6B V, 2, 67. 
leuçon (O. Edd. Alanson) a French naine: 
LLL Il, 61. 195. H5 III, 5, 42. IV, 7, 161. IV, 8, 
101 etc. H6A I, 1, 95. lI, 1, 60. III, 
173. IV, 4, 27. lV 6, 14. H6B I, 1 7. HS III, 2, 85. 
&elapO, town in Turkish Asia: hIcb. I, 3, 7. 
Oth. V, 2, 352. 



A 29 

Ale-washed, steeped in le, dulled by 
drinking ale: a. wits, tI5 III, 6, 82. 
Alewife, a woman who keeps an aleh)use: 
Shr. Ind. 2, 23. H4B II, 2, 89. 
Alexander, 1) the king of Macedon: LLL V, 2, 
539. 570. Vint. V, 1, 47. H5 111, 1, 19. IV, 7, 14. 
20. Cor. V, 4, 23. Hml. V, 1, 218. 225. 231. -- 2) 
A. Iden: II6B IV, 10, 46. V, 1, 74. -- 3) Cressida's 
servant: Troil. I, 2, 45. -- 4) son of Antony: Ant. 
III, 6, 15. 
Alexandrla, town in Egypt: Ant. I, 4, 3. II, -0, 
72. III, 6, 2. III, 13, 168. IV, 8, 30. 
.lexandrian, pertaining to Alexandria: an A. 
feast, Ant. 11, 7, 102. out A. revels, V, 2, 218. 
Alexas, attendant on Cleopatra: Ant. I, 2, I sq. 
IV, 6, 12 etc. 
Alias, a Latin word - otherwise, elsc 
called: te black prince, allas te devil, Alls IV, 5, 
44. test.y ma9fstrates , a. fools, Cor. II, 1, 48. 
Alice, female name (cf. Al'ce): Wiv. I, 1, 211. 
II, 1, 51. H5 III, 4, 1 sq. 
Aliell, subst., s tr a n g c r: {f {t be proved ago5st 
an a. that e seeIc te loEe of a»y citfzen, Merch. IV, 1, 
349. and art almost an a. fo the ]earts of all t]e' 
court, II4A III, 2, 34. 
A|ien, adj., belonging to others: evey a. 
pen ]ath 9ot ny use, Sonu. 78, 3. 
Aliena, assumed naine of Celia: As l, 3, 130. 
11, 4, 8. IV, 1, 220. V, 2, 9 elc. 
Alight, 1) intr. to descend îrom horse or 
carriage: c'en ai ]and, --ed bf t]fs, Shr. IV, 1, 
120. t]ere fs --ed at four gare a 21oun 9 lCedan, 
Merch. II, 9, 86. newlf --ed, Tire. 1, œee, 181 (in all 
these passages it seems almost  arrived), bidher a., 
and ]er troth plfg]t, Lr. III, 4, 127. 
2) trans.: a. thf steed, Ven. 13. 
llike, adv., in the saine manner: sfnce all 
a. rnf prafses be fo one, Sonn. 105, 3. Fortune ]ad 
left fo botl of us a. wlmt fo dell9lt in, Err. I, 1. 106. 
LLL IV, 3, 126. Wint. I, 2, 310. IV, 4, 457. John Il, 
331. H8 1-°,39. Il, 2,54. Cor. 1,4,62. IV, 1, 6. Troil. 
IV, 1,54. Rom. I, 2, 2. lIChor. 6. Tim. IV, 2, 19. 
V, 1, 124. hlcb. 111, 1, 101. Ant. I, 1, 35. Il, 2, 50. 
51. III, 13, 34. Cymb. I, 6, 48. III, 2, 37. IV, 1, 13. 
Alike, adj. (never preceding the substantive  
looking or being like each other, equal: 
male twfns, all a. Err. I, 1 56. all men are hot a. 
Ado I11, 5, 43. Meas. 1, 1, 35. Wint. V, 1, 207. John 
11,331. tI5 IV, 7, 27. H6A II, 1, 55. H6CV, 6, 4. 
Cor. 1, 3, 25. Tit. I, 174. Il, 3, 146. Rom. Prol. 1. 
Tim. III, 6, 75. Ant. 1, 2, 56. Cymb. IV, , 5. V, 
5 125. 
Alisander, for Alexander, in the language of 
Sir lathaniel and Costard: LLL V, 2, 567. 572. 575. 
578.583. 587. 
Alive, in lire, living: Ven. 174. 1009. 1076. 
Lncr. 1768. Tp. II, 1, 122. 236. II, 2, 25. Gentl. III, 
1, 184. V, 4, 66. Meas. IV, 3, 90. V, 472. Merch. Il, 
2, 75. John IV, 2, 251. H6B III, 2, 64. III, 3, 12. IV, 
4, 41. IV, 7, 140. H6C I, 1,161. I, 3, 33. R3 I, 2, 91. 
III, 7, 193. IV, 4, 472. Caes. IV, 3, 196 (now fo out 
wor]c a.). Lr. ¥, 1, 59. 62. Ant. IV, 6, 2. Cymb. III, 
3, 81. IV, 2, 253 etc. 
2) in existence, in the world: but were 
o,« c]dld of fours a. that drue, Sonn. 17, 13. none 
else fo me, nor I to none a. 11-0 7. none a. wfll pitf 

me, t'ilgr. 400. there be fools a. Merch. II, 9, 68. the 
cruelf st she a. Tw. I, 5, 259. there fs scarce truth 
enou.qh a. fo make socfeties secure, Meas. III, 2, 240. 
I had hot left a purse a. in the whole armf, Wint. IV. 
4, 631. the brfcks are a. ai thfs dal to testiff, H6B 
IV, 2, 157. Gentl. II, 6, 27. Ado IV, 1, 180. Shr. 11, 
10. H4A III, 1, 173. H6A I, 4, 85. H6B III, 1,244. 
R3 Il, 1, 69. Oth. IV, 1, 68. 
Ail, 1) subsmntively, the whole, opposed to 
p.'u-t, every thing: all lost, Tp. 1, 1, 54. all fs but 
fortune, V, 257. Tw. 1I, 5, 27. I leave tuf self, ml 
ri'rends, and a.,for love, Gentl.l, 1,65. I bave scanted 
a. wherefn I should four 9reat deserts repaf, Sonn. 
117, l. I shall bave 9old for all, tt6B I, 2, 107. ml 
ail, Sonn. 109, 14. wlwse ail hot equals JEdward's 
mofetf, R3 I, 2, 250. believe hot all, Ant. III, 4, 11. 
bave raff thanks for all, IV, 14, 140. and ail fo all, 
hlcb. III, 4, 92¢etc. etc. the ont alrnost as 5jïnfte as 
all, tIe otIer blan]c as notMng, Troil. IV, 5, 80, i. e. 
as the universe. And thon, all thef, hast all tle all qf 
me, Sonn. 31, 14 (being to me instead of all deceased 
friends). The verf all ofall is, LLL V, 1, 115. 
In ail  everything put down to account: wlen 
but in all I was six thousand strong, tI6A IV, 1, 20. 
All in all, properly every thiug in every respect, an 
expression of mere enforcement for ail: le that van 
do all in all wfth ler, H6B Il, 4, 51. he was a nan, 
take Mm for all in all, Hanl. I, 2, 187 (i. e. consider 
him with respect to the whole of his qnalitiesL ber 
love;for that fs all in all, Skr. II, 130. ff bath been all 
in all Ms studf, H5 I, l, 42. he will do ail fn all as 
IIastings doth, I13 III, 1, 168. flou are all in all in 
spleen, Oth. IV, 1, 89. whom our full senate call all in 
ail sufficfent, 276. 
For all  a) once for all: learn now, for all, I 
care hot for flou, Cymb. Il, 3, 111. for once, for ail. 
and ever, R2 I1, .'2, 148. tMs {s for all - in short : 
Hml. I, 3,131. b) though :for allfou are n»f man, Viv. 
I, 1, 281. V, 5, 204. Ven. 342. Cymb. V, 4, 209. 
Ai ail, a phrase used by way of enforcement, sel- 
dom in affirmative sentences, as: fo bear off any 
weather ai all, Tp. Il, 2, 19. an if thfs be at all, V, 
117; oftener with a negation either implied: desfst 
to bufld ai all, H4B I, 3, 48. whhout expense ai 
ail, H6A 1, 1, 76; witlwut more circumstance ai all, 
Hml. l, 5, 127; or directly expressed: hot ai all, Pilgr. 
.°74. Gentl. I1, 4, 96. Meas. IV, 1, 71. IV, 2, 161. 
Merch. 11, 1, 39. Vint. 11I, 2, 62. V, 1, 20. H8 Il, 
4, 84. Tir. 1I, 1, 119. Rom. Il, 2, 112. IV, 3, 21. 
Caes. III, 1, 248. no rime ai ail: Sonn. 57, 3. Meas. 
Il, 4, 66. hlids. I, 2, 100. III, .o, 301. Merch. V, 120. 
All's III, 6, 103. tt6C V, 5, 53. Ant. III, 4, 20. none 
at all: LLL IV, 3, 354. As III, 2, 212. tI6B I, 4, 52. 
R3 II, 3, -04. notMng ai all: Gentl. I, 1, 144. R3 I, 
.9, 236. nought ai ail: Ven. 911. Err. IV, 1, 91. this 
no more dfshonours you ai all than. . . Cor. III, 2, 58. 
All fs one, cf. One. 
And all  and the rest, and every thing else: 
Frfdafs and Saturdays and all As IV, 1, 117. this 
wfns hlra» liver and all Tw. II, 5, 106. rapier, scabbard 
and all III, 4, 303. and lose if, lire and all John III, 
4, 144. words, lire andall R2 II, 1, 150. arepluck'd 
up foot and all. 111, 4, 5-0. I bave entered hfm and all 
H4B Il, 1,11 (Mrs. Quickly). Cor. IV, 2, 27. leap thou, 
attire and all, fo raff heart, Ant. IV, 8 14. brin 9 out 
crown and all» V, 2, 232. In the saine sense : thatfou 



3O 

A 

iusult» exult, and all al once, over tlte wretched» As 111, 
5, 36. dld lose his seat and all al once, H5 1, 1, 36. 
2"hls is all  in short: Wint. 1, 2, 347. 
Ail but, originally anything except,  scarcely, 
hOt even: tenry's death, my lovely .Edwarars deadt, 
their kingdorn's loss, could all but answer for tltat loee- 
vlslt brai . R3 1, 3, 194. 
Als hot off'en:e, Lr. Il, 4, 199. cf. Ant. V, 
326: als hOt well. 
2) Adjcctively and pronominally: a) evcry, 
any, any imaginable: capable of ail iii, Tp. 1, 
2, 353. ail foison, all abundance, Il, l, 163. all 
Less becltance fo thee, Gentl. I, 1, 61. all good, III, 
243. 'gainst all other vol:e, Mer:b. IV, 1 356. all 
bond and privilege of nature break, Cor. V, 3, 25. 
whorn wlth all praise I point al, 11, 2, 94. all joy 
befall . .., Cymb. III, 5, 9. cf. all popular rate, Tp. I, 
2, 92. wltlt all prero9ative , 105. all strange forrn, 
Compl. 303. in all desired employrnent, LLL IV, 
140. Cor. l, 3, 8. Iii, 1, 129. Caes. 111, 1,246. Lr. 
11, 4, 107. Mcb. 111, 1, 13. on all cause, Ant. III, 11, 
68. in all haste, Wiv. 111, 3, 14. l'll rnake all speed, 
Mcas. IV, 3, 109. with all sw(ft speed, R2 V, 1, 54. 
And so even: witout all bail, Sonn. 74, 2. wltout 
ail doubt (for any doubt) H8 IV, 1, 113. wltout all 
remedy, Mcb.lll, 2,11. Alls Il, 3, 173. Cor. III, 1,144. 
b) the whole, without the m-ri:le bcfore names 
of towns and countries as well as the words day and 
night: throu9h all Athen, Mids I, 2, 5. in oll lrenlce, 
Merch. l, 1,115. all It'et» John V, 1, 30. all France» 
H6A I, 1, 139. H6B 1¥, 8, 17. all Europe, H6A l, 1, 
16. l, 6, 15. all daff, Meas. IV, 1, 20. Mids. 11, 1, 
66. Merch. l, 1, 117. H6A Il, 1, 12. H6B 111, 1, 186. 
all night , Meas. IV, 3, 46. LLL I, 1, 44. Shr. IV, 1, 
208. John IV, 1, 30. H4A IV, 2, 63. Rom. lY, 4, 10. 
Caes. 11, 1, 88. all night long, ttml. I, 1,160. 
The article admissible before dag and ni9ht: all 
the dag, Sonn. 43, 2. Wint. IV, 3, 134. all the nl9ht , 
Lr. Il, 4, 90; indispensable belote other words: all 
the world, Tp. I. 2, 69. all the test, l, 2, 226. 11, 1, 
287. ail the wine 11, 2, 96. all the ind of the JLaunces 
Gentl. 11, 3, 2. all the difference, IV, 4, 195. ail the 
draff, Wiv. IV, 2, 109. all thefool LLL V, 2, 384. all 
the pack ofyou» R3 III, 3, 5. etc. etc. Of course, the 
demonstrative and possessive pronouns serve as well : 
ail this day, John III, 1, 18. allrnystudy, Tp. l, 2, 74. 
all Ms quallty, I, 2, 193. in all ber trirn, V, 236. all 
your part» Mids. III, 1, 102. all rny flowerin 9 youth, 
H6A Il, 5, 56. llke all your self, Cor. V, 3, 70. all his 
arm, Hml. Il, 1, 88.95 etc. all rny every part» So.nn. 
62, 2. You are rny all the world, Sonn. 112 5. John' 
ili 4, 104. 
Ail the whole, cf. whole. ' 
e) only, alone, nothing bnt: thou art all  
m. child = my only ehild, All's 111, 2, 71. fo find a 
.face where ail distress is steld; man. she secs where 
cares bave carved some, but none where ail distress 
and dolour dwell'd» Luer. 1444 (nothing but» more 
distress), wh. write I still all one, ever the sarne? 
Sonn. 76, 5, i. e. always but one thing. I do srnell 
all horsepiss» Tp. IV, 199. all torrnent, trouble» wonder 
and arnazernent inhabits here, Tp. V» 104. a 9entlernan 
ofall ternperance, Meas. III, 2, 251 (a gentleman, the 
groundwork and sum of whose qualifies was tempe- 
rance). I was born to speak all mirth and no matter, 
Ado 1I, 1, 343. he is all mirth» Ado 111» 2» 10. all to 

make /ou sport, Mids. 1, 3, 114. vows so born, in thelr 
nativit. all truth appears, 11I, 2, 125. and hOt ail love 
fo sec .ou, but jealous...., Tw.. 111, 3, 6. gold, ail 
7old! Wint. 11I, 3» 126. wh. bave rn. sisters husbands, 
if the. sa. the. love.ou all. Lr. I, 1,102. I shall never 
rnarr. like m. sisters» to loyerCu ai1, 106. no seconds? 
all rn.self? IV, 6, 198. er. H4B ¥, 3, 37. 
d) In the tlural  every on% the whole 
number of pa_'tienlars: let's all slnk» Tp. I, 1, 
67. all plunged in the foarnlng brine, I, 2, 210. the mari- 
ners all under hatches stowed» 230. the. all bave met, 
233. we all 11, 1,251 etc. etc. 
All of us  we ail, Tp. 1I, 1,129. V, 212. Wiv. I1, 
2, 58. I3 I1, 2, 101. Caes. 11, 1, 212. all ofgou: R2 
IV, 237. H6B 111, 1, 165. R3 1, 3» 171. all of thern: 
Tp. Y, 132. Ado V, 1, 44. all three ofthern: Tp. III, 3, 
104. all qf.ours: R2 11, 4, 72. 
Joined to , substautive without au axfiele: all 
hearts i 'the state, Tp. 1, 2, 84. all corners else of the 
earth, 1, 2, 491 etc. The article gives ita restrictive 
sense: throu9h ail the si9nories, Tp. I, 2, 71.fait $Iilan 
with ail the honours, 127. all the devils, 215. ail the 
! charms of S.corax, 339. all the qualities of the isle, 
337. I ara all the subjects that .ou bave, 341. ail the 
infections that. . . 11, 2, 1. ail the blessin9s of a 91ad 
father, V, 179 etc. etc. Secmingly in a general accep- 
tation: incensed the seas and shores, .ea, ail the crea- 
tures (sc. that dwell in them a9ainst .our loeace, Tp. 
111, 3 74. these are the villains that all the travellers 
(se. who bave passed through this forest) do fear so 
much, Gentl. IV, 1, 6. I/or. IV, 6, 102. 
With a possessive pronoun: all out reasons, R3 
111, 1, 174. Tp. 1, 2, 370. 437. 488. IV, 1, 5 etc. etc. 
Used in addressing no more than two persons: 
9ood rnorrow to.ou all» H4B 11I 1 35. as all.ou 
H6B 11, 2, 26. 
2"0 all out lamentation, Cor. IV, 6, 34,  to the 
lmentation of us all. to ail out sorrows, John IV, 2, 
102 (cf. both). 
.Best of all: tt6C Il, 5, 18. last ni9ht o.f all, Hml. 
I, 1, 35 (- the very last night). Ces. I, 1, 65. 
Frorn the all that are  from ail them that are: 
Wint. V, 1, 14. 
3) Adverbially, a) quite, entirely: no ton9ue! 
all ees! Tp. IV, 1, 59. Troil. l, 2, 31. love is all trutli, 
Ven. 804. all t.rant» 149, 4. she's all 9rease, Err. III, 
2, 97. all adoration, As V, 2, 102 sq. all tears, ttml. 
I, 2, 149. he's all the mother's, R3 III, 1, 156. ail wet, 
Ven. 83. all unpossible» R2 Il, 2, 126. all dedlcated fo 
closeness, Tp. l, 2, 89. all wound with adders, Il, 1, 13. 
all hurnbled, Gentl. I, 2, 59. all enra9ed II, 6, 38. a// 
arrned, Mids. lI» 1, 157. all with wear task foredone, 
V, 381. all unwaril., John V, 7, 63. dashed all to 
pieces, Tp. 1, 2, 8. Oth. 111, 3, 431. dlspossess ber all, 
Tire. 1, 1, 139. all afire with me, Tp. I, 2, 212. all in 
buff, Err. IV, 2, 36. one all of luxure, Meas. V, 506. 
ail in post, tt6C V, 5, 84. all at one side, Oth. 1¥, 
32. ofall oneloaln (quite the saine p.) R3 IV, 4, 303. 
all alone» Sonn. 29, 2. 124, 11. As 11, 7, 136. ttml. I, 
5, 102. Aut. I, 1, 52. bllster ou all o'er, Tp. I, 2, 324. 
all as mad as he, Err. ¥, 141. all as soon as I» John 
11, 59. ¥. 2, 170. Cor. I, 9, 44. Lr. lV 7, 42. 
b) serving only to enforce the expression: all in 
war with lime, Sonn. 15, 13. all for want of pruning, 
Err. Il, 2, 181. when all aloud the wind doth blow, 
LLL ¥, 2» 931. what occasion bath all so long detained 



A 

you, Shr. 111, 2, 105. ail al once» H5 I, 1, 36. hot all so 
muoh .for love, R3 1, 1, 157. all headlog, "rit. v, 
132. la.y thee all along, Rom. V, 3, 3. stand ail aloo.f, 
', 3, 26. ail but now, 0th. 11, 3, 179. all too timeless, 
Lucr. 44. all too lute, 1686. all too short, Sonn. 18, 4. 
all too near, 61, 14. ail too precious, 86,2. all too 
Gcntl. III, 1, 162. all too wanton, John I11, 3, 36. all 
too base» R2 IV, 1, 28. all too heavy, H4B V, 2, 24. 
(tll too dear, 0th. 11, 3, 94. all too soo b Cymb. V, 5, 
169. 
The following passagcs may be interpreted othcr- 
wise: t]e marbled mansion all aboie, Tim. lV, 3, 191 
(--- ail the marbled nmnsion aboie), down from 
waist the.y are Centaurs, tlough women ail aboie, Lr. 
lV, 6, 127. things outward do draw the inward qualil.y 
after them, to surfer all alike, Ant. III, 13, 34. 
c)  although: th.y head, all hàirectbj, 9aie 
direction, R3 IV, 4, 225. Perhaps also: his horse is 
Main, and ail on.foot he fights R3 V, 4, 4. But er. went 
ail afoot in summer" s sealdin 9 heat, H6C V, 7, 18. 
d) Il is with hesitation that we advanee the 
opinion that, like the German all in popular language, 
il is sometimes used for already: lIethhks I sec 
tlds hurl.y all on foot, John I11, 4, 169. but tell 
for I haie heard il all, lom. I, 1, 181. she could haie 
run and waddled ail about, I, 3, 37. 
Alloabhored, H4AV, 1, 16; cfAll 3a; or ab- 
horred by ail. 
All-admiring, H5 l, 1, 39; cfAll 3a. 
Allay, rb» 1) trans, a) to abate, mitigate, 
appcase: appetite, which but to-day with feedi 9 is 
d» Sonn. 56, 3. a. them (the waters), Tp. 1, 2, 2. 
---in 9 both their.fur.y and m.y passion, I, 2, 392. a. thj 
ecstas.y, hlerch. II!, 2, 112. to a. the gust he bath 
quarrelling, Tw. 1, 3, 32. a. this th.y abortive pride, 
H6B IV, l, 60. --'d their swellin 9 9fiefs, H6C IV, 8, 
42. a. those longues » H8 I1, 1, 152. Chiefly of tire and 
heat: whose heat I«ath this condition» that nothin 9 Cml 
a. John HI, 1, 342. V, 7, 8. H8 I, 1, 149. And tropi- 
cally: a. with some cold drops of modesty th.y sippi 9 
spirit, Merch. Il, 2, 195. a cup of hot wine with hot a 
drop of--in 9 Tiber in't, Cor. Il, 1, 53. to a. m.y rages 
with gour colder reasons, V, 3, 85. b) to weakeu, 
to detraet from: I do hot like 'But.ye?, il does a. 
the good preceàenee, Ant. Il, 5, 50. 
2) intr. to abate, decrease: when the rage 
--s, the tain begins, H6C I, 4, 146. the heat ofhis dis- 
pleasure.., would scarcel.y a. Lr. I, 2, 179. 
Allay, subst., that which abates: to whose 
sorrws I nti9ht be some a. Wint. iV, 2, 9. 
Allaymen¢, the same: the like a. could I give 
m.y grief, Troil. IV 4, 8. appbj --s to their ac G Cymb. 
l, 5, 22. 
All-bulding, beiug the gronnd and found- 
atlou of ail." the manacles of the a. law, Meus. 
Il,4, 94 (Rowe: ail-holding; Johnson: ail binding). 
All-changingoword, word or signal of a 
gencral change or defection from former 
opinions and affections: tMs commodit.y, tMs 
bawd, tlis broker, tlis a. John 11, 582 (bi. Edd. ail- 
changin 9 word). 
AII-cheering, cheering, gladdening ail: 
te a. sun, Rom. I, 1, 141. 
All-disgraced, eithcr completely disgra- 
ced, or disgraced with ail, despised by ail: 
Ser a..friend» Ant. I11, 12, 22. 

All-dreaded, feared by all: Cymb. IV, 2, 271 
AIl-eating, consuming ail, destrofing every 
advantage: an a. shame. Sonn. 2, 8. 
Allegation, assertion: reprove my a., if you 
can, H6B 111, 1, 40. fo swearfalse --s, 181. 
Allege, to produce, to cite: I can a. no 
cause, Sonn. 49, 14.--d ma»y reasos, H8 I1, 1, 13. 
m.y --d reasons, il, 4, 225. Troil. 11, 2, 168. 
Allegiance, fidelity of subjects, loyalty: 
to follow with a. a fail'n lord, Ant. I11, 18, 44. contrar.y 
to the faith and a. of a truc subject, Wint. 111, 2, 20. 
Ado 111, 8, 5. John 111, 1,175 (to one). R2 11, 1,108. 
I11, 3, 37. H5 11, 2, 4. tI6A V, 5, 3. H6C II1, 1, 70. 
IV, 7, 19. R3 I, 3, 171. il8 I, 2, 62. V, 3, 43. Mcb. 
1, 28. Hml. IV, 5, 131. Icharge tce on t)y a.: Ado 
I, 1,210. 213. Wint. !1, 3, 121. H6A III, 1, 86 (on a. 
to ourself). Lr. I, 1, 170. to swear a. to one: John V, 
1, 10. H6A V, 4, 169. H6B V. 1, 20. 179. 
D er o ti o n in general :pluck a.from men's )fearts, 
H4A I11, 2, 52. 
Allegianl, loyal: I can nothin 9 tender but a. 
thanks, H8 III, 2, 176. 
All-ending, ri n i s h i n g a II : even to the 9eneral 
a. da!l, R3 iii, 1, 78. 
Alley: 1) a shady walk in a garden: Ado 
1.2, 10. I!1, 1, 16. 2) a narrow way in a city: 
En'. IV, 2, 38. 3) passage in general: t]e natural 
gares and --s of t]e body, Hml. I, 5, 67. 
Ail-hall, subst, a term of salutation, expressing 
a wish of health and happiness: give t]e a. to 
Cor. V, 3, 139. greater than bot], b.y t]e a. hereafter. 
hlcb. i, 5, 56. Without the hyphen: Tp. I, 2, 189. 
LLL V, 2, 158.339. R2 IV, 169 etc. cf. Hall. 
Alloha]l, vb. to cry Ail hall to: --ed me, 
Mcb. 1, 5, 7. 
All-hallond eve, the eve of Ail Saints' 
day: Meus. I1, 1, 130. 
AII-hallontas, Ail Saints' day (lSt lov.): 
Viv. 1, 1,211. 
AIl-hallovn (Ff Ail-oilown), falling into 
the time of Ail Saints' day: a. summer, H4A 
l, 2, 178.* 
All-haling, entirely filled with hatred: 
in this a. world, R2 V, 5, 66. 
All-hiding, eoneealing all: thy black a. 
eloak, Luer. 801. 
AIl-honoured, honoured by ail: Ant. 11, 
6, 16. 
All-hnrting, never missing: hls c. aire, 
Compl. 310. 
Alliance, 1) relationship of any kind: 
Wint. Il, 3, 21. H6A 11, 5, 53. IV, 1, 62. 
2) relationship by marriage: HSV, 2,878. 
II6A V, 5, 42. H6C I11, 8, 70. 177. IV, 1, 86. 186. 
8) marri age: Ado II, 1, 880. Tw. V, 826. H6C 
III, 3, 142. R3 IV, 4, 313. 343. Rom. II, 3, 91. 
4) league: let out a. be combined, Caes. IV, 
1, 43. 
Alligant. lIrs. Quickly says: in such a. terres, 
Viv. I1, _'2, 69; as Intpp. will haie it for elegant; but 
elegant is hot a Shakespearian word. Perhaps for 
alle91ant or eloquent. 
Alligator, American crocodile: Rom. V, 
1, 43. 
All-licensed, privileged to do or say any- 
thing: tMsyour a. fool, Lr. 1, 4, 220. 



32 

A 

AII-ohe]ing, obeyed by ail: from Ms a. 
breath I hear tle doom of Egypt, Ant. 111, 13, 77. 
Johnson all-obeyed, Anon. all-swauin#. But cf. 
feelinç sorrows, a trembling contribution, etc. 
&ll-ohlivious, forgetful of aih a. entait!C 
Sonn. 55, 9 (- enmity of oblivion, hostile oblivion). 
AlloŒE, 1) to grant by destiny: whomfavour- 
able stars a. tlee for his lovel!/ bed-fellow, Shr. IV, 
5, 41. tlou art --ed to be ta'en b!/ ne, H6A V 3 55. 
2) to bestow on, to grant in general: 
and undeserved reproach fo him --ed Lucr. 824..rive 
da.ys we do a. thee Lï. I 1 176. 
Ailottery, portion granted: #ire ne thepoor 
a. rn. father left ne, As 1, 1, 77. 
/kllow, 1) followed by an accus, a) to grant, 
to yield, to give: I would a. him odds, R:2 I, 1, 
62. free speech and fearless 1 to thee a., 123. H4A 
11, 1, 21. H4B V, 5, 70. H8 111 1, 151. Rom. 11, 3» 86. 
Tim. 111 3 41. Hml. 1, 2 38. V, 1, 255 (she is --eà 
ber vir#in rites). V, 2, 47. Lr. 11 4, 269. Cnnb. I, 4, 
3. a. the wind, A1Fs V 2, 10 -- do hot stop if, stand 
to the leeward of me. whose ro#uish rnadness --s itsel.f 
to anythin#, Lr. III, 7, 105 i. e. allows itself to be 
employed in anything. 
b) to grant, to permit: if the law wo«ld a. 
it, Meas 11, 1, 239. 240. 241. trie law --s it, Merch. 
lV, 1,303. the worser was --ed a furred gown, Mcas. 
III, 2, 8. bein 9 --ed fiis way, H8 l, 1, 133. scfiolars 
--ed freelg to argue for fier, Il, 2, 113. a. me such 
exercises, As l, 1, 76. Tw. 1, 5, 210. V, 304. Wint. I, 
_'2, 263. IV, 1, 15. IV, 4, 479. H6C V, 4, 20. Lr. III, 
6, 106. V 3, 233. Cymb. II, 3, 121. --in 9 film to 
monarcfiize R2 111 2 164. H4B ll, 2, 115. Caes. III, 
2, 64. fiim in tfi.y course untainted do a. Sonn. 19, 11. 
c) to grant, adroit: wfio did fiis words a. 
Lucr. 1845. I well a. trie occasion of our arms, H4B 
I, 3, 5. I like tfiem all and do a. tfiem well H4B lV, 
2 54. 
d) to license: she is --ed for the day-woman, 
LLL I, 2 136. an --edfool, Tw. 1, 5, 101. you are 
--ed  an --ed fool, LLL V, 2,478. 
e) to acknowledge: so you o'ergreen my bad 
my good a. Sonn. 112, 4. Wiv. II, 2,236. As 1, 1, 49. 
R2 V 2, 40. H8 1 2, 83. lI, 4, 4. Troil. III, 2,98. Cor. 
III, 345. Oth. 1, 3, 224. Cymb. III, 3 17. that will a. 
me very worth his service, Tw. I 2 59  make me 
acknowledged. 
f) t o s a n c t i o n : (f your sweet sway a. obedience, 
Lr. 11, 4, 194. --ed with absolute power, Tire. V, 1, 
165 (trusted, invested by public authority). 
2) Followed by of: a) to permit: of tMs a. 
Wint. lV 1, 29. b) to adroit: ere I will a. of thy 
wits, Tw. IV, 2, 63. 
3) Absolutely: ber --ing husband, Wint. I, 2 185 
 conniving. 
.,ll«wance, 1) authorisation, permission: 
without the king's will or the state's a. H8 lll 2,322. 
on such regards of safety and a. Hml. lI, 2, 79. you 
protect this course, and put if on by your a. Lr. l, 4 
228. if this be known to you and your a. Oth. 1, 1,128. 
under the a. of your great aspect, Lr. 11 2, 112. 
2) acknowledgment: which one nust in your 
a. o'erweigh a whole theatre, t/ml. III, 2, 31. give 
a. for the better nan Troil. I, 3 377. a stirring dwarf 
we do a. give before a sleeping giant ll 3 146. syl- 
lables of no a. to your bosom's truth, Cor. I11 2 57. 

his pilot of verni expert and approved a. Oth. I1, 1, 49 
(i. e. of allowed approof, or of acknowledged ex- 
perience). 
All-praised, praised by ail: H4AIII'2,140. 
AII-seer, he who secs all: R3V, 1,20. 
AIl-seeing, se eing all: a. heaven, R3 11, 1,82. 
a. sun, Rora. 1, 2, 97. 
All.shaltiag, shaklng all: a. tltunder, Lr. III, 
26. 
Ail-shuaned, avoided by all: a. Æovertu, 
Tire. IV, 2, 14. 
AIl.souls' day, the day on which supplications 
are made for all souls by the Roman chttrch, the 2 d 
of Novcmber: R3 V, 1 10. 12.18. 
All-telling, divulging everything: a.fame 
LLL 11, 21. 
All-the-vrhl, the whole world: ou arc 
ms a. Sonn. 1125. John III, 4, 104. O. Edd. without 
hyphen, cf. All. 
AII-thing, every way: it had been as a ffap in 
out #reat feast, and a. unbecomb#, hIcb. 111, 1, 13. 
Ail-fo, an adverb, meaning 'entirely,' received 
by some M. Edd. into the text of Sh., but hot 
warranted by O. Edd., which bave hot the hyphen: 
it was hot she that call'd Mm ail to nou#ht, Ven. 993, 
i. e. that call'd him good for nothing. The very prin- 
cipals did seem to rend, and ai1 to topple Ier. 111 2, 
17 (i.e. did ail seem to topple). 
Ail-too-timeless, Lucr. 44, hot hyphened by 
O. Edd., cf. timeless. 
Allure, to entice: to a. his eye, Pi]gr. 48. Tire. 
IV, 3, 141. Cymb. 1, 6, 46. 11 4, 34. Per. ¥, 1, 46. 
Absol.: --ing beauty, Err. 11, 1 89. 
Ailllremellt, entieement, temptation: 
take heeà of the a. o] one Count lousillon All's IV, 3, 
241. 
Allusion, perhaps used by Holophernes in its 
old Latin meaning of jesting: the a. holds in the 
exchange, LLL 1¥, 2, 42. But it may bave the modern 
sense of referen ce. 
AIl-alched, watched throughout: the 
weary and a. ni#ht H5 1V Chor. 38. 
AIl-,orthy, of the highest worth: O, 
a. lord! A. villain! Cymb. 111, 5, 95. 
Ally, subst., relation, kinsman: As V, 4, 195. H4A 
1, 1, 16. R3 I, 3, 330. 1I, 1» 30. 111, 2 103. V, 1, 15. 
Rom. Ill, 1,114. 
Aily, vb. used only in the partie, allied : re- 
lated: Gentl. IV, 1, 49. Meas. 111, 2, 109. Tw. 11, 3 
104. Wint. 1, 2, 339. Rom. 11I 5, 182 (Qt and most 
bi. Edd. trained). In a more general sense: j o i n e d : 
neither allied fo eminent assistants, II8 I, 1, 61. 
AII eholly, corrupted from m e I a n e h o I y: Gentl. 
1V, 2,27. Wiv. 1,4, 164. cf. 3Iallicholie LLL IV, 3, 14. 
Almain, a German: Oth. 1I, 3 86. 
Almalae, calendar: Err. I, 2, 41 (cf. V, 404). 
hids. 111, 1, 54. H4B Il, 4 287. Ant. 1, 2, 154. 
Ahnighty, omnipotent: Lucr. 568. LLL 11I, 
205. ¥, 2, 650 Çoflances the a.). Troil. V, 2, 173. 
God Ahai#hty: H5 1I, 4, 77. IV, 1, 3. II6B 11, 1, 95. 
Almond, fruit of Amygdalus communia: 
Troil. V, 2, 194. 
Almost, for the greatest part, nearly: 
Lucr. 282. 1413. Sonn. 29, 9. ï6, 7. 111, 6. Tp. Il, 
1, 37.59. 234. 111, 2, 10. IV, 142. Gentl. IV, 2, 139. 
4, 148. Wiv. I, 3, 34. 11, 1, 88. 5Ieas. I, 2, 113. IV, 



A 33 

2, 109. 226 etc. etc. tou a.re a. corne to part a. a frat , 
Ado V, 1, 113 (i. e. what was almost a fray). Follow- 
ing the vord vhich it qualifies: as lilce a. to Claudio 
as himself, Meas. V, 494. I swoon a. Mids. II, 2, 154. 
cf. not a. Err. V, 1, 1S1. R3 Il, 3, 39.*Oth. III, 3, 66. 
Uscd emphatically, -- even: more klnd than tou 
shall.find man,j, nay a. ant , Tp. III, 3, 34. or could 
tou think, or do you a. t]ffnk, although tou sec, John 
IV, 3, 43. would yo irnaglne, or a. belleve, R3 Il[, 5, 
35. ere a. Borne sould }now, Cor. I, 2, 24. 
Altos, subst, sing., vhat is given in cha- 
rity: it were an a. to bang irn Ado II 3, 164. ave 
a present a. Shr. IV, 3 5. at received an a. Cor. 
III, 2,120. beg te a. Meas. III, l, 35. Seemingly but 
not evidently, in the plur: tat by a. dot live, Lucr. 
986. give a. Wint. IV, 4, 138. wherein e purs a. for 
oblivion, Troil. III, 3, 146. I bave our a. Cor. Il, 
87. 5y Ms own a. empoisoned V, 6, 11. bave the5" a. 
out oJ te empress" cest Tir. Il, 3, 9. one bred of a. 
Cymb. II 3, 119. -- received ou atortune's a. Lr. 
I 1,281, literally: on occasion of Fortune's al- 
ging, as an aIlns of Fortune. And sut yself up 
in some orner course, to Fortune's a. Oth. III, 4, 
i. e. and stint myself to the charity of Fortune. 
AIms-basket, a basket to receive altos 
(Troil. III, 3, 145): they 
words, LLL V, 1, 41, i. e. on what tbey have gaoEered 
out of other people's mout. 
AIn.s-deed, act of charity: murder is th a. 
H6C V, 5, 79. 
lms-drink, according to Warburton, a phrase 
amongst good fellows, to siify that liquor of 
anooEms share which s companion drinks to case 
him; but in the ouly psage in wch it occurs 
ave ade Mm drin} a. Ant. II, 7, 5) it evidently 
means the leavings. 
Altos-bouse, hospital for the poor: H5 I, 
1, 17. 
Alnts-nan, a man who lires npon altos: 
R2 III, 3, 149. 
Aloes, the juice extracted from Aloë 
v n 1 g a r i s; a sbol of bitterness: and sweetens the 
a. of all forces, shocks, and fears, Compl. 273. 
lloft, adv., 1) above, opposed to beloxv: ber 
chamber is a. Gentl. III, 1, 114. that $ou be by er a., 
wMle we be busy below, H6B I, 4, 11. Tit. Il, 3, 244. 
2) on high: Lucr. 505. Soun. 78, 6. H6B I, I, 
254. Il, 1, 11. V, 1, 204. Tir. Il, 1, 2.13. III, 1, 169. 
C)b. V, 5, 471. In Per. IV, 6, 95 O. Edd. aloft, M. 
Edd. aloof. 
lloft, prep., above: now I breathe again a. the 
flood, John IV, 2, 139. cL H6B V, l, 204 (?). 
llone, 1) solitary, without company: 
a., it was the subject of my theme, n copan$ I 
glanced if, Err. V, 65. Vert. 382. 786. Lucr. 795 (a. 
a.). 1480. Sonn. 4, 9. 29, 2. 36, 4. 66, 14. 105, 13. 
131, 8. 141, 8. Pilgr. 130. 297. Gentl. 1, 2, 1. Il, 1, 
21. III, 1, 99. III, 1 127. IV, 3, 36. V, 4, 4. Wiv. 
III, 3, 38. Err. III, 1, 96. Ado ll 2, 34 III, 1 13. 
LLL IV, 3, 328. Mids. II, 1, 225. 2, 87. Merch. III, 
151. As I, 1, 167 (oEever he go a. aga{n, i. e. withont 
help). III, 2, 270 
Let alone (originally let be alone)= do hot 
care for: let them a. awMle, and then open the door, 
H4A Il, 4, 95. let ber a., and list to e, III, 3, 110. 
let them a.  do hot aist them, H4B Il, 3, 41. Hence 
$¢hmidt, Shakespeare Lexicon. 3. Ed. T.I. 

--- forbear molesting, or meddling with: 
Tp. IV, 223. 231. Gentl. 11, 4, 167. riv. IV, 2, 145. 
Ado Ill, 3, 48. Mids. III, 2, 332. Merch. Ill, 3, 19. 
Tw. IV, 1, 35. Wint. V, 3, 73. R2 V, 3, 86. H4A ]I, 
4, 231. H4B [11, 2, 123. H6A I, 2, 44. H8 V, 2, 34. 
Cor. I, 6, 41. Rom. [, 5, 67. Lr. Ill, 4, 3. IV, 7, 51. 
Ant. V, 1, 71. Cymb. V, 5, 305. Then = forbear: 
let tour epilogue a. Mids. V, 369. let tly courtes{es a. 
All's V, 3, 324. let't alone, Shr. IV, 3, 195. let these 
threats a. Troil. IV, 5, 261. It4B II, 1, 169. H8 II, 1, 
101. Ant. Il, 5, 3. let alone, without an object, Tir. 
IV, 1, 102. Sometimes it is as ranch as let me do 
alone: let me a. with hlrn, Tv. Il, 3, 145. III, 4, 106. 
192. 201. Shr. IV, 2, 71. H4A V, 4, 53. H6B IV, 2, 
109. H8 I, 4, 34. Col'. I, 2, 27. Tir. I, 449. IV, 3, 114. 
Rom. IV, 2, 42. 
Zeave me a.  let me a.: leave me a. to woo 
Mm, As I, 3, 135 (cf. Cor. !, 2, 27). 
2) only, vithout another: eontentng but 
the eye a. Ven.213. lght a. upon his head, Lncr. 1480. 
thine a. Sonn. 31, 12. which thou deservest a., 39, 8. 
42, 14. 45, 7. 79, 1. 84, 2. 91, 13. Meas. Il, 1,40. 
Err. [1, 1, 107. LLL IV, 1, 34. Cor. I, 6, 76. Ant. III, 
13, 154. 11, 38 (--- only, but) etc. All alone: Sonn. 
124, 11. As Il, 7, 136. Hml. 1, 5, 102. Ill, 1, 190. 
1Vot alone -- but  hot only- but: John [, 210. 
H8 III, 2, 157. IIml. I, 2, 77. 3, 11. Lr. I, 1,300. 
3) vithout a paraIIel.: she œs a. Gentl. 11,4, 
167. H8 Il, 4, 136 (M. Edd. thou art, alone), that 
must needs be sport a. hlids. III, 2, 119. that it a. is 
hOh fantastcal , Tv. I, 1, 15. I ara a. the villain of 
the earth, Ant. IV, 6, 30 (par excellence). Perhaps 
also in: /ou ail three, the senators a. of this great 
world, Ant. I1, 6, 9 (cf. onlff). 
&long, adv. 1) at one's length: so soon was 
she a. as he was down, Vert. 43. as he lay a. under 
an oak, As Il, 1, 30. stretched a. III, 2, 253. lay thee 
all a. Rom. V, 3, 3. that now on 1%mpey's basis lles 
a. Caes. III, 1, 115. when he lies a. Cor. V, 6, 57. 
2) onward, on; to go, pass, rnarch etc. along: 
Ven. 1093. Gentl. Il, 7, 39. V, 4, 162. 168. LLL Il, 
245. As II, 1, 53. R2 V, 2, 21. H6A IV, 3, 5. II6C V, 
1, 76. H8 V, 2, 11 etc. let's along  let us go there, 
Cor. I, 1, 283. Wiut. V, 2, 121. speak the word a. 
Caes. IV, 2, 33. go a. by him  call at his house, Caes. 
I1, 1,218. cf. IV, 3, 207 (v. bff). l'Il go a. by ]our 
prescription (proceed according to your p.) II8 I, 
1, 150. 
3) together, with one; to go, corne etc. a. 
with one: Gentl. Il, 4, 88.176. IV, 3, 39. Wiv. Il, 2, 
139. IV, 6, 47. V, 1, 25. ]Ieas. IV, 1, 46.3,174. Err. 
V, 236. LLL V, 2, 5. Merch. III, 2, 233. As I, 3, 107. 
Shr. IV, 5, 51. H4A V, 4, 131. H6B III, 2,300. YI6C 
Il, 5, 134 etc. along with us to watch, Hml. 1, 1, 26. 
eparated from with: with him is Gratiano gone a., 
Merch. Il, 8, 2. else had she with her father ranged . 
As I, 3, 70. TropicaIly: tour better wisdoms which 
bave freely gone wlth thls a.ff'air a. Hml. I, 2, 16. 
Without with: go a.  come vitJa me, Err. IV, 4, 42. 
Mids. I, 1, 123. Merch. III, 2, 310. All's III, 2, 98 (to 
bear a. -- to take with one). YI6C Il, 1, 115. lII, 2, 
123. IV, 5, 25. R3 III, 1, 136. H8 I, 3, 64. Cor. V, 2, 
96. Il, 3, 157. Rom. 1, 1, 201. Caes. IV, 3, 25. 
Fiml. III, 3, 4. Ant. V, 1, 69. Vert. 1093 etc. Without 
a verb: a. wlth me: Gentl. Ill, 1,256. Tir. Il, 3, 246. 
long, prep., folloving the length of: tra- 
3 



84 

A 

velling a. tMs coast, LLL V, 2, 557. the brook that 
brawls a. this wood, As II, 1, 32. Troil. V, 8, 2- °. 
Aionso, naine of the king in Tp. 111, 3, 75. V, 72. 
/ioof, ata distance froln a person or action, 
bnt in close connection with them: one a. stand 
sentinel, Mids. II, 2, 26. love's hot love wlen it is 
mingled with regards tlat stand a. from tle entb'e 
point, Lr. I, 1, -O43. Chiefly in speaking of persons 
who are not to be prescrit at, or interfere with, 
omething: ]Verissa and te test, stand all a. Merch. 
HI, 2, 42,. Tw. I, 4, 12. tt6A IV, 4, 21. Tir. V, 3, 151. 
Rom. V, 3 1. -°6. 28-O; or who are kept back by 
caution or fera': 0 appetite, from judgment stand a. 
Compl. 166. I stand for sacrifice, tle test a. are tle 
Dardanian wives, Merch. III, -O, 58. keep a. from strict 
arbitrement, H4A IV, 1, 70. H6A IV, 2, 52. V 4, 150. 
I-I6B I, 1,2-O7. II6C II, 1,17. tIml. III. 1, 8. 
Per. IV, 6, 95 (Qq Ff aloft). It is, with one exception 
(Merch. III, -O, 58) always joined with the verbs to 
stand and to keep. 
/loug, with a raised voice: Ven. 282. 886. 
l,Ieas. 1I, 4. 153. Ado II, 1,108. Tw. II, 5, 94. John 
I11, 4, 70. H5 V, 2, 258. II6B 11I, 2, 378. R3 I, 4, 50. 
54. Troil. I, 3, 259. II, 2, 185. lII 3, 
161. III, 1,169. Mcb. V, 8, 58. Lr. IV, 4, 2. Aut. IlI 
13, 101. Cymb. I, 6, -O6. V, 5, 130. 
Of the noise of inds: LLL V, 2, 931. Oth. Il, 1, 
5. of bells: H6A I, 6, 11. H6B V, 1, 3. 
Alphabet, the ABC: Tit. III, 2, 44. 
A|phahetieal, concerning the letters of 
t h e a I p h a b e t: what s]iould that a. position portend? 
Tw. Il, 5, 130. 
Alphonso, nmne in GeutL I, 3, 39. 
Aips, the lnountaius in Switzerland: 
John I, 20-O. R2 I, 1, 64. Ant. I, 4, 66. te valleys 
wwse low vassal seat the AIps doth spit and void his 
r)eum upon, H5 III, 5, 52 (siug.) 
Aiready, opposed to hot yet: Lucr. 1589. 
Sonu. 76, 12. Geutl. I, 1, 72. III, 1, -O06. -O19. 2, 58. 
IV, -O, 1. Wiv. II, 3, 9. 11I 5, 134. IV, 1, 1. Meas. I, 4, 
73. II, 2, 22. 4, 44. III, 1,270. IV, 3, 134. 177. Ado 
1, 20. Il, 3, 5. III, -O, 47. 1¥, 2 23. LLL I, 1, 34. IV, 
3, 16. V 2, 683. Mids. III, 2,384. V, 254. 328. Merch. 
I, '2., 38. III, 4, 37. V 146 etc. etc. 
Aise, likewise, besides; a word ofnot so 
frequent occulu-ence as would be expected, but only 
in Gentl. III, -O, 25. Wiv. I, 1» 43. III, 1, 9. 1¥, 4, 67. 
V, 1, -o4. 5, 7. Ado V, 1, 316. III, 3, 35. As Il, 2, 9. 
Tw. I. 2, 39. Wint. IV, 4, 235. H4A Il, 4, 440. 459. 
H4B Il, 4, 171. ¥, 3,145. H5 I, 2, 77. IV, I, 80.6,10. 7, 
28.39. Tire. III, 6, 2. Caes. II, 1,329. Hlnl. V» -O,402 (Ff 
alwa.s). Lr. I, 4, 66. 
Allar, the place where sacrifices and 
prayers are offercd: Vert. 103. Compl. 224. 
Gentl. III, 2, 73. Wiv. IV, 2, 217. All's II, 3, 80. Mids. 
l, 1, 89. Tw. V, 116. John V, 4, 18. H4A IV, 1,116. 
H6A I, 1, 45. H8 IV, 1, 83. Troil. III, 3, 74. IV, 3» 8. 
Cymb. V, 5» 478.1)er. V, 1, 242. 3, 17. 
Airer, 1) trans, a) to change: add fo ]iis 
fow, but a. hot ]ifs faste, Lucr. 651. 948. Sonn. 36, 7. 
93, 3. 145, 9. Gentl. II, 4, 1-O8. Wiv. II, 1, 52. Tw. Il, 
5,112. Wint. I, 1, 37. 2» 384. IV, 4, 586. H4A III, 1, 
116. H5 V, 2, 87. H6B III, 1, 5. H6C IV, 3, 31. H8 I, 
1 189. IV, 1,98. 2,96. 112. Mcb. 1,573. Lr. IV,6,7. 
Çymb. IV, 2,365. Per. III, 1, 76. Especially  to make 
.aï another mind or humour: Angelo will hot be 

Meas. III, -O, 2"20. there is no power bt the tongue of men 
to a. me, Mereh. IV, 1,242. Err. II, 2, 7. Ado 1,3,39. 
Wint. IV, 4, 475. Cor. V, 4, 9. Oth. III, 4, 1-O5. ler. 
IV, 6, 11,'2. And  to reverse a law, a judgment: no 
power in lCice can a. a decree, Mereh. 1¥: 1,219. but 
you, sir, --ed that, Tw. I1,122. John III, 1, 311. 
II1, -O, 214. Followed by f rom : out theme is --ed from a 
serous thing, 11.'2 V, 3 79. Absol.: stupid with age and 
--ing rheums, Wint. lV, 4, 410. 
b) to exchange: would a. services with thee, 
Tw. II» 5, 172. 
2) intr., to change: love is hot love whiclt 
Sonn. 116, 3. 11. 115, 8. Ado II, 3, 247. Mids. II, 1, 
107. 2, 61. tI4B IV, 5, 12 (cf. It8 IV, :2, 96). 
Aiteration, change: Sonn. 116, 3. Wint. 1, _'2, 
383. IV, 4, 536. H4B III, 1, 52. II6A IV, 1, 54. Cor. 
IV, 5, 154. Tiln. IV, 3, 468. Lr. V 1, 3. Oth. V, 2,101. 
Aihaea, the mother of Mcleager: H4B 11,2, 93. 
H6B I, 1,234. 
Aihough, notwithstanding, though; 
followed by the indie, as well as the subjunctive: 
Sonn. 81, 4. 138, 6. John IV 2, 83. H6B II,4, 101. III, 
2, 57. R3 III, -O, 1-O3, etc. etc. Sonn. 40, 10. 56, 5. 11(;, 
8. As II, 7, 54. 179. Tw. !,11, -O, 50. Wint. 11, 3, 95. 
112 III -O 193. H6A V, 5, 3. Ht;B II, 1,71. 111» -O, 193. 
I16C 1\,6, 23, etc. etc. no marrer, then, a. re.y foot did 
stand . Sonn. 44, 5. 
$1itude, height: nearer to heaven b.y the a. of 
a chopine, Hml. 1I, 2,446. ten toasts ai each make hot 
the a. Lr. IV, 6, 53. he is proud, even fo the a. of his 
vb.tue, Cor. I, 1, 40. 
Altogether, entirely: this your request is a. 
just, Wint. III, 2, 118. Luer. 696. Wiv. I, -O, 8. II1, 
64. As I, 1, 14-O.177. Tw. I, 3, 1-Ol. R2 111,4, 13. H4A 
1II, 1, 237. 3, 40. II5 III, 2, 70. R3 I 3, 156. Hml. III. 
2, 42. Ofll. I, 3 25. Joined to the comparative  by 
far: much more gentle, and a. more trtctable, Troil. 
11, 3, 160. Preeeded by hot: Wiv. I, 1, 175. All's 
3,53.319. '£im.II,2,122`. Lr.l,4, 165. II, 4,234. III5, 
6. Cymb. I, 4, 51. Sometimes miswritten for all together. 
Alon. Lord lCdun of A, one of Talbot's tifles, 
H6A lV, 7, 65. 
Alvay, for a 1 w ay s : H4B I, 2,, 240. H6C V, 6, 64. 
Alvays, at all times, ever: Ven.801. Som. 
76, 9. Pilgr. 3"29. Tp. II, 1, 175. IV, 174. Gent. II, 
31. |I, 5, 4. IV, 2, 70. 7-O. ]Viv. IV, 2, 58. V, 5, 12-'2. 
Meas. I, 1, "26. I, -O, 53. Il, 3 32. IY, 1 -O5 (I ara a. 
bound to you). Err. I, 1, 64. IV 3, 32. Ado l, 1,145. 
III, 1, 93. Il|, 3 64. V, l, 311. V, -O, 10. LLL IV, 
384. V, 2 495. Merch. III, 5, 4. As |, , 57. Alls 
52. IV, 5, 49. Wint. l|, 3, 148. R2 Il, 1, 0. 
H4A I, 3 286. H4B III, -O, 214. -O94. H5 V, -O» 165. 
H6A Il, 3, 80. IV, 1, 38. V, 1, 11. H6B IV, 7, 72. H6C 
II 2, 47. III, 1, 88. IV, 3, 45. V, 6, 11. R3 III, 1 48. 
H8 II, -O, 110. V 3 59. Cor. |, 1, 53. III, 3, 8. IV 5, 
193. V .2, 30. Tire. I, 2, 21. II, 2, 130. II|, 1, 33. 36. 
IV, 3, 37. Caes. I, 2, 21-O. Mcb. IlI 1, 132. Hml. l, 
5, 60. Lr. I, 1 3..293. Cymb. I, 1, 87. l, 2, 31. 
Smaimon (O. Edd. Amaimon and Amamon), naine 
of a devil: Vfiv. || "2, 311. H4A l|, 4, 370. 
Amain, with fnll force; 1)aloud: criedout 
a. It6AI, 1, 12`8. cry you all a. Troil. ¥, 8, 13. 
2) swiftly: ICus makes a. to Mm, Ven. 5. Tp. 
IV, 1, 74. Err. I, 1, 93. LLL V, 2, 549. H6B III, 1, 
282. V, 1, 114. tt6C II, 1» 182. II 3 56. ll 5, 128. 
103. 1¥, 8 4. 64. Tir. IV, 4, 65. 



A 35 

Amaze, subst, extreme wonder aud ad- 
m i r a t i o n : his face's own margent did quote sucl 
--s, LLL 11,246. 
Amaze, rb. 1) to briug iuto a maze, fo 
make one lose the way: like a labrith to a. 
Ids jbes, Veu. 684. I ara --d, mellffnks, ad lose my 
way amo,g tle tlwrns aud daners of tMs world, John 
IV, 3, 140. 
2) to put in confusion, to put lu astate 
whcre one does not know what to do or to say or to 
think: w]ereat --d. . . in t]e dark s]e lay, Ven. 823. 
ber earest eye dld make ]im more --d, Lucr. 1356. 
jou are --d; but t]ds s]mll absolutely resolve jou, 
Meas. 1V, 2, 224. LLL V, 9, 391. Mids. 111, 2, 2°0. 
344. Merch. V, 266. As l, 2, 115. Shr. 1V, 5, 54. Tw. 
V, 271. Johu IV, _'2, 137. H6A I, 2, 68. Cymb. IV, 3, 
28. to stand --d: Wiv. V, 5, 244. Shr. II, 156. Tw. 
II1, 4, 371. John Il, 356. Rom. III, 1, 139. Lr. III, 6, 
35. Oth. lV, 2, 246. This state may be caused by fear : 
Ven. 469. 925. Lncr. 446. Wiv. III, 3, 125. V, 3, 18. 
19. 20. V, 5, 233. Err. III, _'2, 149. Shr. lli, 2, 163. 
John Ii, 926. R21,3,81. V, 2, 85. II4AV, 4, 6. tI6A 
IV, 7, 54. R3 V, 3, 341. Caes. Iii, 1, 96. Mcb. Il, 3, 
114. V, 1, 86. Ihul. I. _'2, 235. Il, 2, 591. 0th. III, 3, 
371. l'er. 1, 4, 87. Or by the highest admiratiou: 
w]wse full perfect&n all the world --s, Ven. 634. 
steals men's eyes and women's sotls --th, Soun. 20, 
.% Or by extreme snrprise: Meas. V, 385. Ado Il, 3, 
118. Alls II, 1, 87. John V, 2, 51. R2 III, 3, 7- ° • HS 
III, 9, 373 (--d at). Troil. V, 3, 91 (--d at.). Rom. 
111, 3, 114. Cacs. i, 2, 128. 
Amazedly, 1) confusedly: I shall repbj a., 
],al.I" sleep, half waking, Mids. IV, 1,151. I speak a. 
Wint. V, 1, 187. 
2) in a manner indicating fear or horror: 
(. in er sad face ]e stares, Lucr. 1591. wl sta,ds 
3[acbet] tus a.? Mcb. IV, 1, 126. 
Anazedness, state of bcing amazed, ex- 
treme surprise, terror: we two in great a. will 
]/y Wiv. IV, 4, 55. (tf ter a little a. Wint. V, 9, 5. 
Ailaze||¢nt, 1) confusion, perplexity, 
bewilderment: put ot yourself into a. ]ww t]ese 
tMgs s]wdd be, Meas. IV, 2, 2,00. and wild a. ]urries 
up and down the little number of our doubtful friends, 
John V, 1, 35. a. s]mll drive courage from t]e state, 
Per. l, 2, "26. 
2) surprise, astonishment: all tMs a. can 
I qualiJ, AdoV,4,67. resolve joufor more a. Wiut. 
V, 3, 87. tey did so to t]e a. of mine eyes, Mcb. Il, 
4, 19. struc]z ]er into a. and admS"ation, Hml. I11, 2, 
339. 
3) horror, terror: no more a. Tp. 1, 2, 14. I 
flamed a. 198. all torment, trouble, wonder and a. in- 
abl,s ]ere, V 104. strike a. to t]eir dmvsy spb'its 
Troil. I1, 2» 210. distractions, fi'enzy acd a. V, 8, 85. 
a. on th »wther sits, Hml. 111, 4» 112. 
Amazon, one of the fabulous race of female 
warriors: Mids. I1, 1, 70. John V 2, 155. H6A 1 2 
104. H6C 1"¢, 1» 106. 
Amazonia, resembling an Amazon: like 
an A. trull, H6C I æ 4 114. Ms A. chln» Cor. I1, 2 95 
(beardless). 
Ambassador (O. Edd. frequently embassador), 
1) messenger from a sovereign power: Meas. 
III, 1, 58. H5 1, 1, 91. _'2, 3. I1, 4, 81. (;5. 111Chor.28. 
H6A v» 1» 24.34. 4 144. H6B I 1, 45. 111, 2 276. 

1V, 8, 7. II6C 111, 3, 163. 256. IV, 3, 36. H8 I, 1, 97. 
4, 55. H, 4, 172. 111, 2, 318. IV, 2, 109. Troil. III, 
267. Tit. lV, 4, 100. Hml. 11, 2, 40.51. lV, 6, 10. V, 
2, 362. Ant. I, 1, 48. Cymb. Il, 3, 59. III, 4, 144. 
2) any messenger: LLL III, 53. V, 2,788. Merch. 
II, 9, 92. 
Amber, a fossil resin: Comp1. 37. LLL IV, 
3, 87. Resin lu general: tMck a. andplum-tree gum, 
Hml. Il, 2, 901. 
Adjectively: Pilgr. 366. LLL lV, 3, 87. Shr. lV, 
3, 58. Wiut. IV, 4, 224 (placed after the subst, in a 
popular rhyme). 
Amher-colottred: LLL IV, 3, 88. 
Aul»igity, uncertainty, obscurity: 
we can cler tese --ies Rom. V 3 216. out of doubt, 
ad out of qesHon too, ad --les, H5 V 1, 48. 
Ambiguos, of uncertain signification, 
obscure: such a. givig out, to note t]at you know 
aught qfe, thnl. l, 5, 178. 
Ambitions, desire of superiority, of ho- 
nor and power: Lncr. 68.411. Tp. I, 2, 105. 
1,242. V, 75. Viv. fil, 3, 47. As I, 1. 149. Il, 5, 40. 
All's l, I, 101. 185. R2 V, 5 18. }I6A Il, 4, 112. 5 
123. II6B l, l, 180. Il, l, 32. 2, 71. III, 1,143. R3 
lll 7, 145. Mcb. Il, 4, 28. Ihnl. Il, 2, 258 etc. etc. 
Plurah --s, coveli»gs, Cynb. II, 5 25. H6B IV, 10, 1 
(ouly Ft). Followcd by the iuf.: 1 ]ave no a. to see 
agoodlier ma, Tp. I, 2, 482. Abstr. pro concr.: 1 
ara sliH possess'd of those eects for wMch 1 did te 
urder, y crown, mine own a. and my queen. Hml. 
111,3, 55; 'desire' for what is dcsircd ;' 'my ambition' 
for qhe object of my ambitiou.' 
tmbiiots, desirous of superiority, of 
houor and power: Lucr. 150. LLL V, 1, 12. 
Mcrch. II, 7, 44. III, , 152. As IV, 1, 13. All's III, 4, 
5. John l, 32. R2 i, 3, 130. II6A l, 3 29. Il, 4, 114. 
I11, 1, 29. II6B l, 2, 18. 3, 112. Il, 1, 182. IV, 1, 84. 
V, 1, 132. H6C I1, 2, 19. III, 3, 27. V, 5, 17. Caes. l, 
3, 7. tlml. 11, , 264 etc. Placed after its subst.: love 
a., John Il, 430. Followed by for: I ara a. jbr a 
motley coat, As 11, 7, 43. you are a. for poor knaves" 
caps, Cor. 11, 1, 76. 
tmbiiously, with a desire of snperior- 
ity: H6BII, 3,36. Tit. l, 19. 
mble, 1) to more easily and without 
hard shocks: n --inggelding. Wiv. ll, 2319. your 
wit s well, it goes easily, Ado V, 1 159. As III, 
328. 343. 8362 
2) to more affcctcdly, as lu a dance: 
skipping kbg Ie --d up and down H4A III, 2 60. a 
wanton --ing nmpJ, R3 l, l, 17. give me a torc: 
ara mt for this --ing, Rom. l, 4, 11. ou jlg, you a., 
andyou lisp, Hml. I11, 1, 151. 
ml»us¢ado, ambush: Rom. l 4, 84. 
ml»ush, 1) a covert to surprise the 
enemy: lain la a. Lucr. 233. All's IV, 3, 335. R2 
l. l, 137 (lay an a.). H6C lV, 6, 83. Metaphorically: 
pass'd by te a. of oung das Sonn. 70 9. wo ma, 
in tJe a. of m naine, strike Jmme, Meas. 1, 3 41. 
2) the troops or persons posted in a 
concealed place: see tIe a. of out friends be 
strong, Tir. V, 3, 9. Ifear some a. Cymb. IV, 2, 65. 
meu, term of devotion,  so be it: Tp. Il, , 
98. Wiv. III, 3 20. Me. 1  6. ll 2 157. Ado 
1, 223. LLL Il, 127. lV, 3, 94. As 111» 3 48. Shr. 
Ind.  100. H5 V 2 384. R3 Il, 2 109. fil» 7 241 
3" 



36 

A 

?roil. lI, 3, 37. lom. I11, 5» 229 etc. etc. ]appily, a.! 
Ant. II, 2, 155. now, Ipral/ God, a.: HSIl, 3» 56. 
At the end of a prayer: Tim. 1, 2, 71. In divine ser- 
vice it was the office of the clcrk to say A. to what 
the priest had spoken: Sonn. 85, 6. R2 IV, 173. Ado 
1I, 1, 114. Amen, amen! Gentl. V, 1, 8. hIids. II, 2,62. 
John Il, 287. Rom. Il, 6, 3. I erg a. : Ado Il, 1,110. 
R2 l, 3, 102. I say a.: Tp. V, 204. Mereh. II, 2, 203. 
III, 1» 22. 8hr. Il, 322. Amen fo that! Oth. Il, 1, 197. 
ery a. fo sth.: 8onn. 85, 6. John III, 1, 181. H5 V, 2, 
21. say a. to sth: AdolI, l,315. R3I, 3, 21. IV, 4, 
197. V, 5, 8. Amen, amen fo that fait pral/er sag I, 
Mids. Il, 2, 62. J][arry, amen! Tw. IV, 2, 109. H8 
III, 2, 54. ]larry, and amen! H4A II, 4, 128. Rom. 
IV, 5, 8. 8ubstantively: ray a. to it! H8 llI, 2,45. God 
Æpeak this a. H5 V, 2, 396. I eould erg the a. II8 V» 
1 24. 
Amend, 1) ta'ans, to make better what was 
wrong, to improve: weak sfghts t]ieir sickly 
radlance do a. Compl. 214. Goda. us! Goda.! LLL 
IV, 3, 76. Mids. 11, 1, 118. V, 214. Tw. 1, 5, 48. 11, 
5, 81. Wint. V, 2, 166. H4A III, 1, 180. III, 3, 27. 
H4B I, 2, 142. Cyïmb. Il, 3,35. V, 5,216. = to cure: 
I ara ill, but your hein 9 by me eannot a. me, Cymb. IV, 
2, 12. cf. Il, 3, 35. tI4B l, 2, 142. = to rcpair, to 
mend: the case rnay be --ed, 1Rom. IV, 5, 101. I 
rnust excuse what eannot be --ed, Cor. IV, 7, 12. if is 
rnff shame to be so .fox, d, but it iÆ hot in rny virtue to a. 
ff, Oth. I, 3, 321. Luer. 578. 1614. All's III, 4, 7. R3 
III, 7 115. IV. 4, 291. 
2) intrans, to beeome better from a bad 
s tare: sin that--s is but patched withvirtue, Tw. l, 
5» 54. Espeeially to reeover: the affliction of mg 
rabid--s, Tp. V, 115. ai his touch they presentll/ a. 
Meb. IV, 3, 145. 
A-mending, in repairing: when he speaks, 
'ris like a chirac a. Troil. I, 3, 159. 
k, mendment, change for the better: Isee 
a good a. of lire in thee, H4A 1, 2, 114. Especially' 
recovery: what likelihood ofhis a.? 13 1, 3, 33. 
Shr. Ind. 2, 131. All's 1, 1, 14. 
k, mends, compensation, atonement: what 
shall be thl/ a. for thl/ neglect of truth? Sonn. 101, 1. 
l'll kiss each several paper for a. Gentl. 1, 2, 108. 
for a. fo his posteritl/, John 1I, 6. Robin shall restore 
a. lids. V, 445. Mostly joined to the verb fo make: 
l/our compensation makes a. ŒEp. IV, 1, 2. Lucr. 961. 
Mids. V, 441. H6C V, 1, 100. R3 IV, 4, 295. Mcb. 
III, 5, 14. Cymb. I, 6, 168. make a. for sth.: Gentl. 
III» 1, 331. To make a p. a.: make thl/ love a. Gentl. 
lV, 2, 99. Wiv. 11, 3, 70. II!, 1» 90. 5, 49. Err. I1, 2, 
54. H6C IV, 7, 2. R3 I, 1, 155. Oth. IV, 1, 255. I 
cannot make !Cu what a. I would, R3 IV, 4, 309. 
Wrongly for anaendment  recovery: Shr. Ind. 
2, 99. 
k, merce, to punish with a pecuniary 
penalty: l'll a. !Cu with so strong a flïne» Rom. Ill 
1» 195. 
k, merica, the new Continent: Err. III, 2, 136. 

thg a. cheeks do colC Mids.IV, 1, 2. and in no sense is 
meet or a. Shr. ¥, 2, 141. 0 a. lovelg death ! JohnllI, 
4, 25. 'twould mae ber a. and subdue mlCailler enti- 
relg fo ber love» Oth. I11, 4, 59. 
,mid, in the midst of: famish them a. their 
plentl/, Ven. 20. a. this hurlg I intend that all is donc 
in reverend care of ber, Shr. 1¥, 1, 206. 
k, midst, in the midst of'- enthroned and 
sphered a. the other, Troil. I, 3, 91. 
k, miens: my Lord o] A. As I1, 1, 29. 
lmil[as, king of Lycaonia» Ant. III» 6» 7 (part 
of M. Edd. Aml/ntas). 
Amiss, adv. originally  astray" what error 
&'ives our ciCs and ears a.? Err. I1, 2» 186. Usnally 
.improperly, wrongly, ill: beara, the second 
burden of a former child, Sonn.59, 3. choose a. Merch. 
11, 9, 65. nothing cornes a., so money cornes withal, 
Shr. I, 2 82. speed a. 11, 285. talk'd a. of ber, 293. 
that which thou hast sworn to do a. is hot a. John 111, 
1,270. a. employed, R2 11, 3» 132. if I bave done a. 
H6A IV, 1 27. gold cannot corne a. H6B 1, 2, 92. take 
if hot a. ( take it hot iii) R3 I11 7» 206. donc augh 
a. Tir. V 3, 129. Caes. I, 2, 273. a. interpreted» II, 2 
83. said or donc a. Oth. 11, 3, 201. such a sffht here 
shows nuch a. Ihnl. V, 2 413. 
k, miss, adj., only used in the predieate,  out 
of time and order, wrong: allisa. 1)ilgr. 248. 
never anything can be a., when simpleness and duty 
tender if» Mids. V, 82. God may Jïnish it when he will, 
'ris hOt a hair a. yet, H4B 1, 2, 27. Tire. I1, 2, 217. 
III» 6, 91. Caes. 111, 1, 31. Mcb. 11, 3, 102. Ant. Il, 2 
19. Contrary to justice: John 111, 1, 271. 
Iffegatively: that shall hot be rnuch a. Meas. I!I, 1 
200. 'ris hot a. 11I, 2» 66. it had hot been a. Ado II 1 
234. All's IV 5, 72. Tw. 111, 2» 49. H6B IV, 10, 10. 
V, 1, 76. Tire. V, 1, 14. Oth. IV, 1, 92. Ant. 1, 4, 17. 
t'er. I¥, 2, 36. 
lmiss, subst. 1) wrong, offenee: salvlng thy 
a. Sonn. 35, 7. urge hot mlWa. 151,3. 2) misehief: 
fo mlWsick soul each toy seems prologue to some great 
a. Hml. IV, 5, 18. 
k, mity, good understanding, friendæhip: 
Mids. 1¥, 1, 92. Merch. 111» 2, 30. I11, 4, 3. All's I1, 5, 
15. Wint. V, 1, 136. John I1, 537. 111, 1,105. 231. 
V, 4, 20. H4B III, 1, 79. IV, 2, 65. H6A III, 1, 68. IV, 
1» 62. V, 1, 16. H6C 111, 3, 53.54. R3 I, 3, 281. I-I$ 
1, 1, 181. Troil. I1, 3, 110. Lr. I1, 4 245 (hold a.). 
Aut. I1, 2, 127. 11, 6, 130. l).lural: Hml. V, 2» 42. Lr. 
1» 2, 159. 
.mnng(ef. 'mong), in or into the midst of, 
in or into the number of: sometime he runs a. 
aflock of sheep, Ven. 685. Luer. Arg. 7. Sonn. 12, 
10. 124, 4. 136, 8. Compl. 190. Gentl. I11, 1, 337. 
IV, 2, 37. Wir. lll, 3, 14. 236. Ado V,2,76. LLL III, 
197. V, 1, 104. V, 2, 684. lids. 11I, 1, 32. I11, 2, 67. 
Mereh. I» 2, 120. 11, 1, 46. 11I, 1, 25. III, 2, 182. All's 
I, 3» 81. IV 1, 6. Wint. 1, 2 253. V, 2, 132. H4A 1, 
3 105. H6A V, 5, 93 etc. etc. l)reeeded by its snb- 
stantive: and mine I pour l/our ocean ail a. Compl. 

Ames-ace, two aces, the lowest throw at dice: 256. go thefools a. Lr. 1, 4, 194. 
throw a.for mlWlire, All's I1, 3, 85 (cf. deuce-ace). 2) Among them  jointly, both together: 
Amiable, 1) concerning love, donc out lyon bave a. !Cu killed a sweet and innocent lad!C Ado 
of I ove: laiA an a. siege fo the honesty of ths Ford's V, 1,194. rnake hm hanged a. !Cu, H4B II, 2, 105. the 
wife, Wiv. 11, 2, 243. saw a.fir off in the orchard tMs I man is dead that !Cu and Pistol beat a. ,you, V, 4, 19 
a. encounter, Ado 111, 3,161. 2) lovely, p leasing: / (Q arnongst), a woman lost arnong l/e (---- rnined by 
bull Jove sir» had an a. low» Ado V, 4, 48. while I  you) H8 llI 1,107. that will Ibestow a. mlWwlfe and 



A 37 

ber con.federates, Err. IV, 1, 17 (i. e. npoll lny wife as 
well as ail ber confederates), let his knights bave colder 
looks a. you, Lr. I, 3, 22 (i. e. from your whole com- 
pany)..you bave a. you rnany a purchased slave, Merch. 
IV, 1, 90, i.e. you possess in common public slaves (cf. 
between). 
3) between: that such immanlt.y cn bloodj strif e 
should relgn a. professors of onefaith, H6A V, 1, 14. 
Adverbially: and lustj hds roctm here and there 
so merribj, and ever a. so rnerrlbj, II4B V, 3, 23. 
(Nares: "To and among was equivalent to here and 
there. Ovcrbury: She travels to and anaong." Per- 
haps eorrupted from ever and anon. er. still an end 
for still and anon). 
:t_mongs¢  among (H4B 1I, 4, 80 Q among» Ff 
amongst, 114B V, 4, 19 and R3 II, 1, 53 Qq arnongst, 
Ff arno»,g): Lucr. Arg. 10. As IV, 3, 1'2.4. V, 4, 57. 
Shr. I» 1, 58. I, _'2, 266. All's I, 3, 233. Wint. II, 1, '2.1. 
R2 IV, 14. H4A I, 1, 82. 3, 47. H6A I, ], 70. Il, 2, 
'2.4. III, 1,182. IV, 1, 138. 7, 83. V, 2, 6. tI6C II, 1, 
180. V, 6, 58. R3 II, 1, 53. Tit. I, 84. IV, 2, 68. Tin. 
IV. 2, 23 (I'll share a. l/ou) etc. etc. 
Amongst them = j o i n t 1 y: and a. them fell'd hbn 
dead, Lr. 1¥, 2, 76. -- lrature does requlre ber rimes 
of preservation, whlch perforce I, her frail son, a. rmj 
brethren rnortal, rnust give rn.y tendence to, H8 III, 2, 
148. i. e. as well as my brethren. 
.¢morous, 1) pertaining to love: Ms a. 
spoil, Compl. 154. rn.y a. tale» Ado I, 1,327. your a. 
token, All's V, 3,68. fetter'd in a. chains, Tit. II, 1,15. 
a. rites, Rom. III, 2, 8. thelr a. sojourn, Lr. I, 1, 48. 
hls a. works, Oth. V, 2, 213. 
2) fond» in love: ourfine rnusiciangroweth a. 
Shr. III, 1, 63. Rom. V, 3, 103. Cymb. V, 5, 195. a. 
Phillida, Mids. II, 1, 68. Merch. II, 8, 9. Shr. 1,2,144. 
III, 2'2, 149. All's III, 5, 72. Troil. V, 5, 4. Ant. Il, 1, 
33. unloose his a..fold, Troil. III, 3, 223. bent of a. 
view, IV, 5, 282. Phoebus' a. plnches, Ant. I, 5, 28. 
to court an a. lookingglass, R3 I, 1, 15, i.e. a looking- 
glas which reflects a face fond of itself. 
Followed by of: a. of their strokes, Ant. II, 2,202. 
by on: a. on lfero, Ado II, 1, 161. 
Amorously, fondly: wlth twisled rnetal a. 
impleach'd, Compl. 2'205. 
• tmort, dejected, dispirited: what, sweeting, 
ail a.? Shr. IV, 3, 36. what, all a.? H6A III, 2, 124. 
;tmonn, rb. (never subst.) to compose in 
the whole; followed by to: a. to three ducats, Err. 
IV, 1, 30. LLL I, 2, 49. Shr. II, 375. All's IV, 3, 190. 
H5 III, .'2, 33. H6C II, 1,181. or byunto: En'. I, 1,25. 
Costard in LLL uses until for to: whereuntil it doth a. 
V, 2, 494. 501. 
Amphimachus, naine of a Greek, Troil. V, 5, 
:tmple, large, copions, liberal, un- 
restrained: this a. third of ourlait kingdom, Lr. 
I, 1, 8_ °. an a. tear, IV, 3, 14. with a. andbrim.fulness 
of hls.]brce H5 I, 2, 150. such a. grace and honour, 
Me. I, 1, 24. b, large and a. ernperj H5 I, 2, 226. a. 
power, Troil. II, 2, 140. in ver.y a. virtue ofhls father, 
H4B IV, 1, 163. a. satisfaction, Err. V, 252. mj a. 
hope John V, 2, 112. Troil. I, 3» 3. a. interchange qf 
sweet dlscourse, R3 V, 3, 99. the great dlgnitj . . . shall 
at home be encountered wlth a shame as a. All's IV, 3, 
8o,. at a. view (----- at full and open view) Tw. I, 1, 
27. at a. point (in fidl measure) Troil. III, 3, 89. 
Compar. ampler :--r strength, Wint. 1V, 4,414. Superl. 

amplest: --st credence, All's I 2» 11. with --st enter- 
tainment, Tire. I, 1, 45. 
Adverbially: I lznow jour hostess as a. as rmjself 
All's III, 5, 46. how a..you're beloved, Tim. I, 2, 136. 
tmplif' to enlarge: to a. too much, Lr. V, 3, 
206. Idld a. myjudgment. Cymb. I, 5, 17. to show 
in the most favourable light, to set off: 
deep-brain'd sonnets that did a. each stone's dear 
ture, Compl. 209. his faine.., hapl --ied, Cor. V, 
2, 16. 
Amply, without restriction, copiously: 
can prate as a. and unnecessarlbj, Tp. II, 1,264. than 
a. to imbar thelr crooked titles, H5 I, 2, 94 (liberally, 
without reserve), as a. titled as Acilles, Troil. II 3, 
203. 
Ampthil, place in England, H8 IV, 1, 28. 
Amurah, (Ff Amurah), name of Turkish sul- 
tans: H4B V, 2, 48. 
Amyntas, v. Amlntas. 
An art., v. a. 
A, conj., in O. Edd. mostly written and, but 
sometimes also an, f. i. LLL V, 2, 232. 584. H4A II, 
1, 1. II5 IV, 7, 96. II6B V, 1, 72. Caes. IV, 3, 258. 
M. Edd. bave often been too rash in changing and to 
an, f.i. Err. IV, 1, 43. Mids. III, 2, 78. H4A I, 3, 125. 
H5 II, 4, 120. Troil. III, 2, 149. 3 256. Tir. Il, 1 
69 etc. 
1) i f; followed by the indic, as well as the subi. 
mood: Err. I, 2, 94. Il, 2, 36. III, 1, 39. Ado I, 1, 80. 
137. 192. III, 3, 91. LLL Il, 248. III, 103. IV, 1, 49. 
V, 1, 74. IIids. I, 2, 53. 76. IV, 2, 21. Merch. V, 176. 
H4B I, 1, 13 etc. etc. Of vel'y frequent occurrence in 
the phrase an it please .you: Wiv. Il, 2» 37. Meas. II, 
1, 205. Merch. Il, 2 61. H6B I, 3, 18. an please you, 
H6A V 4, 10. an't shall please you» LLL I, 1» 273. 
V, 2, 584. Merch. Il, 4, 10 (Qt/f). H6B I, 3, 190. 
an't like ou, Tp. IV, 239. Meas. II, 1, 169. V, 74, 
etc. etc. 
2) if but: it is best put finger in the eye, an she 
knew whj, Shr. I, 1, 79. Tp. I1, 1, 181. John II, 136. 
3) though: an thou wert a lion, we would do so, 
LLLV, 2, 627. Merch. I, 2, 96. tI6B IV, 7, 112. 
4) In vadgar language : whether: to spy an 
I can hear rny 77dsby'sface, Mids. V, 195. and  as 
i f: I will roar you an "twere amj nightingale» Mids. 
I, 2» 86. 115 II, 3, 11. Troil. I, 2, 139. 189. 
An if: if: Tp. II, 2, 1-'20. V, 117. Gentl. I 1, 
75. III, 1, 257. Err. IV, 3, 76. Ado V, 1,178. LLL 
I, 1, 50. IV, 1, 137. V, 2, 32. 232. Mids. II, 2, 153. 
Mereh. IV 1, 445. V, 159. As II 5, 59. All's II, 1, 74. 
H6A III, 1, 153. IV, 6, 36. 116B II, 1, 124. 3 74. 
H6C I, 1, 137. Oth. III, 4, 83 etc. 
What an if= though: what an if his sorrows 
ha'e so overwhelm'd his wits, Tit. IV, 4, 9. 
Auatomize (0. Edd. anathomize» except Lr. III, 
6, 80), to dissect for the pro'pose of examining the 
intcrior structure: let them a. Regan, Lr. III, 6, 80. 
Figuratively:to lay open, to show distinctly: 
in ber the painter had--d time's ruin, Lucr. 1450. 
should I a. Mm to thee, As I, 1, 1622. the wise rnan's 
foll.y is --d» II, 7, 56. see his cornpany --d, All's IV, 
3, 37. rmj well-known body to a. H4B Ind. 21. Don 
Armado writes annothanize, and nses it in the sense 
of to explain: which to a. in the vulgm', LLL 1V, 
1, 69. 
,tnatom.v, 1) skeleton: a rnere a. Err. V 238. 



38 
t]at fell a. (Death) John III, 4, 40. lIrs Quickly says' I, 2, 159. Superl. : ere anclent'st order was çint. 
tom.y instead: H4BV433.2)incontempt,  body: 1 10. -- Tle a. ofwar, Lr. V, ], 32 (corr.i.I. 

l'll eat tle test of t]e a. ŒEw. I11, _'2, 67. i1 wIat vile 
part of tlds a. does m. lame Iodge? Rom. III, 3, 106. 
An¢esor, progenitor: Ado V, 1, 69. All's IV, 
2, 43. V, 3, 196. 1.2 11, 1, 54. H4A 11|, .'2 31. ¥, 
11. H4B IV, 4 61. H5 l,  102. 135. 11, 41 9.'2. R3 
III, 7 119. Cor. Il, 3 53. ŒEit. 1 84. V, 3, 80. Iom. 
IV 3 41. Caes. l,  ll?.. l, 3, 81. lll  55. Ant. IV, 
12, 44. Cymb. 111 1, 17. lV,  48. Per. ¥, 1, 91. 
Wrongly for descendant: Wiv. l, 1 15. 
.a_neestry, series of progenitors li neage, 
noble descent: b.9 t]e honour of my a. Gentl. V, 
4. 139. draw forth .our mble a. from tke corruption 
o.f abusin 9 rimes, R3 111, 7, 198. ot propp'd by a. H8 
1. 1, 59. 9reat ature lie lis a. mulded the stuff 
Cymb. V, 4, 48. 
,n«hises, father of Aeneas: tI6B ¥, 2, 62. Troil. 
I¥, 1 21. Caes. l, , 114. 
Anehor, subst, anchorite, hermit: an--'s 
v]eer in prison be  scope, Hml. III, .o, 2:9. 
,nvhor, subst, iron instrnmcnt to hold a 
ship at rest: t]e a. is deep, Y¢iv. 1, 3, 56 (it is cast 
ont and holds), to make his a. kold, Vint. 1, , 13. 
if came home 14 i. e. it was dislodged f,'om its bed. 
not]in 9 so certain as .our --s 1 lV 4, 581. II6C V, 4, 
13.16. R3 1, 4,'2.6. Tit.lV, 438. at a. Per.V Prol. 16. 
lvhor, rb., 1) intr. to lie at anchor: H6B 
IV, 1, 9. Lr. IV, 6, 18. To keep hold in general: 
a pair of--i 9 ooksl Gentl. lll 1, 118. Figuratively 
to keep hold of; with on: zy invention --s on 
]sabel, lIeas. 11, 4, 4. Posthumus --s upon Imogen, 
Cymb. V, 5, 393. 
2) trans., to place at anchor, and figura- 
tively to fix: if eyes be --'d in tte bay where ail 
men ride, Solm. 137, 6. till that my ails were --'d in 
thine e.,es, 13 IV, 4, -°31. there would Ite a. Ids aspect 
Ant. I, 5, 33. 
&l¢horage, the anchor and ail the ne- 
cessary tackle for anchoring: sIeweigh'dIer 
a. Tir. l, 73. 
nd, ovy, a small sea-fish of the genus 
hening: --ies II4A Il, 4, 588. O. Edd. ancIoves. 
&n¢ient, adj. 1) ha,ing happened or 
existed in former times, ind now no more 
in existence: te a. Roman Ionour, lIerch. Il[, 2 297. 
derlved from the e. Capilet, All's V 3 159. lcnowledge 
in te a. wars II5 III, 2, 83. a. wrlters II4A ll, 
455. a. ravens" wl»gs, Lucr. 949. 
2) having eolne down frOlU a time far 
remote, of long standing: tIe a. prlvilege of 
AtIens, Mids. l, 1 41. tIe a. sayb*g, lIerch, ll, 9, 82. 
proverb, H6B III, 1, 170. traditlon II5 V, 1, 74. a. 
feast, lm. 1, , 87 (cf. 20: an old accustomedfeast). 
gentr., H6A 11, 4, 93. getlemen, Hlnl. V, 1, 33. rigltt 
13 111, 1 92. an a. watchman Ado 111, 3, 41. servant 
Shr. 1, 2 47. a. word of courage, R3 ¥, 3, 349. tale, 
John IV, 2, 18. receptacle, Rom. IV 3, 39. city, H6B 
1 1 5. castle R2 III, 3, 3?,. stoltes, R3 lV 1 99. 
a. skill, 5leas. IV, 2 164. sorrow, R3 IV 4,35. Hence 
---- inveterate: a. grudge hlerch. 1 3 48. quarrels, 
R2 11, 1, 248. Rom. ! 1 111. blckeritgs, H6B 1, 
144. malice, R'2 I, 1, 9. Cor. 111 1, -044. lV, 5, 102. 
envy, IV 5, 109. grudge, Rom. Prol. 3. lds a. knot 
dangerous adversarlesl R3 111 1,182. On the other 
hand: a. love hids. 111 2 2'215. Lr. IV, 1 45. alniics 

3) former: call lome t]y a. t]muç]ts from ba- 
ns]ment Shr. Ind. , 33. ny a. icmtations are toc 
wea, tI6AV, 3, 7. new lameting a. oversigts H4B 
ll, 3, 47. recovered our a. freedom H6B lV, 8, 27. 
where is your a. courage? Cor. lV, 1 3. 
4) advanced in years, old: tMs a. orsel, 
Tp. Il, 1,286. a ve' a. smell, ll  27. avgel Sllr. lV 
, 61. getleman, V 1 75. Wint. IV, 4, 79. 372. H4A 
III,  104. II4B 114 91. Tit.lll, 1 17. Rom.l 1, 99. 
I1,3,74.4 150. 111535. Lr.!1967. Cymb.V,3» 15. 
An¢ien subst. 1) the next in command 
under the lieutenant: --s, corpovals, lieuteants 
tI4A lV , 6. a. Pistol H4B ll 4 74.89.10. 164. 
H5 Il, lç 3. V, 1 18 (Fluellen pronounces Auc£ient). 
Oth. 1 1, 33. , 49. 3, 11 and passim. Fluellen says: 
an auncMet lleutemt, II5 111, 6 13. 
2) standard: an ohl.faced a., H4A IV, 2, 34, an 
old standard mendcd with a different colour. 
neientry, ol d age: gettig we»ches wlth child, 
wrongi»g the a. i. e. the old peçple, Wint. 111, 3 63. 
the wedding mamerly-modest as a measure, .full qf 
state md a. Ado ll 1 80 i. e. the port and behaviour 
of old age.* 
n«le, the jointwhich connectsthe foot 
with the leg: Hml. ll 1 80. 
«¢n¢us 5Iarcius, naine of the fourth king of Rome, 
Cor. lI 3 247. 
Aad, conj., 1)  an; v. Ara 
2) the particle which ser-es to join clauses and 
words. Pecnliarities of its use: the composed hume- 
vals bave generally the form one and twenty" etc.: 
Wint. 111 3 60.65. IV 3 44. II4A 1, 1 68. 11, 2 17. 
4, 206. 111, 3, 54.85. 1V 3, 56. H4B !, 2 50. 3, 11. 
H5 ! 2 57. IV 8 111. ŒEroil. 1 , 171. 255. ŒEit. !, 
79. 195. Ill 1 10. Rom. 1, 5 39. 1V 1,105. Tim. 
1 3. Caes. V 1 53. IIml. V» 1 190. Lr. !1, 4 œee51. 
.257. 262. 11I 7 16 etc. etc. But sometimes also 
twent one: Wint. 1 2 155. 11 3 197. lV 4 464. 
1 126. II4B Il» 4, 413. !11 2, 224. It5 1, 2 61. IV, 
8 88. Cr. 11 1 170. 171. Tim. 111 2 43. Caes. 111, 
Y 248. Icb. lV, 1 7. Lr. l 4 42 etc. Irregularly: 
tMrt and six, H6C lll 3 96. ŒEroil. Pr. 5. two £undred 
fift$, All's IV, 3, 186. 188 (I. Edd. aadfifty). 
Two ad two  by twos II4A 111 3. 104. 
Ad  and that: $ou are abused ad b sonne 
utter-on Vint. !1, 1, 141. 
Used  a mere explefive ilx popular songs: when 
tat I was and a tiy llttle boy, Tw. V, 397. e tIat 
£as a[d a little tiny wlt Lr. lll 9 74 (Qq las a 
llttle). Kig Stepe was and a worty peer, Oth. Il, 
3, 99 (Q1 and M. Edd. was a worty pee O. 
Very frequently notions of which one is subordi- 
nate to the other, are joined by md, a rhetorical 
figure called ë, «5 Œvoh' by gralnmarians: s£elces 
ad sands : sandy shelves, Lucr. 335. gice .fear to 
use ad liberty (to the usual or customary liberty) 
Meas. l, 4, 6. wit£ daces and deliglt  with delight- 
ful dances, 5Iids. 11, 1 254. contempt a»d clamour, 
Wint. 1 2, 189. in t£e instant of repalr ad £ealt. 
John lll 4 113. t£e tediousness ad process of 
tracel (= the tedious process) R2 ll 3 12. we [eed 
your use and comsel, H4A 1 3, 1. voucsafe me 
£earig and respect, 1V 3 31. t£e ragged'st £our t£az 
I rime ad spire cnn brig (: the splte of rime, or the 



A 39 

spiteful time) II4B !, 1, 151. the charge and kingl# 
government of this pour land, R3 I11, 7, 131. no more 
assurance of equal fi'iendship and proceeding (of an 
impartiM and friendly proeeding) H8 II, 4, 18.fool 
and feather, I, 3, 25. to keep ber constancy in plight 
andgouth (in youthful plight) Troil. I11, 2, 168. with 
all mg force, pursult and policy (with the pursuit of 
ail my force and policy) IV, 1, 18. rime, force and 
death -- the force of time and death, IV, 9, 107. 
through the cranks and offices of man = the cranking 
offices, Cor.I, 1,140. by interims and conveyi»g gusts, 
!, 6, 5. thy faine and envy (envions, odious lame) I, 
8, 4. applause and clamour, !, 9, 64. the horn and 
noise o' the monster's, !II, 1,95. with the saine austerity 
and gin'b, IV, 7, 44. thy t»iu»phs and retnrn, Tir. !, 
110. the vigour and the picture of my youth, IV, 2,108. 
out yoke and serance, Caes. 1, 3, 84. for warni»gs 
and portents and evils imminent, 1I, '2., 80. in a general 
honest thought and comraon good to ail, V, 5, 72. our 
qriefs and clamour, Mcb. I, 7, 78..our leave and fa- 
vmtr, tIml. !, 2, 51. in hls particulçr act and place, 
1: 3, 26. by law and heraldry, !, 1, 87. reason aud sa- 
nity, II, , 214. a eombination and a form, III, 4, 60. 
hot tomb enough and continent, IV,4,64. his sables and 
hls weeds, IV, 7, 81. respect andfortunes, Lr. 1, 1,251 
(Qq respects of fortune), the image and horror of i t, 
1. 2, 192. this nfflky gentleness and course o.f yours, 
4, 364. with every gale and vary, Ii, 2, 85. on the court 
and guard of safety, Oth. 11, 3, 216. out of ber own 
love and.fl«ttery, IV, 1,133. rather victorious life than 
death and honour, Ant. IV, .'2, 44. the.flint and hardness 
qf my fault, IV, 9, 16. the heaviness and guilt within 
my bosom,Cymb.V, , 1. Lr. I, 2, 48. 4, 309. IV, 7, 97. 
It is the saine with adjectives: thyfiU, and outward 
character (outwardly fair) Tv. !, 2, 51. with self and 
rafi conceit, R21 II, 2, 166. raff strange and self abuse, 
Mcb. ii!, 4, 14. 9. by self and violent hands, V, 8, 70. 
this prostrate and exterior bendlng, H4B IV, 5, 149. 
the fatal and neglected JEnglish (: fatally neglected) 
H5 11, 4, 13. sick and green (: green-sick), Rom. !I, 
, 8. by free and offer'd light (freely offered) Tire. V, 
1, 48. his slow and moving dï»ger (slowly moving) 
Oth. IV, 2, 56 (Qq slow unmovbg). 
Andirot, ornamental iron at the side of the 
tireplace: ber --s were two winkin Cupfds of sflver, 
Canb. II, 4, 88.  
Andren, place in France between Guisnes and 
Ard, probably Arden, H8 I, 1, 7. 
Andrew, 1) name of a ship: raff wealthy A. 
Merch. 1, 1, 27. -- 2) SirA. A#uecheek, Tw. !, 3, 18. 
46. II, 3, 1 etc. 
Andromaehe, wife of Heetor: Troil. I, _'2, 6. V, 
3, 77. 
Andraniei, plur. of Andronicus: Tir. !!, 3, 189. 
V, 3, 131 (without article). 176. 
Andr6nicus, naine in Tit. I, 23 etc. etc. 
Anele, in unaneled, q. v. 
An-end : on end: each parHcular haïr to stand 
a. Hml. l, 5, 19. III, 4, IY. cf. End. 
Anew, 1) another time, afresh: Ven. 60. 
Sonn. 119, 11. Pilgr. 332. All's I, 1, 4. H4B I, 3, 46. 
H6B I, 3, 42. Tir. l, 262. Oth. IV, 1, 85. 
2) newly, in a new and other manner: 
thou art enforced to seek a. some fresher stan Sonn. 
8.'2, 7. and tauyht it thus a. to #met, 145, 8. 
Angel, 1) messenger of God: Tp. I, 2, 481. 

I Gentl. II!, 1,103. Meas. !I, 2, 122. i1I, 2, 286. LLL 
V, 2, 103. 297. Mids. III, 1, 132. Merch. Il, 7, 56. 
V, 61. All's III, 2, 129. John IV, 1, 68. H5 l, 1, 28. 
R3 I, 2, 74 etc. etc. God's a. tI4A Iii, 3, 40. --s of 
light, Err. IV, 3, 56. holy a. Mcb. I!!, 6, 45. heavenl.y 
a. C)anb. !I, 2, 50. good a. Tp. !!, 1,306. Meas. II, 4, 
16. H4A III, 3, 200. H4B Ii, 4, 36- 9. R3 IV, 1, 93. 
V, 3, 138. 156. 175. H8 II, 1, 75. !!I, 2, 442. V, 1, 
161. the better a. Sonu. 144, 3. evil a. Err. IV, 3, 20. 
LLL !, 2, 178. ill a. II4B 1, 2, 186. black a. Lr. III, 
6, 34. 
2) genlus, demon: let the a. whom thou still 
hast served, tell thee, Mcb. V, 8, 14. thy a. Ant. !I, 3, 
21. reverence, that a. of the world, Cymb. IV, 2, 248. 
: at last I spied an ancient a. combg down, Shr. iV. 
.'2, 61 (= one coming in good time? cf. John V, ,64).* 
3) darling: JBrutus was Caesar's a. Caes. !!I, 
2, 185.* 
An a. spake, Johu V, .'2, 64 (Nares: a common 
phrase of approval of a proposal ruade by another); 
it seems rather to mean an unexpected confirmation 
of what has been said. l'erhaps also a quibble is in- 
tended, v. the ords purse and nobles v. 61 and 6- °. 
Adjectively: in a. u'hiteness Ado IV, 1, 163. that 
a. knowledge, LLL I, 1, 113. m.y other a. husband, R3 
IV, 1, 69 (which may also meau: my other husband 
who is now nmde an angel of heaven). 
Angel, a gold coin worth tcu shillings (de- 
scribed in Merch. 11.7, 56 : they hare in nfland a coin 
that bears the figure of an angel stamped in #old): 
Wiv. II, -9, 73. Err. IV, 3, 41. John II, 590. !I!, 3, 8. 
H4A IV,-9, 6. Quibbles between the two signifieations: 
Wiv. !, 3, 60. Ado II, 3, 35. H4A I, 2, 187. 
?.ngeliea, ehristian name of Lady Capnlet, Rom. 
IV: 4, 5. 
Angelieal, resembling an angel: dïend a. 
Rom. 11I, .'2, 75. 
Angel-like, resembling an angel: a. per- 
fection, Gentl. 11, 4, 66. Adverbially: how a. he sin#s: 
"Cymb. IV, , 48. 
Angelo, 1) naine of the goldsmith in Err. III, 1, 
1. IV, 4, 1;55. 2) of a Venetian commander in Oth. 
I, 3, 16. 3) of the deputy in lXleas. !, 1, 16. 25. _'2, 
123 and passim. 
Anger, subst., emotion of the mind at an 
injury, choler: Ven. 76. Lucr. 478 (for a.) 8onn. 
50, 10. Pilgr. 68. Tp. IV, 145. Gentl. IV, 3, -97. Ado 
I, 1, 251. Mids. I1, 1,104. As I, 3, 42. III, 5, 67. Shr. 
IV, 1,175. IV, 3, 77. All's I!, 3, -922. Tw. Iii, 1, 158. 
V¢int. 1I, 2, 69,. H4A 1, 1,107. Ha IV, 7, 40. H6A I!, 
4, 65. H6CI, 1, 60 (y heartfor a. burns). 211. H8 
I!I, 2, 92. Cor. 111, -9, 95. Ant. IV, 1, 9 etc. etc. 
Anger, vb., to make angry, to provoke: 
Tp. IV, 169. Genfl. I, -9, 101. 103 Ado ! b 1, 146. 
Tw. 11, 5, 11. YI4A 111, 1,148.19.'2. II4B !!, 4, 9. I!!, 
2 216. Rom. 1, 4, 10.'2. II, 1, 2. 23. !I, 4, 216. Tim. 
I, 1, -908. Mcb. III, 6, 15. Lr. IV, 1, 41 (--in# itself 
and others, ---- givin offence). Oth. II, 1, 153..'274. 
Ant. !I 6, -91. Cymb. !I 3, 145. 
Angerly, adv. angrily: how a. I taught mg 
brow tofrown Gentl. I, .'2, 62. John IV, 1, 8:2. Mcb. 
I!!, 5, 1. 
Angiers, the ton of Angers in France, John 
I!, 1, 17. 22 sq. 
Angle, subst. 1) corner: in an odd a. of the 
isle, Tp. I, L2,-923. -- 2) the instrument to take 



40 A 

fish: give rae ralne a., we'll to the river, Ant. 1I, 5, 
10. Figuratively: the a. that plucks out son thither, 
Vint. IV, 2, 52. throwt out his a. for ray proper lire, 
Hml. V, 2» 66. 
Angle, vb. to fish with an angle: the 
pleasant'st --ing is to sec the Jïsh • •., Ado Iii, 1, 26. 
I ara --bg now, Vint. I, 2, 180. Ant. Ii, 5, 16. fo a. 
for sth: so a. we for JBeatrice, Ado III, 1» 29. Figu- 
ratively, to bait, fo try fo gain: she dld a. for 
rae, All's V, 3, 212. the hearts of ail that he did a. for, 
H4A lV, 3, 84. to a. for 2/our thoughts, Ti'oil. Iil, 2, 
162. one of the prettiest touches of ail and that which 
--d for mine e.yes, caught the water though hot the Jïsh, 
Wint. V, 2, 90. 
Angler, a person who angles: Lr. III, 6, 8. 
Angr.v, feeling or showing auget, pro- 
voked, properly and tropically: Vert. 70. 283. Luer. 
388. 461. 1421. Sonn. 147, 6. Tp. Ii, 1,186. Gentl. 
II, 1, 164. 4, 23. Wiv. Iii, 4, 97. V, 5, 213. hIeas. I!, 
2,120. I11, 1 207. Ado V, 1, 1.ql. 141. iMids, iI» 1, 
112. III, 2» 323. As IV, 3, 11. Shr. I, 2, 203. II» 210. 
250. Wint. III, 2, 147. V, 1, 173. John IV, 2, 268. 
115 IV, 7, 58. H6A II, 4, 107. IV, 1, 168. 7, 9. I-I6B 
I, 2, 55. Iil, 1, 15. 2, 125. IV, 2, 134. V, 1, 126. 2, 3. 
H6C II, .'2, 20. R3 I, _o, 74. 24. !1I, 1,144. IV, 2, 27. 
Caes. I, 2, 183. Ant. V» 2, 309 etc. etc. Followed by 
at and wkh (more frequently by the latter) indis- 
criminateIy: I ara so a. at these abject terms» H6B 
V, 1, 25. 1"fa a. at him, Tim. III, 3, 13. were he more 
a. at it (sc. the commonwealth) Cor. IV» 6, 14. -- be 
hot a. with rae, Ado III» 1, 94. I should be a. wlth .you, 
1115 lV, 1, 217. be hot a. with the child, R3 Il, 4, 36. 
art thou a.? what, with rae Troil. I, 1, 74. he raakes 
me a. with hlm, Ant. III, 13, 141. And on the other 
hand: the heavens wkh that we bave in hand are a. 
Wint. iii, 3, 5. who therewkh a. 114A I» 3, 40. a. with 
mg fancg, Troil. IV, 4» 27. 
Trisyllxbic in Tire. III» 5, 57 : but who is raan that 
is hot a. ? 
Angry-el|altng (hot hyphened by O. Edd.) 
fretting vith rage: Ven. 662. 
Anguish, subst., excessive pain, either of 
body or of mind: I hace staff d for thee in a., pain 
and a gon.y, R3 IV, 4, 163 (FL torraent), one pain is 
lessen'd b.y another" s a. Rom. I, 2, 47. g/out other senses 
grow bnperfect bff your e.yes" a. Lr. IV, 6, 6. raore fell 
than a., hunge G or the sea, Oth. V, 2, 362. -- [s there 
no pla2/ to ease the a. of a torturing hour? Mids. V, 37. 
the words would add more a. than the wounds» H6C 
il, 1, 99. to close the eye of a. Lr. IV, 4, 15. 
Angns, naine of a Scottish earh 114A I, 1, 73.* 
An-heires: Will2/ou go, An-heires? Wiv. II, 1, 
228. Most SI. Edd. after Theobald: raynheers; others : 
on, hem; on, hearts; on» heroes; and hear us; caval- 
cires; eh, sir. 
.tn-hungry, Cor.I» 1, 209, v. A. 
A-nigh/, af night: As lI4, 48. cL2Vi9ht. 
&nimal, subst., living creature: Ado IV, 1, 
61. As il, 1, 36.6 °. Opposed to man: LLL IV, 2, 28. 
lIerch. IV, 1,132. As I, 1, 16. Including the species 
of man: 11ml. Il» 2, 320. Lr. III, 4» 113. 
Anjou, a French province: John I, 11. Il, 152 
and 487 (Ff Angiers). 528. H6A I, 1, 94. V, 3, 95.' 
147. 154. 111613 i, 1, 50. 110. IV, 1» 86. 
Anltle, v. ancle. 
Auna, the confident of Dido: Shr. I, 1,159. 

Armais, relation of events in the oràer 
of years: Cor. V, 6, 114. 
Amie. 1) Saint A.: Shr. I, 1,255. Tw. II, 3, 126. 
-- 2) daughter of Rogcr Earl of Match: HGB Il» 2, 
38.43. -- 3) daughter of Warwick and wife of Prince 
Edward and King Richard iii: R3 I, 2, 9. IV, 2, 53. 
3, 39. V, 3, 159. -- 4) A. Bullen, afterwards ife of 
Henry VIII: II8 Iii, 2, 36. 87. 402. IV, 1, 3. -- 5) 
Anne Page: NViv. I, 1, 45. 4, 33. II, 1, 168. lll, 4, 
14. 71 etc. 
Arme.x, fo add, to unite fo: andtohisrobber.y 
had--'d th.y breath, Sonn. 99, 11. whieh (heart) 
whilst it was faine had--'d unto't a raillion raore, Ant. 
IV, 14, 17. cf. Ill-annexed. 
Annexion, a d d i t i o n: with the --s offar geras 
enriched, Compl. 208. 
Ànnexment, appendage: each sraall a., pettg 
consequence, attends the boisterous ruhb IIml. III, 3» 21. 
Aothanize, v. anatomlze. 
Annox, subst., pain, suffering, grief: life 
was death's a. Ven. 497. worse than Tantalus' is ber 
a. 599. ra5"th doth search the bottora of n. Luèr. 1109. 
threaten5g Ilion with a. 1370. receivest with pleasure 
thbe a. Sonn. 8, 4. farewell sour a. H6C V, 7, 45. 
rape was root of thine a. Tir. IV, 1» 49. 
2) injury, barre: good angels guard thee frora 
the boar's a. It3 V» 3, 156. 
,nnoy, rb. to molest, to harm, to hurt: 
she will hot be --'d zoith suitors, Shr. I. 1,189. one 
spark of evil that raight a. raff finger, H5 Ii, 2, 102. 
thorns that would a. our foot, I-I6B III, 1, 67. without 
--ing rae, Caes. I, 3, 22. so far as to a. us ail, 1I, 1, 
160. what cmt frora Ital.y a. us» Cymb. IV, 3, 34. 
Annoyance, 1) injury, harm: doing a. to the 
treacherous feet, R2 III, 2, 16. the herd bath raore a. 
bg the breese than bg the tlger, Troil. I, 3, 48. reraove 
erora ber the raeans of ail a. Mcb. V, 1, 84. 
2) that whieh barres or hurts: a grain, a 
ust, .... an2/a, in that precious sense, JohnlV, 1, 94. 
to souse a. that cornes near his nest, V, 2, 150. 
Annual, happening every year, yearly: 
a. tribute, Tp. I, 2, 113. LLL V, 2, 808. 1118 II, 3, 64. 
Hml. II, 2, 73. Per. V Prol. 17. 
Anoint (cf. 'noint), to overspread wlth a 
liquid substance: a. his eges, blids. 11, 1, 261. 
l'lla, mgsword, Hml. IV, 7, 141. Especially fo eon- 
seerate by unetion: LLL Iii, 184. V, 2, 523. 
VVint. I, 2, 358. John i1I, 1, 136. II2 I, 2, 38. II, 1, 
98. I!, 3, 96. III, 2, 55. IV, 127. H4A IV, 3, 40. H4B 
Ind. 32. 116A V, 5, 91. H6C I11.1, 17.76. 3, 29. R3 IV, 
1, 62. 4, 150. V, 3, 124. Meb. II, 3, 73. Lr. II!, 7, 58 
(always in the partie, anointed). 
Anon, soon, presently, immediately af- 
t e r: a. their loud alaruras he doth hear, Ven. 700. 869. 
Luer. 433. Sonn. 33, 5. Pilgr. 79.1-°2. Tp. il, 2, 83. 
147. Wiv. lll, 2, 87. 3, 180. IV, 2, 41. 146. biens.IV, 
1, 23. 2, 162.212. 5, 13. V, 364. llids. Ii, 1, 17. III, 
2, 18.356. IV, 1, 183. V, 145. lIereh. I!, 2, 1-95. 9, 
97. Iil, 5, 91. As II, 1, 52. 8hr. Ind. 1,130. All's I, 
3, 133. IV, 1, 68. H4B II» 4, 187. 1115 IV, 1, L26. 116A 
IV, 7, 19. II6B V, 1, 159. 116C III» 1, 2. R3 I, 4, 168. 
III, 1, 39. Rom. i, 4, 85. Mcb. V, 5, 34. ttml. V, 1 
309 etc. etc. Used as answer to a call: Rom. Il» 2, 
137. II, 4» 111. Mcb. II» 3, 2'2. ; especially by waiters 
instead of the modern coraing': H4A Il, 1» 5. 4, 29. 
36.41.49.58.63.72.97. H4B 11, 4, 306. 



A 41 

Used instead of a repeated sometlmes, now, or 
then: sometime he trots, anon he rears upright , Ven. 
279. sometlme he scuds far off; a. he starts, 309. some- 
rimes the.y do extend their view right on, a. their gazes 
lend to everl place, Compl. 26. now proud as an en joliet 
and a. doubtin 9 the.filchin 9 age will steal hls treasure, 
Sonn. 75, 5. who now hangeth like a jewel in the car 
qf caelo, and a. falleth lilce a crab, LLL IV, 2, 6. now 
the ship borb 9 the moon, and a. swallowed, Wint. I!I, 
3, 94. then stops again, strikes hls breast hard, and a. 
he casts his e.ye against the rnoon, H8 111, 2, 117. 
IF, ver and a.  every now and then: ever 
and a. the.y raade a doubt, LLL V, 2, 102. a pouncet- 
box which ever and a. he gave his nose, tI4A I, 3, 38. 
In the saine seuse still and a.: like the watchful minutes 
to the hour still and a. cheer'd up the heavj time, John 
IV, 1, 47 (Corrupted to still an end. Gentl. IV, 4, 67). 
Till a.  for a moment: Ant. I1, 7, 44. 
Anothcr, 1) some or any else: no hope that 
wa.y is a. wa.l so high a hope, Tp. 1I, 1, 241. Gentl. I, 
1, 86. Err. I, 1, 113. Wiv. I, 1, 43 etc. etc. Another 
while  af other times, II6B IV, 10, 9. temember thls 
a. dag, R3 I, 3, 299 ( one day). LLL IV, 1, 109. 
2) somebody or anybody else: fo choose 
lofe bj ---'s e.yes, lIids. I, 1, 140. Gentl. IV, 4, 23. 
"Viv. 1, 4, 179 etc. 
3) differcnt: "tls one tMng to be tempted, a. thing 
to.fall, Mens. II, 1, 18. Iwillwedthee ina. kej, Mids. 
I, 1, 15. II1 2, 388. OEw. III, 1, 119 etc. 
4) a new, a second: th.y sorrow to mg sorrow 
lendeth a. power, Lucr. 1677. these blenches gave mg 
heart a..youth, Sonn. 110., 7. to scale a. tIero's tower, 
Gentl. I11, 1, 119. a. I:tero, Ado V, 4, 62. I have re- 
ceived from her a. erabassl of raeeth9, Wiv. II1, 5, 
131. III, 3, 58. V, 5, 10. four happ da.ys brin 9 in a. 
moon, Mids. I, 1, 3. enough to purchase such a. island, 
H6B !I1, 3, 3..you would be a. Penelope, Cor. !, 3, 92. 
Ant. V, 2, 77 etc. 
5) one more: a. storm brewing, Tp. 11, 1, 19. 
IV, 1, 244. Gentl. I, , 103. I1, 1, 135. Wiv. II, 2, 97. 
Err. 1I, 2, 64. Win. IV, 4, 290 etc. Another rime  
once more, Tp. II1, 2, 85. such a. trick, Tp. IV, 1, 37. 
Wiv. III, 5, 7. As IV, 1, 40. such a. proof, Gentl. I, 1, 
97. be choked with such a. emphasis! Ant. I, 5, 68. 
6) a second of the saine sort or set: mg 
cousin'» a ]bol, and thon art a. ( art so too), Ado 
II1, 4, 11. ILeonatus! a banished rascal; and he's a., 
whatsoewr he be, Cymb. II, 1, 43. l'll get me one o] 
such a. length, Gentl. III, 1, 133. one heat a. expels, 
II, 4, 91. one drunkard loves a. LLL IV, 3, 50. 
It is such a. 1Van!  an arch girl, a wicked little 
Anne! (Germ. auch so eine) Wiv. !, 4, 160. Benedick 
was such a. Ado 11I, 4, 87. the prince himself is such 
a. tI4B II, 4, 275..you are such a. woman (Q such a 
woman) Troil. I, 2, 282. gou are such a. 296. "tis 
such a..fitchew, Oth. IV, 1, 150. 
7)  the other: as gou have one ege upon mg 
.fo!lies, turn a. into the register of gcur own, Wiv. ll, 
2, 193. a pair of boots, one buckled, a. laced, Shr. III, 
2, 46. sometimes her head on one side, some a. Wint. 
11I, 3, 20. she had one e.ye dedined, a. elevated, V, 2, 
82. with one hand on his dagger, a. spread on" s breast, 
I-I8 I, 2, 205. Gentl. I, 2, 128. Sonn. 144, 12. Err. 
V, 425. Ado II, 3, 224. Mids. III, 2, 359. Merch. I, 2, 
89. Win. IV, 4, 176. H4B II, 4, 63. H6C 11, 5, 10. 
ŒEroil. III» 2» 206. Oth. I, 3 331. Lr. 1II, 7 71. 

8) One another, either separated by other words 
(as in All's IV, 1, 20. H4B I1, 4, 63. V, 1, 86. Troil. 
III, 2, 206 etc.) or placed together, may as well be 
used ofseveral persons or things (f. i. John IV, 2, 189. 
H6A III, 1, 82. Oth. I, 
257. Il, 2, 132. V, 2, 5. 7. Ado !I!, 2, 80. As V, 2, 
39. q-'w. !II, 4, 214. Wint. V, 2, 13. R2 IV, 185. I:I6B 
IV, 7, 139. R3 IV, 3, 10. -- One with another  pell- 
mell: he loves . . • both goun 9 and old, one with a. Viv. 
I1, 1,118. 
Peeuliar repetition of the article: another such a 
nlght, R3 I, 4, 5. 
,nsehne, name ir. Rom. I, 2, 68. 
.¢»swer, subst., 1)that hieh is said in re- 
turn, reply: Luer. 1664. 'lp. I, 2, 309. Gentl. I, 1, 
81. Vqv. l, 1,261. En'. !1, 2, 13. Lr. IV, 2, 6 etc. etc. 
Followed by to: John II, 44. Merch. 1,3, 11. H6A 
V, 3, 150. II6B I, 2, 80. IV, 4, 7 etc. Plut.: Mids. 
III, 2, 287. LLL I, 2, 31. IIis a." is ordinarily the 
auswer whieh he gives, (f.i. Mereh. I, 3, 11 ), but 
sometimes also the answer whieh he reeeives: 5Iereh. 
II, 7, 72. IV, 1, 52. Tw. l, 5, 282. Cymb. Il, 4, 30. 
To raake a.: Sonn. 101, 5. Ado III, 3, 50. John Il, 
121. R2 IV, 20 (what a. shall I raake to this base 
man?). II6A V, 3, 150. II6B I, 2, 80. IV, 4, 7, H6C 
IV, 1, 91. IIml. I, 2, 215. Ant. lI, 7, 107. 
' As an answer may imply a declaration of will 
and purpose (LLL V, 2, 849. 5Ierch. I, 3, 8 etc.), to 
give a. of sth. is equivalent to to declare one's 
meaning about sth.: is hot this the da.y that 
He-mia should gh'e a. of ber cholce? Mids. IV, l, 141. 
I descend to give thee a. of thy just demand, II6 A V 
3, 144. 
2) account: nothing of.your a. 5Ieas. Il, 4, 73. 
to make .lour a. before him III, 2, 165. thus bound to 
.your a. _Ado V, 1, 233. let me go no farther to mine 
a. 237. this is hot laid to thy a. Wint. III, 2, 200. for 
your dm.ls of a. R2 IV 159. he'll call .you to so hot an 
a. of it, H5 II, 4, 1_'23. call these foul o.ffCders to 
their --s, H6B II, 1, 203. brought him to his a., H8 
IV, 2, 14. follow to thine a. Cor. iii, l, 177. I know 
m.y answer must be ruade, Caes. I, 3, 114. 
Very ncar to, and ahnost coincidcnt with, this 
signification is that of atonement, reparation 
for au offence, punishment: arrestthem to 
a. of the law, H5 Il, 2» 143. render'd to .your public 
laws at heaviest a. Tin. V, 4, 63. whose a. would 
death, Cymb. IV, 4, 13. 
3) return, retaliation: Great the slaught«r 
is here ruade b.y the Roman; great the a. be Britons 
must take, Cymb. V, 3, 79. in a. of which daim, H5 
1, 2, 249. Especially, as it is explained in Hml. V, 2, 
176, the «opposition of one' s person in trial,'" in con- 
sequence of an offence or a challenge: it raa.y be his 
enem.y is a gentleman of great sort, quite from the a. 
o.f his degree, H5 IV, 7, 142. and wake him to the a. 
Troil. I, 3, 332. if .your lordshlp would vouchsa]e the 
a. Hml. V, 2, 176. he'll hot feel wrongs that rie 
to an a. Lr. IV, 2, 14. 
In fencing it is the coming in or striking 
in return after having parried or received a hit: 
on the a. he pays you as surel.y, Tw. III, 4, 305. /f 
Itamlet give the jïrst or second hit, or quit in a. of the 
third exchange, Hml. V, 2, 280. 
.,nswer, rb., 1) to reply; a) absolutely: 
Gentl. I 3, 91. II, 2, 13. 7, 89. Meas. I, 2, 18. III, 1, 



42 

136. Err. II, 2, 195. V, 89. Adoll, 1, 114. IlS V, 3, 
163 etc. 
b) iv a. one: Lucr. 1459. 'iv. IV, 1, 20. E'r. I, 
2, 77. II, 2, 12. 1V, 1, 60. Mids. III, 2, 18. tt5 V, 2, 
• q19. H6CllI, 3, 66 etc. =- to serve one well, to 
turn one off ith a reply: I mn not able fo a. 
the Welsh flannel, Wiv. V, 5, 172. I ara --ed, LLL 
], 2, 33. the clerk is --ed, .Ado Il, 1, 115. are .you 
.-edf Merch. IV, 1, 62. how a beggar should be --ed, 
.0. an .you will hot be --ed with reaso% As Il, 7, 
100. must she hot then be --edf (i.e. acquiesce in 
that answer) Tw. Il, 4, 95. iv a. vue iv sth.: a. me 
unto tMs question, II4A II, 8, 88. a. me te what I ask 
you, Mcb. IV, 1, 60. 
c) iv a. iv vue  to replyto one: what canst thou 
e. to . majesOd? H6B 1V, 7, 29. a. to us, Cor. III, 
o, 61. 
d) to a. sth.  to reply to sth.: which heavilff 
he --s u'ith a çroan, Sonn. 50,11. I will a. il straight, 
Wiv. I, 1, 118. Mids. III, 1, 12. lIerch IV, 1, 4. V, 
99. H4A I, 3, 66. II6A Ill, 1, 7. II6B IV, lo, 56. 
II6Ç III, 3, 259. Iom. II, 4, 10. Ant. llI, 6, 30. a. ne 
v»e doubt, H6C III, 3, 238. Metaphorieally - to 
return: she --ed t».y affection, SViv. IV, 6, 10. the.y 

Sonn. 1_'26, 11. that praise which Collatlne doth owe 
enchanted T«rquin --s, Lucr. 83. Err. IV, 1, 82. Wint. 
V 3, 8. II4A I, 3, 185. H4B V, 1, 27. tI6C II, 6, 55. 
Cor. V 6, 67. Zut. III, lœee, 33..And inta'.: to bring 
me down »st a. for .your raising? Alls Il, 3, 120. 
5) To rcnder accouut: tou art cote fo a. a 
sion# adversary, Merch. 1V, 1, 3. H4A Il, 4, 565. 
Cor. III, l, 162. 325. And hence to face, to 
natch: dare as weR a. a man, Ado V, 1, 89. how wa 
hall a. him, John V, 7, 60. ail these bold fears I bave 
--ed, II4B IV 5 197. here I sta»d iv a. thee, H6C II, 
2, 96. who shall a. h;m? Tmil. Il, 1,139. if Hector will 
to mrrow be --ed, Troil. III, 3, 35 (met in combat). 
read.y iv a. us, Cor. I, 2, 19. fo er. all the city, 4, 52. 
he will a. the letter's toaster, Rom. Il 4, 11. iv a. perils, 
Caes. 1¥. l. 47. fo a. this extremit?! o.f the skies, Lr. 
lII, 4, 106. V, 3, 152. Zut. III, 13, 27. Irre- 
gular construction: u»less .you underta]ze that with 
me which with as n,.ch safet.y .you might a. him, Tw. 
111,4,273. Absolutely-to be ready for combat: 
fo a. ro.yall] in out defences, H5 II, 4, 3. armin 9 to a. 
in a night alarm, Troil. 1, 3, 171. wMle gou bave 
throats to a. Tire.V, 1,182. --in 9 belote we do demand 
of them, Caes. V, 1, 6 (a quibble), tre will a. on their 

cannot a. t;,z.y distress, l'it. !11. 1, 38. --ed t»y steps charge, 24. 
too loud (resounded too loud) Cymb. lV, 2, 215. 6) hot to let slip, to profit by: a. the rince 
e) to a. sth  to say sth. in answer: what ] qf request, Alls I, 1,168. a. the vantage of his anger, 
canst thou a.? H6B IV, 7, 29. what --s Clarenee? ] Cor. 11, 3, 267. 
II6C IV, 6, 45. I 7) to rentier aeeount off 1 shall a. that better 
f) to a. to sth.: a. fo this, lIeas. II, 4, 60. Ado lto the eommomvealth than .you ... Mereh. III, 5, 40. 
IV, 1,86. All's II, 2, 57. IV, 3, 145. II6C IV, 6, 45.1Meas. II, 1,39. IV, 2, 129. if would sear, ce be --ed, 
V. 5,21. Rom.ll,5,35. = to vield answer on occasion ] Tw. III, 3, 28. SVint. l, 2, 83. H4A III, o, 198. tt6B 
of a peeuliar address: the. ill hot a. fo that epithet, Il, 1, 41. Il1, 1, 133. IV, 7, 47. Tit. 11, 3, 298. Hml. 
LLL ¥, 2, 170. fo make .you a. trul.y to .your naine, III, 4 176. Lr. I. 3, 10. Cymh. III, 5 42. Followed 

Ado IV, 1, 80. I a to that naine, V, 4, 73. Coriolanus 
he would hot a. to, Cor.V, 1, 12. Again, to yield answer 
on occasion of certain questions: .you bave --ed to 
hls reputation with the duke and to his valour: what 
is his honesty? Ails IV, 3, 277. where we naff leisurel.y 
eaeh one demand and a. to his part performed, Wint. 
V, 3, 153. 
2) to reply to one who calls or knocks 
at the door, to open: Ipra.yott, a. hhn. lleas. 
1, 4, 14 (cf. v. 8). knock but at the 9are, and he him- 
self will a. H4B 1, 1, 6. 8imilarly: a. !lour summons, 
Tp. IV, 131. tapsters --in 9 ererç call, Ven. 849. 
ô) to agree with, to correspond: let if a. 
ererlt strah» for strain, Ado V, 1 12. sinee the heavens 
bave shaped my bodç so, let hell nake erook'd mg nffnd 
to a. it, H6C V, 6, 79. if seeonds had --ed hbn ( 
had donc like him) Cymb. V, 3, 91. ifthç sweet rb'tue 
a. hot th.y show, 8onn. 93, 14. fo a. his desire, Lucr. 
1606. Ven. Ded. 7. Tp. I, 2, 190. Meus. 11I, 1, 253. 
2, 269. V, 415. /do II, 1,241. 376. En-. III, 1, 20. 
Troil. I, 3, 15. Oth. I, 3, 278. Cymb. V, 5, 450. ol- 
lowed by fo: that the phzce c. fo convenience, Meas. 
!II, 1, 258..you bear it as --i» 9 fo the weight , /nt. 
V, 2, 102. doublet, bat, hose, all that a. fo them, Cymb. 
III, 4, 173. if this but a. fo nff just beliefi Pet'. V, 1, 
239. Absolutely: I could hOt a. in that course ofhonour, 
Alls V, 3, 98,  aet aeeording to ber invitation. 
4) to satisïy: out hopes are--ed, Caes.V,l,1. 
• ,.ne to-morrow, Meus. 11.4, 167. As II. 7, 99. Hence  
to perform: fo a. other business, Tp. 1,2,367. fo 
a. matters of this consequence, H5 Il. 4, 146. And = 
to puy: ber audit, thouh dda'd, --ed must be, 

by fo»': we that bave 9ood wits bave much fo a. for, 
As V, 1, 13. Absolutely  to he responsible: 
onlç thus far .you shall a. Cymb. I, 4, 170. 
8) to warrant, to he answerable for: l"tt 
a. the coina9e, tI4A IV, 2, 8. a. . li.fe rnç jud9ment , Lr. 
I, I, 153. U 10. 11.2, 154. 
9) to atone for: this shall be--ed, Wiv. I, 1, 
117. --in 9 one foul wrong, Meus. II, 2, 103. llI, 2, 
188. 1V; 3, 172. Err. IV, 3, 31. Tw. lII, 3 33. John 
IV, 2, 89. H6A l. 3, 52. 123 IV, 2, 96. Caes. llI, 2, 85. 
but. V, 2, 178. Followed by for: (fthe first had 
for his deed. Meus. II, 2, 93. eon/d «Il but a. for that 
oeevish brut? R3 I, 3, 194. 
nswerable, 1) correspondent: if was a 
iolent commencement, and thou shalt see an a. se- 
questration, 0th. I, 3, 351. ail thi»gs a. fo this portion, 
Shr. II, 361. 
2) responsible: he shll be a. It4A II, 4, 571. 
Ansered, adj. fnrnished with aa answer: 
be simple a. Lr. III, 7 43 (Qq answerer). 
An***erer, one who answers: be simple a., 
for we know the truth, Lr. III, 7, 43 (Ff. answered). 
Ant, emmet: H4A III, 1,149. Ir. II, 4, 68. 
Anlenor, name of a Trojan: Troil. I, 2, 206. 
[II, 1,148. 3, 18 etc. 
Àntenorides, name of a gate of Troy: Troil. 
Prol. 17 (f. Antenonidus). 
Anthem, a song performed as part of 
divine service: H4B l, 2, 213; and then in ge- 
neral a solemn and monrnful song: Ven. 839. 
lPhoen. 21. Gentl. III, 1, .'240. 
Anthonio, v. Antonio. 



A 43 

All|llolliUs, V. 
An|hony, v. 
Atttllropophagi, man-eaters, eannibals: 
Oth. I, 3, 144 (seemingly used as a noun proper, and 
defined by 'Çannibals tat eac orner eat'). 
Anthropophaginiau, a word uscd, but, il should 
seem, not understood by the host in Wiv. IV, 5, 10. 
&lîafea inhabitants of Antium: Cor. I, 6 53. 
59. III, 3, 4. ¥, 6, 80. 
Aatie (O. Edd. promiscuously antick and antique, 
but always accented on the first syllable), adj. 1) 
belonging to the limes, or resembliug the 
manners of antlquity: show me our image in 
some a. book, Sonn. 59, 7. n him those hol a. hours 
are seen, Sonn. 68, 9. 106, 7. the constant service oj 
the a. world As lI 3 57. the senators of the a. Rome. 
H5 V Chor. 26. an a. Roman, Hml. V 2, 352. 
2) ancient: in this the a. and well noted face 
f plaln old form fs nuch disfigured, John IV 2, 21. 
the dust on a. lime would lie unswept, Cor. Il» 3 126. 
a handkerchiefi an a. token, Oth. V , 216. 
3) old and quaintly figured: stretched 
mette qf an a. sonç, Sonn. 17 12. lnever ma believe 
these a. fables hIids. V, 3. an oak whose a. foot peeps 
out, As II 1 31. that old and a. son#, Tw. Il. 4 3. 
while ou peform our a. round» Mcb. IV l 130. his 
a. sword Hnl. I1.  491. 
4) odd, fantastic, foolish: &'aw no Hnes 
there with thlne a. pen Sonn. 19, 10. cover'd with an 
a. face Rom. I 5 58. the pox of such a. fantasticoes, 
11, 4, 29. to put an a. disposition on, Hml. I, 5, 172. 
Anie, subst., 1) odd and fantastic appear- 
ance: there appears 9nick-shin# s, Lucr. 459. 
LLL V, 1, 119 (Armado mlskes the word). 154. 
were he the veriest a. in the world Shr. Ind. l, 101. 
) a buffoon, practising odd gesticu- 
lattons: drawinç of an a. Ado Ill l, 63. and there 
the a. sits, R2 lit, 2 162. old father a. the law, H4A 
1, 2, 69 three such s, H5 111  3. t£ou a. death, 
II6A I  7 18. like witless s, Troil. V, 3, 86. I 
Anie, vb., to make appear like a buf- 
foon: the wiM disçuise bath almost antlcked us ail, 
Ant. II 7 132. 
An«ieipa«e,to act or corne before others: 
here art thou iu appointment fresh and fab', 
time Troil. lV 5, 2. whose footlnç here s out thouçhts 
Oth. Il, 1,76. Uence : to prevent by acting 
before: to a. the ills that were nol Sonn. 118 9. 
lime, thou st m &'ead exploits, Mcb. IV, l, 144. 
&nieipaio, the acting before another: 
so shall m a. prevent our discoveT Hml. I1 2 304. 
Antic, v. antic. 
Auiiely, oddly, fantasically: AdoV, 1,96. 
Antidote, medicine: trust hot te phsician; 
his s are poison, ŒEim. IV, 3, 435. with some a. 
cleanse le stu'd bosom, Icb. V, 3, 43. 
Antigonus, me in Wint. Il, 3, 42. III, 3, 7. 
98. V, 1, 42 etc. 
Aiitioch, the famous town in Sia: Per. Prol. 
17. I, 1,134, and psim. 
Antiochus, naine of the king of Anfioch: Per. 
Prol. 17. I, 1, 3, and psim. 
Antiopa, an Amazon and daughter of Mars, in 
love with ŒEheseus: Mids. Il, 1, 80. 
Atipathy, natural aversion: no contraries 
hold more a. Lr. Il, 2, 93. 

Atttiphohts, naine of the twin brothers in Err. 
1I, 2, 112. llI, 2, 2. 170. IV, 1, 8. 3, 45. ¥, 13 etc. 
Plur. Antlpholuses after the writing of l'I. Edd.; O. 
Ed. Antipholus, as it is required by the metre: V, 
357. 
Antipodes, the people living on the op- 
posite side of the globe: Ado Il, 1,273. lIid». 
Ill, 2, 55. lIerch. V, 1-°7. R2 III, _'2, 49. H6C 1,4, 135. 
.ll|iqllary, adj. ïull of old lofe: znstructed 
by the a. limes, Troil. I1, 3, 262. 
An|ique and tntiqely, v. antic and auticly. 
Antiquiiy, 1) old age: beatcd and copp'd 
wfflt tann'd a. Sonn. 62, 10. 108, 12. bald with dr. a. 
AsIV, 3, 106. hadst thou hot te prlvilege qf a. All's 
II, 3, 220. everj part about I/ou blasted wit£ a. H4B 
I, 2, 208. 
2) aneient date, long standing: bawd is 
he doubtless, and of a. too, lIeas. III, 2, 72. 
3) aneient rime: a. forgot, custom not l¢nown. 
Hml. I', 5, 104. In the plnr. -- remains of aneient 
rimes: to spoil --ie» of hammer'd steel, Luer. 951. 
A»tium, town in old Latium and capital of the 
' Volsei: Cor. III, 1, 11. IV, 4, 1 etc. 
Antolliad, naine of thc flag-ship of Antony: 
Ant. III, 10, . 
Antoio (in this and the two following natne» 
O. Ed. now th, now t; bi. Edd. throughout without 
an h); 1) brother of Prospero: Tp. I, 2,66. 129. ¥. 
264.2) ftther of Proteus in Gentl. II, 4, 54. 3) brother 
of Leonato in Ado Il, 1,117. 4) father of Petruchio 
in Shr. I, 2, 54. Il, 68. 5) son of the dtoEe of Florence 
in All's Ill, 5, 79. 6) the merchant of Yeuice, passim 
in Merch. 7) the sea-captain in Tw. 11, 1, 16.35. III, 
3, 13 etc. 
In O. Edd. the nmue of the Roman triumvir is 
repeatedly spelt Autonio, which M. Edd. bave con- 
stantly changed to Antonius: Caes. I, 2, 3.4. 190. I, 
3, 37. Ant. Il, 2, 7. Il, 5, _'26. 
Antonius, a form frequently introduced into the 
text by bi. Edd. (cf.Antonio), used by O. Edd. only in 
Ant. I, 1, 56. 11,6,119 (JMarcus .Anthonius); III, 1,25. 
Antony, 1) the Roman triumvir: H5 Ill, 6, 15. 
Mcb. Ill, 1, 57. Caes. 1, 2, 29.204 etc. Ant. I, 1, 19 
etc. ) A. Woodville, brother of Queen Elizabeth in 
R3 I, 1, 67. 3' A. duke of Brabant: H5 I', 8, 101. 
4) brother of Leonato, else called Antonio: Ado Y, 
1, 91. 100. 5) A. Dull, the constable in LLL I, 1, 
271. 273. 6) a servant in Rom. I, 5, 11. 
Antre, cavern: Oth. I, 3, 140. 
Atil, iron block for the use of smiths: 
John IV, 2, 194. Cor. I¥, 5, 116 (the a. ofm!/sword ). 
Any, pron.,whoever or whatever il may 
be; of the saine sense and use as now-a-days: bg a. 
other bouse or person, Tp. I, 2, 42. had I been a. 9od 
ofpower, 10. Il, 1, 1(31.2, 19.72. 108. 177 (without a. 
more talking). III, 3.34. Gentl. III, 1, 30, cte. In a 
negative sentence: Tp. I, 2, 31. 352. 111, 1, 55 etc. 
Passing into the sense of every: tell the cloek fo a. 
business, Tp. Il, 1,289. 2 32. III, 2 129. Gentl. III, 
1, 11.13-[. Il, 4, 53. Wir. IV, 2, 26. Ado III, 3, 1(39. 
Mids.I, 2, 73. H4AII,2,16 (a. tbne  every moment). 
R3 I, 4, 1-[5. Vert. 354 etc. 
Ant thing, in O. Edd. always in two words: Tp. 
I, 1, 71. 2, 43. Gentl. IV, 1, 42 etc. : everything: 
mg horse, mg ox, mg a. Shr. III, 2, 234. hlereh. Ill, 
2, 33. R3 1: 1, 89. Err. V, 144 etc. shallit be so? 



44 A 

A,y thbg (.- whatever you please) Wiv. 111, 3, 249. 
Lord Alexas, sweet Alexas, most any thing Alexas, 
Ant. I, 2, 1. for an.y thing [ know H4B V 5, 146. 
Any body also always in two words: Wiv. I, 4 
4. III, 3, 224. 5Ie. IV, 1, 16 etc. etc. 
Any for anybody: is there a. logs to sec ... 
As I, 2, 149. whiles a. speas tlzat fought with us, 
H5 IV 3, 66. Mens. I, 1, 13. 3. Gentl. V 4, 4. Il, 4, 
154. Err. I, 1, 17. II, 2, 211. Lr. I, 4, 246. 
A»y for anything: OE there be a. of Mm left, 
171 bury if, Wint. Ill, 3, 136 (the Clown speaks', last 
a. more ofthlsV çp. II, 2, 137. 
Joined to the superfive: as common as a. tle 
most vulgar thing, Hml. I, 2, 99. less attemptable than 
a. the rarest of out dies, Cymb. I, 4, 65. 
Joined to comparatives of adverbs: OEyou t'ouble 
him a. more Tp. lII 2 55. to slander nusic a. more, 
Ado lI 3 47. Wint. ll 2, 35. IV 4 506. R2 Ill 2 
208. Troil. Il, 1, 129. u are hot to go loose a. 
longer, Wiv. IV, 2, 128. Gentl. Il, 3, 39. Merch. Il, 2, 
120. -- shall be a. further afflicted, Wiv. IV, 2, 233. 
Cor. I, 1, 1. Caes. I 2 45. 167. 
Any wlere (in two xvords) : Wint. III, 3 68. Rom. 
Il Chor. 12. 5icb. Il, 3 93. Oth. III, 4» 3. 
no, Welsh particle (ofO: Bice ap omas, R3 
IV» 5, 12. 
.oaee, at a quick pace, fast, quickly: 
and homoard runs a. Ven. 813. ŒEp. V, 64. 5Iids. [, 
1, 2. Aslll 3 1. Shr. IV 3, 52. Wint. Il, 1 16. John 
V, 2, 65. H4A V, 2, 90. H5 IV, 8, 3. R311,4, 13. 
Rom. Il, 4, 233. III, 2, 1. Caes. V 3, 87. 5Icb. III, 3 
6. Lr. IV, 7 94. Ant. I 3 50. IV 14 41. V 2 325. 
In speaking of approaching rime, almost  s o o n : 
out nuptial hour draws on a. Mids. I, 1, 2. Sunday 
tomes a. Shr. Il, 324. tlat hour approacles a. All's 
IV, 3 36. the future cornes a. Tire. Il, 2 157. 0f 
running blood and tears  fast: I bleed a. Lr. IIl 
7 97. Ant. IV 7, 6. each check a river downward 
flow'd a. Compl. 284. -- To spea a.  to speak 
qckly, As Ill 2 208; but also  to speak at ran- 
dom: ou are pleasant, and spea a. Me. III, 2, 
120. lere they sta'd an bout, and tal'd a. LLL V 
2. 369. 
• oar, I) separately, by one's self: stay, 
stand a.; I now hot which is which, Err. V, 364. I 
keep k lonely, a. Wint. V, 3, 18. each man a., all slngle 
and alone Tire. V 1, 110. resolve yourselves a. ( 
wiout me , 5Icb. III 1, 137. Caesar's will? hear it 
a. (hot in the presence of ooEers) Ant. III, 13, 47. 
some nobler toen I bave ept a. (hOt put in the in- 
ventory, kept back) Ant. V, 2, 168. 
2) at or to a distance from the other 
company or from the place in question, 
off, back: go a., Adam, and thon shak hear how 
he will shake me up, As l, 1, 29. to put a. these your 
attendants ( to send away) Wint. Il, 2 14. stand 
ail a. ( stand bk) R2 III, 3, 187. H6B III, 2, 242. 
R3 IV 2 1. 0. IV 1, 75. drew myse a. OEit. V 1, 
112. In pricate will I tal with thee a. t[6A I 2 69. 
get thee a. and weep Caes. III, 1, 282. to draw a. the 
bod, Hml. IV, 1, 24. go but a. (withdraw with me) 
Hml. IV 5, 203. to draw tle 3[oor a. 0. II, 3 391. 
o wi me a. I will withdraw, III, 3 476. a. upon 
out nees  let m widraw and fa on out knees) 
Çymb. IV, 2, 288. 
3) aside: th godhead laid a. As IV, 3, . all 

reverence set a. to hbn, John 11I, 1 159. lay a. the 
borrowed glories, H5 Il, 4, 78. to lay a. theiÆ partlcular 
functions, I11, 7 41. to lay his gay comparisons a. 
Ant. 3, 13, 26. Henry put a. (ruade away with) H6B 
III, 1,383. 
-le, the animal $imia: Tp. II, 2 9. IV, 249. 
]eas. 11, 2, 120. Err. II, 2, 200. Ado V 1,205. LLL 
111, 85. 90. 96. IV, 2, 131. H4B Il, 2, 77. R3 Ill, 1 
130. Cor. I, 4, 36. Caes. V, 1, 41. Hml. IV, 2 19 (Qq 
apple). Apes and monkeys are put together with no 
discernible difference: on meddling monke.y or on 
busy a. lIids. Il, 1, 181. more new-fangled t]an an a. 
more giddy in mg des.es than a monkey, As IV, 1, 13. 
--s and monkeys "twixt two such shes would..., 
Cymb. I, 6 39. 
Terre of reproach: boys, --s, brag9arts Ado V, 
1, 91. out, gon md-headed a. H4A Il, 3, 80. thls is 
the a. of form, LLL V, 2 325. --s of idleness, H4B 
IV, 5, 123 ( formal, idle apes). Cynb. IV, 2, 194. 
Terre of endearment: poor a. low tlou sweatest! 
H4B Il, 4, 234. the a. is dead and [ must conjure 
hlm, Rom. Il, 1, 16. 
Symbol of imitativeness: Julio ]omano would 
beguile Nature of ber custom so perfectl/ he is ]er a. 
Wint. V, 2, 108. 0 sleep, thon a. of deat] Cymb. Il, 
2, 31. 
To lead opes in hell was the punihment of old 
maids : Ado II 1, 43. 49. Shr. Il, 34. 
A fable now unknown alluded to: unpeg the basket 
on the house's top, let the blrds .fty, and like the fa- 
»ous a. to try conclusions, in tIe basket creep and 
brealc .your own neck down Hml. IIl 4 194 (we are 
perhaps to think of a dove-cote on the top of a 
home). 
Ape-bearer, one who leads about apes: Wint. 
IV 3 101. 
hpemauius, name of the Cynic in Tire. I, 1 
62. 181 etc. etc. 
Apennines, the monntains of Italy: John I, 202. 
A-pieee, to the part or share of eaeh: 
cost me two shilling a. Wiv. I, 1 160. sixteen businesses, 
a month's len9th a. All's IV, 3, 99. four bonds offort/ 
pomds a. H4A III, 3, 117. an hundred ducats a. Hml. 
Il, 2, 383. 
Apish, like an ape: proud, fantastical, a., 
shallow, As III, 2 432. this a. and unmannerly approach 
John V 2 131. with French nods and a. courtes.y 
R3 I, 3, 49. thelr nanners are so a. Lr. I, 4 184. 
Imitative like an ape: out tardy a. nation R2 
II» 1, 22. 
.,pollo, the famons God of ancient Greece: 
Troil. I 3 328. Il, 2, 79. Tir. IV, 1, 67. 4, 15. Lr. I, 
1, 162. God of music and song: LLL IV, 3 343. 
V, 2, 941. Shr. Ind. 2, 37. Troil. III, 3, 305. of ax-t 
and letters: Per. III, 2, 67. of light and the sun (cf. 
Phoebus): Wint. IV, 4, 30. of prophecy (by the Del- 
phian oracle): Wint. Il, 1, 183. 3 200. III, 1, 14. 2, 
117 sq. V, 1, 37. In love with Daphne: lIids. II 1, 
231. Shr. Ind. 2, 61. Troil. I, 1 101. 
ApoHodorus, naine of the Greek who carried 
Cleopatra to Caesar, Ant. Il, 6 68. 
Apology, excuse: there needs no such a. 1.3 
III, 7, 104. LLLV, 1, 142. V 2 597. All'sII, 4, 51. 
Rom. I, 4, 2. In Lucr. 31 it is evidenfly used in the 
sense of encomium, high praise: what needeth 
then--ies be ruade, to set forth that which is so slngular? 



A 45 

Apoldexed, affected with apoplexy: but[ as well fo ]car as 9rant wtat le ]at] said, Lucr. 
sure, t]at sense is a. Hml. 111, 4, 73. 914. 
Apoplexy, sudden stop of sense aud vo- I Appeach, to impeach, inform against: 
luntary motion, from an affectiou of the brains:lIwill a. tle villain, R2 V, -9, 79. 10-9'2. Absolutelv: 
H4B I, .9, 1.93. 126. IV, 4, 130. Cor. IV, 5, .239. .your passions lave fo tlefull--ed, Airs I, 3, 19"7, 
lpostle, disciple of Crist: H6B I, 3, 60. i. e. informed against you. 
R3V, 3,216. I Appeal, vb., to refer toa superior judge; 

Aposlrolha (O. Edd. apostrapha) c o n t r a c t i o n 
of a word by omission of a letter: çoufind hot 
the --s, and so nziss the accent, LLL IV, .2, 1.23. 
pothe¢ary, one who sells drugs for me- 
dicinal uses: H6B III, 3, 17. Rom. V, 1, 37. 57. V, 
3, 119. Lr. IV, 6, 133. 
&ppal, 1) to strike with extreme fear: 
--s er senses and ber spb'it confounds, Ven. 882. 
Troil. IV, 5, 4. V, 5, 15. Mcb. I1, .2, 58. I11, 4, 60. 
Hml. I1, .2, 590. 
.2) to abate, destroy (cf. pall):propertgwas 
thns --ed, that the self was hot the saine, Phoen. 37. 
methlnks, .your looks are sad, .your cheer --ed, H6A 
1, .2 48. 
Apparel (cf. 'parel), subst., dress: Wiv. 
78. V, 5, "204. Meas. IV, '2, 46. Ado II, 1, 37..263. 
III, 3, 1.27. 149. Mids. 11I, 2, .29. IV, .2, 36. Mereh. 11, 
5, 5. As II, 4, 5. 111, .2, .243. IV, 1, 88. hr. Ind. 1, 60. 
I, 1, .234. 11, 317. 354. 11I, .2, 71. IV, .2, 64. Airs IV, 
3, 167. ,Vint. IV, 3, 65. 111. R2 111, 3, 149. V, -9, 66. 
H4B I, .2, .20. !II, .2, 154. 350. H6B IV, 7, 106. Caes. 
1, 1,8.1[m1.1,3,7.2. Cymb. III, 5» 156. Ornamental 
dress: and purs a. on rmj tatter'd loving, Sonn. 
.26 11. 
pparel, vb., to dress: I will a. them all in 
one livery, H6B IV, 2, 80. a. thg head, LLL V, 1, 104 
(it is Armado that speaks), and are --ed thus, like 
,][uscoites, LLL V, .2, 1.20. Err. IV, 3, 14. Shr. 
.2, 76. To put in a showy dress: a. vice like 
vhtne's harbinger , En'. I11, .2, 1.2. Ado IV, 1, .2.29. 
Shr. III .2, 91. tt6A I1, 4, .2.2. Per. I, 1, 1.2. 
pparent, adj. 1) seeming: thy strange a. 
cruelty, Merch. IV, 1, .21. it shonld be put to no a. 
likelihood of breach, R3 II, ,'2, 136. and is no less a. 
to the vulgar eye Cor. IV, 7, 20. these a. prodigles , 
Ces. I1, 1, 198. 
.2) visible: bg some a. si#n let us bave know- 
led#e, H6A II, 1, 3. 
3) evident, obvious: one cinnct ellmb 
without a. hazard of hls lire, Gentl. III, 1,116. is if 
now a.? 3[ost manifest. Meas. IV, .2, 144. Wint. I, .2, 
270. John IV, .2, 93. R.2 I, 1, 13. IV, 1.24. tt4A I, .2, 
65. 11, 4, .29.2. H6A IV, .2, 26. 5, 44. R3 1I, .2, 130. 
III, 5,30. Tit. II, 3, .29 9. Cymb. 11, 4, 56. Cco. I1, 1,198. 
4) certain (helr): H4A I, ,9, 65. - presumptive: 
H6B I, 1, 15.2. Per. lll Prol. 37. er. JHeir-aloparent. 
pparent, subst., apparent heir: as a. to 
the crown, I460 II, .2, 64. Figuratively one who 
bas a elaim to sth.: next to thgsel.f, he's a. fo 
m.y heart, Vint. I, _9, 177. 
pparenlly, evidently: if he should scorn me 
so a. Err. IV, 1, 78. 
&pparition significative appearance: 
amazed at --s, si9ns and prodl91es, Ven. 9.26. a 
thousand blushing --s fo start into ber face, Ado IV, 
1, 161. Espeeially sight ofa spirit or spectre: 
fine a. Tp. I, , 317. this monstrous a. Caes. IV 
277. Hml. I, 1, .28. I, .2, .211. 
&ppay, to pay, satisfy: thou art well appaid 

absolutely: or we a. and from th.y justice Jïg, Cymb. 
V, 4, 91. Followed by fo: to thee rn.y heaz, ed-np hands 
a. Luer. 638. Meas. I, -9, 179. W'int. III, 2, 46. I[5 
1 .2, .290. II, .2, 78. 116B II, 1, 190. tt8 1I, 4, 119. 
.2) to impeaeh: if he a. the duke on ancient 
malice, R..2 I, 1, 9. '2-7. I, 3, '2.1. 
Henee appealcd, adjeetively,  pertaining to 
an inipeaehment: as for the rest appealed, R 
1, 1, 14.2. 
lppeal, snbst., referenee fo a superior 
IJudge: Lueï..293. Meas. V, 303. H4B IV 1, 88. 
. Followed by to: 118 II, 4, '2-34. V, 1, 15.2. 
.2) a plea put in before the judge: mj a. sags 
I did strive to prove the constanc.y and virtue ofyonr 
love, Sonn. 117, 13. 
4) impeachment: fo make 9ood the boisterons 
a. R.2 I, 1, 4. IV, 45.79. Ant. III, 5, 1.2. 
lppealant (Qq MÈ. appellant), impeaeher, 
accuser: R.2 I, 1, 34. 3, 4.5.2. IV, 104 (Lords --s). 
H6B II, 3, 49.57. 
.ppear, 1) to be or beeome visible: in 
each eheek --s a pret.y dlmple, Ven. '2-4.2. to make the 
truth a. where it seems hid, Meas. V, 66. graces will 
a. Ado 11, 1, 1.29. Ven. 1175. Luer. 116. 458. 138.2. 
1434. Sonn. 102, .2. 103, 6. Compl. 93. Wïv. III, 3, 
170. Ado I, -9, .22. Mids. I, 1,185. II, -9, 3.2. V, 4.q3. 
Merch. l, 3, 115. 11I, ,.297.4,3 etc. Appearlng -- ri. 
sible, H4B IV, 1, 82. To a. to one : to be seen by 
one, to show one's self: men's faults do seldom fo 
themselves a. Luer. 633. a. to him, as he fo me --s, 
ail melting, Compl..299. God's mother delgned fo a. 
to me, H6A !, -9, 78. Caes. V, 5, 17. as if ma.y a. nnto 
lyou = as you may well pereeive, Ado III, 5, 55. Cor. 
I, .2, -9.2. Hml. I, 1, 101. Ant. III, 4, 33. a. it to your 
I mind = eall to mind, Troil. III, 3, 3. 
Henee :- to be eonspieuous: AoEdins will 
a. well in these vars, Cor. IV, 3, 34. there she --ed 
indeed, Ant. 1I, .2, 193 (perhaps = she was an appa- 
rition, like a spirit or goddess . 
.2) to be or beeome evident: if must a. that 
malice bears down truth, Merch. IV, 1, .213. R.2 I, 1, 
.26. tt4A 111, 3, 191. 116A 11, 1, 36. tt6C 111, 3, 146. 
Hml. IV, 7, 5. Lr. 1, 1, 4. With a following noun: 
vows so born ... all truth --s, Mids. III, .2, 1.25. that 
mg love mag a. plain and free, Gentl. V, 4, 8.2. Meas. 
1I, 4, 78. I11, 1, 93. Merch. 1I» 9, 73. IV, 1, .249. H6A 
II, 4, .20. he shall a. fo the envious a scholar, Meas. 
III, .2, 154. 
3) to eome in iigh% to stand in the pre- 
senee of another: mg sancy bark on your broad 
main doth wil.fdly a. Sonn. 80, 8. a., and pertl.y! Tp. 
IV, 58. let ber a. Meas. V, 517. Ado lV, .2, 1. Tw. III, 
4, 40. H6A V, 3, 7. Ant. III, 1-'2., 1. What art thou 
that darest a. to us -- eome before us, Ant. V, 1, 5. 
and bff and bg I shall fo thee a. : eome to thee, 
Mids. III, 1, 89 (Bottom's speeeh), fo a. tMs morniny 
to them  meet them» Troil. V,3, 69. Cor. 1, 5, .21. 
4) to seem: Sonn. 31, 7. 53, 11. Tp. I, .2, 497. 
Gend. II, 4, 45. Wiv. II, .o, .230. III, 1, 73. Meas. II, 



46 

A 

4, 30. 111, 1,213. V, 476. Err. 111, 1, 16. IV, 3e 56. 
Mids. V, 257. H4B 11, 1, 125. Caes. III, 1, 165 etc. 
etc. This youth ..... --s he bath had good ancestors, 
Cymb. IVe 2e 47. ttow --s the .fig]tt? -- how seems 
he fight to go? Ant. III, 10e 8. 
Appeared, adjectivel)b  apparent, p ercept- 
ible, discernible: 3tour favour is well appeared 
by tour togue, Cor. IV, 3e 9 (IIanmer affeer'd; 
"Warburton appcal'd; Jackson apparel'd; Collier ap- 
proved; Singer appayed). 
Appea¢amaee, 1) visibleness: chased your 
blood out of a. H5 11, 2 e 76. bearb9 with frank a. 
their purposes toward Cyprus, Oth. I, 3e 38. there is 
no a. of faney in him, Ado III, 2, 31. no man should 
possess hbn with any a. of lest, H5 IV, 1, 116. 
2) semblanee: had three tbnes slai?t the a. of 
the king, II4B 1, 1, 128. 
3) personal presenee: OE she deng the a. of 
a naked blind boy in ber naked seein 9 self, H5 V, 2, 
324. II6AV, 3,8. H8 II, 4 e 132. Ofl1. I, 2,37 (er. 
not-appearance). 
4) prescnce, outside: thy .f, tb" a. Sonn. 46, 
8. you sec what a ragged a. it is e II4B III, 2, 279. thou 
hast a grbn a. Cor. IV e 5e 66. 
.¢ppearer, one who bas a ccrtaiu appear- 
ance: reverend a. Per. V, 3e 18. 
.tppeaue, to put in a state of peace, to 
calm e to reconcile: the Eternal's wrath's--d, 
Gentl. V, 4, 81. H6B IV, 4, 42. H6C IV, 1, 34. R3 I, 
4 69. Tir. 1, 126. Caes. III, 1 e 179. Mcb. IV, 3e 17. 
Cymb. V, 4, 12. 5, 72. 
.¢ppellanl, writing of Qq for appealant» q. Vo 
.¢ppendix, something appended and con- 
comitant: with your a. (i. e. your bride) Shr. IV, 
4 e 104. 
_tpperil, peril, danger: let ne stay at thine 
a. Tire. le 2, 32. 
Appertain, to belong to, to become: all 
rites that a. unto a 5urial, Ado IV e 1 210. a congruent 
epitheton --ing to ty young dayse LLL I, 2, 15. the 
ing rage to such a greetbg, Rom. 111, 1, 66. IIence 
to concern: I should know no secrets that a. to you, 
Ces. 11, 1,282. what most nearly --s to us both, 
I, le 287. 
Absolutely  to be ineumbent: ere supper- 
tlme znust I perform much business --fig, Tp. III, 1, 96. 
Appertaiing, subst, that whieh belongs 
to a persone external attribute: therealhabi- 
rude gave lire and grace to --s and to ornamente Compl. 
115. we ly by out --s, Troil. 11, 3e 87 (Ff appertain- 
ments). 
Al»pertalnnet, the saine: Troil. 11,3, 87 
appertainin9s ).* 
Appertinent, adj: belonging, beeoming 
as an a. title to .our old drue, LLL I, 2, 17. all the 
other 9ifts a. to man are hot worth a 9ooseberry, H4B 
1, 2e 194. 
Appertinent, subst.  appertainment: to 
firMsh hSn with all --s belonging to hls honour H5 
1I 2 87. 
Al»Petite, 1) desire of food: to?nakeour--s 
more keene Sonn. 118e 1.56, 2. 147, 4. Meas. I e e 52. 
do Il e , 247. Merch. 11, 6e 9. OEw. 1, 5, 98. Wint. 
11, e 16. R2 1e,296. H4B 11,2,11. HSV, 1,27. H8 
111 e 2 e 20. OEroil. I11 
6» 1. Caes. 1, 2 06. Mcb. 111, 4 e 38. Lr. 1, 1, lœee0. 

Ant. 1I, I e 0,5. Cymb. 11I, 6, 37. dry a.  thirt, Tit. 
III e 1, 14. This fundamental notion is in most cases 
retained, when the word indicates d e si r e in general: 
that surfeitlng the a. (i.e. the desire of hearing music) 
may slcken, Tw. le le 3. 11, 4e 100. Sonn. ll0e 10. 
Troil. 1, 3e 120. Cor. 1, I e 107. 
2) Sensual desire: Lucr. 546. Wiv. 1, 3e 73. 
Meas. Il, 4, 176. Troil. 11, 2 e 181. Oth. 111, 3, 270. 
Especially carnal lust: Vert. 34. Lncr. 9. Compl. 
166. Meas. 11, 4, 161. R3 111, 5, 81. Hml. 1, 2e 144. 
Lr. IV, 6, 125. Oth. I, 3 e 263. 1I, 1, 231. Ant. 11, 2, 
242. Cymb. 1, 6, 43. 
3) C a p r i c e : as ber a. shall play the god with his 
weakfunction, Oth. 11, 3, 353. Will: dexterity so 
obeging a. Troil. V, 5, 27. 
1)lural --s: Sonn. 118, 1. H5 V, 1, 27 (luellen). 
Troil. Il, o,, 181. Oth. III, 3, 270. Ant. 11, 2, 242. 
.pplatd, 1) to receive with acclanations, 
to extol with shouts: a. the naine o] Henry 
with your leader, H6C IV, 2, 27. till fields and blows 
and groans a. our sport, H4A 1, 3, 302. enter like 
great triumphers in thelr --ing gares, Tim. V, 1,200. 
I would a. thee to the very echo, that should a. again, 
Mcb. V, 3, 53. Caps, hands and tongues a. it to the 
clouds, Ihnl. IV, 5, 107. that heaven and earth rnag 
strike theb" sounds together» --bg our approach, Ant. 
IV, 8, 39. 
2) in a weaker sense -- to prtise, approve: 
a. out loves, Gentl. 1, 3, 48. V, 4, 140. H6A Il, 2, 36. 
Tit. l, 164. 321. IV, 2, 30. Meb. III e 2 46. Per. lI, 
5, 58. 
Applause, acclamaion shout of appro- 
b a t i o n: their loud a. and Aves veemente Meas. 1, 1 
71. Merch. llle 2, 144. H4B I e 3e 91. R3 III, 7, 39. 
Troil. I, 3e 163. 379. Cor. l, 9e 64. Tit. 1, 230. Caes. 
1, 2, 1 (--s). 
lraisee approbation in general: high com- 
mendaton, true a. and love, As 1, 2e 275. Troil. I, 
59. Il, 3, 211. lll, 3, 119. Oth. Il, 3 e 293. 
/pl»le, 1) the fruit of the apple-tree: 
Sonn. 93e 13. Tp. II, le 91. Merch. le 3e 102. Shr. 
I e I e 139. IVe2e 101. ŒEw. l e5e 167. V e230. tt5111, 
7 e 155. H8 V e 4e 64. Lr. I, 5e 16. 
2) the a. of the eye ---- eye-ball: sink in a. of 
his eye, Mids. 111, 2 e 104. and laugh upon the a. of her 
eye, LLL V, 2, 475 (i. e. perhaps: always laugh upon 
ber, though she perhaps look another way?) 
.ppleoJohu, a sort of apple whieh keeps 
long, but becomes very withered: I ara withered like 
.anolda. H4A 111,3,5. H4BII, 4,?; and inwhat 
follows. 
.¢pple.tarl, a tart marie of apples: carved 
llke a a. Shr. IV e 3, 89. 
Applianee, cure, medieament: to tender 
and mg a. All's 1I, le 116. wlth all--s and means to 
boot e H4B 11I, I e 29. that's the a. only whlch your 
disease requirese H8 I, 1, 124. diseases desperate 
grown by desperate a. are relieved e Hml. IV, 3, 10. 
who was by good a. recovered, Per. 11I e 22 e 86. 
guratively: tfiou art too noble to conserve a life 
base --s, Meas. 111, 1, 89, i. e. to preserve thy life 
by base remedies, by base means. 
Apllicaion, curee medieament: the rest 
have worn me out with several --s, All's 1, 2 e 74. 
tpply, 1) trans, a) to make use of: craft 
against vice I rnust a. Meas. 11I, 2, 291. Luer. 531. 



LLL V, 2 e 77. fo sth: Compl. 303. Ven. 713. Tw. 
IV, 1, 13. Especially of medicaments: fo a. a moral 
medicine to a mortifying mischief Ado I, 3, 13. 
haler did a. hot liquors in my bloode As Il, 3, 48. a. 
fo ber soin« remediese Wint. III, 2e 153. H6B 
404. Cor. I e 6e 64. Lr. lll e 7 e 107. Cymb. I, 5, 21. 
Figurafively: --ing fears to hopes, and hopes to fears e 
Sonn. 119e 3. there my be aught --ied which may 
ler su.ffîering ecstasy assuage e Compl. 68. what coin- 
.fort to this great decay my came shall be --iede Lr. 
V, 3. 298. 
b) to put one thing to another: like usury, 
--ing wet fo wet, Compl. 40. 
c) reflectively, to employ or dedicate one's 
sel f: " you a. yourselfto out int«nts, Ant. Ve 2e 126. 
d) to explain, moralize on: estor sall 
a. thy latest words, Troil. I e 3, 32. how a. you this 
Cor. l e 1 e 151. and these does she a. for warnings and 
patients, Caes. lle , 80. cf. Ven. 713. 
2) intr. a) to dedicate, devote one's self: 
let your remembrance a. fo Banquo, Mcb. III e 2 e 30. 
cf. Shr. I, 1, 19. b) to be convenient, to agree 
with: would it a. well to the vehemency of your qf- 
fection, Wiv. ll. ?, 247. 
The prepo»ition to omittcd: l'Il a. your e.e re- 
nedy, lIids. III, _'2, 450 (M. Edd. fo your eye). Virtue 
and that part of philosophy will I a. Shr. l, 1, 19, 
vhere Hamner, against the mette e proposed to read 
'to vi,-tue." Ierhaps ---- ply, as appay  pay. 
?kPlaOitl, 1) to fix, to determine, to settle: 
let's a. him a meeting, Wiv. 11, 1, 97. --ed them con- 
trary places e Il, I e 216. the hour se 
66. !11, 1, 95. IV e 4, 15. Meas. I!I, 1,223. hIids. I 1, 
177. All's 111 e Te 32. H4A le 2e 190. Tit. IV e 4, 102. 
I da a. hira store qf provender, Caes. IV, 
the passive voice either the persan may be subject: : 
as he was --ede Ado file 3, 171. sall I be 
bourse Shr. I e le 103; or the thing: here is the place 
--ed for the wrestlinge As l, 2 e 154. let tese ave 
day --ed them, H6B I, 3, 211. Il e 3e 48. 4 e 6. as is 
--ed us, H4A III, 1, 86. 
Things nmy be fixcd by mutual agreement, and 
sa the word convey the sense of to concert: as 
Arme and I had --ede Wiv. V 5 210. cf. III, 2 e 55. 
IV, 6, 28. V, 1, 15. 
2) to establish by decree: fo a. who should 
attend on him, HSl, le 74. he did a. sa, Mcb. ll, 3e 58. 
Hence to choose, .o designate, nominate 
for an office: being ten --ed toaster of this deson , 
Tp. I, 2 e 16:2. fo a. saine of your council fo sit wit 
us, H5 Ve 2, 79. Wiv. I e 4, 124. if I be --ed.for the 
placee H6B I e 3e 170. Cymb. llI» 5 10. And  to 
order» to direct: l'll a. my rnen fo carry 
basket, Wiv. 1Ve 2, 96. Ado Il e 2, 17. Shr. IV, 4 
102. R2 I e 3 45. H6B II e 4, 77. IV, 7, 45. R3 I, 1, 
44. I ara --ed him fo murder /Cou, Wint. I, 2, 412, 
nvhere him is the dativus commodi. To saine retention 
and--ed guarde Lr. V, 3, 47 (Ff. only: fo saine re- 
tention), i. e. to a guard expressly ordered to keep 
him. 
3) to furnish, to equip (cf. atpobt s. v. 
pobt); at least in the participle appointed: to bave 
y/ou royally --ed e Wint. IV, 4, 603; in ail other in- 
stances preceded or followed by well:ytou may be armed 
and --ed well, Tit. IV, 2, 16. with well --ed powers, 
H4B I, le 190. IV I e 25. I-I5 I11 Char. 4. H6A IV, 

2, 21. H6C Il, 1, 113 (cf. I)isappointed). Singular 
expression : fo appoint myself b this vexation, Wint. I, 
2, 326e  to dress myself in this vexation (cf. drest 
in an opinion e attired in wondere wrapt in fears etc.) 
/klalaOimet, 1) assignation, stipulation: 
I shall be with ber by ber own a. Wiv. Il, 2e 272. llle 
1, 92. Hence --- engagement: I will then address 
me fo »y a. Wiv. IlleSe135. fo stead up your a. hleas. 
111, 1, 261.*my--s have in them a neede All's I1, 
5e 72. 
2) direction: that good fellow follows my a. 
H8 Il, , 134. 
3) equipment, furnit,are: therefore your best 
a. make with speed, Meas. III e le 60. where we'll set 
forth in best a. ail out regimentse John II, 296. out 
fait --s, R III e 3e 53. by our habits and by every 
other a. tI4A I e 2 197. here art thon in a. fresh and 
faire Troil. IVe 5» 1. a pirate of very warlike a. Hml. 
IV, 6e 16. where their a. we may best discover Ant. 
IV e 10, S. 
tllrehend, 1) to take, to seize: which 1 
--ed with the qforesaid swain, LLL I, 1,276. in pri- 
rate brabble did we l. hbn, Tw. V, 68.89. whom we 
bave --ed in thefoct, IlbB Il, 1, 173. Tire. ! e 1, 219. 
where we may a. ber and the lloor Oth. l, 1, 178. 
Especially to arrest: Err. l, , 4. Wiv. IV, 5, 
119. H5 Il, 2,2. IV 7, 165. Se 18. H6CIII, le 71. 
Cor. llle 1, 173. Rom. V e3 53. 56. Lr.! e283. Il, 
le ll0. Oth. I _'2, 77. 
2) to seize by the mind, to conceive, 
to form a conception; a) absolutely: /ou a. 
passing shrewdly, Ado Il, I e 84 (you have a shrewd 
way of thinking, of forming ideas), fo a. thuse draws 
us a profit from oll thbgs we seee Cymb. 111, 3e 17. 
b) ïollowed by an acc. : a man that --s death no more 
dreadfully but as a drunken sleepe lIeas. IV e 2 149. 
V, 486. fant«sies that a. more than cool reason ever 
comprehends, lIids. V, 5. a. saine joy, 19. a. nothing 
but.]ollity e Wint. IV, 4, _'24. he --s a world of Jïgurese 
H4A le 3, 209. H4B I, 1, 176. and--ed here the un- 
lcnown Ajaxe Troil. III, 3, 124. a. nofeare file 2, 80. 
/klalarehesion, 1) scizuree arrestation: 
to question of his a. It6C III e 2 e 122. that he may be 
readyfor our a. Lr. III e 5e 20 (i. e. to be apprehended 
by us). 
2) conception, imagination: the sense of 
death is toast in a. Meas. 111, 1, 78. LLL IV, 2, 69. 
H4A I¥, 1, 66. H6A II, 4, 102. Tim. I, 1, 211. Hml. 
1V, 1, 11. Oth. III, 3e 139. Followed by of: the a. qf 
the good gices but the greater feeling to the worse, R2 
I, 3, 300. he had not a. of roaring terrors, Cymb. IV, 
2 110. 
3) perception: dark night the ear more quick 
of a. makes, lIids. !11, 2, 178. took.from you the a. of 
hispresentportance, Cor. !I, 3 e 3"_ ). 
4) the faculty of conception or percep- 
tion: hls ecasion cannot out.fly out --s, Troil. Il e 3, 
124. if the English had any a., theyt would run away, 
H5 III, 7, 145. in a. how iike a God! Hml. II, 2, 319. 
Hence simply for wit : how long bave you professed 
a.? Ado !1I, 4 e 68. 
Apprehensie, imaginative: makes it a.. 
quick, forgetire, H4B IV, 3, 107. Ruled by ima- 
ginations and caprices» fantastic: whose a. 
senses ail but new things disdain, All's I, 2, 60. men 
are.flesh and blood and a. Caes. 111, I e 67. 



48 

A 

Aprcnice, v. Prentice. 
Appre|icehood, state of apprcntice, of 
gaining instruction: must I t serve a long a. to 
forei9n passages R2 l, 3 271. 
roaeb, rb, 1) to draw near in time or 
place: Tp. V 80. hIeas. 1V, 1, 58. Merch. Il» 9 88. 
All's IV. 3, 36. Wint. IV 4, 52. V, 3, 99. H6A IV, 
2, 17. V 4, 101. Tit. IV, 4 72. Rom. I, 1, 114. Lr. 
IV, 7, 93. V, 3, 99. Ant. III, 12, 6. 13, 89. Followed 
by an accns.: no woman ay a. his silent court, LLL 
Il, 24. As IV, 3 110. 120. Tir.l, 13. theremembrance 
of her father never es ber heart but ... All's l l, 
57. when thou dost hear I ara  I bave been a. 
H4B V, 5, 65 i. e. seek my company, access to me. 
Fo[lowed by fo: when he --eth fo your presence Gentl. 
v, 4 32. --eth boldly to out presence, H6C Iii, 3, 44. 
Joincd to near: a. hot near Iids. Il, 2 22. 
near these eyes, John IV, 1 62. some danger does a. 
you nearly hicb. IV, 2 67. 
2) to come arrive: return'dso soon? rather 
--ed too laie, Err. l 2 43. they a. sadly and go a,ay 
erry. Tire. II, 2 106. a .fairer former fortune than 
tat wich is fo a. Ant. l, , 34. he was expected the», 
but hot ed, Cymb. Il, 4, 39. cL Tp. l, ? 188. IV, 
49. 75. Ado l i 95. hIeas. V 405. LLL V, 2, 83. 
900. hlids. V 289. hlcrch, ll 6 24. ŒEw. ll, 3 1. 
Vint. lV 4, 213. H4B l, 1, 150. H6A lI562. Mcb. 
lll 4 100. Lr. Il, 2, 170. Ant. lll 11 46. V,?,326. 
Let him a.  let him corne, let him enter: Wiv. II, 
34. LLL V, 2 512. hlids. V, 107. All's V,3,25. Tw. 
1, 5 172. John I, 47. 
3) to enter trans.: if they do a. the clty, we 
shaH lose all the slght, All's III, 5, 1. she dld a. 
cabin where ] lay, Vint. IlI 3 3. lie a shepherd, 
a. the fohl and cull the iected forth, Tire. V 4, 43 
(cL v. 39). a. the chamber ad destroy your slght 
with a ew Gorgom Mcb. ll 3 76. 
lroa¢h, subst. 1) the act of drawing 
n e af: gives intelligence of Ford's a. Viv. III, 5 86. 
Mids. lll 2 381. Vint. I, 2, 422. H5 1V 1 90. 
H6B lll 3 6. Troil. IV 1 43. Mcb. I 4, 46. Ant. 
III, 645.  hostile advance, attack: thls apish 
and unmannerly a. John V, » 131. E,gland Ms es 
makes asfierce H5 II, 4, 9. IV, 2 36. should the a. 
of tMs wild river break, H8 III, 2 198. Tim. 
167. V 2, 4. makes hls--es to the port of ome 
Ant. I 3, 46. Figuratively: welcomes the warm a. of 
sweet sire Ven. 386. 
2) access: allowed your a. ŒEw. [, 5 210. at 
th« first a. ou must kneel ŒEit. IV, 3 110. 
3) arrival, coming: did loo for his a. Pilgr. 
78. by thy a. thou akest e ost unhapp, Genfl. 
4 31. Navarre had notice of our falr a. LLL lI 81. 
I should be glad ofhis a. Merch. l, 2, 142. As Il, 7, 
8. Wint. V, 1, 89. John Il, 216. R2 I, 3, 6. H6A l[, 
1 9. Ant. IV, 8, 39. 3[ark his first a. belote y lady 
( coming, appearing) Tw. Il, 5 217. 
,iroaeher a person who draws near a corner: 
bid welcome fo knaves and all --s, ŒEim. IV 3 216. 
troation, 1) approval, assent: by 
learned a. of the judges H8 I 2 71. the applause 
and a. th« which I give to ... Troil. l, 3, 59. the a. 
of those Cymb. [ 4 19. to such proceeding who ever 
but his a. added Per. IV 3, 26. 
2) ratification attestation: glves 
ood more a. than proof itse(f, ŒEw. III, 4, 198. nought 

for a. but only seeing, Wint. I1, 1, 177. shall 
thelr blood in a. of..., H5 1, 2, 19. upon your a. (to 
ratify your election) Cor. 1I, 3, 152. revol:e your 
deu a., 2'259. put ray estate on the a. of..., Cymb. 1, 
4, 134. 
3) state of being approved: hls worth and 
credit that's sealed in a. Ieas. V, 245. comlng home, 
an with most prosperous a. Cor. Il, 1, 114. [cire them 
title, knee ad a. wlth senators on the bech, Tire. 
3, 36. 
4) probation novitiate: and there receive 
her a. Meas. l 2, 183. 
Aplr', 1) approval: either ofcondemnatlon 
or a. hleas. II 4, 174. 
2) state of being approved: ofvery vallant 
a. ( of approved valour) All's ll 5» 3. so in a. lires 
uot fils epltaplt as in your royal speeclt, 1, 2 50, i. e. 
his epitaph receivcs by nothing such confirmation 
and living truth as by your spcech. Pcove such a 
wife as ray thou9hts make thee, and as ny farthest 
band shall pass on thy a. Ant. III, 2, 27, i. e. such as, 
when tried (a. -- proof), will prove to be beyond any- 
thing that I can promise (band obj. of pass). 
Appropriation, probably  acquisition, ex- 
cellence acquired: he doth nothing but talk of his 
horse, and he raakes it a great a. fo his own good 
arts, that he can shoe him himself, Merch. l, 2, 46. 
lppro'e, 1) to like, to be pleased with, 
go adroit the propriety of: I o way a. his 
opinion Tw. iV, 2, 60. I muse raff mother does hot a. 
mefurther, Cor. III. 2, 8. ]frs scorn I a. Oth. IV 3, 
5.'2. I a. your wisdozn in the deed, Ant. V, 2, 149. In 
a stronger sense  to be fond of: suffering 
frlend for ray sake fo a. ber, Sonn. 42, 8. that so a. 
the ][oor Oth. I1, I, 4. ray love doth so a. hi»b IV, 
3, 19. And in a weaker sense  to assent to, to 
give eredit: but the raain article I do a.  fearful 
sense, Oth. 1, 3, 11 ( believe). 
2) to experience, to try: Idesperate now 
' a. deslre is death, Sonn. 147, 7. "ris the ourse in love, 
and still --d Gentl. V, 4, 43. on whose eyes I might 
a. thls flower' s ]orce, Mids. 11, 2, 68. when they bave 
--d their virtues, Wint. IV, 2 31. must a. the comrnon 
saw Lr. 11, 2, 167. I bave well--d it Oth. II 3 317. 
a. me, lord, H4A IV 1, 9 (= try me, put me to the 
proof). Approved=tried proved to be so by 
experiment: of--d valour, Ado 11, 1,394. 1V 1»45. 
303. Err. V, 103. Shr. 1, 1 7. 9, 3. All's 1, 2, 10. 
3 234. R2 II, 3,44. H4A 1, 1 54. OEit. V 1, 1. 
Oth. 1, 3, 77. I1, 1 49. 
3) to prov% to justify: a. it wlth a text, 
Mereh. 111 2, 79. my growth would a. the truth H4B 
I, 2, 180. cf. 214. whlch well --s j/ou "re great in 
fortune, All's I11 7, 13. that rny sword upon thee shall 
a. Tit. ll 1,35. Mcb. l 6, 4. Lr.I 1 187. II, 4 
186. Oth. II, 3, 64. With a double aeeus.: slander 
doth but a. thy worth the greater, Sonn. 70 5. R2 
3 112. H6A V, 5, 69. H6B 111 2, 22. Lr. III, 5 12. 
Cymb. IV, 2 380. V, 5, 245. I shall hot far fo a. 
the falr concelt the king bath of you, H8 11, 3, 74, i. e. 
to justify, to confirm it by showing it to be true. 
am full sorrff that he --s the comraon llar, Ant. 
60, i. e. contirms the publie slander by his behaviour. 
That he raay a. our eyes Hml. I, 1, 29, i- e. that he 
may affirm what we have seen. He that is --d in 
thls o.ff'ence» Oth. Il, 3 211 i. e. proved to bave coin- 



A 49 

mitted this offence. Truc swcdns shall a. their truths 
by Troilus, Troil. 111, 2, 181, i. e. avouch their faith 
by comparing themselves to Troilus. 
4) to make approved, to eommend: it 
would hot rauch a. rae, Hml. V, 2, 141. all that raay 
raen a. or raen detect, Per. 11, 1, 55. 
Approver, he that makes triah will raake 
known to their --s theg are people such, Cymb. II, 4, 25. 
Appurtenan¢e, that which belongs to sth: 
the a. of welcorae is fasMon and ceremong, Hml. II, 
2, 388. 
Apri¢o¢lt, the fruit of p runus Armen iaea: 
Mids. 1II, 1, 169. 1RL2 III, 4, 29. 
April, the fourth month: Wint. IV, 4, 281. John 
IV, 2, 120. It is the month of sprlng and flowers: 
Sonu. 3, I0. 21, 7. 98, 2. 104, 7. Luer. 395. Tp. 
IV, 65. Wiv. III, 2, 69. blereh. II, 9, 93. As IV, 1, 
147. Wint. IV, 4, 3. Rom. I, 2, 27. Tire. IV, 3, 41; 
thongh a month of incoustant weather, Gentl. I, 3, 85. 
Compl. 102 ; and of lnueh rain: Tp. IV, 65. Troil. I, 
2, 189 (he will weep you, an 'twere a raan born in 
.4pri/). Tit. 111, 1, 1S. Ant. III, ,'2, 43 (he A. 's n ber 
ees). 
Apron, a eloth or pieee of leather worn 
belote: H4B I1, 9, 190. 1I, 4, 18. H6B 1I, 3, 75. 
IV, , 14. Tire. IV, 3, 135. Caes. I, I, 7. Ant. V, 2, 
210. t'er. IV, 6, 64. 
Apron-luan, a man who wears an apron 
a mechanic: Cor. IV, 6, 96. 
Apt, 1) ri t : in ail the pla/ there is hOt one wort 
a. Ilids. V, 65. LLL I, 2, 19. 11, 73. V, 1, 99. Tw. 
I. 5, ,'28. John IV, 2, 226. Hml. 1II,2,226. Followed 
by for: right a. for tlds affair, Tw. 1, 4, 35. H4B 1, 
1, ,'213. Followed by an infinitive : --er than thg tongue 
to tell thg errand, H4B I, 1, G9. Caes. I1, 2, 97. 
2) easily impressed, impressionable: as 
a. as new-failen ShOW takes ang dlnt, Ven. 354. 
she is young and a. Tire. I, 1,132 (and may therefore 
easily be moved to love). 1 bave a heart as little a. 
as yours, but /et a brain ... Cor. I11, ,'2, 29. O fatal 
error, whg dost thou show to the a. thoughts of raen the 
thin#s that are hot? Caes. V, 3, 68. she is of so free, 
so kind, so a., so blessed a disposition, Oth. II, 3,326. 
lfind thee a. Hml. I, 3, 31. Thus absolutely = d o- 
clic: is she hot a.? H5 V, 2, 31,'2 (= apt to learn). 
3) inelined, ready: youth so a. to pluck a 
dqower, Pilgr. 240 and LLL IV, 3, 114. lfind an a. 
reraission in mgself, Meas.V,303 (= a ready pardon, 
an inclination to pardon), how a. it s to learn, _Ado 
I, 1, 294. Shr. II, 166. Tw. Ili, 1, 138. V, 328. As 
11I, 2, 408. H3 11, 2, 86. 118 II, 4, 122. Rom. III, 1, 
34. Caes. III, 1, 160. Lr. Il, 4, 309. IV, , 6. Oth. 
II, 1, 17. ,o I ara a. to do ragself wrong = I ara 
ready, I ara about to .... , Ado II, 1,213. As for Tw. 
V, 135, v. Aptlg. Apt to that, Rom. 1II, 1, 44. 1II, 3, 
157. AptJor depravation, Troil. V, 2, 131. 
4) easily aeeounted for, natural: asschool- 
raalds change thelr naraes bg vain though a. affection, 
Meas. I, 4, 48. that she loves hin b "ris a. and of great 
credit, Oth. 11, 1, 296. what he round hiraself was a. 
and true, V, 2, 177. the fit and a. construction of thg 
naine doth import so rauch, Cylnb. V, 5, 444. 
Compar. apter As III, 2, 408 and H4B I, 1, 69. 
Aptest, H4B 1, 1,213. 
Apt.ly, I) fitly, properly: leaverae, andthen 
the storg a. ends, Ven. 716. grief and blushes, a. under- 
flchmidt, Shakespeare Lexieon. :|. Ed. T. L 

stood in wMte and red, Compl. 200. that part was a. 
fitted, Shr. Ind. I, 87. R3 III, 1, 134. Tire. I, 1, 17. 
a fiock or livery that a. is put on (i. e. easily, as the 
froek fits well) Hml. !II, 4, 165. 
2) willlngly, readily: what's sweet to do, to 
do will a. find, Compl. 88, i.e. what is sweet to do, 
will readily find to do, will readily final business. Tw. 
11I, 4, 12. V, 135 (apt and willinglg for apfly and 
willingly). Per. V, 2, 5. 
Aptness, 1) fitness, propriety: in either's 
a. Compl. 306 (as eithex vas fit). be friended with a. 
of the season (ehoose a proper rime) Cymb. II, 3, 53. 
2) readiness, propensity: theg are in a ripe 
a. to take ail power frora the people, Cor. IV, 3, 23. 
Aqua.vitae, ardent spirits: Wiv. 1I, 2, 318. 
Err. 1V, I, 89. Tw.II,5,215. Wint. IV, 4,816. Rom. 
lIl, 2, 88. IV, 5, 16. 
Aquilon, the north wind: Troil. IV, 5, 9. 
Aquitaine, part of France: LLL I, 1, 138. II, 
8. 136. 140. 146. 149. 160. 
Arabia, country in Asia: p. III, 3, 22. Merch. 
11, 7, 42. Çor. 1V, 2, 24. Meb. V, 1, 57. Ant. III. 
6, 72. 
Arabian, pertaining to Arabia: on the sole A. 
:tree, Phoen. 2, l. e. t e tree of the Phoenix. drop 
tears as fast as the A. trees thelr raedicinal çum, Oth. 
V, 2, 30. 0 thou A. bird! (Phoenix) Ant. 111, 2, 12. 
Cmb. I, 6, 17. 
Ara¢hne, v. Arachne. 
Araise, to raise from the dead: powe#tl 
to a. kin# Pepin, All's I!, 1, 79. 
Arbitrate, to decide, determine: decides 
thit which lon# process could hot a. LLL V, 9, 73-3. 
John 1, 38. I{2 I, 1, 50. 00. Mcb. V, 4, 20. The 
original 8ignification of determination by an 
umpire still perceptible in Rom. IV, 1, 63. 
Arbitrator, u rn p if e; used figuratively: Out, 
dle words, weak--s, Luer. 1017. the a. of despab's, 
just death, kind umpire of raen's raiseriei, 116A I1, 
8. that old common a. Time will one dag end it, 
Troil. IV, 3, 
Arbitrement, 1)decision: incensed against 
you even to a raortal a. Tw. III,4,86. OE it corne to the 
a. of swords, 115 IV, 1, 168. 1R3 V, 3, 89. Lr. IV, 7, 
95. Cymb. I, 4, 52. 
2) judicial inquiry: we of the oçer{ng side 
raust ]ceep aloof frora strict a. H4A IV, 1, 70. 
Arbour, bower: Ado Il, 3, 38. 114B V, 3, 2. 
Caes. III, _'2, 253. 
Are: Joan ofA. H6A Il, 2, 20. V, 4, 49 (O. Edd. 
Acre and Aire). 
Ar¢h, subst, concave and hollow struc- 
tut e: as through an a. the violent roar{ng ride, Lncr. 
1667. like an a., reverberates the voice, Troil. III, 3, 
120. Cor. V, 4, 50. the watersWa. (rainbow) Tp. IV, 
71. this vaulted a. (sc. of heaven) Cymb. 1, 6, 33. let 
lome in Tiber raelt, and the wide a. of the ranged 
empke fall, Ant. I, 1, 33. 
Ar¢h, adj. wicked, arrant: the raost a. act oJ 
piteous raassacre, R3 IV, 3, 2. that a. hereHc, John 
III, 1, 192. an heretic, an a. one, 118 III, , 102. a 
raost a. heretlc, ¥, 1, 45 (cf. arch-enemg, arch-mock, 
arch-villain). 
Arih, subst, chier, toaster: rag worthg a. and 
patron, Lr. II, 1, 61. 
Ardthishop, chier blshop, superintendent of 
4 



5O 

the suffragans: John III, 1 143. R2 II, 1, 282. H4A 
I, 3, 268. |il, 2, 119. H4B I, 1, 189. II» 3, 42. 
1» 41 etc. lt6C IV, 3, 53. H8 Iil, 2, 74. 402. IV 
24. 86 etc. 
Archbishopriv, the province over which an 
archbishop has authority: H8 ll 1, 164. 
Arch-deacon, ecclesiastical dignitary 
who in case of need supplies the bkhop s place: H4A 
III 1, 72. 
Arched, 1) built with an areh: teçates of 
monarcs are a. so ig, Cb. IiI 3, 5. 
2) bent like an arch: te rigt a. beaut of 
ge brow, Viv. III» 3 59. Ms a. brows All's I, 1,105. 
Archelaus, king of Cappadocia: Ant. IlI 6 69. 
Arch-enemy, principal enemy, or wicked 
enemy? H6C II 2 2. 
Archer, bowman: Ado II 1 401. H6A I, 
ll. R3 V, 3 295. 339. Tit. IV, 3, 52. Per. I, 1, 164. 
Archery, skill of an archer: Mt wlt Cu- 
pid's a. Mids. III 2 103. let me see our a. Tit. IV, 
3,2. 
Arch-heretic, v. ArcS. 
Archilmld, christian ngme of Douglas: 4A I, 
Architec, fignratively, con triver: cief«, and 
plotter of tese oes, Tir. V, 8, 
Arch-mock, principal mock: t«end's 
Oth. IV, 1, 71. 
Arch-illain.  get nd confirmed vil- 
1aih: n a. Meas. V, 57. Tire. V, ], 111. 
Arde, place in Çrance: H8 I, 1, 7. 
Arden, town in atinm, besieged by Tarquin: 
ucr. Arg. 4. Lucr. 1. 
Arden; tefores of A.: As I, 1, 12]î8, 109. 11 
4, 15. 
Ardent, fiery: under ot «. zeal, Ti.lil, , . 
Ardour, het: l« . of  li«r, Tp. IV 
Argal, vulgar couption of the atin erço, con- 
seqnently: IIml. V, 1, 1. 21.55. 
Argentine, silx'ery, silver-hued: Celesti«l 
, çoddess a. Per. V 1 21. 
Argiër, Algier: Tp. I, 2, 2çl. 
Argo, corruption of the atin erço: HçB IV 
2, 1. 
Argosy, large merchantman: Merch. 1, 
. , 18. III, 1 10. V, 27ç. Shr. II, BTç. 78. 80. 
H6Ç Ii, 6, 6. 
Argue, 1) to reason to debate, discuss; 
a) absolutely: a. lfke a fate G R2 I, 3 238. well ave 
you --d IV 150. H8 II, 2, 113. Cor. I 1» 225. Caes. 
V 1 48. b) followed by upon: --ing upon tat doubt 
Shr. III, 1, 55. c) followed by an acc.: we are too 
open ere to a. tis H8 I1 1, 168. H6A IV, 1, 96. 
2) to prove show: tis eraldry .... argued 
by beauty's red and virtue's wite ( shown) Lncr. 
65. it --s facflity, LLL IV, 2» 57. H4B lV, 1 160. 
H6A II 5, 7. V 3 8. V 4, 15. H6B Ill 3, 30. H6C 
II, 2, 25. Iil 2 84. R3 lll 7 40. 174. Rom. II 
33. Tim. V, 1 30. Hml. V 1 11. Oth. llI 4 38. 
In H6C with a double accusative. 
Argument, 1) reasoning debate, discus- 
sion: I force hot a. a straw, Lucr. 1021. all kind of 
--s and question deep, Compl. 121. ow did is a. 
beginf LLL III, 105. l'Il darkly end te a. V, 2 23. 
V, 1, 19. 2,84. Asl, 2,50. Johnl, 36. IV, 2,54. 

A 
H5 III, 2, 104. H6A II, 5, 45 (in a. upon a case). 
Rom. II, 4, 105. Cymb. I, 4, 60. To ]iold a. -- to 
dispute: Pilgr. 30. I,LL IV, 3, 61. Ado II, 3, 55. 
H6A II» 4, 57. For s]iape, for bearing, a. and valour 
(manner of reasoning or discoursing) Ado III» 1 96 
(O. Edd. bearing arguraen?, without a comma). 
2) the matter in question the business 
in hand: how can theff charitabl. dispose of an.- 
thbg, when blood is their a.? H5 IV, 1» 150. sheathed 
helr swords for lack of a. H5 III. 1, °-1. I cannot 
fi.qht upon this a. Troil. I, 1, 95 (cf. IIml. IV,.4, 54). 
ail the a. is a cuckold and a whore, II, 3, ï8. that most 
ma.y claire tMs a. for ours, Meb. II, 3, 126. in a. of 
praise, All's Iii, 5, 62 ; i. e. if praise is the thing re- 
quired. 
8) the theme, the subjeet: pour'st into 
verse thlne own sweet a. Souri. 88, 8 (i. e. thou art 
the theme of my verse)..you and love are still rn!l a. 
ï6, 10. 79, 5. 100, 8. 103, 3. 105, 9. LLL V, 2, 
757. Tw. ii, 5, 163. Wint. IV, 1, 29. R2 I, 1» 12. 
H4B V, 2» 23. II5 III 2» 85. Troil. II, 3, 104. 105. 
106. Tire. I11, 3» 20. 5» 23. Lr. I, 1,218. II, 1, 9. 
I should hot seek an absent a. of mg revenffe, As III, 
1, 3 (object). the rarest a. of wonder, Ails II, 3, 7. 
become the a. of his own scorn, Ado II, 3» 11; and 
absolutely: thon wilt prove a notable a. Ado I, 1» 258 
( wilt be spoken of, turned into ridicule). 
would hot ma/ce me such an a. Mids. III, 2 24- °. 
would be a. for a week. H4A II, 2» 100. 
4) that of which a dramatic play treats: 
the a. shall be th runnin# awa H4A II, 4, 310. 
H4B IV, 5, 199. Troil. Prol. 25. Hml. III» 2» 149. 
0.42. there was no money bld for a. (i. e. for a dra- 
matic subject) Hml. II, 2, 372. 
5) contents: ff I would broach the vessels qf 
my love, and tr. the a. of hearts b. borrowin#» Tim. 
II -0» 187. cf. the superscr, of Lucr. Arg. 
6) cause» reason: m.y deslres had instance and 
a. to commend themselves, Wiv. II 2, 256. grounded 
upon no other a. As I, 2 291. b. these--s of fear» 
Tw. III» 3» 1-0. blood. a.  cause of bloodshed, 3'2.. 
II5 IV, 3, 113. H6B III 1 241. 1:[6CII» 2,44. 11I, 
49. R3 I, 1, 148. H8 1I, 4» 67. Troil. IV» 5 26. 27. 
29 (a quibble). Hml. lV, 4, 54. 
7) a reason offered in proof: no #reat a. 
ofherfolly, Ado II, 3, 243. LLL I. 2, 175. Tw. III, 
2, 12. H6A II 4 59. V» 1, 46. H6B I» 2» 3"0. Ant. 
III 12» 3. 
lrgus, the keeper of Io, having a hundred eyes: 
LLL III, 201. lIerch. V, 230. Troil. I, "0» 31. 
Ariachne, (so O. Edd, and so the verse reqnires; 
M. Edd. Arachne), for Arachne, the virgin vho 
vied with Minerva in the art of weaving: Troil. 
2, 150.. 
Ariadne, the daughter of Minos» forsaken by 
Theseus: Gentl. IV 4» 17-0. Mids. II 1» 80. 
Ariel, the airy spirit in the service of Prospero: 
Tp. I 2, 188. 193. °-17. 237. 317. 441. 494. III, 
3» 84. IV» 1, 33.49. 164. V» 95 etc. 
Aries, the Ram, the first of the twelve signs 
of the zodiac: Tit. IV» 3, 71. 
Aright, rightly without mistake: censures 
falsel. what t]ie. sec a. Sonn. 148, 4. never going a. 
LLL i11, 194. t]iou speak'st a. Mids. II, 1, 4-0. H6C 
III, 2, 68. Tit. V, 2, 89. Mcb. IV, 1, 74. Hml. V, _'2, 
350. Lr. I» 4, -060. IV 3» 55. 



A 51 

,rion (O. Edd. OHon), the singer preserved by 
the dolphin: Tw. l, 2, 15. 
.irise (impf. arose, H8 IV, 1, 71. Caes. 11, 1, 
'2.39. partie, arose, Err. V, 388), 1) to monnt 
ascend: the htrk arlsbg fiom sullen earth, Sonn. _09, 
11. a..forth from the couch of lasting night, John II!, 
4, '2.7. Used ofthe sun: Ven. 856. Rom. ll,_'2,4. Caes. 
11, 1, 106. Cymb. I1, 3, 22. 
2) to get up; from a fall: Lr. !, 4. 99. Cymb. 
IV, 2 e 403; fi'om a seat: Tp. !, 2, 16:). Ant. !!! 1 I. 
46; from table: Caes. 11 e I, 39; from kneeliug: Tir. 
v, 181. John !, 162. H6B I 1, 17. I16C !!. , 61. 
R3 l 2, 185. IlS I, 2, 10. V, 1, 92. Cymb. V, 5, 20. 
o_13; from the ground: Lucr. 1818. ïit. !!1 1.65. 
Rom. 111, 3, 71; ff'oto sleep: Meas. IV, 2, 94. Mids. 
111, 1, 174. V, 333. tI6C V, 4.57. Oth. l, 1, 89. 92. 
('ymb. I!, 3, 29; from death: Sonn. 55, 13; and flgu- 
rarively: spotless shall mhe imocence a. H8 !!!,2,301. 
3) to be engendered, to begin to exist: 
what sorrow maj on this a. Lucr. 186. and thereupoa 
these errors are arose Err. V, 388. I[6A IV, I, 113. 
143. what showers o. II6C !1, 5, 85. IIS IV, 1, 71. 
Followed by of: 115 IV.. 7, 186. Followcd byfrom: 
Oth. I!, 3 168. 
Ari.|o|le, the famous Greek ldfilosopher: Shr. 
! 1, 32. Troil. I! _'2, 166. 
Arithmetic, the art of computation, of 
casting aceounts: Troil. I, œee, 123. !!!, 3, 253. 
Cor. lll, 1 2t5. Rom. 111, I 106. llml. V, _'2, 119. 
Cymb. !!, 4, 142. 
A, rith|eticia,, one skilled in arithmetic: 
Oth. I, 1, 19. 
.*,rl, the vesscl of oah: As V, 4, 36. 
P, rm, the limb from the shoulder to the 
hand; Sing.: Ven. 31. Err. !!!, _'2, 23. 148. Ado !!, 
1. 197. As 11, 7. 199 (snpport hlm bj the a.). V, 
='4. H6A !!. 1, 17. lI6B !!1. I, 159 etc. etc. I)lur.: 
Lucr. 517. lilgr. 148. Tp. 11, 1, 119. 2, 35. Wiv. 
!!I, 1, 35. V e 5 58. lIeas. III, 1, 85. Mids. IV 1.45. 
.All's ll 3, 265. I[6A l, 1, 11. 5, 11. I!, 3, 63. II]3 
1. I 120 etc. etc. Figuratively: that 2'eptune's 
who cllppeth thee about, would bear thee .... John V, 
, 34. knit out powers to the a. of peace H4B IV, 1, 
177. the cedar whose --s gae shelter .. 
1. the a. and burgonet of nen» Ant. l, 5, ,3. bejood 
ndne a.  without my reach, Wint. I!, 3, 5. --In tlie 
owner's --s, Luer. 7. I had brin 5 mie --s, Meas. 
V, 198. tend me an a. All's I, 2, 73. holds his wife 
bj the a. Wint. 12,193. a. in a. H6A I!, _'2 29. H6B 
V, 1.57. a. toa. R2 !, 1,76. In --s  in embrace- 
ment.% John III, 1, 103. To cross or fold or wreathe 
one's arms» a sign either ofsorrow: Lucr. 793. 1662., 
Tp. l, _'2, 224. Tit. 111, 2, 7. Caes. Il, 1, 240; or of' 
love: LLL III, 18. 183. IV3135; orofboth: Gentl. 
11, 1, 19. Double meaning: this is the ierj top, the 
height, the crest, or crest unto the crest of murder's 
--s, John lV, 3, 47. and date avow ber beautj and 
er wortli in orner --s than £ers» Troil. [ 3, 272. 
Quibble: so maj jou lose jour --s, Shr. !!, 222. lie 
was t£e first tliat ever bore --s Hml. V 1, 38. John 
111, I e 102. 103. At tlie --'s end, As ![, 6 10  at a 
little distance: IIhl deat£ awMle at t£e 
keep death off awhile. 1)erhaps a quibble intended 
in Gentl. V e 4, 57: l'Il woo jou llke a soldier at arms' 
end: i.e. laying hands on thce for my weapons instead 
-of useless words. 

Arm, rb. 1) trans, a)to fttrnish with wea- 
pons of offcnce or defence: hclp to a. me, 113 V, 3, 
78. 1"11 go a. mjsel H5 III, 7, 97. --s ber, Wint. l, 
2, 184. Mids. l, , 117. John IV, 2, 249. V, 6, 25. 
R2 V, 3, 48. H6B V, 1, 192. 116C IV, 1, 113. Troil. 
V, 2, 183. Caes. V, 1, 106. Hml. !11, 3, 4 etc. Par- 
ticularly in the partic, armed: Ven. 779. Lucr. 1425 
Err. !11, _'2, 126. AdoV, 4,128. Mids. II, I, 157. Shl'. 
1V, 3, 149. John I!!, 1, 111. R2 !!!, 2 25. II6A 11, 
2, 24. II(;B !!!, , 233. II6C I, I, 38. 113 !, 1, 42. 
V, 3, 219 etc. Of bees: --ed in their stings, II5 !, 
193. --ed rail, Troil. V, 10, 44. 
b) to furnish with anything that wil, 
add strength or security: --edgauntlets, John 
V, 2, 156. --edjïst, Troil. !! 3,212. --ed heels, H4B 
I, 1 44. t15 IV, 783. mj --ed knees, Cor. !11,.'2, 118. 
mine --ed neck, Ant. IV, 8, 14. their --ed staves 
charge, H4B IV 1, 120. the lion's--edjaws, H4A 
I!!, œee, 102. the --ed rhlnoceros, Mcb. 111, 4. 101. 
brawny sides, with hairy bristles --ed, Ven. 625. 
c) to fit up to prepare provide: even as 
subtle Sinon, so sober-sad, to me came Tarquin --ed, 
Lnc'. 1544. aud--ed his log-hid wits, 1816. if jou 
are --ed to do as sworn to do. LLL 
84. look .you a. jourself to fit .your j'mcies to jour 
fitther's will, Mids. !, le 117. Merch. 1V 1, 11. 264. 
As IV, 1, 61. Shr. I. 1. 5. he bath --ed our answer, 
All's !, _o 11 (i.e. has furni»hed us with a ready and 
fit answer), point from point, to the fMI --i»g of the 
verity. IV, 3 72 (so that the truth, as it were, stand 
proof against contradiction). Wint. l, 2 184. R2 V, 
3, 48. Tit. I, 136. 11, 1, 12. Caes. V, 1, 106. C)anb. 
!, 6, 19. a..you to the sudde time John V, 6 25. 
--ing the minds of fifants to exclalms, Tit. IV, 1, 86. 
a..you to this speedy vojage, Ilml. !11, 3, 24. be thou 
--ed./br so,e_ unha t,»,Py words, Shr. II, 140. she is --ed 
Cor him, Ail s 111, 5, 76. a. thy nobler parts agalnst..., 
John !11, 1,291. H6C IV, I, 128. Cor. 111,2, 138. 
o) intr. to arm one's self, to take arms: 
we must hot only a. to invde the French, II5 !, o 136. 
look .you stro»gly a. to meet him, 11, 4, 49. a. figlit 
and conquer, 113 V, 3, 150. "ris rime to a. 236. Troil. 
I, 3, 171. !11 1, 150. V, 4, 17. Especially in the 
imperative: a. gentlemen, to trms! ll4A V, 2, 42. 
And tice repeated: a., wenches, a.! LLL V, 2, 82. 
John I!1, 1, 107. R2 I11, 2, 86. H6A I!, I, 38. R3 
V, 3, 288. Tit. IV, 4. 62. Mcb. V e 5, 46. 
Arm, rb., to take into the arms: come a. 
Mm, Cymb. IV. 2, 400. 
P, rmado, flcet: Spain, wlio sent w£ole --s of 
caracks to be ballast at lier nose, Err. III, 2, 140. so 
by a roaring tempest on tlie flood a wliole a. is scat- 
tered, John I!!, 4, 2. 
.rmado or .*,rmatho, name of the Spaniard in 
LLL I, 1, 171. 175. 193. 280 (IDott .A&'iano de A.). 
1¥, 1, 89. 100. 2, 94. ¥, 1 9. 113. 2, 336. 
ttmagttae, (O. Edd. Arminack), naine of a 
French noblenan: H6A V, 1, 2. 17. 5, 44. 
ltmetia, country in Asia: Ant. !!!, 6, 14. 35. 
Afin-garrot, a word not yet satifactorily ex- 
plained: So e nodded, and soberly dld mount an a. 
steed, who neçqli'd so lilgli . .. , Ant. !,5,48. Johnson: 
slender as the arm; which is little probable; 
Warburton: worn by military service; ichol- 
son: - armor-gloved. There is in Old English ano- 
ther 'gaunt', fim Gernmn gan: signifying wholo, 
4* 



52 

A 

healthful lusty and arm-gaut may meancom-' 
pletely armed harnessed or rather: lusty in anns 
full of life and martial spirits.* 
Armigero, %Viv. I» 1 10; v. Latin appendix. 
Armioen¢ mighty in arms: te a. $[ars 
LLL V 2 650. 657. te a. soldier All's IV, 3 265. 
lmou, 1) the habit worn to protect the 
body in battle: likt unscour'd a. Mens. l, 2 171. 
clad in a. H6A l, 5, 3. II 1, 24. H6C ]ll, 3 230. 
[V 1, 105. a çood a. Adoll 3, 17. a rica. H4B 
V 5 30. Ant. IV 8 27. Per. ll 1 125. all te com- 
plete a. R3 IV 4 189. te verya. e ad o» Hml. l, 
1, 60. myLord of York's a. H6B [ 3 195. wit: 
burden qf out a. John ll 9. R2 
143. H6C II  130. R3 V, 3» 51. Cor. lll,  34. 
Mcb. V 3, 33. Aut. IV 4, 1 etc. Plural: tir 
John Il, 315. H6C V 7 17. TroH. V, 3,46. Figura- 
fively : Ms nad a. of still-shut«rcd hst, Lucr. 188. 
 t¢ir ¢ads ad a intdlctual a. H5 III, 7, 148. 
l'll çiv¢ t¢ a. fo k¢p off tat word» om. lll, 3, 54. 
put a. on th¢ cars Tm. lV, 3, 123. with all 
strcnçt and a. f t« mlnd» Hml. lll 3 12. 
2) the whole apparatus of var, offensive 
as well as defensve arms; 5rinç awa 
t«re R2 Il,  107. out a. all s 
15ç. would av¢ a. h«r out qf t¢ 
7. hnds çoods hous¢ a. HB V, 1, 52. 
Amoure, 1) manufacturer of weapons: 
H5 II Chor. 3. IV Chor. 12. H6B ll, 3 50. 58. 
2) he who bas care of the arms and 
ffresses his toaster n armour: Troil. 1,26. 
tou art t¢ a. of  ¢art Ant. IV, 4 7. 
mouy, place where instruments of 
war are eposite: t¢ town a. Shr. lll, 2, 47. 
mi a. Tir. IV 1 113. Ms . lV, 2, 11. 
Ams, 1) weapons: art wit a. 
Pilgr. 223. LLL ll 45. 5ruiscd a. Lucr. 110. 197. 
m a. LLL .V 2 558. çrcat in . H6A 
up a. H6A lll 2, 70. rlsiç up in a. H6B IV ], 93. 
scrvat in a. fo Hm» H6A lV, 2 4. 
LLL V, 2 636. John III, 1 10. 2 llI 2 20. 
H6A l, 1 125. 3 75. fo ars John ll, 287. fil, 
255. H6C l, 2, 28. fo follow a.  to be a soldier, 
John ll 31. H6A ll 1 3. a an ai a.  an arme 
knght, H6C V, 4, 42; figuratively: action's men 
at a. LLL IV, 3 290. a man of a.  a knight, H6A 
I 4 30. wort of a.  hero of war, Troil. IV 5, 
163. « hw of a.  the law of war, H5 IV, 7, 
and  the statntes about the e of arms an the 

Army, a body of men armed for war: 
Lucr. Arg. 5. Lucr. 76. Tp. I, 2, 128. Ado I, 1, 33. 
11, 1, 254. All's IV, 3, 261. Wint. IV, 4, 631. H5 
111, 5, 58. H6A 1, 1, 101. 158. II, 5, 8"8. IV, 3, 2. 
V, 2, 11. 4, 173. H6B IV, 2, 185. 4 32. 6» 13. V, 
1, 35. It6C 1, 1, 6. 2, 64 (rb. in the plural). R3 IV, 
3, 50. H8 V, 4, 81. Troil. I11, 3 9"79. -Ant. 111.7,43. 
Cymb. IV, 4, 31 etc. etc. Figuratively for a great 
number: the huge a. of the worlcrs desires, LLL 1, 
1 10. an a. ofgood words, lIerch, fil, 5, 79". 
Aroint, stand off, oï be gon% a word of 
m-ersion: a. thee, witch! licb. I, 3 6. a. thee, witch, 
a. thee! Lr. lll, 4 19"9. ° 
rouse, to awaken: loud-howling wolves a. the 
jades, H6B IV, 1, 3. d vengeance sets him new to 
work, Hml. 11, 9", 510 (O. Edd. a roused vengeance). 
-row, in a row, one after nother: 
beaten the maids a. Err. V, 170. 
rragon, province of Spain: -Ado I, 
2. lierch. Il, 9, 2. 
rraign, fo snmmon belote  conrt of 
justice: l'Il teach /ou how /ou shall a. your con- 
sclece» lIeas. 11, 3 21. In general, to accuse: 
Wint. 11, 3, 202. Hnfl. 1¥ 5, 93. Lr. 111, 6, 22.48. 
Oth. !11, 4, 159". accused ad --ed of high treasob 
Wint. I11, 2, 14. who tan a. me for't? Lr. V, 3, 159. 
Arrant, arch: a. Icnave, .Ado III, 
330. H4B V, 1 35.45. V 4, 1. Hml. l, 5, 19"4. III, 
1, 131. that a. »mlmsegnose knave, It4B Il, 1, 49". 
a. counterfeit rascal H5 lll, 6, 64. a. traitor, H5 
8, 10. a. thief, Tire. IV, 3, 440. a. whore, Lr. 11, 4, 
52. a. cowards» H4-All,9",106. Fhtellen says even: as 
a. a piece of knaver, H51V,7,2. as a. a villain, 148. 
what an a., rascally, beggarlu lousgknave it is, IV, 8, 36. 
Arras, tapestry hangings of rooms, wo- 
ven with figures: Cymb. I1, 2, 26. Serving as  place 
of concealment: Wiv. lll, 3, 97. -Ado 1, 3, 63. John 
IV, 1, 2. H4-A 11, 4, 54.q 577. 111, 3, 113. Hml. Il, 
2, 163. 111, 3, 28. IV, 1, 9. Arras counterpoits -- 
counterpanes of tapestry, Shr. Il, 353. 
CeCa.v, rb. to clothe, dress: these rebelpow- 
ets (the body) that thee (the soul) array, Sonn. 146, 
2. I drink, 1 eat, a. rn.yself and live» hleas.lll, 2,26. 
War, --ed in flames like to the prince of .fieds, H5 
111 3 16. is he --ed? Lr. IV, 7, 9"0. 
lrray, subst. 1) dress, especially orna- 
mental dress: the fair sun» when in his fresh a. he 
cheers the rnorn, Ven. 483. fresh a. -As IV, 3, 144. 
your best a. V, 2, 79..fine a. Shr. 11, ô-oS. in all ber 

forms of duelling: the law of a. is such that whoso best a. Rom. IV, 5, 81. proud a. Lr. Ill, 4, 85. -As. 
draws a sword, 'ris present death, H6A 111, 4 38; 1 a vox media: thon wolf in sheep's a. H6-A 1, 3 55. 
crave the bene.fit of law of a. H6A IV, 1, 100 (i. e. rnean a. Shr. IV, 3,182. Figuratively: in whlch a. (in 

of fighting him in duel). Very frequently = war» 
combat: callin# thee to a. H6B V» 9,, 7. /7o hot fo 
a. a#ainst my uncle, John 111, 1» 308. the a. are fait» 
when the intent of bearin# thern is just, H4A V, 2, 88. 
I see the issue ofthese a. Itg" 11, 3» 15- 9. rnost shallowlff 
did.you these a. commence» H4B IV, 2, 118. H6B Ill, 
1, 378. IV, 9» 37. ¥, 1, 18. the occasion of out a. 
H4B I» 3, 5. IV» 1» 78. his a. are onlff fo renmvefi'om 
thee the duke ofSomerset» H6B IV, 9, 29. V, 1, 39. 
9") Ensigns armorial of afamily: H6-A I 1, 
80. H6B I, 1, 256. IV, 1, 42. out oJficers ai a. Rg" 
1, 1, 204. apursuivant ai a. R3 V» 3» 59. Quibbling: 
Shr. !I, 222. Hml.V, 1,38. -Ambiguous : Lucr. 1693. 
John IV» 3, 47. H6A 1, _o 42. 

blood), brave soldler, doth he lie, H5 IV, 6, 7. hap- 
ffness courts thee in her best a. Rom. Ill, 3, 142. 
2) order of troops in match and batfle: is 
,narchln# hitherward in proud a. H6B IV, 9, 27. stand 
we in good a. H6C V» 1, 62. 
rrearages, remainder of an account: Cymb. ll, 
4 13. 
lrres¢,vb. (cf.'test) 1) to seize, fo appre- 
hend a person by virtue of the law: hIeas.I, 2,60. 
Err. IV, 1, 69.75. 106. IV, 2, 43.44. IV, 4, 85. V, 
230. Tw. IlI 4 360. H4BII, 1 9.48. H511,_o» 143. 
H6B III, 1, 136. V, 1, 136. H8 IV, 2, 13. The cause 
of the seizure sometimes expressed by the prep. on: 
he --s Mm on itç hleas.l, 4, 66; --ed on a band s Err. 



A 

53 

IV» 2, 49; I a. thee on capital treason» Lr. V, 3, 82; 
more frequently by of: of capital treason we a. you, 
1¢2 IV, 151. H4B IV, 2, I07. H5 Il, 2, 145. H6B 
III, I, 97. V, 1, 106. H8 I, I, 201. 
2) to seize a thing for debt: his horses are 
--ed for it, Wiv. V, 5, 119. 
3) larrest/our word --- I take you at your word: 
lIeas. Il, 4, 134. LLL Il, 160. 
Arres¢, subst. 1) the taking or apprehend- 
ing of a pemon in the way of law: H6B III, l, 99. 
Lr. V, 3, 83 (Qq attaint), under an a.  in prison, 
Meas. I, 2, 136. Figuratively: Hml. V, 2, 348 (cf. 3). 
2) any restraint upon a person binding him 
to be responsable to the law: lords /ou that here are 
under out a. R2 IV, 158, i. e. bound to appear in 
judgment. He sends out --s on Fortinbras, Hml. 
"2, 67, i. e. couutermandates. 
3) stop, stay: that fell a. without all bail (sc. 
death) Sonn. 74, 1 (cf. Hml. V, 2, 348). served a 
dumb a. upon his tongue, Lncr. 1780. 
&rrival, the act of coning to a place: by 
theb" secret and sudden a. Lucr. Arg. 8. is appre- 
hendedfor a. here, Err. l, 2, 4. Shr. IV, 5, 70. "Wint. 
V, 1, 167. R2 I, 3, 8. II6A I11, 4, 2. 
2) followed by of, the reaching, attaining: 
if lire did ride upon a dial's point, still ending at the 
a. qfan bout, H4A V, 2, 85. 
Arrivante, company coming: every minute 
is expectancy of more a. Oth. Il, I, 42 (Ff. arrivancy). 
Arrive, 1) intrans, to come to, to reach 
place: Tp. I, 2, 292. Err. 1, 1, 49. Shr. I, 2, 213. 
All's Il, 1, 82. Wint. I1, 3, 196. IV, 4, 633. John 
Il. 51. IV, 2, 115. 160. H5 IV, 8, 131. H6AV, 5, 8. 
H6C IV, 7, 7. H8 II, I, 160. Rom. I!, 6, 15. Caes. 
IV. 2, 30. lIcb. V, 8, 35. Hml. V, 2, 388. Oth. Il, 1, 
58. 89. Il, 2, 3. Per. V Prol. 14. With at: Lucr. 50. 
R2 |I, 2, 50. With in: Tp. 1, 2, 171. Sha-. IV, 4, 65. 
Vith to: I bave--d at the last unto the wished haven, 
8hr. V, 1, 130. hot --d to plth and puissance, H5 III 
Chor. 91. cf. 1 bave since --d but hither, Tw. Il, 2, 
4. With for: --d for fruioEul Lombardy, Shr. I, 1, 3. 
Toa. at ---to obtain: manj so a. at second 
masters, Tim. IV, 3, 512. 
In general to arrive As to reach a place after a 
previous travel, but sometimes simply --to come: 
a savour that may strike the dullest nostril where I a. 
( wherever I corne) 'int. I, 
he moves all hearts agalnst us, Lr. IV, 5, I0. 
2) trans, to reach: ere he a. hiswearynoon-tide 
prick, Lncr. 781. bave --d out coast, H6C V, 3, 8. 
--ing a place of potence], Cor. Il, 3, 189. a. the point 
proposed, Caes. I, 2, I10. 
Arrogance, presumption: All's II, 1, 198. 
R3 1, 3, 24. Troil. 1I, 3, 195. III, 3, 49. Almost 
impudence: Shr. IV, 3, 107. H8 III, ,'2, 278. 
Arrogancy, the saine: H8 Il, 4, II0. 
Arrogat, presumptuous: H6A I, 3, °3. 
H6B 111, 9, 205. Tire. IV, 3, 180. Cymb. IV, 2, 127. 
),rrow,.missile shot with a bow: Ven. 947. 
Tp. IV, 99. Wiv. V, 5, 248. Ado III, I, 29. 106. 
LLL V, 2, 261. Mids. I, 1,170. III, 2, I01. Merch. 

Sonn. 53, 7. Meas. I, 2, 189. llids. I, I, 192. Shr. 
III, 1, 66. Vint. IV, 4, 90. V, 3, 6S. Mcb. I, 2, 9 etc. 
etc. /our a. of wooing, Wiv. I1, 2, .944. the a. to love, 
Shr. IV, 2, 8. Opposed to nature: Vert. 291. Lucr: 
1374. lIeas. Il, 2, 184. Mids. Il, .'2, 104. As III, 2, 
31. Wint. IV, 4, 90. All's Il, 1, 121. H6A V, 3, 192. 
Rom. II, 4, 94. Caes. IV, 3, 194. Lr. IV, 6, 86. 
Sometimes joined with, or syuonymous to, 
p r a c t i c e: so that the a. and practic part of lire must 
be the mistress to this theoric, H5 I, 1, 51. as art and 
practice bave enriched an/, lIeas. I, I, 13. a practice 
as full of labour as a wise man's a. Tw. III, 1, 73. 
b.y the a. of known and feellng sorrows ara pregnant 
to good pity, Lr. IV, 6, 226 (-- experience). I bave 
as much of this in a. as tou, but tet my nature could 
hot bear it so, Caes. IV, 3,194 (external skill aequired 
by labour? Maloue explains it by theory in which 
he may be right). 
Someimes -- maglc: Tp. 1, 9, 1.25.28. 291. 
372. II, 1, 297. IV, 1, 41. 10. V, 50. Ep. 14. As 
V, 2, 67. Wint. V, 3, 110. II4A III, 1, 48. tI6A 
1, 15. H8 III, 1, 12. Oth. I, 2, 79. Perhaps magic 
may be meant in Sonn. 139, 4 : use power with power 
and slat me hot by a. 
Synonymous to eunning, artifice, craft: 
thonght characters and words merebj but a. Compl. 
174. his passion, but an a. of craft, 295. 
'2) Letters, learning, study: a. witharms 
contending, i. e. a scholar with a soldier, Pilgr. 0-23. 
study his bias leaves and makes his book thlne eyes, 
rhere all those pleasures lire that a. van comprehend, 
Pilgr. 62 and LLL IV, , 113. a. ruade tongue-tied 
by authority (science put to silence by power) Sonn. 
66, 9. in them (thy eyes) l read such a. as truth and 
beaut.y shall together thrive, Sonn. 14, I0 (: I gather 
this knowledge), the liberal --s, Tp. I, , 73. well 
fitted in --s (full of instrnction) LLL II, 45. living 
a., I, 1,14 (immortal science), other slow--s entlrely 
keep the brain, IV, 3, 324. bo]s of a. Wiv. 111,1,109. 
All's I!, 1, 121. 136. 161. Padua, nurser.y of--s, 
Shr. I, 1, 2. had I butfollowed the --si Tw. 1,3,99. 
the commission of thy tears and a. Rom. IV, 1, 64. 
those --s they bave as I could put into them, Cymb. 
V, 5, 338. 
Artemidors, the rhetorician in Caes. II, 3, I0. 
trtery, tube conveying the blood from 
the heart to ail parts of the body: poisons up the 
nlmble spirits in the --les, LLL IV, 3, 06. each petiot 
a. in thls bod.y, Hm1.I,4,82 (Ff Qq attire and arture). 
• rthur, 1) the fabulous king of Britain: when 
A. first in court, H4B II, 4, 36. I was then ,Sir 
gonet 5 --'s show, 11I, 2, 300 (an e=aibition of ar- 
chery by a toxophilite society in London, whose 
'members assumed the names of the knights of the 
Round Table). he's in ---'s bosom (for Abraham's) 
H5 1I, 3, I0. -- 2) A. Plantagenet, nephew to king 
John: John I, 9. 1I, 2. 153. 156 (A. of Bretagne). 
1II, 4,160 etc. etc. -- 3) elder brother of Henry VIII : 
H8 11I, 2, 71. 
Article, 1) sangle clause in a stipulation, 
)articular item in a writingor discourse: in that 

I, 1, 148. As 11I, 5, 31. IV, 3, 4. H4B I, 1, 123. IV last a. Gentl. III, I, 366. thls a. jourselfmust break, 
3, 36. H5 I, 2, 207. R3 V, 3, 339. Rom. I, 1, 215. I LLL 1, 1, 134. 140. leas. IV, 9, 107. R2 IV, ,'233. 
HmL III, 1, 58. IV, 7, 91. V, 2,254. Per. l, 1, 163.1243. H4.B IV, 1, 74. 170. 2,53. H5V,_'2, 78. 94. 
Art, 1) the power of doing something 97. 360. 374. H6B I, 1, 40. 217. H6C I, 1, 180. 
hot tanght by nat(tre, skill, dexterit¥: Ven. 291. III, 3, 135. H8 I. 1. 169. 11I,'2,293. 299. 304. Hml. 



54 

A 

I, 1, 94. 2, 38. Oth. I, 3, 11. V, 2, 54. Ant. Il 7 2, 
82. 87. Cylub. l, 4, 169. 1)er. I, 1, 88. :Eadures hot 
a. t.yia 9 hlm to aught (-- eondition) Cor. II, 3, 204. 
to ever.y a. Tp. I, 2, 195. fo the last a. Oth. III, 3, 22. 
to draw 7mj answer from thy --s, John Il, 111 (as from 
an inventory ruade by thee), thou shouldst hot alter 
the a. ofth.,u 9entry, 'iv. II, 1, 53 ( the tenour of 
thy gentry, thy r:mk). I take h5n to be a soul qf great 
a.7 Hml. V 7 2, 122 i. e. of a great item, one who, if 
virtues shouhl be speeified inventorially (cf. v. 118), 
would have many items in the list. 
2) the gramluatieal article, the word pre- 
fixed to substantives: Wiv. IV, 1, 40. 41. 
/krlizulale, 1)intr. to enter into egoeia- 
tions: the best with whom we may a. Cor. I, 9, 77. 
2) trans, to draw u l) iu articles, to spe- 
cify: these thlngs indeed you bave a. II4A V, 1, 72 
(Ff. articulated). 
.Irlifl¢er, artisan: another lean umvashed a. 
John IV, 2, 201. 
/krtifi¢ial, 1) produced by art, not namral: 
makes himself an a. ni.qht, Rare. 1, 1,146. his a. stone, 
Tim. II 2, 117 (the philosopher's stone), raise st,ch 
a. sprites, lXicb. 111, 5, 27. In a bad sense 
feigned: a. tears, tl6C Ill, 2 184. 
2) artful; a) of persans: liketwo a. gods,Iids. 
111 2, 208.*b) of thinffs: th prosperous and a. feat, 
Per. V, 1, 72. 
3) a. strife Tire. I, 1, 37  the strife, the emula- 
tion of art, to vie with nature. 
g, rliller-, cannon, ordnance: John Il, 403. 
II4_/k l, 1, 57. H6A I, 1, 168. 1V, 2 29. heaven's a. 
Shr. I, 2, 205. 
/krli, scholar: to be relinqulshed of the 
(i. e. thc Iearned physicians) All's Il, 3» 10. the a. 
and unread, Troil. 1, 3, 24. b.framln 9 an a., art bath 
thus decreed, to make saine 9ood, but others to exceed; 
and.you are ber labour'd scholar, Per. II, 3, 15. 
/k ri less, u n s k i I fu I : sa full of a. jealo us.y is 9uilt 
it spills itself U fearin9 to be spilt, Hml. IV, 5, 19. 
/krlois, province of France: H6A Il, 1 9. 
/krts-man, scholar: LLL V, 1, 85. 
.rundel, 122 II, 1, 280 (not in O. Edd. but in- 
serted by lI. Edd.) 
/krviragus, son of Cymbeline: Cymb. fil, 3 96. 
V, 57 359. 
/s; --in the quality off, as a spy 7 Tp. l, 2, 
455. as my 9i.fl IV1713. as one relyin 9 on *jour lord- 
ship's will, Gentl. I, 3, 61. whom she esteemeth as his 
friend, 111, 2, 37. I will encounter darkness as a bride, 
Meas. 111, 1 84. I speak hot like a dotard nor a fool, 
as under prlvile9e of a9e to bra9, Ado V 1, 60. f 1 
affect it more than as yovr honour. H4B IV 7 5, 146. 
as loath to depose the child, R3 111, 77 208. we shall 
acquaint him with it, as need.ful in out laves, Hml. 
1, 173 etc. etc. 
Sometimes  like: true grief is .fond and testg 
as a child7 Lucr. 1094. these means, as frets upon an 
instrument7 shall tune out heart-strb9s, 1140. when 
perceive that men as plants increase Sonn. 15, 5. 
bosom as a bed shall lodge thee, Gentl. I, 27 114. 
marvel thov9h .Demetrivs da as a monster.[tg rny pre- 
sente, Mids. I1, 2, 97. and slts as one new risen from 
a dream7 Shr. IV, 1,189. which ever as ravenousJïshes 
da a vessel follow H8 I, 2 79. and hither make as 
9reat ambassadors frorn foreign princes» I» 47 55. he 

sits b hls state as a thin 9 nade for Alexander, Cor. 
V, 4, 22. your face is as a book where men mag read 
llcb. I, 5, 63. Caes. I, 2, 128. the violence of action 
bath marie gou ree as a sacrifice, Cymb. 1, 2, 3. 
Serving to denote eonformity: as thou sag'st, 
Tp. I, 2, 62. 219. 271. 420. II, 1, 61. 288, etc. etc. 
as 'tis, 1, 2,310. as in a dream 1,2,486. all's hvsh'd 
as mldni9ht, IV, 207. I know hbn as myself, Gentl. 11, 
4, 62. if he had been as yot,, and you as he, lIca». 
11, 2, 64. nd as a buck, Err. III, 17 72. here shall 
he see 9ross .fools as he, As II, 5 58. dear almost as 
his lfa, All's IV, 4.6. humble as the ripest mulberry 
Cor. 111, 2, 79. the humble as the proudest sail, Sonn. 
80, 6. Caes. II, 2, 29. la bave them reconqgensed as 
thovght on, Wint. lV, 4, 581. Frequently before if: 
as iJ it had lun9s 7 Tp. 11, 1, 47. Err. IV, 3, 2. Lr.V, 
3, 17 etc. 
Coward as thou art7 R3 1.4,286  that thou art. 
unmerciful la@ as you are, Lr. 111, 7, 88. cf. Tp. I, 
2, 846. Gentl. I11, 1, 7. LLL V, 2, 280. H6B I, 3 
86. 111, 2, 59. As you like this, give me the iie another 
time, Tp. Ill, 2, 85 (-- aeeording as, if). as ,jo« look 
to bave my pardon7 trlm it7 ¥, 292. as thou lorest th?t 
life, make speed from henee, Gentl. III, 1, 169. I con- 
jure thee7 as thou believest there is another conoEort 
than this world, thot thou .... , lIeas. V, 48. as jou 
love strokes, sa jest with we agaln, Err. Il, 2, 8. sa 
befall my soul, as thls is false, V, 209. as the winds 
ffve benejït, let me hear .from jou, Hml. 1, 3, 2. 
Hence uscd in asseverations and obsecrations: as 
ara a man, Tp. I, 2, 456. IV, 1, 23. Gentl. 11, 7, 
57. III 7 1 255. SViv. 11, 2, 264. IV, 2, 151. Err. 1, 
2, 77. Ado lV, 1, 77. V, 1, 85. LLL I, 1,236. Mids. 
V, 438. As 11, 7 14. All's IV, 3, 1.54. V, 8, 113. R2 
111, 3, 119. 115 11, 1, 69. R3 IV, 4, 397. HS 111, 2, 
221. Lr. IV, 7, 69. 
And--in as far as, in as much as: as I 
ara »mn, my state is desperate for my master's love: 
as I ara woman, ... Tw. 1I, 2 37. as thou art but 
ma, 1 date; but as thou art prince, l fear thee, H4A 
111, 3, 165. jou da repent, as that the sbz bath brou9ht 
fou to this shame, lleas. 11, 3, 31. 
In a temporal sense --- wh e n: as mine eyes opened. 
saw theb" weapons drawn, OEp. 11, 1 319. Gentl. V, 
2, 38. I pray you, jest, sir, as you sit at dinner, Err. 
I, 2, 62. peruse this as thou 9oest7 Mereh. 11, 4, 39. 
you.[tg them as you swear them lordship, All's V, 3, 
156. as 1 was banished 1 was banished Hereford. 
R2 11, 3 113. do9s bark at me as l halt b.y them, R3 
17 1, '2,3. his lady deceased as he was born, Cyrnb. 1, 
1 40. as I slept7 methought, V, 5, 426. 
--- to wit: a quest of thoughts» .... as thus: nine 
eye's dve is thy outward part Sonn. 467 13. as thtts: 
Alexander dled ... Hml. V 7 1. 231. mad mischances 
and much miser.y» as bvrnia9 fevers7 a9ues pale and 
faint .... , Ven. 739. tired with ail these» as, to behold 
desert a beg9ar borb Sonn. 66, 2. theg say, this town 
is full of cozenage, as nlmble ju991ers , da,'k-worlcing 
sorcerers, Err. I, 2, 98. told me what p.rivg marks I 
had about me, as the mark of my shoulder .... 7 111, 2, 
147. but there are other strict observances as hot to 
see a womaa ..., LLLI, 1,37. the seasons" difference, 
as the ioj fan 9 of the wlnter's wlnd» As I1, 1, 6. but 
when th" parties were met themselves one of them 
thought but of an lf, as qf .you sald sa, then I said sa," 
V, 47 106. and of other motions» as promising ber 



A 

55 

marriage All's V, 3, 264. it is stopped with other 
.flattering sounds, as praises of Ms state R2 II, 1, 18. 
two Cliçords, as the father and the son, H6C V, 7, 7. 
she had all the rogal makings of a queen, as holy oil 
.... , H8 IV, 1, 88. together with the terror of the place 
as in a vault..., Rom. IV, 3, 39..for some vicious 
mole of nature in them, as in their birth .... , Hlnl. I 
4, 25. 
Correlatively as ... as so ... as, such ... as, the 
saine ... as in the same dcgree, of the 
saine quality of which ...: hot so muchperdi- 
tion as an hair, Tp. I, 2, 30. so mch as makes it 
light, llerch. IV, 1, 328. such senses as we bave, Tp. 
I, 2, 413. Gentl. IV, 1, 58. Meas. II, 2, 122. as leaky 
as an unstanched wench, Tp. I, 1, 50. 2, 281. 321. 
329. 498. I1, 1, 68. 238. 2, 63. II1, 3, 62. V 145. 
242. 290. recking as little what betideth me, as much 
I wlsh ail good befortune .you, Geutl. IV, 3, 40, etc. 
etc. to whom as great a charge as little honour he 
meant to la# upon, H8 I, 1, 77. as well at London 
bridge as at the Tower. H6A 111, 1, 23. as well m.y 
undertakings as gour counsels, Troil. 11, 2, 131. as 
low as to th.y foot doth Cassius fall, Caes. 11I, 1, 56 
(v.far, deep etc.), as trulg as he nwves, Cymb. I11 
4, 154. ingular expression: Sou that choose hot by 
the view, chance as fait and choose as truc, Merch. 
II1, 2,133 (i. e. your chance is as fair as yonr choice 
is true). 
As ... as joining cven two adjectives correlati- 
vely: as heavg fo me as odious, Tp. 111, 1, 5. as hol.y 
as severe, Meas. I11, 2, 276. n as fait as noble la- 
dies, Cor. 11, 1, 107. Mereh. Il: 7, 70. Shr. 11, 132. 
All's IV, 4, 33. Tw. III, 4, 277. Wint. I1, 3, 37. R2 
V, 3, 20. Troil. IV, 4, 71. Hnd. 11, 2, 465. Cymb. I, 
6, 144. 111, 4, 121. Per. II, 5, 66. hot so short as 
sweet, R2 V, 3, 117. 
As ... as  though, however: as like hbn as 
.he is, Ado I, 1, 116 ( however she may be like 
him). as young as 1 ara, 1 bave observed these three 
swashers, H5 1II, 2 29. as cold a night as "tis, IV, 1» 
119. lronically: as honest as Ian b Oth. II, 1, 203. 
The correlative sometimes wanting: this is a 
strange thing as e'er 1 looked on, Tp.V,289. a strange 
one as ever 1 looked on, Cor.IV,5,21. an eye of doubt 
as bid me tell ..., John IV, 2, 234. that's worthily as 
any ear can hear, Cor. IV, 1, 51. 11, 1, 48. Lr. V, 3, 
123. 261. Per. Ill, 2, 62. 
A demonstrative pronoun serving as correlative: 
those as sleep and think hot on their slns, Wiv. V, 5, 
57. I could hot answer hz that course of honour as she 
had ruade the overture, All's V, 3, 99. do me this 
courteous office as to know of the knight ..., Tw. I11 
4,278. that kbd of.fruit as maids call medlars, Rom. 
I1 1, 36. these hard conditions as this time is like to 
la.y upon us, Caes. I, 2,174. I return those duties back 
as are right fit, Lr. I, 1, 99. those arts the.y bave as 
I couldput into them, Cymb. V, 5, 338. 
As  in the saine degree, con-elativeness 
being understood, hot expressed: of as little memor!/, 
Tp. II, 1, 233. a thousand tbnes as much, Genfl. II 
1 121. three rimes as much more, LLL III, 48. twice 
as nmch, IV, 3, 132. he's as good at an!Wthlng, As V, 
4, 110. Tp. II, 1, 266. V, 23. 169. Gentl. I, 1, 62. 
III 1, 142. IV, , 2 etc. etc. The indef, art. wanting: 
as good deed, H4A II 1, 3 (Ff. as good a deed). 
Oue as wanting: that's as much to saç, Err. IV, 

3, 54 (= as much as to say, cf. Gentl.lll, l,308 etc.) 
I bave trusted thee with ail the nearest thlngs to 
heart, as well m chanber-councils (= as well as) 
Wint. I, 2 236. whlch he took fast as 'twas mbdstered 
Cymb. I, 1 45. will contbme fast fo .your affection, 
still close as sure, I, 6, 139. 
After so and such, as sometimes for that: which 
the conceited pabter drew so proud, as heaven, 
seem'd, fo kiss the turrets bow'd, Lucr. 137:L such 
si.qns of rage they bear as if seem'd they would debate 
with angr.y swords» 1420. Sonn. 14, 11. 36 14. 78, 
3. 96, 14. Phoen. 25. Gentl. I1, 4, 137. LLL II, 
174. Mids. II1, , 359. Shr. Ind. 2, 12. Shr. I 1 33. 
I11, , 111. IV, 3 114. All's V, 1, 6. Tw. I 5, 2. 
John III, 1,296. H4A IV, 1, 4. H6A II1, 1, 16. V, 
1,43. V, 4, 115. 5, 42. H6B IV, 9, 47. R3111,4. 
40 (Ff. that). I11, 7, 161 (Ff. that). Troil. III, 2, 104. 
Tit. II, 3, 103. Hnfl. II, 1, 95 (Ff. that). Oth. I, 1, 
73. Ant. V, , 0. Even when the subordinate clause 
has the saine sbjeet: the one so like the other as could 
hot be distlnguishe& Err. I, 1, 53. which harm within 
itself so heinous is as it makes harmful ail, John I11, 
1 41. l feel such sharp dissension in my breast as 
ara sick, H6A V, 5, 86. such a prince he was as he 
stood by ..., II6B I1, 4, 45. hast glven unto the bouse 
of York such head as thou shalt reign but by their 
sufferance, H6C I, 1 234. 
As  so that, the correlative adverb wanting: 
we will play out part, as he shall thbk .... Shr. Ind. 
1, 70. and for m.yself mbie own worth do define, as 1 
ail other in all worths surmount Sonn. 62, 8. the fixure 
qf her eye bas motion bi't, as we are mock'd with art, 
Wint. V, 3, 68. 
As  as if, sometimes with inversion of the 
subject: as had she studied fo misuse me so Shr. 11, 
160. as were out England Ms, R2 I, 4, 35. as were 
a war in expectation, H5 II, 4, 20. as had he been 
incorpsed, Hml. IV 7, 88. More frequently with the 
regular construction : as they were mad unto the wood 
they hie then, Ven. 323. 357. 473. Compl. 23. Mids. 
1I, 1 160. I11, 2, 258. Shr. I 2, 157. ¥, 1 17. Wint. 
1, 2, 369. 415. IV, 1, 17. 4, 185. ¥, 2, 16. 332. 
H4B IV, 4, 123. H6B I, 1, 103. 187. H6C II1 3, 169. 
R3 111, 5, 63. H8 I, 1, 10. II1, 1, 7. Troil. III, 3, 167. 
IV, 5, 238. Rom. 11, 5, 16. Caes. 111 1, 98. V, 1, 86. 
Mcb. II, 2, 28. ¥, 5, 13. Hml. II, 1, 91. IV, 5, 103. 
Lr. III, 4, 15. ¥ 3, 201. Ant. 1, _'2, 103. IV, 1, 1. 
Cymb. 1¥ 2, 50. ¥, 5, 423. ler. lrol. 24. Like as 
!here were husbandrg in war, Troil. 1, 2, 7. like as it 
would speak, tIml. 1, 2 217. As it were  in a 
manner: as 'twere encouragin 9 the Greeks fo fi9ht, 
Lucr. 1402. Gentl. IV, 4, 14. Wiv. I, 1,215. 4, 30. 
111, 5, 75. Meas. 1, 3, 44. I1, 1, 94. 111, 1» 33. Err. 
V, 244. LLL IV, 1, 145. 2, 14. 26. V, 1, 15. 121. 
Merch. 1, 1, 11. All's II, 3, 180. Wint. l, 1, 33. IV, 
4, 174. H4B V, 5, 21..H6B II, 3, 87. R3 I, 4,31. 
III, 1, 77. 170. 4, 91. 5 93. H8 III, 2, 189. Troil. I, 
3, 150. Cor. IV, 4, 15. Caes. Il, 1, 283. Tire. I, 1, 
10. Hml. I, 2, 10. 11, 1 13. ler. I, 3, 17. 
In the saine manner before single parts of a sen- 
tence: asfearful o.[ him ( as if fearful), Ven. 630. 
as pltying me, Sonn. 132,1. as stooping to relieve him, 
Tp. Il, 1, 121. as by consent, 203. as by a thunder- 
stroke, 204. cf. Ven. 968. 1031. Lucr. 437. 1747. 
Shr. Ind. 2, 31. H4B II 1, 141. IV, 5, 158. Troil. 
I, 1, 35. III, 3, 12. Rom. III, 3. 39. 



56 A 

I spea/c hot as b» absolute fear of .ou, Mcb. IV 
3, 38. Caes. 111, 2, 13. 
Superfluous: as for  for, eoneerning: as 
.for you, say what .ou can Meas. Il, 4, 169. R2 I» 1» 
142. H6B I, 3, 40. 100. 158. IV, 1, 139. 2, 136. 
H6CI, 3»4. 111,3,208. R3 1,3,313. H8 V, 133. 
Tit. III, 1, 198 (cf.for). 
As yet  yet (v./let). Similarly joined to other 
expressions of time: one I, uclo as then the rnessenger» 
Meas. V, 74. as at that tirne it was the first, Tp. I 2, 
70..[eels hot what he owes but b/l re.flection» as when 
hls virtues shining upon others heat thern» Troil. lll 
3, 100. that he should hither corne as this dire nl9ht, 
Rom. V, 3, 247. as this verni dag was Cassius born, 
Ches. V. I, 72. 
As touchin 9 -- touehing: as touchb 9 the hit it, 
LLL I¥, I, 123. H5 1 I, 79. R3 V, 3, 271. Costm'd 
even says: the conternpts thereof are as touchin 9 me» 
LLL I, 1, 191. er. as concernin 9 sorne entertainrnent, 
LLL V, 1, 125. OE/ou faint, as fearing to do so, R2 
11, 1,297. ifSCu suppose as fearin 9/lou it shook H4A 
111» I 28. as hatin 9 thee, are rising up in arrns, H6B 
I¥, 1, 98. pale theg loo/c with fear, as witnessin 9 the 
truth on our side, H6AII, 4, 63. I told the pursuivant 
as too triumphing, R3 II1, 4 91 (Qq as 'twere trlurnph- 
b9). if he be now returned as checkin 9 at his voyage, 
Hml. IV, 7» 63. but he, as lovb 9 his own pride and 
purposes, evades thern, Oth. I» 1, 12. our countrjrnen 
are 9one and .fled, as well assured Richard is dead» 
R2 !I, 4 17. I do remain as neuter» II, » 159. I ara 
as like to call thee so again, Mereh. I » 181. the 
tenderness of ber nature becarne as a pre.y to ber grief, 
All's IV 8» 61. made the dags and nights as one, V, 
1,3. 
Redundant before how: our recountrnents ... as 
how I carne into that desert place, As IV, 8, 142. The 
case is different in Hml. IV, 7, 59: if it be so -- as 
how should if be so? how otherwise? The king was 
going to say: as it will prove to be, but altered 
his expression, cf. if ever, as that ever rnay be 
near, As 111 5, "2,8. when in .our motion you are hot 
and dry, as ma/ce .our bouts more violent t. that end, 
Hml. IV, 7» 159. 
.As treated as a snbstantive: and rnan.y such-like 
Ases ofgreat charge, Hml. V, 2, 43.* 
Coneerning li/ce as, when as, where as, while as 
v. like, when, where, while. 
Aseanius, son of Aeneas: H6B 111 2 116. 
tseaparl, a giani vanquished by Bevis of Soufl- 
,-mapton: lq6B 1I » 98 (hOt in Ff, but inserted by 
M. Edd. from the spurious Qq). 
Aseaunt, across: there is a willow grows a. a 
broo/c Hml. IV» 7, 167 (Ff amant). 
Aseend, to mount, climb, 1) trans.: a. ber 
charnber-window, Gentl. III» 1 9. Rom. III 8» 147. 
n/l charnbers, Wiv. 111, » 178. they (eurses) a. the 
s/cg, R3 I, 8, 287. a. the brightest heaven of invention 
H5 Prol. I. a. the throne, R2 IV, 111. 113. V I, 56. 
H4B III 1, 71. Pantheon» 'rit. 1» 833. 
2) intr. to fise: peace a. to heaven, John Il t 86. 
it--s me into the brain, H4B IV, 8» 105. a.» brave 
Talbot, H6A 1I, I, 28. the base degrees bg which he 
dld a. Caes. II t 1, 27. the noble Bcutus is --ed, III 2 
I I. the dust should bave --ed to the roof of heaven, 
Ant. II1» 6, 49. 
Ascension, the et of rising: his (the holy 

eagle's) a. is more sweet than our blest fields, Cymb. 
V»4 116 (nearly the ecclesiastical sense of the word). 
Ascelisioli-day, holy Thursday: John IV, 2, 
151. V» 1, "2.2. 25. 
Ascent, act of rising: his a. is hot b.y such 
easff degrees» Cor. II, 2, 28. 
Ascribe, o attribute as to a cause: which 
we a. to heaven» All's I, 1 232. H5 IV 8, I13. tt6A 
I11, 4, 11. to attribute as a quality: rnuch attri- 
bute he bath» and rnuch the reason why we a. it to hirn 
Troil. II, 3, 126. 
Ash, the Linnaean fraxinus exeelsior; used 
for the lance ruade of it: whereagainst rny grained a. 
an hundred rimes bath bro/ce, Cor. IV 5 114. 
A-shalting» to trembling: sers every jolnt a. 
Lucr. 452. 
Ashamed. To be a.  I) to be abashed, to be 
put to the blush; absolutely: are/lou hot a.? Wiv. 
I11 3» 230. IV 2» 144. 197. Meas. V, 278. Ado 111, 
4, 28. LLL IV, 3, 159. WinLV, 3, 37. H4A I3, 
118. III, 3» 184. Troil. II1 2, 146. Followed by of: 
li/ce stars a. of dag, Ven. 1032. I ara much a. of mj 
exchange, Merch. 11 6» 5. Ado 111» 4, "2,9. Shr. V» I, 
150. H4A IV, 2, 12. H5 IV» 7, 118. I arn a. on't, 
Tim. III, 2, 19. Followed by an inflnitive: art thou 
a. fo/ciss? Vert. 121. Gentl. IV, 2, II1. Merch. 11, 3, 
17. All's 1 3, 179. John 11I 3» 27. H4B II, I, 88. 
II» 4» 152. H6A IV» I 125. Rom. 111, 2» 92. l:[ml. 
111» 2» 155. Lr. I» I, 215. 11, 4 196. /knt. 1II» II» 2. 
Cymb. IV, 4, 40. Followed by a clause: be thou a. 
that I bave too/c upon me such an irnrnodest ralrnent, 
Gentl. V, 4, 105. Shr. V, 2 161. Lr. !, 4, 318. I ara 
a. I did yield to thern» Caes. II 2 106. 
2)  disgraeed: .you will be a. for ever Oth. 
II » 16"2, (Qq and most M. Edd. sharned). 
Asher-house, a farm-house near Hampton-Com't, 
1:I8 III, 2» 231. 
Ashes, 1) the remains of any thing burnt: 
Sonn. 73, 10. John 111, 1» 45. H5 III, » 9. FI6A 
I11 I, 190. ¥» 4» 9"2.. H6B Il t  7. Ant. V» 2, 174. 
repentant a. John IV, l, Ili. rnourn in a. R2 V, 1» 49. 
repent in a. and sac/ccloth» H4B 1 2» 22 I. pale as a. 
Rom. II1, 2, 55. the roses in thff chee/cs shall fade to 
pabj a. ( to ashy paleness) Rom. IV, I, I00. 
2) the remains of the human body: H6A 
I, 6, 24. R8 I, 2, 6. H8 IV, 2, 75. t'er. Prol. 2. q[ 
sharne's a. shall m/l farne be bred, Lucr. 1188. H6A 
IV» 7, 9- ° . H6C I, 4» 35. H8 V» 5, 42. 
Ashford, the birthplace of John Cade: FI6B lll 
1 357. IV» 8» 1. 
Ashore, I) on shore» on land: here shall I 
dle a. Tp. I1 2» 45. 
2) to the shore, to the land: how carne we 
a.? Tp. 1 2, 158. II 2» 129. 183. qv.ll, l» 66. Shr. 
l» 1» 42. 236. H5 lll » "2.7. R8 IV, 4 439. Oth. lI, 
I, 8 (reading of Qt). "2.92. Ant. Il, 7, 91. ler. ¥. 
I, 261. 
Ash-¥edlesday, the first dag of Lent: Merch. 
Il t 5, 26. 
Ashy, ash-eoloured, pale: anger ashg-pale, 
Vert. 76. dylng ejes 9learn'd forth their a. lights, Laer. 
1378. a. pale 1512. a tirnel. parted ghost » of a. sern- 
blanee, H6B III, 2, 162. 
Asia, the Cntinent east of Europe: Err. I 1,134. 
Ado Il, I, 275. H4B Il, 4, 178. Ant. I, 2, 105. 
Aslde, to the side: hC9¤ a. frorn the direct 



A 57 

foJ'thrlght, Troil. III, 3, 158. glance a. fo new-fouttd 
methods, Sonn. 76, 3. forbear fo glance tltlne eye a. 
139, 6. he tltrew his eye a. As IV, 3, 103. he trod tlte 
w«tcr» wltose enrnit.y lte flung a. Tp. Il, 1» 116. tltrow- 
iag ita. Caes. l, 2, 108. flicWbrotlters beat a. tlte point, 
R3 1 2, 96. beats cold death a. Rom. III, 1,166. turn 
a. and weep for ber, Ant. i, 3, 76. daff'd tlte world a. 
and bid it pass, H4A IV, 1, 96. w)o sees the lurking 
serpent steps a. Lucr. 362. 
Hence - out of the way: stand a.: Gcntl. IV, 
2, 81. Ado IV, 2, 32. LLL 1V, 1,55. V,2,591. hiids. 
III, _'2, 116. As 111, 2, 132. Alls V, 3, 270. Shr. V, 1, 
63. H4A Il, 4, 428. H4B III, 2, 243. 249. H6C III, 
3, 110. Caes. Il, 1, 312. step a. H4A Il, 4, 36 (i. e. 
into a by-room, cf. . 32). Rom. 1, 1, 162. Absolu- 
tely: a., a.! Wint. IV 4, 700. Tim. Il, 2, 127. Hml. 
V, 1. 240. 
And thon  away: will't please you w«lk a.? 
Meas. IV, 1, 59. Ado 111, 2, 73. LLL IV, 3, 212. 
stand a.  go away, Shr. Ii, 24. take Mm a. Tw. V, 
103. draw a. t]te curtains, hierch. 11, 7, 1. 
To lay a., in speaking of garments,  to take 
off: my mourning weeds are laid a. H6C 111, 3, 229. 
Similarly of other things about a person: lay a. your 
stitc]terj Cor. 1, 3, 75. lay a. the sword, John i, 12. 
Figuratiely: lay a. t]te thoughts of Sicilia, Wint. iV 
2, 58. and l. aside ny blood's royalty, R2 1, 1, 71. 
to lay a. life-harmSig heaviness, 11, 2, 3. I lay a. that 
which grows to met H4B 1, 2, 100. pity must be laid 
«. H6C Il, 2, 10. In the same sense to cast a.: casting 
their savageness a. Wint. Il, 3 188. whch would be 
worn now, hot cast a. so soon, ]icb. i, 7, 35. 
To set a.  to e up, desist from: our purposed 
hunting sltall be set a. Mids. IV, 1 188. setting all 
tMs clat a. Shr. Il, 270. set this unaccustomed figlt 
a. H6A III, 1, 93. all disserabling set a. H6C IiI 3 
119. S_etting aside  abstractedly from: setting tlte 
attraction of my good parts a. Wi. 11, 2, 110. setting 
. Ms Mgh blood's royalty, R2 1, 1, 58. H4A III, 3, 
137. H4B i 2, 93. 95. H6CIV, 1,24. Tim. Iii,5, 14. 
Aside as a preposition: 1tain rushed a. tlte law, 
Rom. III, 3,26 (cf. 1tare run by tlte ltideous law, Mens. 
1, 4, 63)  bas openly evaded the law. 
.lsii¢., (1. Edd. assinego), as s, stupid fellow : 
an a. may tutor thee, Troil. 11 1, 49. 
As]t, 1) to inquire; abs.: tltat it pleases .your 
good worsMp to a. Vi. i, 4, 145. let me a. Mens. I, 
4, 21. why doest ttou a. again? 11, 2, 9 etc. A clause 
following: thou shouldst radier a. if it were possible, 
Ado Iii, 3, 119. Shr. 111» ,'2, 161. Alls 115,70. John 
IV 2 43 etc. to a. forto enquire after: tlte 
gentlernan tat you --ed.for, Gent. IV 2, 32. Err. 11, 
?, 211. Ado i, 1, 34. LLL 111, 168. As III, 2, 235.' 
111 5, 109. Tw. 11, 5, 61. H6A IV, 7, 58. Troil. III, 
3 244. lom. 1, 3, 101. i, 5, 13. Iii, 1, 101 etc. to 
a. of  to put a question to: durst hot a. o./lier 
w)y ... Lucr. 1223. let me a. of tltese if tltey ... H6B 
V, 1, 109. and a. «wltat news" o.fme, Cymb. V, 3, 65. 
In the language of Evans fo a. of to a. for: Wiv. 
., 2, 1. 
Trans.; the accus, indicating the person ques- 
tioned: to a. the spotted princess how she fares, Lucr. 
721. 1594. Sonn. 2, 5. Gent. 1, 1, 121. 11, 5, 36. 
Wiv. 111, 4, 69. I11, 5, 103. IV 4, 58. lleas. I1, 1, 
148. 11, 2, 137. Ado Iii 4, 37. V, 1, 225 etc. to a. 
oneforto put a qnestion to one in order 

to be informed about: --s the weary caitiff for 
his toaster» Ven. 914. As IV, 1, 138. H4B 11, 4, 389 
etc. to a. one of, in the same sense : why does he a. Mm 
of me? Ails IV, 3, 317. With a double accus., in the 
same sense: a. me no reason, Wiv. Ii 1, 4. As 
38. 12,9 1, 3, 9. Lr. V, 3, 118 etc. a. him some ques- 
tions, Wiv. IV, 1, 16. Ails 1, 1, 123. H6A 1, 2 87 
etc. to a. the question, LLL Il, 117 (cf. Question). 
The accus, indicating the thing inqtfired after: 
the hour that fools should a. LLL il, 123. a. rny opinion, 
Merch. i11, 5 90. he --ed the way fo Chester, II4B 
i, 1, 39. answer that I shall a. H6B 1, 4, 29. why a. 
I that? II6C V, 2, 7. 
2) to request, to petition, to beg; absol.: 
yet a. R2 IV, 310. did hot . but mock, Cor. Il, 3, 
215. V, 3, 79. 89. upon--ing, Tw. 111,4, 232. athis 
--in9, H8 ii, 1,163..yet date I never dent.your--in9, 
Cor. I, 6, 65. my offer, hot thy --ing, Hml. 1, 2, 46. 
fo a. for - to request: bade me a. for it to-day, 
II5 11, 2, 63. and never --edfor restitution» H6C III, 
1, 118. to a. of=to pray: he --s of youthatnever 
used to beg, Per. Il, 1, 66. 
Trans.; to a. a thing  a) to beg, to express 
a desire of having, to demand: a. rernission 
for myfoll#, Gent. l, 2, 65. a. for9iveness, Mens. IV, 
2, 54. Err. IV, 3, 72. Merch. IV, 1, 369. Shr. ii, 181. 
Tw. 11, 5, 201. John IV 2, 63. 64. H6B 11, 4, 72. 
H6C Il, 6, 69. 90. III, 1, 44. H8 I, 1,187. Il, 2 112. 
Tit. I, 201 etc. b) to require: that will a. some 
tears, lIids. 1, 2, 27. my business --eth baste, Shr. 
11, 115. these great a.ff'airs do a. some charge R2 11, 
1, 159. the business --eth silent secrecy, H6B 1, 2, 
90. To a. a thing of a person : one boon that I shall 
a. ofyou, Gent. V, 4 150. Mids. IV, 1, 64. Tw. I11 
4, 231. Tit. 1, 473. Tire. 111, 4, 45. Lr. V, 3, 11. 
Cymb. V, 5, 97. Per. i, 1, 62 (nor a. advice of any 
other thought) etc. Double accus. : must a. my child 
forgiveness, Tp. V, 198. Meas. 111, 1, 173. As IV, 1, 
113. Shr. 1I, I, 2, 178. Wint. V2,56. John IV, 1, 44. 
V, 7,41. Lr. V, 3,10 etc. To a. apersonfor a thing: 
when I could hot a. my father for his advice, Tp. V, 
190. he --ed me for a thousand marks in gold, Err. 
11, 1 61. to a. youfor mypurse» Tw. 111,4,369. 
1, 3, 91. H8 1, 1, 124. Oth. 11, 3, 306 etc. 
Askan¢e, adv. with a sidelong glance, with 
a look of indifference or disdain: taking no notice 
that she is so nigh, for ail a. he holds ber in his eye, 
Ven. 342. I bave looked on truth a. and strangely, 
Sonn. 110, 6. thon canst not frown» thou canst hot look 
a. Shr. Ii, 249. 
As]tance, rb. to turn aside, to make to look 
with indifference: O how are the.y wrapped in 
with infamies, that ri'oto their own nffsdeeds a. their 
e.yes! Lucr. 637, i. e. who, in consequence of their 
own misdeeds look with indifference on the offences 
of others. 
Askaunt, v. ascaunt. 
Asker, p e t i ri o n e r: bave you ere now denled the 
a.? Cor. II 3, 214. 
Aslant, across: a. a brook I4_ml.lV 7, 167 
(Qq ascaunt). 
Asleep, 1) in sleep, sleeping: lying once a. 
Sonn. 154, 1. Tp. I, 2, 232. 11, 1, 191. ,'213. 215. 
155. 111, 2, 68. 122. V, 98. Gentl. I11, 1, .'25. IV .'2, 
136. Ado 111, 3, 71. Mids. 11, 1, 177. 2, 101. IV 1, 
133. 209. V 331. Tw. I 5, 151. H4A I» 3, 221. 1I, 



58 

A 

4, 577. It6A I!!, 9, 1-°2. H6B I, 1, -049. R3 I, 4, 96. 
H8 IV, 2, 81. Cor. IV, 5, o,. Itlnl. III, 3, 89 (when 
he is drunk a.). Oth. IV, 2, 97, etc. got "lween a. and 
wake ( betwecn a. and awake) Lr. l, -0, 15. Figu- 
ratively: though credit be a. V¢int.V,2,67. their prlde 
and tactile is a. tI4A IV, 3, 22. 
9) into sleep: fall a. Sonn. 153, 1. II4A III, 3, 
112. lau.qh me a. Tp. Il, 1, 189. sing me a. Mids. 
1I,-0, 7. Tit. V, 3, 163. rock me a. H4B Il, 4, -011. 
lull a. Cor. |||, 2, 115. iv bring ber babe a. Tir. lI, 
3, 29. sucks lhe mv'se a. Ant. V, 2, 313 etc. 
Asmatl,, naine of a spirit, H6B 1, 4, -07.* 
Aspé¢t, subst. 1) look, glance: some other 
mistress bath thl] sweet --s, Err. Il, 9, 113. render'd 
such a. as cloudl] men use iv lheU" adcersaries, II4A 
|Il, 2, 82. lhere would he anchor his a. Ant. I, 5, 33. 
9) look, air, countenance: whose grbn a. 
sels everl] .]oint a shaking. Lucr. 452. if l]ou willjest 
with me, know ml] a. Err. Il, -0, 32. declinin9 their 
rich a. iv lhe hot breath of Spain, Err. III, -0, 139. qf 
such vinegar a. Mcrch. l, 1, 54. lhis a. of mine bath 
feared lhe valiant, Il, 1, 8. what slrange eèct would 
"they work in mild a. As IV, ;, 53. a nuncio of more 
grave a. Tw. l, 4, 28. that close a. of his does show 
the mood of a much troubled breast, John IV, -0, 72. 
fading note of lhl] abhorred a. 994. thl] sad a. R2 I, 
3, 209. lend lhe el]e a terrible a. II5 III, 1, 9. with 
an a. of iron, V, 2, 244. his grim a. H6A 1, 3, 20. 
whose ugll] and unnalural a. R3 I, 2, 23. shamed their 
a. with store qf childish drops, 155. 'Ils his a. of ter- 
rot, H8 ¥, 1, 89. lhat smile we would aspire Iv, that 
sweet a. of princes, III, -0, 369. my l]oung bol] bath an 
a. of intercession, Cor. V, 3, 32. pul on a most impor- 
tunate a. Tim. lI, 1, 28. tears in hls ci]es, distraction 
in's a. tIml. Il, -0, 581. 
3) view, sight: ravish dolers wilh a false a. 
LLL IV, 3 260. out arms, save i*t a., bath all oènce 
sealed up , John II, 250. the dire a. of civil wounds 
R2 I, 3, 127. 
4) the peculiar position and influence 
of a planet: where mortal stars, as bright as 
heaven's beautles, with pure --s did him peculiar 
lies, Lucr. 14. till whatsoever star that guides 
moving points on me graciousll] with fidr a. Sonn. 26, 
10. some ill pichet relgns: I must be patient till the 
heavens look wlth an a. more favourable, Wint. II, 
107. malevolent toCCu in all--s, H4A l, I, 97. corrects 
the ill --s of planers evil, Troil. 1,3, 92 (Q influence). 
under the allowance o.f /our great a. Lr.ll, -0,112. 
Aspett, pertainin i to the asp tree: shake, 
tre 'twere an a. leaf, H4B Il, 4, 117. tremble like a. 
leaves Tit. II 4, 45. 
Aspersion, a sprinkling of dew or rain: 
lO sweet a. shall the heavens let fall to make this con- 
lract grow Tp. IV, 1, 18. 
Aspi¢ions for suspicious, in the language of 
I)ogberry, Ado I1[, 5, 50. 
Aspiek a venomous shake: swell, bosom, 
with thl] 'au9ht, for 'ris of --s' ton9ues, Oth. III, 3, 
450. bave I the a. in rn lips ? Ant. V, 2, 296. 354. 
355. 
Aspiration, high desire: that spirit ofhis in 
a. lifts im from the earth, Troil. lV 5 16. 
Aspire, 1) followed by to  to desire ambi- 
tiously: a. iv guide the heavenll] car Genfl. III, 1, 
154. Iv a. unto the crown, H6C l, 1, 53. that stalle 

we wotdd et. to, II8 III, 2, 368. --d to Solon's t«tppl- 
ness, 'rit. l, 177. 
2) absolutely, --- to fise, to tower; of flames: 
love is a spirit ail compact of jïre, ot gross fo sink, 
but light, and will a. Ven. 150. the llghtless jïre wheh 
in pale embers hid, ho'ks to a. Lucr. 5. whose flames 
a. as thoughts do blow them, Wiv.V,5,101. the --ing 
flame of golden sovereignty, R3 IV, 4, 328. Of moun- 
tains: a cloud in his dira mist the --bg mountains 
hiding, Lucr. 548. digs hills because the do a. Per. 
1,4,5. Aspiriog  anabitious: the --ing French, H6A 
V, 4, 99. Eleanor's --b.q humour, II6B I, ".2, 97. John 
V 1, 56. R2 V, -0, 9. II6C V, 6, 61. 
3) transitively  to aseend, to mount to: 
that gallant spb'it bath --d the clouds, Rom. III, 1,122. 
sprar, see Osprel]. 
A-squint, hot in the straight line of vi- 
ion, perversely: look'd a. Lr.V, 3,72. 
.ss, the animal Asinus: lIeas. Iil, 1, 26. Err. 
iV, 4, 28. -09. liids. III, 2, 17. 34. IV, 1, 82. 212. 
Merch. IV, 1, 91. Shr. Il, 200. Tw. V, 20 etc. etc. 
I will fil], like a dog, the heels o" the a. Tire. I, 1, 
283. thou borest thl] ass oit th.y back o'er the dlrt, Lr. 
!, 4, 177 (allusions to well-known fables of Aesop). 
As a term of reproaeh,  stnpid fellow, doit: iv make 
an a. of me, Mids. III, 1, 124. Wiv. V, 5, 125. Tw. 
V 20. I jïnd the a. in compound wlth the major part 
of2/our sl]llables, Cor. 11, 1, 64.* Tp. V, 295. Gentl. 
II, 3, 39. 5, 25.49. V, -0, 28. V'iv. I, 1, 176. lleas. 
'11, 2, 315. V, 506. Err. II, 1, 14. 2, 201. III 1, 15. 
Mids. IV, 1, -07. V, 317 (quibble with ace). Ado IV, 
,o, 75. V, 1, 315. LLL V, 2, 628 etc. etc. 
' Assail, 1) trans, to attack: --ed bj ni9ht, 
]Lucr. 1262. when violence --s us, 0th. II, 3, 204. 
John III, -0, 6. H5 IV 1, 159. H6A 1V, 7 10. H6B 
IV, 2, 185. II6CI, 1,65. Figuratively: let us a..your 
ears that are so fortijïed agalnst out storl], Hml. I, l, 
31. Lucr. 1562. thttt fell poison which --eth him, 
John V, 7, 9. --ed withfortunejïerce and keen, Per. 
V, 3, 88. Especially used of what the poet calls 'an 
amorous siege:' beauteous thou art, therefore iv be 
--ed, Sonn. 41, 6. eilher hot --ed or victor being 
charged, Sonn. 70, 10. woo her a. her Tw. I 3, 60. 
what ladl] would you choose iv a. Cymb. 1, 4, 136. 
I bave --ed ber with music 11, 3, 44. 
2) absolutely  to make an attack: iv beat 
--ing death from his weak legions H6A IV, 4, 16. 
whea shame --ed, lhe red should fence the white Lucr. 
63. To attcmpt to seduce: when lhe to a. 
begun, Compl. 262. but he --s, All's I, 1 126. the 
encounter of --ing ci]es, Rom. I, 1,219. 
.ssai]ab]e, liable to an attack: the are a. 
Mcb. I[l, -0, 39. 
Assailant, attacker: th2/ a. is quick, Tw. Ill, 
4, -045. 0ne who attempts to debauch a 
woman: and never stlr --s As I, 3, 116. 
.issassination, murder: if the a. could trammd 
up the consequence, hlcb. I, 7, 2. 
Assault, rb. to attack; absol.: where will.you 
a. ? John Il, 408. trans, to a. th. countrl], Cor. V, 3, 
123. Lr. 11, 2, 156. 0th. ¥, 2, 258. ¢Ietaphorically: 
pral]er which plerces so that it --s merc. tself  Tp. 
Epil. 17. 
Assault, subst, attack, onset, storm: what 
menus death in this rude a. ? R-0 V, 5, 106. the mal] 
vex ris wkh shot or with a. H6A 1, 4, 13. the enem:t 



A 59 

doth make a. iI 1, ôS. in which a. we lost twelve 
hundred raen, IV, 1, 24. Cor. IV, 5, 180. Mcb. i, 2, 33. 
Figuratively: [ will muke a complimental a. upon hbn, 
Troil. 111, 1, 42. a savageness in unreclabned blood, 
o.fgeneral a. Hml. ii, 1, 35 (= incident to ail men). 
Especially an attempt on the chastity of a 
woman : f, Collatlne, thi»e honour lac in me, from 
me by strong a. it is bereft, Lucr.835. Dian no queen 
of vb'gins, that would surfer ber poor knlght surprlsed, 
wlthout rescue in thc first a. or ransom afterward, 
AII's i, 3, 121. A mere proposal of that kind termed 
sa: the a. that A.qelo bath ruade fo you, Meas. !!!, 1, 
188. the a. you bave ruade to ber chastlty, Cymb. 
i, 4, 175. All's IV, 2 51. Cymb. 1, 6, 150. 111 2, 8. 
Used of hononrble love: invincible agabst ail 
of a.t]èction, Ado ii, 3, 120. 
Assay, rb. to try, attempt: she bath--edas 
much as nta 9 be proved, Vert. 608. who ever shunned 
b 9 precedent the destbed ill she must herselfa. Compi. 
156. a. the power ou bave, Meas. 
labour in --ing it, Err. V, 97. if we --ed to steal tle 
clownish fool, As I, 3, 131. to-night let us a. out plot, 
All's III, 7, 44. the rebels bave --ed to wh the Tower, 
H6B IV, 5, 9. I would a. fo make thee blash, H6C i, 
4 118. 'twere better hot --ed, Hml. IV, 7, 53. came 
on, a. Oth. !! 1,121. passion --s fo lead the wa.y, ll 
3, 207. To a. one, properly to probe, to put one to 
the proof, is either=to apply to to aeeost 
one vith a particular purpose: that he dates 
in thls rnanner a. rne Wiv. !i, 1, 26; bld herself a. 
hlm, Meas. i, 2, 186; or to measure swords with 
o n e: seebg thon fallest on me sa luckily, I will a. 
thee, H4A V, 4, 34; or to teml)t one (followed by 
to): did.ou a. hbn fo any pasthne? Hml. 111, 1 14. 
Assay, subst. (in Sonn. 110, 8 and La'. !, 2, 47 
essay) 1) examination, probation, triai: 
onl.ç he bath ruade an a. of her vb'tue, Meas. 111, 1, 
164. and worse --s proved thee rny best o.f love, Sonn. 
110, 8. with windlasses and with --s of bias, Hml.ii, 
1, 65. he wrote this but as an e. or faste o.f ».ç virtue, 
Lr. I, 2, 47. thls cannot be, by no a. of reason, Oth. i, 3,18. 
2) attempt, trial: afler rnan.¢ accents and 
delays, untimel.¢ breathi»gs, sick and short --s, Lucr. 
1720. let us make the a. upon hlm, Tire. lV, 3, 406. 
their malad. convlnces the great a. of art, bleb. IV 3, 
143. make a. 1"1m1.111,3,69. Hostile attempt, 
attack: galllng the gleaned land with hot --s, 1-I5 i, 
2 151. never more fo give tle a. of orms against your 
majesty, t/ml. ii, 2, 71. 
Assenddaace, semblance, external 
aspect: care I for the limb the thewes, the stature 
bulk, and big a. ofa raan? 1"14B iil, 2, 277 (or eau it 
possibly be : the conglomerate? Attirance is : ail 
that arrives; sa assemblance perhaps ail that is as- 
sembled in a body). 
Assemble, 1)trans. to bring or call toge- 
ther: ail that are--din this place Err. V 396. H4B 
1V 2, 5. for which we bave --d them H5 Ii, 2, 18. ii, 
4, 19. V, 2, 64. 1"16A I, 1, 139. i, 3, 74. I3 iii 7, 84. 
t/8 11, 4, 60. Cor. i!i, 3, 12. Caes. i 1, 62. Ant. 1, 4 
75. i11, 6, 68. 
2) intr. (mostly followed by to) to came toge- 
ther: as fast as abjects to his beams a. Sonn. 114, 
8. to me and to the state of my great grief let kings a. 
John iil, 1» 71. and fo the English court a. now, H4B 
IV, 5, 122. let them a. Cor. ii, 3» 225. 

Assemldy (twiee qnadrisyllable: Ado V, 4, 34 
nd Cor. l, 1, 159),  compny me together 
in he saine place, whether for mnusement or to transact 
business: lffe,s. 1, 3, 9. Err. V, 60. AsV, 4, 159. II4B 
V 5, 141. II5 V, 2, 6. II8 i, 4, 137.87. Cor. i, 1,159. 
11, 2, t31. lom. i, 2, 75. ïim. ii!, 6 86. Caes. i!I, 2, 
19. Lr. 111, 6, 49. Sometimes  eongregation: 
we bave no temple but the wood, o a. but horn-beasts, 
As 111, 3, 50. Ado IV, 2, 57. V, 4, 34. A meeting 
in arms, for the purpose of rebellion: Is this pro- 
ceedin 9 just and honourable? Is gour a. sa? H4B IV, 
2, 111 er. Cor. l, 1, 159. 
.ssent, subst., agreement: without the l:b9'x 
a. or l.-»owledge you wrought fo be a legate, II8 iii, 2, 
310. by the ab a. of ail these learned en she n'as 
divorced, IV, i, 31. 
Sss-hcad, head of an ass: gon see an a. qf 
ymw owu, Mids. !!i, 1, 119. Tw. V, 212. 
ssign. rb. 1) to allot: like fools that in th" 
bagination set the goodly abjects which abroad they 
find of lands and ansions, theirs in thought --ed, 
Compl. 188. in thelr --ed and native dwelling-placc, 
As 11 1, 63. England.from Trent and Severn hltherto 
is to nt. part --ed, H4A iil, 1, 75. to his cowlance 
I a. mg wife, Oth. !, 8: 286. to Ptolem.¢ he --ed 
Ant. 111, 6, 15. 
2) to appoint: I pra. gour highaess fo a. our 
trlal da.h I{2 I, 1, 151. And with a eommon inver- 
sion: tir we a. gon fo gour days of trial» 
till we a. to you your days of trial). 
3) to destine: --ed ara I fo be the Efflish 
scour9e, II6A I, 2, 129. whether I in ang just terre ara 
--ed to love the 3[oor, Oth. i, 1, 89 (sa Q; ail the 
other O. Edd. affi»ed). 
Ass|gn, subst, a p p e n d a g e (affected expression) : 
six Fre»ch rapiers and poniards, with theb" --s, as 
girdle, hangers, and sa, Hml. V, 2, 157. 169. 
Assinego, v. Asinlco. 
Assist, rb. trans, 1) to help: how van theg then 
a. me in the act? Luer. 350. 
1. Wiv. IV, 5, 92. IV» 6, 3. V, 5, 3. Meas. 1V, 2, 11. 
Ado i, 3, 71. LLL i, 2, 101. 189. 8hr. Ind. 1, 92. 
8hr. I, 1, 163. i, 2, 196. Wint. V 3, 90. H6C I, 1.2S. 
30. Cor. i, 2, 36. Mcb. 1, 2, 52. Otb. !, 3, 247. Ant. 
ii 1, 1. Per. II!, 1, 19. Absolntely: a. goodfi.iends, 
Ant. IV, 15, 31. 
2) to attend, to join: the king andprince ai 
pra.yers! let us a. them, Tp. I, 1, 57. rnldnight, a. out 
moan, AdoV, 3, 16. gourself, --ed wlth your honoured 
fi'iends, brbtg them fo our embracement, Wint. V, 1, 
113. Absolutely: Cor. V, 6, 156. 
Assistance, 1) help: Sonn. 78, 2. Ado 11, 1, 
385. LLL V, 1, 123. 127. John III, 1, 158. V, 4, 9. 
R2 il, 1, 1G0. H4AIV, 3, 65. H4BI, 
194 (by theb" --s). 1.1GC V, 4, 68. R3 IV, .'2, 4. Tire. 
Iii, 1, 21. llcb, iii, 1,124. 
2) assistants, associates: affectlngone sole 
throne, without a. Cor. IV 6  (1.1anmer: assistants; 
cf. LLL V, 1,127, where O. Edd. inversely hve as- 
sistants for assistance). 
Assistant, subst., helper, associate: her a. 
or go-between Wiv. il, 2, 27. fo ask those on the 
banks if they were his --s, R3 IV» 4 526. allled fo 
eminent --s, H8 I 1, 62. l'll thy a. be, Rom. ii, 
90. let me be no a. for a state, but keep a farrn and 
carters, Hml. ll, , 166 (i. e. no publie fnnctionm'y). 



0 A 

Assistant, adj., h e I p fu 1 : as the winds give bene- 
fit and convoy is a. Hml. I, 3, 3. 
Asso¢iate, vb. trans., to accompany, to join, 
atteu d: fi'iends should a. friends in grief and woe, 
Tit. V, 3,169. to a. me, Rom. V, 
bj ,lIarcius, --d with (- by) Aufidius, Cor. IV, 6, 76. 
Assoeiate, subst., compaaion: the bark is 
ready, and the wid at help, the--s tend, thnl. IV, 
3, 47. 
Assuage, to allay, appease: his fury was 
--d, Ven. 318. 334. Lucr. 790. Compl. 69. Cor. 
, 83. 
Assubjugate, to bring into subjection, to de- 
b as e : nor a. ]frs merit, as amply titled as Achilles is, 
b. going to Achilles, Troil. Il, 3, 202. 
Assume, 1) to take, to put on: my very 
oisor began to a. lire, Ado lI, 1,249. our project's lire 
this shape of sense --s, Troil. I, 3, 385. --ig men" s 
ioErmities, Per. Prol. 3. Especially to take a form 
an appearance: I will a. thy part in some disguise, 
Ado 1, 1,323. there is no vice so simple but --s some 
mark of virtue on his outward parts, Merch. III, 2, 81. 
and these a. but valour's excrement, 87. if spirits can 
a. both form andsuit, Tw. V,242. a. te port of 3[ars, 
II5 Prol. 6. do ,ot a. my likeness, Tim. IV, 3,218. 
if a. my noble father's person, Ihnl. 1, 2, 244. a. some 
other horrible form, l, 4, 72. Il, 2, 629. to a. a sem- 
blance that very dogs disdained, Lr. V, 3, 187.  to 
take the appearance of: a. a virtue, ifyou bave 
it hot, tIml. 11I, 4, 160. were reason can revoit with- 
out perditwn, and loss a. all reason without revolt, 
Troil. V, 2,145. he it is that bath --d tMs age, Cymb. 
V, 5, 319 (Belarius speaks so, because to Cymbeline 
he must appem" as quite another person). 
2) to claire: I will a. desert, Merch. II, 9, 51. 
like a bold champion, I a. the lists, t'er. 1, 1, 61. 
Assurance, 1) confidence, certaiuknow- 
I e d g e: rater llke a dream than an a. that m. remem- 
brance warrants, Tp. I, 2, 45. my a. bids me search 
Wiv. III, 2, 47. put your lord into a desperate a. she 
will noue of him, Tw. H, o_, 8. a. bless .your thoughts! 
Tire. 11, 2, 189. l'Il make a. double sure, lIcb. IV, 1, 
3. and'om some knowledge and a. o.er this office 
to you, Lr. III, 1, 41. For a.  to make confidence 
greater: for more a. that a licing prince does now 
speak to thee Tp. V, 108. for the more better a. tell 
tem that I ara hot P#ramus, Mids. IH, 1, 21. fo» a. 
let's each one send mto his wife, Shr. V, 2, 65. 
2) that which gives confidence, a) certainty, 
safety: jelousy shll be clled a. Ado Il, 2, 50. by 
this knot thou shalt so surely tic th.y now unsured a. to 
the crown, John 1I, 471. his head's a. is but frail, R3 
IV, 4, 498. they are sheep and cah'es which seek out 
a. in that, Hml. V, 1, 126. quite forego the way wMch 
promises a., and give up yourself to chance, Ant. I11, 
7, 47. cf. takeyou a. ofher. make sm'e ofher, Shr. 
iV, 4, 92. by an auricular a. bave your satisfaction, 
Lr. I, 2, 99 (confirmation). 
b) a solemn deelaration or promise: give 
a. to Baptista, as if he were the right Vincenti% Shr. 
IV, 2, 69. glve me modest a. if .you be the lady of the 
bouse, Tw. I, 5,192. pllght me the full a. of your faith, 
IV, 3, 26. if .you mind to hold your truc obedience, give 
me a. H6C IV, 1, 141. 
c) a certain proof: to give the world a. of a 
man, Ihul. III, 4, 62. 

d) a legal evidence: let.yourfather rnake ber 
the a., she is your own, Shr. II, 389. 398. and make a. 
hoee of greater sums, II1, 2,136. to pass a. of a dower, 
IV, , 117. where then do you know best we be affied 
and such a. ta'en, IV, 4, 49. the.y are busied about a 
counterfeit a. IV, 4, 92. 
e) surety, warrant: .you should procure him 
better a. than Bardolph, tI4B I, .9, 36. having here no 
judge indifferent, nor no more a. of equal friendship 
and proceeding, H8 1I, 4, 17. 
Assure, 1) to make sure: a) to eonvince, to 
persuade: I know hot how I shall a..you further, 
All's 111, 7, o. thy earliness doth me a. thou art up- 
roused by some distemperature, Rom. 11, 3, 39. a. th.- 
self - be persuaded: 5 his grave a. thyself my love 
is buried, Gentl. IV, 2, 115. Tw. I, 2, 9. 1II, , 38. 
H6B IV, 9, 19. Tir. V, 1, 61. Lr. 1I, 1, 106. Oth. 111, 
3 20. IV, , 02. Assured or well assured  sure, 
persuaded: lIerch. I, 1, 137. 1, 3, 9. IV, 1,315. John 
1I, 534. R2 II, 4, 17. H6B 111, 1,346. I11, , 349. II6C 
V, 3,16. R3 I, 3,23. II, I, 37. V, 3, 36. Cor. V, 2, 
79. Cymb. I, 5, 81 etc. stand .you so --d, Shr. I, 2, 
156. remain --d, Tire. V, 1, 100. test--d, Cor. 111, 
1, 121. Caes. V, 3, 17. with --dtrust, Pilgr. 329. ber 
--d credit (firm belief) Cymb. I, 6, 159. --d of 
sure of: ---d of acceptance, Lucr. Ded. 3. Sonn. 45, 
11. lleas. II 2, 119. All's II, 3, 19. H4B IV, 5, 106. 
Lr. IV, 7, 56. Irregttlarly: this I ara --d, H6A V, 5, 
83; er. this Ido a. myself, H6B 1I, , 80. 
b) to deelare solemnly: I a. 3tou, Tp.11,1,85. 
, 141. onn. 111, 13. Wiv. 11, 2, 109. Ado IV, , 7. 
LLL IV, , 10. ¥, 1, 99. llids. 1, 9, 14. V, 358. As 1, 
1, 159. IV, 3, 173. Shr. IV, 3, 191. H4A V, 4, 146. 
H4B I, , 33. V, 3, 70. H6B I1, 2, 78. Caes. V, 4, 2i 
etc. ITl a. you, H8 1, 3, 54. IV, 1, 12. that I a. /ou, 
Troil. IV, 1, 45. Lr. II, 1,106. 
) to make certain and doubtless, to 
answer for, to warrant: this shall a. my construit 
loyalty, H6C III, 3, 40. for one sweet look thy help I 
would a. thee, Ven. 371. he of both that tan a. my 
daughter greatest dower, Shr. 1I, 345. 347. 381. l'Il 
a. ber of ber widowhood, Shr. 11, 14. Assured =- cer- 
tain: thou art --d mine, Sonn. 9,'2, 2. incertainties now 
crown themselves --d, 107, 7. faults --d, 118, 10. 
John III, 1, 336. II5 IV, 3, 81. H6A 1, 2, 82. R3 V, 
3, 319. Lr. III, 6, 102. Cymb. I, 6, 73. 
3) to affiance: swore I was --d to her, Err. 
Il L 2, 145. when I wasfirst --d, John lI, 535. 
Assuredly, surely, certainly: a. the thbg is 
to be sold, As 1I, 4, 96. H6A I, 2, 130. I18 IV, 2, 92. 
Ant. V, 2, 72. 
Assyrian, pertaining to Assyria: 0 base A. 
knight, H4B ¥, 3, 105. the old A. slings, H5 IV, 7, 65. 
Aslnish, fo confound with some sudden emo- 
tion; 1) to strike with admiration: whose 
beauty did a. the survey of richest eyes, All's V, 3, 16. 
thou hast --ed me with th. high terres, H6A I, 2, 93. 
V, 5, 2. Hml. III, 2, 340 (Qq stonis). 
2) to amaze, to stun with fear and ter- 
fo r: stone-still,--ed with this deadl. deed, Lucr. lï30. 
neither he nor his compeers my verse --ed, Sonn. 86, 
8..you bave --ed him, H5 V, 1,40. a. these f ell-lurk{g 
ours, H6B V, 1, 146. such dreadful heralds to a. us, 
Caes. I, 3, 56. 
Astraea, the Goddess of justice: H6A 1, 6, 4. 
Tit. 1V, 3, 4. 



A 61 

As|fa.v, out of the right way: you are a.' 
Gentl. I, 1,109. lead t]ese rivais so a. Mids. I1[ .'2, 
358. 
h, strOlaO,ner, as trologer, one who professes 
to foretell future evcnts by the situation of the stars: 
vhen he performs, --s foretell il, Troil. V, 1, 100. 
learned bdeed were that a. that knew the stars as I 
his characters; he'Id lac the future open, Cymb. 111, 
', 27. 
Astronomical, pertaining to astrology: how lon 
bave you been a sectary a.? Lr. I, ,, 165. 
Ast.rOlaOmy, a s tf o 1 o g y, science teaching to 
foretell fnture events by the situation of the stars: 
not frorn the stars do I raff judgrnent pluck, and /et 
methinks I bave a. Sonn. 14 ,. 
Asunder, 1) parted, hot together: hearts 
rernote, yet hot a. Phoen. 29. could hot lire a. H6A 
Il, ,, 31. that we two are a. Cymb. III, 2, 3'. villaln 
and he be rnany rniles a. Rom. Ill, 5, 8,. tlie.¢ whirl 
a. and dismember me, John III, 1,330. rnj/ cha.ff" and 
corn shall fiy a. H8 V, 1, 11.'2. keep them a. Wiv.III 
1 74. H6B I, 4, 54. part a. I15 Prol. ,2. p[uck thern 
a. Itml. V, 1, ,87. will /ou rent out ancient love a.? 
Mids. Ill, ,, ,15. frorn rny shoulders crack rny arrns 
a. H6A I, 5, 11. 
,) in two, to pieces: his woven glrths he 
breaks a. Ven. ,66. cut rny lace a. R3 IV, 1, 34 (Qq 
in sunder), cracking ten thousand curbs of more strong 
link a. Cor. 1, 1, 73. hack their bones a. H6A 1¥, 7, 
47. to rend his limbs a. H6B 1, 3, 15. 
h.l, prepos, serving to mark a point of place or 
rime. 1) of place: at Ardea to rn.¢ lord, Lucr. 133'2. 
(cf. going bock to school in lVittenberg, Hml. 1, ,, 113; 
but: depart to Paris to the king, H6A I11, 2, 1,8). at 
Tunls, Tp. Il, 1, 97. at Hindsor Wiv. Il, 1, 66. at 
.Ephesus, Err. I, 1, 17. at Be-wick, H6A Il, 1, 83. at 
London, 179. at the Tower, R3 III, 1, 65. at .Exeter, 
IV, 2, 106 etc. etc. Even a country treated as a local 
point : when at Bohemia .you take rn.y lord, Wint. [, 
39. -- At the Phoenlx, Err. I, , 88. at .your shop, llI 
1, 3. does he lle at the Garter? Wiv. Il, 1, 187. at 
]laster Page's, III, ,, 86. at 3[aster For(fs, IV, 1, 1. 
at the .Duke Alençon's, LLL Il, 61. at the.father's of 
« certain pupil of mine, IV, 2, 159. at the notar.¢'s 
Merch. 1, 3, 173. at the governor's, H6A I, 4, ,0. at 
rn.y cousb Cresslda's, Troil. III, ,, 1. at the dulce's 
Oth. I, ,» 44. at her.father's I, 3, ,41. rneet me at the 
JVorth-gate, Gentl. III, 1, ,58. porter at the gare, Err. 
Il, 2, ,19. at the food, Gentl.l, 1,53. at the other bill, 
John II, ,98. at that oak, Wiv. IV, 4, 4,. at tterne's 
oak, IV, 6, 19. at the duke's oak, Mids.I, 2, 113. whose 
throats had hanglng at them wallets of flesh, Tp. III, 
345. at wMch end of the bearn, Il, 1, 130. at 
mistress' e.yes love's brand new fired, Sonu. 153, 9. 
light thern at the glow-vorn's eyes, hids. III, 1» 173. 
at herfather's chnrlish feet, Gentl. III, 1, 225 (cf. 
foot), close at the heels, Gentl. l[l, 1.325. out at elbow, 
Meas. Il, 1 61. out at heels, Wiv. 1, 3, 34. Lr. Il, 
164. I arn pale at rn.y heart, Meas. IV, 3, 157. breathes 
at's nostrils, Tp. Il, ,, 65. foams at rnouth, Troil. V, 
5, 36. overlust.y at legs, La'. II, 4 10. gladat soul, Oth. 
1 3, 196. at ber window, Gentl. Ill, 1, 113. ]vlids. 
1, 30. in at the window John I 171. Caes. I, 2, 320. 
shine in at the casernent, hIids. III, 1, 59. thrown in 
at the casement Lr. 1, 2, 64. my rnaster is corne in at 
/our back-door Wiv. III» 3 '4. sofi pit.y enters at an 

iron gare, Lucr. 595. saw'st thon Mm enter or the obbcy 
here? Err. V, ,78. truc prayers thatshall be up 
heaven and enter there, Mcas. II, ,, 15,. enter at a 
lad.¢'s ear, H5 V, ,, 100. faine, late entering at his 
heedful cors, H6C III, 3, 63. to look out at her lady's 
wlndow, Ado 1I, ,, 17. leans me out at ber mlstçess" 
wlndow, Ado III, 3, 156. talked with .you out at /our 
wiMow, IV, 1, 85. talk with a man out at a wlndow, 
IV, 1,311. look out at wlndow, hicrch. II, 5, 41. Shr. 
V, 1, 3. it will out at the casernent, As IV, 1,163. out 
at the ke.¢hole, 164. out at the chimne.¢, 165. out at 
the postern, Gentl. V, 1, 9. it would hot out at windows 
nor at doors, John V, 7, '2.9. sec him out at gares, Cr. 
I11, 3 138. goes out ai the portal, Hml. I11, 4, 136. I 
rnust be brie f, lest resolution drop out at mine eyes, 
John IV, 1 36. I will ./ëtch thy rira out at thy throat, 
H5 IV, "4, 15. forth at your eyes your spirits wildly 
peep, Hml. III, 4, 119. -- Sometimes other preposi- 
tions, as b or on, would be expected: feed like oxen 
at a stall, H4A V ,, 14. rive justices" hands at it 
V¢int. 1V, 4, ,88 ; but the irregularity may be easily 
accounted for. At land, at sea at freedorn, at llberty, 
v. land, sea etc. 
Serviug to point ont a mark aimed at: love's 
golden arrow at hirn should bave fled, Ven. 947. shoot 
their foam at Simois' banks Luer. 1442. shoot hot at 
me, Sonn. 117, 12. a stone to throw at his dog, Wiv. 
I, 4, 119. abnbg at Silvia, Gentl. 11, 6 30. a certab 
airn he took at a fait [Ctal, Mids. II, 1,158. to strike 
at me, V¢iv. V, 5, ,48. she strikes at the brow, LLL 
IV, 1, 119. dart th.¢skillatrne, V, 2, 396. bore atrnen's 
e.¢es, Tire. IV, 3,116. bark at a crow, Ado I, 1,133. 
beat at th.¢ rocky heart, Luer. 590. spit at me and 
spurn at me, Err. I1, 2, 136. Ishoot thee at the swain, 
LLL II1, 66. reach at the glorlous gold, H613, I, _9, 11 
(er. reach and snatch), jqbg it at th.y.face, H6C V, 1 
51. blow them at the rnoon Hml. III, 4, 209. throw 
sceptre at the bjurlous gods, Ant. IV, 15 76. blow at 
tire, l'er. I, 4, 4. uncouple at the hare, Vert. 674 (to 
chase the hare), that which we run at, It8 1 1, 14- 9. 
none should corne at him, Vint. II, 3  3- 9. rnow and 
chatter at me, Tp. 11, 2, 9. whet his teeth at hirn, Vert. 
1113. And thus even: I ara ai Mm upon rn.¢ knees, 
:Ado II, 1, 30 (i. e. bent towards him, anxious to be 
. heard by him). -- To guess at sth. v. guess. 
Serving to mark a point reached: are you at the 
arthest? 8hr. IV, ,, 73. atfarthest (= at the latest) 
Tp. IV, 114. gape at wldest, Tp. I, 1, 63. thon hast 
me at the worst, H5 V, 2, 250. I arn at the worst, Lr. 
IV, 1,,7. alrnost at fainting under the pleasing punish- 
ment, Err. I, 1, 46. at least, at last etc. er. least, last, 
etc. Especially in estimatiorr of priee and value: 
valued at the highest rate, Err. I, 1,24 (er. price, rate). 
I sit at ten pounds a week. Viv. I, 3, 8. at a few drops 
of womens' rheurn he sold the blood and labour of out 
great action, Cor. V, 6, 46. I do prlze it at rny love 
before the reverend'st thvat in Athens (= worth my 
love) Tire. V, 1 184. if rn.y love thon hold'st at aught. 
Hml. IV, 3, 60. what do you esteem it at? Cymb. 1, 4, 
85. bu.¢ ladies' flesh at a million a drarn, 147. 
speaking of m.y tongue, and I thlne, rnust be granted 
to be rnuch at one (= of the saine value), H5 V, 
_2.04. nothing is at a like goo&ess still Hml. IV, 7, 
117. 
2) Servlng to mark a point of rime: at that rime, 
Tp. l, ', 70. at zvhich time V, 4. at midnight, l, ,, 



ri2 

A 

et this hour IV ')63 at I[allowmas, Gcntl. Il, 1.27. l attd cawing at the gun's report, III, _'2, 22. ai his slght 
ai Pentecostl IV,'ï, 163. ai the day of judgment, Wiv. l away Ms fellows jïy, 24. Isho.uld be.mad ai it, Merch. 
II1 3 ")'»6 ai eighteen years, Err. I, 1 1"-)6. at three I V, 176. laugh ai me, make ther pasttme at my sorrow, 
o 71 at his departure, Gentl.l,4, 140. at my depart I burden the ocean foams, , ", - • " y - 
"' " • " ] • . " took some dis leasure ai hbn, 
or France H6B I 1, 2 etc. etc. men at some ttme sme Cmb. 111, o, 55. '.P 
are nmsters ofthetr fates, Caes. I, 2, lo9 (--- thete s l'et. 1, o, .1 (ef.flla.d, a,,ff etc/etc..). ... 
.l|alat|a tlle uauglter or daSlll$ SWIII III rullo 

a time when ...). 
Hcnce  on occasion of: ai the nmrriage o.[ 
the king's daughter Tp.ll, 1,69.97. to sing ai a man's 
Jimeral, 1I, 2, 46. either at.flesh ordïsh, En'. 11I, 1, 22. 
lost ai a gaine of tick-tack Meas. 1:2 t 196. wbt a lad?] 
at leap-frog H5 V, 2, 142. atfast and loose Ant. IV 
12, 28. ai an earthquake, All's I 3, 91. at requb'ing 
Tp. II, 2 186. at l)ick'd leisure, V 247. at thy request 
11I 2,128. Gentl. 11, 1,132. ai thy hes G Tp. IV 65. at my 
command, V, 4. arrest hlm ai m!! suit, Er». IV, 1, 69. 
at your important letters V, 135. cf. pleasure, leisure, 
control etc. See also : at a burden, Err. V, 348. Wint. 
IV, 4, 267. at a bb'th, Oth. 11 3,212. at a mouthful, 
l'er. 11, 1, 05. 
Again  o c c u p i e d w i t h : at praders Tp. 1, 
1, 57. ai pla!! V, 185. at supper Gentl. II, 1, 46, etc. 
etc. hard at study, Tp. II!, 1 20. he thb&s he still 
rit Ms instrument, Ces. IV, 3 293. at blow and tl, rust 
Oth. II, 3 238. he's ai it ttotv, Wint. 111, 3 109. they 
are ai if ( fighting), Troil. V, 3, 95. he is armed 
and ai it, V, 5, 36. 7, 10. O they are at it Cr. I 4, 
21. a certain convocation of politic worms are e'en ai 
hbn, IIml. IV 3, -o2. (Ai ebb, ai gaze, at a guard, at 
test, v. ebb etc.). From this use the following pro- 
ceeded: a doq at all tMngs, Gentl. IV: 4, 14. I art ill 
at reckonbtg, LLL 1» 2: 42. good at such eruptiotts, V, 
1,120. the very best at a beast (i. e. to represent a 
beast) Mids. V,-032. as good ai atty thing, As V, 4, 
110. I ara dog at a catch, Tw. II, 3, 64. the eur is 
excellent at faults, II, 5 140. you're powerful at it, 
Wint. 11, 1, 28. /ou are the better ai proverbs, H5 11I: 
7, 131. /ott were ever good ai suddett commendations, 
II8 V, 3,122. I ara ill at thes¢ numbers, IIml. 11, 2, 
120. more tight ai this thatt thon, Ant. IV, 4, 15. 
As coincidence of time naturally snggests the 
idea of eausality, at precedes that whieh causes any 
affection : at his look she flatl/ falleth down Ven. 463. 
she trembles ai hls tale, 591. ban 9 their heads ai this 
disdain, Lucr.521. ai hls owtt shadow let the thief 
mad 997. wh quiverest thon at this decree? 1030. 
spread theb" leaves at the sun's eye, Sonn. 25, 6. ai a 
frown the/ in their 91oral die, 25, 8. they morners seem 
at such as . . . 127 10. tremble at thy din Tp. I, 2, 
371. mount thdr pricks at mj footfall, 11 2, 12. do hot 
stalle at me lV, 9. to weep ai what I ara 91ad of 111 
1, 74. my rejolcn 9 ai nothbg can be more, 111, 1, 
at which they prick'd their ears, IV, 176. at which 
nose is in 9reat btdignation IV, 199. admire ai this 
encounter V, 154 (cf. to wonder), this passion at his 
name Gentl. I, 2, 16. 'ris love you cavil at, I, 1 38. 
u.'hen .you chid ai Sit" Proteus, 1I 1» 78. wept herself 
blind ai m.y parting, II, 3 14. railed at me 111 2, 4. 
takes exceptions ai /otr person V¢2, 3. shrleked ai 
it, Wiv. 1 1,309. make sport ai me 111 3, 160. merry 
ai an# thing, Mens. 1II, 2, 250. laugh at it, LLL IV, 3, 
148. better fo weep at joy than to joy at weeping, Ado 
I 1 28. grew civil at ber son9, Mids. I1 1: 152. rising 

ning and to be won only by one who excelled her: 
--'s better part, As !11 2, 155 (i. e. ber beauty and 
chastity, without ber eruelty), ruade of--'s heels, 294. 
tte, the goddess of misehief: /ou shall jïnd ber 
the bfernal A. in good apparel, Ado 11, 1, 263. more 
--s, more --si stir them on! LLL V, 2, 694. an A., 
stirring hlm to blood and strife, John II, 63. A. b 
side corne hot from hell, Caes. III, 1,271. 
|ltetlat, subst, a native of Athens: Mids. Il, 
67. III, 2, 36. 41. Tire. !, 1, 183. 192. 2, 35 etc. Lr. 
lll 4, 185. 
.,thenia**, adj. pertaining to Athcns: Mids. !, 1, 
12. 162. Il, 1, _'260. 264. 2, 73. III, 2, 10. 39. IV, 1, 
70 etc. Troil. Prol. 6. Tire. pazsim. 
l|hens, town ofGreece: Mids. I, 1,41. 119. 159. 
205. 2,5. 11,2,71. 111,2,26. 315. lV, l,72etc. Troil. 
Prol. 3. Tire. I, 1, 39. Il, 2, 17. III, 1, 11. 5, 101, etc. 
Ant. III, 1, 35. 12, 15. 
tlhol a Scotch county: Earl of A., tI4A I, 
1.72. 
.fibre-art, prep., across, from side to side: 
lay his wreathed arms a. his loœing bosom, LLL IV,3, 
135. heave him a. the sea, H5 V Chor. 9. a. men's 
. noses, Rom. I, 4, 58 (only in the spurious Qt; other 
O. Edd. over), a. the lane, Cymb. V, 3, 18. -- A. the 
heart of Ms loyer, As 111, 4, 45 cf. across. Figura- 
tively: whatsoever cornes a. hls affection ( crosses 
his affection) Ado 11 2 æ 6. 
.tthtrart, adv., crossly, wrongly: quite a. 
goes all decorum, Meas. 1, 3, 30. aH a. there came a 
postfrom lVales, II4A I, 1, 36. 
Alla, (cf. Demi-Atlas), the giant supporting the 
hea.ens: thon art no A. for so great a welght, H6C 
1, 36. 
.,lomy, atom smallc»t particle of marrer: it is 
as easy to count --ies, As lll _'2, 245. e/es who shut 
their gares on --ies III, 5 13. a team of little --ies, 
Rom. I, 4 57. Mrs. Quickly uses it instead of ana- 
tomy: H4B V, 4, "" 
ltone. 1) trans, toreconeile: sittcewecannot 
a. you R2 I, 1 2o2. 1 would do much to a. them Oth. 
IV 1,244. the present need speaks to a. you, Ant. II 
2 102. dld a. my countryman and you Cymb. I, 4, 42. 
 to set at peace to put in accord: to a. 
,Iour fears with my more noble meaning, Tire. V, 4 58. 
2) intr. to agree, to be in eoneord: when 
earthly thbtgs ruade even a. together, As V 4 116. he 
and AtoEdits van no more a. than vlolentest contrariety 
Cor. IV 6 72. 
.¢/onement, reconeiliation: to make 
. between you, Wiv. I, 1, 33 (Evms" speeeh), iJ we do 
now make out a. well H4B IV, 1 221. to make a. be- 
twixt the Duke of Gloster and.our brothers R3 I, 3 36. 
ttrlms, one of the Pareae: H4B I1 4 213. 
ltlaeh, to seize: everT man a. the hand of his 
¢alr mistress» LLL IV, 3 375. France bath --ed our 



A 63 

»erc],ants" goods al .Bourdeaux, H8 I, 1, 95. ara 
self--ed witI wearb,ess, Tp. 111, 3, 5. weariness &«rst 
ot trace ed one of so Mgl blood H4B II, 2, 3. 
wortly Troilus be laoE ed witl tat wlffc lere 
passion dot express? Troil. V , 161 (i. e. bas he a 
touch a feeling of that etc.)  Especially  to ar- 
rest: Fil a. ou bÇ tlds officer» Err. lV, l, 6. 73. tat 
Is]wuldb« edln Epesus, 1V, 4, 6. Wint V 1 182. 
R2 Il, 3, 156. lI6A II, 4, 96. H8 I, l, 217. I, 2, 210. 
Cor. III, 1, 175. Rom. V, 3, 173. Oth. I, 2, 77. The 
cause of the arrest adjoined with fle prep. oJ: of ca- 
pital treason I . ou bol],, II4B IV, 2, 109 (cf. arres O. 
Attachment, arrest stop: slee ill t]mse 
pretty eÇes and 9fve as sort a. to ty senses as {»fants', 
Troil. lV, 2, 5 (cL arrest, Soins. 74, 1. Lucr. 1780. 
I[ml. V, 2, 348). 
• lain, to reach, compass, gain; 1) trans.: 
ere e a. Ms easeful western bed, H6C V, 3, 6. but we 
e oce s te upmost round, Caes. Il, l, 24. to a. 
]wur. V, 5, 42. if opportun{tç and £umblest suit cannot 
a. {t, Wiv. III, 4,  1. conld ]ave --ed te effect ofyonr 
vwn pmTose , Mens. Il, l, 13. ere Ms yont] ed a 
beard, Mids. II, l, 95. Merch. II, l, 37. R2 II, 3, 64. 
I[4B IV, 4 71. H6B I, 4, 74. Cor. 1, l, 69. Cymb. 
v, 5, 184. 
) followed by to: tœel t],ey a. to teir ab£orred 
ends, All's IV, 3, 27. wMc te gods grant t],ee to a. 
to,. Tire. 1V. 3, 330. nore glory tl, an Oclavius sall a. 
mto, Caes. V, 5, 38. 
Afainder. a staining, soil: stands in a. of 
e?ernal sae, LLL I, 1, 158. ave nbe onour soile 
wit te a. qf Ms slauderous lips, Rœ IV, 24. e lived 
j)'om all a. qf suspect, 3 III, 5, 32. I]cncc  dis- 
grace: K{ldare's a. It8 II, l, 41. 
• ffain rb, to t'iut disracc- a slor f 
.  . «   .  oj 
faults concee ed, werein I am ed, Soun. 88, 7. wleu 
Hme wit ase dod t£em a. Pilgr. 344. stand'st not 
ed corrupted and exemptJom anciet çet? H6A 
II, 4. 92. Partie. attalnt instead of attinted: 8ou are 
a. wltl .]meSs ad peffurÇ, LLL V, 2, 829. 
2) to impair, infect: m 8 tender 8out wes 
ever t e. witl atÇ lmssion qf iqflaming loz,e, II6A 
V, 5, 81 (atteint for attabed), eL Taint, vb. I. 
3) to conviet of eapitai treason: mSJàter 
wes «tteced ot ed, II6A II, 4 96. I muet o[ed 
belote I be --ed II6B Il, 4, 59. 
Ain, subst., 1) staiu, spot. disgraee: 
Idm tat. is as clear from tMs a. of »dne, Luer. 825. 
I will hot poison tee wit m 8 a. 1072. eS"st witout 
e. o'erlook te dedlceted words, Sonn. 82 . wlat 
simple tlfff brass of Ms own e.? Err. 111» 2, 16. tere 
is no men letl a fb-tue tet e at£ ot a çlbnpse 
or a 8 »mu en a. but le cerHes some stein of lt, Troil. 
l. Y. 6. 
2) i u fo c t i o n, i m p a i r m e n t: e marrow-eatin5 
sickness wlwse a. disorder breeds Vert. 741. but fresl 8 
looks and overbears a. wltA ceed semblance H5 IV 
Chor. 39. 
3) convietion impeaehment: I arrest tlee 
on capital treaso, and in dffne a. tis gilded se7et 
Lr. V, 3, 83 (f. arres O. 
_ ainture, d i s g r a c e : fier a. will be Ilumlres' 
f«6 H6B I, , 06. 
Aas, to reprove, to blame (cf. tesk): 8ou 
are muc more ed for want of wisdom tlan praised 
for ar»oEu/»ffhlns, Lr. I, 4, 366 (f et task). 

Atte.npt, vb., 1) absolutely = to make an 
effort: out doubts are traitors and rnake us lose tle 
good we off »ffg/tt win by fearb,g to a. Mens. I, 4, 79. 
2) trans., a) followed by an accus., a)= to 
tempt, to try to win or snbdue: e willnever 
a. us alain, Wiv. 1V, 2, 226. tlat neither y coat» 
tefritÇ, nor persuasion can with ee a. ou, Mens. lV, 
2, 205. of force I ust a. ou further Merch. IV, l, 
421. for Mm inf who was seoEsub&ted, Lr. II, 2, 129. 
this man of thine s ler lofe, Tire. I, l, 126. cf. how 
can tlmt be truc love wMclt is fael ed? LLL I, 
2, 177. 
) to nndertake, to eudeavour to per- 
form: l'Il venfe thy deatlt or die renowned by ing 
#, H6C 11, 1, 88. never a. any tMng on Mm» I18 111, 
1 . I ave d and led onr wars, Cor. V, 6, 75. Rom. 
Il, 2, 68. Caes. V, 3, 40. Oth. III, 4, 22. V, 9, 255. 
Cb. I, 4, 123. Per. V, l 175. 
b) followcd by an inf.: and eiter hot a. to coose, 
Merch. II, 1, 39. 
Attcmp, l) enterprise, uudertaking: I 
sec wlmt crosses » a. will bring Lucr. 491. glve over 
tMs a. As I, 2, 190. a man ma stagçer in tMs a. III, 
3, 49. impossible be stranye --s to tose tat weiglt 
t£elr pabs b sense» AIl's I, 1, 239. 1, 3, 260. III 
71. 5Iercll. IV, 1, 350. Tw. I11, 2 31. R3 11I, 5, 49. 
Cor. V, 3 146. Tit. 111, 1, 50. Oth. IV, 2, 245. Oppo- 
sed to a performcd deed: te a. and hot te deed con- 
rounds ts Mcb. II 2, 11. Especially a warlike enter- 
pri.e:,, I will not return till m a. so much be glored 
John V, 2, 111. II4A 1V, 1, 61. II4B IV, 1, 15. 1V 2, 
45. It6A II, 5, 79. tI6C 1V 2, 26. R3 IV 4» 236 
success). 398 (Ff affairs). V, 8, 265. Mcb. III, 6, 89. 
Oth. I, 3, 29. Figuratit-ely: tMs a. I ara soldier to, 
Çynlb. II1» 4, 186. An attack on the chastity of a wo- 
man: &e ntaid will I fi'ame and nake fit Jbr Ms a. 
Mens. Iil, 1 267. Cymb. I, 4, 126. 128. Sec also 
Lucr. 491. 
2) pursuit: suc)t low desires, suc poor, such 
bare such lewd, suc mean --s, H4A III, 2 13. one 
tcorporate to our --s, Caes. I, 3, 136. 
Attentptibl e, (most M. Edd. attemptable), 1 i ab 1 c 
to an attempt, scducible: less a. tltan an tlze 
rarest qfour ladies, Cymb. I, 4» 65. 
Attend, 1) abçolutely  a) to be ready for 
service, to be in waiting: te post --s, and se 
delivers it, Lucr. 1333. at te deaner wlere a priest 
--s XViv. IV, 6, 31. wen te priest --s, Shr. 111, 2 5. 
e--et ere ard b, to kwu, yotr answer, Merch. 
IV 1, 145. All's V, 3 135. R2 II1 3, 176. H8 V, 
19. Tire. I, 1 7. 114. trip, Au&'e In, I a. As V 1, 
68 (i. e. I wait on you, I accompany you). se an 
--btg star, LLL IV, 8,281 (i. e. bound to service, sub- 
servient to ber). t/ds lè is wbler tan --ing for a 
ceck (i. e. doing service) Cymb. 111, 3 22. we will 
fear no poison, wMch --s in place of grenier state, 
Cymb. 111 3 77 (i. e. which is prescrit to do service). 
b) =to be attentive, to listen: tou 
hot, Tp. I, 2, 87. sall I ll ou a tiy HWa. LLL 
V, 1, 153. a. and »mrk, Mids. IV, 1, 98. H4A I, 
235. 111 1 228. IlS I 1, 158. Cor. I, 9, 4. Rom. II 
2 167. 
2) followed by to  to listen to: mbe ears 
tlmt to our wanton tal/: --ed Ven. 809. we will a. to 
eiter John V, 2, 163. our grace --ed to teir 
gared words, R3 II1 1, 13. 



64 A 

3) followed by on or upon, a) -- to wait on, 
to serve: the goddess on whom these airs a. Tp. l, 
2, 422. we'll both a. upon .your lad.9ship, Gentl. Il, 4, 
121. let .your will a. on the{r accords, Err. 11, 1» 25. 
llids. 111, 1, 160. Merch. I, 1, 68. As III, 4, 36. Shr. 
Ind. 2, 35. III, 2, '2.25. John III, 3,72; cf. R21,3» 169. 
Iq6B V, 1, 80. 13 1, 3, 294. Oth. I, 1, 51. l'er. V, 3, 
101. tarry I here, I but a. on deat, Gentl. 111» 1» 186 
(i. e. I pay my court to death, instead of payiag it to 
Silvia). 
b) to wait on, to show respect and dnty: 
mortal looks adore his beaut.9 still» --ing on his golden 
pilgrlraage, 8onn. 7, 8. upon a wooden cqffin we a. 
I-I6A I, 1, 19. will a. on ber, II, 2, 52. I will a. upon 
.our lordship" s leisure, V, 1, 55. the soleran feast shall 
raore a. upon the combg space» All's II» 3, 188 (shall 
graee the future time). 
c) to watt on, to aceompany: sorrow on 
love hereafter shall a. Ven. 1136. fair thoughts and 
happy hours a. on.ott! Mereh. IlI» 4» 41. to appoint 
who should a. on him, 1-I8 I» 1, 75. ail fears --ing on 
so dire a project, Troil. II, 2» 134. a. upon Cominius 
to these wars, Cor. I, 1, '2,41. let thy wife a. on ber» Oth. 
I 8, 297. I must a. on Caesar, Ant. V, 2, 206. --ed 
on b.y vmmj a lord and knight, Per. IV, 4, 11. 
4) transitively; a to regard with attention, 
to take notice of, to witness: could hot with 
graceful e.,es a. those wars, Ant. II» 2» 60. Especially 
to listen to: will tie the hearers to a. each line, 
Lucr. 818. which speechless woe of his poor she--eth, 
1674. now a. ve, 1682. to a. this double volte, Compl. 
3. too early I --ed a !louthful suit, 78. dost thon a. 
me? Tp. I, 2, 78. 453. Mereh. V, 103. Tw. I, 4, 7. 
tt4A I» 3» 210. tt6CII t 1» t68. Tit. V, 3, 79. Rom. 
Prol. 13. Rom. V, 3, 77. Cymb. I, 6, 142. Per. I, 
œee, 70. 
b) to guard, to watch: Ifear lam--edby 
sorae spies, Genfl. V, 1, 10. to a. the enperor's person 
carefulbJ, Tir. II, 2, 8. they are in a trunk» --ed by 
mg men» Cymb. I, 6,197. a. raff takbg ( are watching 
to take me, are in watt for me)» Lr. I1, 3, 5. 
e) to take tare of: a. your office, Wiv. V, 5, 
44. Ant. IV, 6, -07. I raust a. his najesty's conunand, 
All's I» 1»4. a. hls further pleasure» II,454. each bath 
his place and function to a. It6C I, 1, 173. 
d) to be about» to watt on: to a. mysons, 
Err. I, 1, 58. I will a. m husband be his nurse, V, 
98. to a. the emperor in is royal court, Gentl.l,3»27. 
and then I"ll presently a. you, 11, 4, 189. Mens. lit 2» 
160. III, 1» 160. As I¢-0, 177. IV, 1» 184. Lr. I» 1» 35. 
I would a. his leisure for a few words, Mcb. III» 2» 3. 
e) to do homage: he cannot want the best that 
shall a. his love» All's I, 1, 82. a. you here the door of 
out stern daughter? Cymb. 11, 3, 42. 

III, 7, 232. IV, 4, 195. H8 V, 5» 28. 12oto. 111, 3, 48. 
Meb. I, 5, 21. 
h) to wait for: 1 nust a. tme's leisure, Sonn. 
44, 1-0. one that--s .our ladyship's eoraraand, Gentl. 
1V» 3, 5. the dinner --s.,ou, Wiv. I, 1,279. Meas. IV, 
1, 57. Ado ¥, 4, 36. LLL II, 33.. V, 2,849. Shr. II 
169. All's II, 3, 57. Tw. 11I, 4, 243. Wint. I, 2, 178. 
R2 I, 3, 116. Iq4A IV, 3, 70. H4B I, 1, 3. tt6C IV, 6, 
82. R3 I, 2, 227. Cor. I, 1, 78. °49. I, lO, 30. Tim. 
I, 2, 160. III, 4, 37. Mcb. III, 1, 45. V, 4, 15. Ihnl. 
2, 205. Lr. 11, 1,127. Oth. I11,3, 281. Ant. III, 10, 
32. Cmb.IV»2»334. Cor. 11,2,164. III, I, 332. 2,138. 
i) to expect: a. ou wei9htier judgment, Tim. 
III, 5, 102. 
Attendance, 1) waiting, service: whal no 
a.? no regard? no duty? Shr. lV, 1, 1-°9. on !lour a., 
m!l lord, here. Tv. 1, 4, 11. 
2) presenee; net of waiting on one: watt 
a. till you hear further from rae, Tim. I, 1, 161 (i. e. 
do not go away). To dance a. = to watt on one 
withont being adnfitted: I dance a. here, R3 11I. 7, 
56. Followed by on: I danced a. on hls will, H6B 
3, 174. to dance a. on their lordships' pleasures, IlS 
V, 2, 31. 
Atendanl, servant: here bave I few --s, Tp. 
V, 166. Err. 1» 1, 18. V, 150. Mids. II, 1, 21. As 
2, 5 (the ladies, ber --s of ber charaber). Shr. Ind. 1, 
40. All's I, 3, 258. Wint. 11, -0, 14. H6A lV, 2, 10. 
Caes. IV, 3, 156. Oth. IV, 3, 8. Cymb. II, 4» 124. IV. 
2, 132. Followed by on: latel!l a. on the Duke qf 
Norfolk, 123 I1, 1,101. -- In Mids. II» 1, .'21 ; Oth. IV, 
3» 8; Cymb. lV, 2, 13_ °, it may be also = com- 
panion. 
Attenl, attentive, heedfuh wlth an a. ear, 
Hml. I, 2, 193. Per. Ili Prol. 11. 
Attention, application of the mind to an 
object: Lncr. 1404. 1610. LLL I, 1,217. 1R2 II, 1, 6. 
H4B I, 2, 142. H8 Il» 4, 168. Cymb. V» 5» 117 (and 
lend ray best a.). 
Attentive, heedfnl: be a. Tp. 1,2, 38. Merch. 
V» 70. H6C I, 1, 122. Troil. I, 3» 252. Ant. I, 2, 20. 
Attentivenes, attention: how a. wounded lds 
daughter, Wint. v, , 94. 
Attest, vb. 1) to certify, testify: acontract 
qf eternal love, --ed by the holy close qf lips, Tw. V, 
161. a crooked'figure na.y a. in little place a nffllion, 
H5 Prol. 16 (i. e. may serve as a certificate for a 
million), now a. that those whom l/ou called fathers 
did beget .ou, H5 Ill, 1, 22 (i. e. certif.v it by your 
deeds). 
2) to call to witness: Ia. theGodsTroil.lI, 
2, 132. 
Attest, subst., testimony: an esperance so 
obstinatebj strong, that doth invert the a. of e.yes and 

f) to serve: let one a. hbn with a silver basin, ears, Troil. V, 2, 122 (Ff test). 
Shr. Ind. 1, 55. it is the curse of kin9s to be--ed b ' Attire, vb., to d ress:. --d in raourning .... habit, 
slaves, John IV, 2, 208. I an nwst dread.fulbj --ed, [ Lucr. Arg. 19. finely --d ,n a robe of whtte,  IV. I$, 
Hml. I b 9» 276. who --s us here? Per. I, 1, 150. [ 4, 72. 1 should blush to see.ou so --d (so meanly) 
g) to accompany: if Venus or ber son do now [ Wint. IV, 4, 13. to a. .ou for out journey, H6B II, 4, 
a. the queen, Tp. IV, 88. I will nwst willin91g a. .our [ 106. 109. --d in grave weeds, Tit. I11, 1, 43. wh# art 
ladyship» Tir. 1V, 1, 28. Merch. Ili, 4, "29. H6C IV, 2, [ thou thus d . V, 3, 30. Flgm atlvely" • " : uh,  rot" thou 
16 5 7 Hml 111,3,22. Ant. V, '2,, 367. Figuratively:l thus --d in dlscontent? Lucr. 1601. I ara so --d in 
the'se let's a. t'he time, Lncr. 330. lin9ering perdition I wonder» Ado 1V, 1, 146 (cf. wrap and enwrap). 
shall a..you and your ways, Tp. Ili, 3, 7.7. 9race and I Attire, subst., dr e s s: in poor and nean a. 
«oo« disposition «. your ladyship o, T,v. III, I, 147. John Il, 3, ol, 13. he bath :orae m,aningoln 
II, 3,35. IV, _0, 56. H511, 4, -9. I16BII, 3,3S. R3|2, 1.6. Tw.V,-57. H5 V, , 61. II6B I, 3, 133. 



A 65 

Caes. 1, 1, 53. Mcb. 1, 3, 40. Lr. III, 6, 85. Ant. IV, 
8, 14. Plural: l'll show thee sone--s, Ado 111,1,10, °. 
those --s are best, Rom. IV, 3, 1. fetch m.y best 
Ant. V, 2, 0.28. 
Attorney, substitute, proxy: and will bave 
no a. but myself, Err. V, 100. die by a. As IV, 1, 94. 
I, by a., bless thee from thy mother, R3 V, 3, 83. 
Especially one who is appointed to transact business 
for another, advocate, pleader: the heart's a. (sc. the 
tongue) Ven. 335. as fit as ten groats is for the hand 
of an a. All's Il, -0, _03. R. ° 11, 3, 134. II6A V, 3, 166. 
R3 IV, 4, 1°-7.413. his --s general  those who are 
appointcd by general authority for ail his affairs and 
suits, R2 Il, 1, 203. the king's a.  what is now 
called attorney-general: H8 11, 1, 15. 
Attorneyed, 1) performed by proxy: their 
encomters, though hot personal, bave been royall2/ a. 
with interchange o.fgifls, Wint. 1 1, 30. 
2) employed as an attorney: Iam stilla. 
at .your service, Meas. V, 390. 
Atorneyship, the office of a substitute, 
p r o x y s h i p : marriage is a marrer of more worth than 
fo be dealt in b.y a. H6A V, 5, 56.* 
Atrac., to draw to, to cause to approaeh: 
who (sc. the heart) in the cooEict that it holds with 
death --s the saine (sc. the blood), H6B III, 2, 165. 
In a moral senseto allure, invite: --s 
soul, Tw. 11, 4, 89. a. more e.yes, H4A I, 2, 238. 
Atra¢ion, the power of attracting: the 
sun's a thief, and with his great a. robs the vast sea, 
Tire. IV, 3, 439. the a. of mj good parts, Wiv. 11, 
109. ber sweet harmony and other chosen --s, Per. 
1, 46. 
Atlraclive, having the power of attract- 
ing: a. eyes, Mids. 11, 2, 91. here's metal more a. 
Hml. 111, 2, 117. 
Attribute, subst. 1) essential quality: his 
sceptre shows the force of temporal power, the a. fo 
awe and majesty, Merch. IV, 1, 191. it is an a. to God 
Mmself, 195. swear b.y God's great --s, All's IV, 
25. could you hot find out that by ber --s? Troil. 11I, 
1, 38 (i. e. by the epithets given to ber). 
2) reputation: much a. he bath, and much the 
reason wh.y we ascribe it fo hlm, Troil. I1, 3, 15. 
takes from out achievements the plth and marrow of 
out a. Hml. 1, 4, 22. unless you play the plous inno- 
cent and for an honest a. cr.y out: she dled b21 foul pla.y, 
Per. IV, 3, 18. 
Attribute, rb., to aseribe: the merit of service 
is seldom --d to the truc and exact performer, All's 
111, 6, 64. 
At/rib,ltion, p r ai s e: such a. should the l)ouglas 
have H4A IV 1, 3. 
Altribuliwe, ascribing excellent quali- 
ries, devoted: and the will dotes that is a. to what 
infecHousl. itself a.ffècts, without some image of the 
qff'ected merit Troil. II, 2, 58 (Ff. inclinable). 
A-twain, in two: breaking rings a. Compl. 
bite the holy cords a. Lr. lI 2, 80 (Qq in twain), shore 
is old thread a. Oth. V 2 206 (ouly in Q1; the other 
O. Edd. in twain). 
Aubrey: Lord A. Vere, H6C Ill 3, 102. 
t, uburn, probably = whitish, flaxen: heads 
some bvwn some black, some a. Cor. Il, 3, 21 
Abram). her haœe is a., nine is perfect yellow, Geutl. IV» 
4, 194(Florio, Ed. 1611 : Alburno, a fish called a Blaie 
Schmidt, $hakespeare Lexicon..q. Ed. T I. 

or Bleake. Also the white, the sappe or softest part 
of any timber subject fo worm-eating. Also that whi- 
tish colour of women's hair which we call an Albm-ne 
or Aburne colou 0. 
Audaciots, overbold, impudent: saucy and 
a. eloquence, Mids. V, 103. Wint. 11, 3, 42. H4A IV, 
3, 45. H6A 111, 1, 14. IV, 1, 124. H6B V, 1, 108. 
Taken hot exactly in a bad sense: .your reasons have 
been a. without impudency, LLL V, 1, 5 (the learned 
Sir lqathauiel's speech). 
Audaciously, boldly: durst hot ask of her a. 
Lucr. 1223. fear hot thou, but speak a. LLL V,2, 104. 
Audaeiy, boldness: k was defect of spb'k, 
i life and bold a. Lucr. 1346. wo would e'er snppose 
: they had such courage and a.? H6A I, 2, 36. arm me, 
'a.,from head tofoot, Cymb. I 6 19. 
Audible, 1) so as to be easily heard, loud; 
adverbially: the ver.y merc.y of the law cries ont nwst 
a. ]Ieas. V, 413. 
2) capable of hearlng, attentive, opposed 
to deaf: let me bave war ; it" s spritely walking, a., azd 
.full of vent. Peace is a ver.y apoplexj, nulled, deaf, 
sleepj, insensible Cor. IV, 5, 238. 
Audie.,ce. 1) hearing: thelr coplous storles 
oftentimes begun end without a. ( without being 
listened to) Vert. 846. llst to .your tribunes; a. ! peace, 
I say! Cor. 111, 3, 40..you yourselfhave ofyour a. been 
most free and bounteous, Hnd. I, 3, 93. call the noblest 
to the a. V, 2, 398. did glbe my missive out of a. Ant. 
11, _'2, 74. the queen of a. nor desb'e shall fail, 111, 1_0, 
21. to bave a.  to be hem'd: LLL V, 1, 140. As V, 
14, 157. Tw. I, 4, 18. John V, 2 119. toglve one a.  
to hear one: As 111 2,251. John 111, 3, 37. IV, 2, 139. 
H4A I 3, 11. Caes. 111, 2 2. IV, 2, 47. lending soft 
a. fo n.y sweet design, Compl. 278. vouchsafe me a. 
LLL V, 2, 313. Admittance to a sovereign: H5 I, 
1, 92. 11, 4, 67. Ant. 1, 4, 7. 11I, 6, 18 (in these two 
passages absolutely: to glve a.). Out a.  out being 
heard or admitted, H4B IV, 1, 76 (cf. .your a.  your 
hearing, Hml. I, 3, 93). A second day o] a. = a s e- 
cond eourt-day: Cor. Il, 1,81. 
2) Persons prescrit, witnesses: dismlssthis 
a. LLL IV, 3, _009. "ris meet that some more a. than a 
mother should o' erhear the speech, Hml. 11I, 3, 31. in 
this a.  before these witnesses, V, 2, 251. Especially 
the spectators in a playhouse: if an.y of the a. Mss, 
LLL V, 1, 145. let the a. look to thelr e.yes, Mids. I, 
2, 28. no a. are able to endure..., H8 V, 4, 65. Figu- 
ratively: the dignity of this act was worth the a. o.f 
kings and princes ( spectatorship) Wint. V, 2 87. 
mutes or a. fo this act, Hml. V, 2, 346. 
Audit, final aecount: when nature calls thee 
to be gone, what acceptable a. canst thou leave? Sonn. 
4, 12. when as thy love bath cast his utmost sure, call'd 
fo that a. by advlsed respects, 49, 4. 1"-'6, 11. and how 
his a. stands who knows save heaven? Uml. I11, 3, 8. 
if you will take this a., take thls life, Cymb. V, 4, 27. 
Account in geueral: to steal from spb'itual leisnre a 
briefspan to keep.your earthl:j a. H8 11I 2, 141. I van 
make my a. up, that all .from me do back receive the 
.flour of ail, and leave me but the bran, Cor. 1, 1, 148. 
to ma]ce their a. at.your highness' pleasure still fo return 
.your own, Mcb. I, 6, 27. fo .your a. cornes thefi" distract 
parcels in combined sums, Compl. 230. 
Auditor, 1) hearer, spectator of a play: 
a play toward! l'Il be an a. Mids. II1, 1 81. 
5 



66 A 

2) a person appointed to examine ac- 
counts: (f you suspect my husbandr..u or falsehood, 
call me before the exactest --s, Tim. Il, 2, 165. An 
officer of the exchequer: II4A II, 1, 63; cf. Il, 2, 57. 
.Inditory, assembly of hearcrs: then noble 
a., be it known to .you, "rit. V, 3, 96. 
.udre, diminutive of Etlleldreda: As III, 3, 1. 
2. 98. V, 1, 1. V, 3, 1 etc. 
A,fldiis, the general of the Volsci: Cor. l, l, 
233 etc. etc. Plural: six --es, V, 6, 130. 
.,ger, a carpcnter's tool to bore holes: 
your franchises confined bto an --'s bore, Cor. IV, 
6, 87. 
A,gcr-hole, hole ruade by an angcr: here, 
where out rare, hld b an a., may rush and seize us, 
Mcb. Il, 3, 128. 
hught, auy thing: Lucr. 546. Sonn. 38, 5. 
125, 1. Çonqd. 68. Tp. I, 2, 51. Gentl. III, 2, 47. V, 
4 20. Err. Il, 2, 179. 201. Ado V, 1, 292. LLL IV, 
3,354. V, 2, 803. Merch. Il, 2, 128. 7, 21. III, 2, 105. 
V, 183. Tw. V, 111. Wiut. I, 2, 395. John 11, 511. 
1-{2 II, 3. 73. V, 1, 35. H5 IV, 1, 263. H6A I, 5, 37. 
11,3,46. 111,1,4. II6B IV, 7, 74. R31,2,100. Il, 1, 
57. III, 1, 1(;6. Cor. I, 1,280. Il, 3, 205. Troil. 11, 2, 
52. 11I, 3, 57. Rom. Il, 3, 19. V, 3, 266. Mcb. I, 3, 42. 
Hml. I, 5, 86. IV, 3, 60. Lr. IV, 6, 49 etc. etc. I know 
but qf a slngle part, in a. pertai,s to the state, II8 I, 
2, 41. For a. I hnow -- fo my knowlcdge: A[l's V, 
3 281. R2 V, 2, 53. Oth. IH, 3, 104. Per. Il, 5, 78. 
for a. thou knowest, Tit. Il, I, 28. fo," a. he knew, John 
V,I,43. for a. Isee, Mcrch. I,2,5. Shr. I,2,33. II(;A 
I, 4, 68. fo; a. that I can tell, Mids. III, 2, 76. for a. 
,hot I could ever read Mids. I, l, 132. 
Augmcnt, rb. trans., to i n c r e a s e : make someth 
nothing by --ing if, Lucr. 154. As II, 1, 43. H5 V, 2, 
87. H6B lll, 1, 169. H6C V, 3,22. H8 1,1,145. Rom. 
I, 1, 138. Caes. II, 1, 30. Mcb. [I, 1» 27. Ant. III, 6, 55. 
ugmentation, addition: more lines than is 
in te new map with the a. of the Indies» Tw. III, 2,85. 
.¢ugre, v. Auget. 
.iugur, subst., pro phet: the sad--s mock thelr 
own presage, Sonn. 107, 6. shrieking harbinger a. of 
the fever's end, Phoen. 7. 
lug,r, rb., to prophesy: my--inghopes«ys 
it will corne to the full, Aut. II, 1, 10. 
lgure (most M. Edd. augurs), augur or au- 
gury? --s and understood relations have b..u znagot- 
pies and choughs and rooks brought forth the secret'st 
man of blood» lIcb. III, 4, 124. 
lgurer, soothsayer in anclent Rome: the a. relis 
me, Cor. II, 1 1. the persuasion ofhis --s, Caes. lI, 1 
200. ,fie--s, ....plucking the entrails of aa oJerlng 
for,h, Il, 2,37. swallows bave built iu Cleopatra" s sails 
thelr ests: ,fie --s say they know ot, An,. IV, 12, 4 
(O. Edd. auguries). .ou are too sure an a. V, 2, 337. 
lgury, art of prophesying: ifmY a. de- 
ceive me no,, Gentl. IV, 4, 73. we defj a. Hml. V 2, 
230. the --ies sa.y, Ant. IV, 12, 4 (M. Edd. augurers). 
lngust, the eighth month of the year: Tp. IV 
134. H6A I, 1, 110. 
Augustus, the first Roman emperor: Cymb. ll, I 
4, 11. Ill, 1, 1 (A. Caesar). 63. V, 5, 82. 
luid, vulgar form for old: take ,bine a. cloak 
e«bout thee, Oth. II, 3, 99. 
lumerle, son to the Duke of York in R2 I, 3, 
1. 64. 4, 1. Il, 3, 125 etc 

P, unl, a fathcr or mother's sis,er: 
IV, 2, 77. 178. Mids. 1, 1,157. R2 V, 3, 76.92. 111. 
129. H4A III, 1,196. H6B I, 3, 146. H6C Il, 1,146. 
R3 Il, 2, 62. 1V, 4, 283. 118 I, 1, 176. Troil. Il, 2, 77. 
80. IV, 5, 134. Tit. III, 2, 47. IV 1, 1.4. 5. their a. 
I ara in law (i. e. by marriage) R3 IV, 1,24. The name 
adjoined with of: ber kbd a. of Gloster, R3 IV, 1, 2. 
Term for an old gossip: the wisest a, telling the 
saddest tale, Mids. ]1, 1, 51. for a loose woman: 
summer songs .for me and ». --s, while we lie tumblin 9 
in the hay, Wïnt. IV, 3, 11. 
unt-mother, uncertain whetber to be called 
aunt or mother, being both: Hnd. II, 2, 394. 
.uri¢liar, got by hearing: and by an a 
assurance bave your satisfaction, Lr. I, 2, 99. 
urora, thc Goddess of the morning: Mids. II[, 
2, 380. Rom. I, 1, 142. 
uspiçious, 1) favourable, propitious; 
always applicd to higher powcrs: stand a. to the hour 
Lucr. 347. my zenith doth depend upon a most a. star, 
Tp. I, 2, 182. a. gales, V, 314. fortue play upon 
prosperous helm as ty a. mistress, All's III, 3, 8. 0 
lad. Fortune, stand you a. Wint. IV, 4, 52. conjuring 
the moon to stand a. mistress, Lr. Il, 1.42. 
2) showing joy, happy: with an a. and a 
dropping eye, thul. I, 2, 11. 
lustere, severc, rigid, stern: this a. in- 
sociable life, LLL V, _'2, 809. with most a. sanctimon., 
All's IV, 3, 59. an a. regard ofcontrol Tw. Il, 5, 73. 
of grave and a. quallty, Tire. I, 1, 54. 
luserely, severely: if l have too a. p»ished 
you, Tp. IV, 1, 1. Singular use: might'st thou percei,e 
a. in his eye ,fiat he did plead in earnest. Err. IV, 2, 
2. This seems to mean: couldst thou perceive, by a 
very grave and severe expression of his eye that he 
was in earnest? 
.*,sereness, strictness, severity: the a. of 
my life, Meas. Il, 4, 155. 
lusteriy, the samc: a. and single lire, Mids. I, 
1, 90.*with such a. as 'longeth to a fa,ber, Shr. IV, 4, 
7. with the saine a. and garb as he cantrolled the war, 
Cor. IV, 7, 44. 
ustria - the duke of Austn-ia: out cousin A. 
All's l, 2, 5. brave A. John II, 1. 414. III, 
lutheie, of acknowledged authority: 
a. in .our place and person, Wïv. Il, 2, 235. all ,fie 
learned and a. fellows, All's II, 3, 14. how could ... 
crowns, sceptres, laurels, but by degree, stand in 
place . Troil. I, 3, 108. yet af, er all comparisons of 
truth, as truth's a. au,hot to be cited, 'As ,rue as 
Troilus' shall crown up the verse III, 2 189. 
l,t|hor, 1) he or she who first causes 
or creates any thing: he's a. ofth. Mander, Vert. 
1006. thou (sc. Lucrece), the a. of theb" obloquy. Lucr. 
' 523. 1244. Ado V, 2, 101. LLL IV, 3, 359. Tw. V, 
i361. R21,3,69. H6CIV, 6,18. H811,1139. Cor. 
V, 3, 36. Hml. IV, 5, 80. the Gods of lome forefend 
I should be a. to dishonour 3fou, Tit. I, 435. truth's 
authentic a. Troil. III, 2, 189 (he that is the source 
and prototype of fidelity). 
Applied to things,  cause: 3fou may call the 
business of the mas,er the a. of the servant's damnation, 
II5 IV, 1 162. that which is the strength qf theb" amity 
shall prove the immedlate a. of their variance, Ant. II, 
6 138. 
2) wrltet: where is any a. b the world, LLL IV, 



A 67 

3, 312. politie --s, Tw. 1I, 5, 175. our humble a. II4B 
V, 5. 143. the5" own --s affirm, H5 I, 2, 43. our bend- 
5 9 a. bath pursued the story, II5 Epil. 2. hot in confi- 
dence qf --'s pen, Troih Prol. 24. at the --'s drift, 
Troil. Iii, 3, 113. Hinl. 1I, 2, 464. Per. Prol. 20. 
Auhoriy, 1) legal and offieial power: 
art ruade tongue-tied by a. Sonn. 66, 9. use your a. 
ŒEp. 1, 1, 26. thus van the demi-9od A. make us pal, 
Meas. 1, 2, 124. I, 4, 56. Il, 2, 118. 134. IV, 2, 114. 
IV, 4, 29. Mereh. Iii, 2, 291. IV, 1, 215. Vint. I, 2, 
463. il, 1, 53. John 11, 113. III, 1, 160. V, 1,4. H4B 
IV, 2,58. V,2, 82. V, 3, 116. II6A V, 1,59. V, 4, 135. 
H6C 1, 2,24 (followed by over). II8 ll, 4, 4. V, 3, 35. 
Cor. III, 1 23. 208. ŒEiin. V, 1, 166. Lr. l, 1,308. 
6, 163. Ant. Il, 2, 49. Il, 6, 100. IIl 6, 33. fil, 13, 90. 
Per.lV, 6,96. Intheplnral: a)-legal powers, 
lodged iii different pel'sons: when two--les are 
neither supreme, Cor. III, I, 109. b) the several 
attribtttes of power: redeliver our --les there, 
Meas. IV. 4, 6. so it must fall out fo him or or --les, 
Cor. il, 1, 260. soaks up the kh9"s eountenance, his 
rewards, hls--les, tIInl. IV, 2, 17. would manetge those 
--les that he bath 91ven awag, Lr. I, 3, 17. 
Abstraetum pro eonereto: what a. sm:feits on 
would relleve us, Cor. 1, 1, 16 (i. e. those in office and 
power). 
2) Power in general: there is no fetterin 9 of 
a. Ails Il, 3, 252. he seems to be of 9rèat a., and 
though a. be a stubborn bear ... Vint. IV, 4, 830. the 
power and corrigible a. of this lies in out wills, Oth. 
I, 3, 329. cf. John IV, 2, 211. It6A V, 1, 18. 5, 41. 
H6B ill, 1,316. 
3) Justification, cottntenance, warrant: 
thfeves for their robbevg bave a. when judges steal 
themselves, Meas. Il, 2, 176. wilt thon be 91ass wherein 
it shetll dlseern a. for sin? Ltter. 620. words eannot 
earr.y a. so weightff, H8 111, 2, 234. gea, 'gabtst the a. 
o.f nanners, praged gon fo hold gour hand more dose, 
Tiin. lI, 2, 147. b.y his et. All's IV, 5, 68. Lr. I1, 1, 62. 
4) that whieh is elailned in support of 
opinions or Ineasures: small bave contbntetl plodders 
ever won save herse a. ri'oto others" books, LLL I, 1, 
87. more et., naine more 1, 2, 70. O, some a. how to 
proeeed, IV, 3, 287. mg hope, whereto thg speeeh serres 
.[or a. ŒEw. I, 2, 20. bl-fold a., Troil. V, 2, 144. have 
studied phgsie, through whieh art, b turnin 9 o'er --ies, 
Per. III, 2, 33. 
5) dignity, nobleness, majesty: O, what 
c. and show of truth van eunnin 9 sin voyer itself wlthal! 
Ado IV, 1, 36. that whleh 1 would faln eall toaster. 
IVhat's that? Authorltg. Lr. 1,4, 32. one that, in the 
a. of ber merlt, dld justl.y put on the voueh of ver 
malice itself Oth. Il, 1 147. 
.uthovize, 1) to justify: --b, 9 thg trespass 
wlth compta'e, Sonn. 35, 6. his rudeness so with hls 
--d gouth did liver.y falseness in a pride of o'uth, 
Compl. 104. 
2) to aeeredit: a woman's storg ett a wlntev's 
tire, --d bg her 9randam, Meb. III, 4, 66. 
Autolyeus, naine of the vagabond in Wint. IV, 
3, 24. 107 (cf. Hoin. Od. XlX, 394). 
.,ll|tllllll. the season between summer and win- 
ter: Sonn. 97, 6. 104, 5. Mids. II, 1, 112. Mcrch. I, 
3, $2. Shr. I, 2, 96. H6C V, 7, 3. Troil. 1, 2, 139. Lr. 
IV, 6, 201 (lmjbg --'s dust). Ant. V, 2, 87 (O. Edd. 
Anthon). 

Autergne; Countess qf A.: H6A II, 2, 38 (O. 
Edd. Ouoyne and Aue»yne). 
ail, rb.» 1) absolutely --- to be of use and 
advantage: which fo deng concerns more than--s 
Vfint. Iii, 2, 87. slnce arms et. hot now that Henry "s 
deetd, H6A 1, 1, 47. 
2) followed by out of, = to profit by: but how 
out of this cern she a.?lIeas. Iil, 1,243. 
3) transitively, = to bencfit, to be profit- 
able to: it small --s n.y mood, Lucr. 1273. now 
will it best a. .your majest.y to cross the seets, H6A III, 
1, 179. 
çail, subst., interest, profit: as heaven shall 
work in me for thine a. All's 1, 3, 190. when better 
fall,.for gour --s theg fell, Ili, 1, 22. 
l-aiee, eovetousnss: Meb. IV, 3, 78.84. 
larieis, eovetous: Meb. IV, 3, 58. 
Aaun«, exel,'mmtion of eontempt or of abhor- 
renee, ttttered to drive one iway: ehildish fear, a.! 
Luer. 9,74. rognes , henee, a.! Wiv. I, 3, 90. a., thon 
witeh! Err. 1V, 3, 80. LLL V, 2, 298. John IV, 3, 77. 
H4B1, 2,103. II5III, 2,21. IIbAV. 4,21. R31, 2, 
46. ŒEit. I, 283. Meb. Iii, 4, 93. Lr. Iii, 6, 68. Oth. 
iii, 3, 335. IV, 1, 271. Ant. iV, 12, 30. Per. IV, 
6, 126. 
8ubstantively: to 9ire ber the a.  to send ber 
paeking, II8 Il, 3, 10. 
.e, subst., reverentlal salutation: ther loud ap- 
pletuse and --s vehement, Me. 1, 1, 7 1. 
A-e-lary, a partictdar prayer with thc Roman 
Catholics, whose chaplets are dirided into a certain 
Intmber of Ave-Maries and Paternosters: to number 
lies ol2 his beads, II6B I, 3, 59. numberin 9 out --les 
with ont beads, tt6C il, 1, 162. 
.-enge, to revenge: re»nember fo «. me on the 
French, H6A I, 4, 94. shall I hot live to be id on 
ber? tI6B 1, 3, 85. and be id on cursed Tamora, 
Tit. V» 1, 16. till C.aesar's three and thirtj wounds be 
well --d, Caes. V, 1, 54. Used of divine retribution : 
0 God! if thon wilt be --d on mg misdeeds, R3 1, 
4, 70. f God will be --d for this deed, 221 (Qq 
reven9ed ). 
ver, to allege: --bt 9 notes of chamber-han 9- 
in9 pictures, Cymb. V, 5, 203. 
,erdupisç v. Avob'dupols. 
-ert, to turn: to a. gour likbt 9 a more worthler 
wag than on a wretch, Lr. I, 1,214. 
._çisetl i I etdvised (q. v.): be a. and petss 9ood 
humours, Viv. I, 1, 169 (i. e. yield to reason). Are 
gon a. o' that?  how came you by that wisdom? 
Wiv. I, 4, 106. art a. o' that? Meas. I1, 2, 132. 
titl, 1) trans. a) to shun, to endeavour 
hot to meet: that you ml9ht a. hbn, if gon saw 
him, Viv. II, 2, 289. the fashlon of the world is to 
a. cost, Ado I 1, 98. 11, 3, 198. V, 1, 270. LLL IV, 
3, 264. As II, 5 35. ŒEw. 111, 4» 338. Vint. I, 2 433. 
John 1, 215. R2 I, 3, 241. 11, 1,264. II4A V, 5, 13. 
H4B IV, 5» 209. H5 i1I, 3, 42. H6C II, 2, 137. II, 6ç 
66. 1V 6, 28. V, 4, 37. R3 III, 5 68. III, 7, 151. IV 
4, 218. 410. 411. Ces. I, 2, 200. 1I, 2, 26. lIcb. 11, 
3, 149. V, 8, 4. Hinl. I, 1, 134. III, 2, 16. III, 4 150. 
Lr. I, 1,126. Cymb. 1, 1,140. 
b) to leare, quit: a. the9allerj, H8 V 1,86. 
a. the bouse, Cor. lV 5, 25. 
c) to let rid of: whett I mn I cannot a. Wiv. 
11I, 5, 152. I will no lonqer endure if, thou9h let [ 
5* 



68 

A 

lcnow no wise remed?] how to a. if, As I, 1, 27. how 
vm. I a. tlge wfe I chose? Troil. Il, 2, 65. 
d) in pleading» to evade thc allegation of the 
other party by setting np some new matter: as the 
marrer now stands, ne will a. l]our accusation: he ruade 
trial of !Aou only, Meas. II1, 1,201. all these l]ou ma!] 
a. but the Lie l)irect, and l]ou mal] a. that too with 
an If, As ¥, 4, 102. 
2) intr. to withdraw, depart: let usa. Wint. 
I, 2, 462. here's no place for l]ou ; prag l]ou, a. Cor. 
I¥» 5, 34. Imperatively, - be gone, avaunt: a.! no 
more! Tp. IV, 142. Satan» a.! Err. I¥,3,48.66. H6B 
l, 4» 43. Ant. ¥, 2, 242. Cymb. l, 1,125. 
Aoirdupois (Q Ff haber-de-pois)» weight: the 
weight of a hair will turn the scales between their a. 
II4B Il» 4» 277. 
Avouela, rb, 1) to assert, maintain: fo 
make trial qf that which everl] one had belote --ed, 
Lucr. ,n, rg. 9. I speak and I a. Wiv. Il, 1, 138. this 
--es the shepherd's son, Wint. ¥, 2, 69. if this wldch 
he --es does appear, Mcb. V, 5, 47. will proue what 
is --ed there, Lr. ¥, 1, 44. 
2) opposed to disavow  to own, to acknow- 
ledge, to answer for, to make good: l]ou 
will think l]ou have ruade no qence, if the duke a. tlge 
justice of l]our dealb»9? Meas. IV, 2, 200. then »l] 
account I well anal] 9ive, and in the stocks a. if, Wint. 
IV» 3, 22. l'll a. it to his head Mids. 1, 1, 106. date 
hot a. in l]our deeds anl] of l]our words, H5 ¥» 1, 77. 
a. the thoughls of l]our heart with the looks of an em- 
press, H5 V, 2, 253. what I fraye said I will a. in pre- 
sence of the kin 9, R3 1, 3, 115. if l]ou'll a. 'twas wls- 
dom Paris wett, Troil. 11, 2, 84. though I could with 
barefaced power sweep hbn from raff si9ht and bid ny 
will a. it Mcb. fil, 1» 120. is this well spoken? I date 
a. it Lr. Il, 4, 240. 
Aoueh, subst., avowal, acknowlcdgment: 
I mi9ht hot thls believe without tlge ,sensible and truc et. 
of mine own ci]es, Hml. l, 1, 57. 
Avouehmel|, uscd by Flucllcn instead of the 
verb to avouch» H5 I¥, 8, 38. 
A-ow, 1) to naintain» to assert: of which 

i.e. begin to be severe, Cor. II1, 1, 98. a. God's gentle- 
sleeping peace, R3 I, 3,288, i. e. stir wars and strife. 
(cf. to wake our peace, R2 I, 3, 132; we will hot wake 
l]our patience» Ado V, 1, 102). To awake one to sth. : 
--s my heart to heart' s and eye's delight, Sonn. 47, 14. 
2) intrans, a) to cease to sleep, to break 
from sleep: a., thou Roman dame, Lucr. 1628. Tp. 
1, 2,305. Il» 1» 305. 308. IV, 232. Wiv. III, 5, 142. 
Meas. IV» 3» 32. 34. Mids. I1» 2, 82. 111, 2, 117. 1V, 
71. As IV, 3, 133. Shr. I, 1» 183. R2 V, 1» 19. H4B 
111, 1, 25. II6A I» 1, 78. R3 I, 4, 42. V» 3,144. Troil. 
1V» 5, 115 (a. thee  a. thou, not-- a. thyself). Rom. 
IV, 1, 106. V, 3, -958 (Q2 awakenlng). Ant. IV, 9, 28. 
they bave --dr Mcb. I1, 2 10. be --d, Mids. Ill, 2, 1. 
H4B V, 5, 55. 
b) to be awake, to watch, hot to sleep: 
such as l]ou nourish the cause of his --ing (i.e. hindcr 
him from sleeping) Wint. Il, 3, 36. 
-alte, adv., hOt sleeping, in a state of 
vigilance: if is m.ç love that keeps mine e.çe a. Sonn. 
61» 10. Tp. V, 100. 229. Meas. 11, 2, 93. Ado II, 3, 
18. Mids. III, 2, 69. IV» 1, 198. 203. Wint. IV, 4, 460. 
H4B V, 5, 55 (Q awaked) Troil. I, 3, 255. Tit. I1, 
17. Caes. lI, 1» 88. Cymb. I11, 4» 46. V, 4, 127. 
Awalten, the saine as fo awake; 1) trans.: An- 
gelo, belike thbking me remiss in mine office, --s me 
with thls unwonted putting on, Meas. IV, 2, 119. 
mistress bride, bath that --ed l]ou? Shr. V, 2, 42. I 
o.ffèred fo a. his regard for' s priuate .friends, Cor. V, 
1, 23. 
2) intr.: some minute ere the rime of ber 
Rom. V» 3, 258 (only in Q2; other O. Edd. awaking). 
A'ard» to adjndge» to decree: the court --s 
if, Merch. IV, 1, 300. 303. lest the supreme king qf 
kings a. either of l]ou to be the other" s end, R3 I1, 1, 
14. fo a. one sth. : she that makes me sln, --s me pain, 
Sonn. 141, 14. 
wa., 1) absent, far: thl]selfa, art prescrit 
still witlg me, Sonn. 47, 10. or gluttoning on all, or all 
a. 75, 14. thou a, the veT bb'ds are mute» 97» 12. 98, 
13. if the shepherd be a wlgile a. Gentl. I, 1, 75. to 
discover islands far a. I, 3, 9. fŒEr from ber nest the 

there is hot one, I date a., but will deserve ... H8 IV. lapwinff cries a. Err. IV, 2, !7 etc. etc. 
') 14' . 2) from a place: thesoundisgoin9a. Tp. II1, 
2) to maintaan, to make good: anddare a. 2, 157. blow hot a word a. Gentl. I,., 118. fo steal 
her beautl] and ber worth in otlger arms than hers, Troil. a. l]our daughter, I11, 1, 11. get thee a. Err. I, 2, 16. 
1, 3, 271. [ be allways a. Mids. IV, 1, 46. stand a. All's V, 2, 17; 
Await, 1) trans., to wait for, to bc in store I etc. etc. that l'll tear a. -- tear off, Gentl. I, 2, 125. 
for: what rates a. the &,ke of Su.ffblk? lI6B 1, 4, I do hot tear a. thyself from me, Err. 11, 2, 126. 
35. 67. Joined to different verbs, it implies the idea of 

2) followedbyfor,  to expect, to look for- 
ward to: Posterit, a. for wretched l]ears, H6A I, 
1, 48. 
Awake, rb. (impf. and partie, awaked). 1) trans. 
to rouse from sleep: Tp. II» 1» 318. V, 235. lleas. 
IV, 2, 159. Merch. V, 110. R3 IV, 1, 85. Hml. I, 1, 
152 etc. Metaphorically, to rouse from what 
resembles sleep, to put to action: --d an evil 
nature, Tp. I» 2, 93. and his untimell] frenzff thus --eth» 
Lncr. 1675. --s the enrolledpenalties, Meas. I, 2, 170. 
Ado IV, 1» 199. hlids. I» 1, 13. All's I, 2, 38. Tw. III, 
2, 20. V, 47. Wint. II1, 2» 114. John V, 4, 43. Troil. 
I, 3, 251. Ant. I» 3, 61. if is required l]ou do a. l]our 
faith, Wint.V,3,95. we must a. endeavour for defence» 
John 11, 81. ml] rester is --d bi] great occasion fo call 
upon his own Tire. Il, o., 21. a. l]our dangerous lenitl], 

spending or destroying by the action: till thou hast 
howld a. tweh.e winters, Tp. I, 2» 296. l"ll weep what 
is left a. Err. II, 1, 115. klssed his hand a. LLL V, 2» 
324. dream a. the time» Mids. I, 1, 8. curse a. a win- 
ter's night, H6B I11, 2, 335. see a. their shilling, H8 
t'roi. 12. £ake a. (cf. make)  to make away with, 
to destroy: so in th./self thl]self art ruade a. Ven. 763. 
threescore l]ear would make the world a. Sonn. 11, 8. 
To go a.  to pass: whlch shall make if (the night) 
go qulck a. Tp. V 304. 
Awal]! .- begone: Tp. V, 298. Gentl. II, 3, 36. 
III, 1, 101. IV, 4» 66 etc. etc. Awal] with the rest! Tp. 
IV» 247 (i.e. take the test; elsewhere the expressiol 
has another sense, cf. with), a. with us fo Athens 
liids. IV» 1» 189. a. from me! H6B I, 2 50. a. thj 
hand! Hml. V, 1, 286 (Qq hohl off). 



A 69 

he couMnet.er a.with me,H4B 111,2,213( she could 
no! bear me, cf. Ben Jonsou's Poetaster A. i I I, Sc. 1). 
Redundantly af!er whither: wMther a.? Mids. 1, 1, 
180, = where are you going? Shr. IV, 5, 38. R3 
1, 7. whlther a. so fast? Gentl. lil, 1, 51. LLL IV, 3, 
187. R3 11, 3, 1. H8 II, 1, 1. 
3) Corne a. eome here, eome to me: Tp. 
1.2, 187. Tw. Il, 4, 52. V¢int. V, 3, 101. H4A 1I, 1, 
24. llcb, lil, 5, 33. Per. il, 1, 17. To brbg a.  to 
bring here: Meas. 11, 1, 41. Rg 11, 2, 107. Tire. V, 
68. Lr. 11, 2, 146. Per. 1I, 1, 13. gou rnust corne a. to 
2/ourfather ( go vith me) As 1, 2, 60. to bave taken 
if a. (= with you) Tw.li,2,7. bring a. thy pack af!er 
me, Wint. IV, 4, 318. 
Ae, subst., reverential fear: wrench a.from 
.fools, Meas. 11, 4, 14. the attribute to a. and rnajesty, 
Mcrch. IV, 1, 191. tI4B IV, 5, 177. H5 IV, 1, 264. 
Tim. IV, 1, 17. to hold one in a. H6A I, 1, 39. to keep 
in a. Luer. 245. H6B 1, 1, 92. R3 V, 3, 310. Cor. 
1, 191. Hm}. V, 1, 238. Per. Prol. 36. With an ob- 
jective genitive: fo be in a. of such a thing, Caes. 
, 96. by m.y sceptre's a. R2 1, 1, 118. stand under 
one man's a. Caes. 11, 1, 5,'2. The possessive pronoun 
objeetively: we'll bend it to out a. H51, 2, 24. sub- 
jeetively: thy free a. pays hornage to us, Ilml. IV,3,63. 
Awe, vb., to strike with fear and reve- 
renee, and hence to keep in eomplete sub- 
j e c t i o n, to intimidate so as to quell any resistance: 
thou (the horse) created to be --d by man, R2 V, 
91. that saine eye whose bend doth a. the world, Caes. 
I, 2, 123. pure shame and --d resistance rnade 
.fret, Ven. 69. I will a. him with my cud#el, Wiv. 
2, 991. shall quips and sentences a. a man from the 
career o.fhls humour? Ado 11, 3, 50. 
Aweary, weary, tired, fatigued: Iama., 
#ive me leave a whi!e, Rom. I1, 5, 95. Followed by of, 
 ti r e d o f: Iam a. o.f this moon, hlids. V, 255. Mereh. 
L 2, 2. All's 1, 3, 47. IV, 5, 59. H4A III, 2, 88. Troil. 
iV, , 7. Caes. IV, 3, 95. Mcb. V, 5, 49. 
Aveless, 1) wanting reverenee and fear: 
a#ainst whose .fury and unmatched force the a. lion 
could hot wa#e thefiht, John 1,266. -- 2) inspiring 
no reverenee and fear: the innocent anda. throne, 
R3 II, 4, 5. 9. 
Avful, 1) filled with awe: to pay their a. 
duty to our presence, R2 111, 3, 76. we corne wlthb our 
a. banks a.qabt, H4B iV, 1, 176. Henee = filled 
with reverenee for ail that deserves it, eon- 
s c i e n t i o u s: thrustfrom the cornpany o fa. men, Gentl. 
IV, 1, 46. a. both in deed and word, Per. ii Prol. 4. 
2) inspiring awe: and a. rule and right su- 
premacff, Shr. V, 2, 109. fo pluck clown justice front 
?/our a. bench, H4B V, 2, 86. an a. princely sceptre» 
H6B V, 1, 98. tI6C 11, 1, 154. 
Awhile (O. Edd. mostly a while, sometimes a- 
while, f.i. Tw. 1, 4, 12. V¢int. IV,4,402. John 11,379. 
H6C II, 3, 5. III, 1, 27. R3 1, 2 3. IV, 4, 116; rarely 
lu one word: All's 11, 3, 283. John 11, 416. Rom. 1, 
3, 8.), some time: counsel rnay stop a. what will 
hot staff, Comp1. 159. Gentl. I 1, 75. 11, 4, 80. II1, 1, 
1. 58. IV, 2, 25. V, 4, 27. Meas. I1, 3, 17. 4, 35. 
1, 160. 180. ¥, 354. Ado I1, 1, 287. IV, 1, 202. 205 
etc. etc. 
A-ltward, 1) perverse, unbeeoming: 'frs 
o slnister nor no a. daim, H511,4,85. with ridiculous 
and a. action he p«t#eants us, Troil. I, 8, 149. 

) adverse: by a. wind ri-oto Enfland's bank 
drot'e back a#ain, tI6B 111, 2, 83. and to 
world and a. casualties bound me in servitude, Per. 
1, 94. 
Awl, an iïon instrument of shoemakers: 
Caes. 1, 1, 25. 
Avle, v. aweless. 
A-vork, to work, into action (alwaysjolned 
to set): So Lucrece, set a., sad tales doth tell, Lucr. 
1496. that sers t a. II4B IV, 3, 14. Troil. V, 10, 
38. Hnd. 11, , 510. Lr. 11I, 5, 8. 
Avry, obliquely: you pluck rny foot a. Shr. 
IV, 1, 150. perspecth, es eed a. distlnguis forrn, R2 
11, 2, 19. looklnç a. npon our lord's departure, .'21. 
enterprises ... their currents turn a. Hml. 111, 1, 8ï 
(f. awa), your crown's a. Ant. V, 2, 31. Hence 
--- perversely: thou airnest all a. II6B 11, 4, 58. 
rnerd a. Cor. I11, l, 305. 
Axe, instrument to hew tituber, to chop wood, 
or to kill cattle: a bu!cher wlth an a. II6B 
189. rnan strokes, thouçh witk a little a., hew down 
the oak» II6C il, 1, 54. 11, 2, 165. V, , 11. Tit. 
1, 185. 186. Tire. V, 1, 14. Metaphorically: is 
hacked down and his sumrner leaves all faded by mur- 
der's blood a. R2 1, 2, 21. hew rn wa ot with a 
bloody a. H6C lil, , 181. 
Especially the executioner's axe : Meas. IV, 2, 56. 
IV, 3, 39. Merch. IV, 1, 15. As ill, 5, 5. H6B Il, 4, 
49. H8 11, 1, 61. lil, , 264. Rom. lll, 3, 22. Hml. lç, 
5, 218. V, 2, 24. Per. I, 2, 58. 
.*,xle-ree, pieee of tituber on whieh the 
wheel turns: hear a drg wheel 9rate on the a., 
H4A Iii, 1, 132. stron 9 as the a. on whlch heaven 
rides, Troil. 1, 3, 66. 
.*,y (O. Ed. always I) yes: is hot thls true? 
A.y, sir. Tp. l, 2, 268. Il, 1, 44. 67.94. 101. III, 1, 88. 
2, 119. 129. IV, 43. 167. 208. ¥, 294 etc. etc. 
Used to enforee the sense: every inch ofwoman 
bt the world, ag, everg drain of woman's flesh is 
false, f she be, Vint. Il, 1, 138. how you maj hurt 
goursel.f, ay, utterly 9row from the kb:9"s acquaintance, 
H8 iii, 1,160 etc. 
Sometimes  why: But, for gour conscience? 
Ay, sir; where lies that? Tp. Il, 1,276. I wouldre- 
sort to ber by night. Ag but the doors be locked, 
Gentl. III, 1,111. A:j, but she'll thlnk that it is spoke 
in baie, III, 2, 34. gou Banbury cheese! Ay, it is no 
rnatter, ttow now, Jffephostophilus! Ag, it is no 
ma!ter. Wiv. l, l, 131. I understand not what you 
mean bg thls. Ay, do, persever, counterfeit sad looks, 
Mids. Iii, 2, 237. Ag mistress bride, bath that awa- 
kened you? Shr. V, 2, 42. A.y, are you thereabouts? 
An!. Iil, 10, 9 etc. etc. 
Ay, interj. (M. Edd. Ah): Ay, alaek, how new 
is husband bt rnff rnouth! John 111, 1,305. Generallv 
eoupled with me: Ag met Vert. 187. 833. Luer. 116. 
Sonn. 41, 9. Comp1. 391. V¢iv. I, 4, 68. Err. IV, 4, 
111. V, 186. LLLIV, 3, 22.47. 141. blids. 11, 9, 147. 
Tw. V, 142. John V, 3, 14. H6B III, 2, 70. 120. 380. 
R3 11, 4, 49. Tir. 11I, 1, 64. Rom. 1, 1, 167. 11, 1, 10. 
il, 2, 25. II1 2, 36. Caes. I1, 4, 39. Hml. Ill, 4, 51. 
Ant. 111, 6, 76. Cymb. IV, 2, 321. V, 5, 10 etc. 
Aye, for ever: let him that will a screech-owl 
a. be called, 90 in to Troy, Troil. V, 10, 16. ignora  
and shame lire a. with thy naine, V, 10, 34. let this 
pernicious hour stand a. accursed in the calendar 



70 B 
Mcb. IV, 1, 134. I ara corne fo bid my ki»g and I 71.90. III, 2, 387. II.2 V, 2, 40. Troil. III, 2, 167. 
toaster a. good night, Lr. V, 3, 235. a. hopeless to I Tire. V, 1, 55. V, 4, 78. 
bave the eourtesy llour eradle promised, Cymb. IV, I »--,!." gull Mm bto a a. Tw. Il, 3 146 (M. 
4, 27. the worth that learned ch«rity a. wears, P.er. i Edd.  nayword). 
.,zure, sky-blue, used of the colour of the 
V, 3, 94. In Per. I11, 1, 63 some M. Edd. aye-remam-[ veins: ber a. velns, Lucr. 419. these windows (se. 
itg lamps (O. Edd. ayre). 
Preeeded by for, in the same sense: makes an- eyelids) white and a. laced wlth blue of heaven's 
Hquity for a. his page, Sonn. 108, 12. whiles you to own tinct, Cymb. II, 2, 22. 
the poTetual wink for a. ndght put this ancient mot- Az,,re,l, sky-blue: "twlxt the green sea and 
sel, Tp. II, 1,285. and 1.fo; a. thy.footllcker, IV,218. the a. vault, Tp. V, 43. the a. harebell» llke thy veins, 
this world is hot for a. Hml. 111, , °10. 1Mids. 1, 1, Cymb. IV, 2, 222. 

B, 1) the ec« ond letter iu the ,alnhabet'. • . LLLI Bal, v,. 1) the same as babe:. Meus. I, 3, 30.V 
V 1, o4 50 fait as a text.B in a eop-boolc, V, 2,[AdoV, 2, 37. Shr. lV, 3, 67. Vmt. ll, 1,6. John 
4 :», i e" no .dr, but black I 2, 56. H6B 1 3, 148. Troil. I, 3, 345. 111, 2, 43. Cor. 
- o) ;ote i" nmsic: S'ir ïll, 1, 75. I ll, 1,223. III, 2, 115. Tit. V, 3, 185. Hml. l, 37 
Bu, to crv like a shccp: will hot heur her] II, 2,400. Ant. V, 2, 312.  child in generm: no 
lomb when if baès, Ado IIl, 3, 75. ha, most slly sheep,  111Chor. 20. R3 IV, l, 103. 
LLL V, 1, 53. a lamb that baes like a bear Cor. ll, I '2.) a d o 1 l: protest me the b. of a girl, Mcb. III, 
1, 12. '4, 106.* 
Baa, the cry of a sheep: will make me erg. 

baa, Gentl. I, 1, 98. 
Bal, hic, snbst., prattlc: this b. shall hot hence- 
forth trouble me, Gentl. I, 2, 98. leaee thy vabt bibble 
babble, Tw. IV, 2, 105. there is o tiddle taddle nor 
pibble pabble b Pompeg" s camp, H5 IV, 1,71 (Flnellen). 
Ballde, rb., to prate, to twaddle: for the 
watch to b. «end to talk, Ado I11 3, 36. for school 
fool, a --i» 9 rhyme, V, 2, 39. the --in 9 9ossip of 
the air, Tw. I, 5, 292. vainness, --b 9, drunkenness, 
I11, 4, 389. out --i@ dreams, R3 V, 3, 308, i. e. 
blabbing, telling tales, the --in9 echo, Tir. I1, 3, 17. 
__in 9 9ossip, IV, 2, 150. (In H5 I1, 3, 17 many M. 
Edd. and a babbled of 9reen fields).* 
Babe, generally a little ehild still at the 
breast: a mrse's son 9 ne'er pleased ber b. so well, 
Vert. 974. Luer. 814. 1161. Sonn. 22, 12. 143, 3. 
Gentl. 1, 2, 58. Err. I, 1, 73. LLL V, 2, 594. Shr. 11, 
138. IV, 3, 74. Wint. II, 2, 26. I11, 2, 135. John I11, 
4, 58. tI6A I, 1, 49. II, 3, 17. III, 1, 197. III, 3, 47. 
H6B V, 2, 52. H6C I1, 1, 86. V, 7, °9. Tir. I1, 3, 29. 
IV, 2, 67. V, 1, 26. Rom. I, 3, 60. Tire. I, 2, 116. 117. 
IV, 3, 118. Mcb.l, 7, 21.55. IV, l, 30. Hml.lll, 3, 71 
Lr. I, 3, 19. Ant. V, 2, 48. Cymb. I, 1, 40. Per. I, 4, 
42. I11Prol. 11. I11, 1, 28 etc. 
But sometimes ehildren of some growth are called 
so: Love is a b., Sonn. 115, 13. holy wrlt in --s 
hath judgment shown, when judges bave been --s, 
All's II, 1,141 (er. St. Matthew XI, 25). those that do 
teach goun 9 --s, Oth. IV, 2, 111. at three and two 
pears old, I stole these --s, Cymb. I11, 3, 101. It is 
used of yonng Rntland: R3 I, 3, 183; of the sons 
of Edward IV: R3 I1, 2, 84. IV, 1, 99. IV, 3, 9. IV, 4, 
9. of the children of Macduff: Mcb. IV, 1,152. IV, 2, 6. 
Baboolt (babo6n in Tire. I, 1, 260 bdboon in 
Meb. IV, 1, 37 and perhaps Per. IV, 6, 189), the ani- 
mal Cynoeephalus: Wiv. II, 2, 9. H4B II, 4, 261. 
Tim. I, 1, 260. lXIeb. IV, 1, 37. 0th. l, 3,318. Per.IV,' 
6, 189. 

Bab.v-brotv: lXIcb. IV, 1, 88. 
Bab.--dat,ghter: Vint. III, 2, 192. 
Bab»ton. the tmons ancient town: when as 
sut in Pabylon, Wiv. II1, 1, 24 (Evans' song), there 
dwelt a man in zB., Tw. I,, 3, 84. the whore of 
H5 11, 3, 41. 
Baccare: baccare! you are marvellous forward, 
Shr. II, 73 (Nares: "a tant word, meaning, go back, 
used in allusion to a proverbial saying, -Backare, 
quoth Mortimer to his sow;' probably made in ri- 
dicule of some man who affeeted a knowledge of 
Latin without having it." cf. Notes and Queries II, 
8, p. 527). 
lSa««hanals, 1) the revels of Baeehus: 
shall we dance now the Eg.ptian B., Ant. I1, 7, 110. 
2) Bacchants: the riot qf the tipsy .B., tearing the 
Thracian sb9er, lXlids. V, 48. 
Baehus, the god of wine: LLL IV, 3, 639. 
Ant. 11, 7, 121. 
Bachelor, a man unmarried: Meus. IV, 2, 3. 
Ado 1, 1, 201. 248. II, 1, 51. II, 3, 252. Mids. II, 2, 
59. hIereh. 111, 1, 127. As 111, 3, 62. All's 1[, ô. 59. 
Tw. I, 2, °.9. tt4A IV, 2, 17. H4B I, 2, 31. H5 V, 
230. II6C III, 2, 103. R3 I, 3, 101. Tit. I, 488. Caes. 
II1, 3, 9.18. In Tp. IV, 67 Oohose shadow the dis- 
missed b. loves) it signifies a young man looking 
out for a wife. cf. H4_A IV, 2, 17. In Rom. I 5, 114 
the nurse addresses Romeo with the word, so that 
it shonld seem to mean a young man in general; 
but it may mean there a very young knight, a 
knight baehelor. 
Baehelorship, state of a baehelor: H6A 
V, 4 13. 
Bavl% subst., 1)the upper, resp. hinder part 
of the body: Ven. 300. 396. 594. Tp. II, 1, 115. 
III, 1, 26. V, 91. Wiv. V 5, 58. lXIeas. I11, 1, "-)6. LLL 
I, 2, 75. V, 9, 476. lXlids. 11, 1, 150. Shr. Ind. 2 9. 
R2 I, 2, 51. H6A I, 1,138. I1, 5, 43. H6C II1, 2, 157 
etc. etc. makbg the beast with two --s, 0th. 1. 1, 



B 71 

118. but the --s of JBrltons seen, Cymb. V, 3, 6. are 
ai out --s (=. are pursuing us) H6C II, 5, 133. these 
people at out b. (-- behind us) Caes. IV, 3, 212. you 
knew I was ai .your b. (= at your elbow t near you) 
H4B 11, 4, 334. no glor.y lives behind the b. of such, 
Ado 111, 1 t 110 (they are not praised in their ab- 
sence). "ris well tou offer if behind ber b. Mercll. lV t 
1,293. being spoke behind your b., Rom. IV, 1, 28. 
that ever turned their --s fo rnortal views, LLL V, 
2, 161. wl«n I turn my b. Mids. ][I, 2, 238. As IV, 
3,128. H4B I, 1, 130. Cor. III, 3,134. Caes. [[, 1, -°5. 
lIcb.ll[, 6, 41. tura b. = fly: H4A l, 2,206. Caes. V, 3, 3. 
lroperly and figuratively, the part of the body 
which bears burdens: more than our --s can bear, 
Tit. IV t 3» 48. ]is losses that bave of late so ]uddled 
on ]is back, Merch. IV t 1, 8. a pack of blessings 
lig]ts upon thy b. Rom. Ill, 3 t 141. bearing t]eir own 
misfortunes on t]e b. of such as ]ave belote endured 
t]e like, R2 V» 5 t 29. I bave 3lears on 3l b. fortg 
eig]t, Lr. l, 4, 4-0. crac mg sinews» break n. b. Tp. 
III, 1.26. II6B IV» 8, 30. It6C V» 7, _'24. H8 I, 1, 84. 
Tire. [I, 1, 4. brea some gallows" b. tI4B IV, 3, 32. 
Used for the whole body, in speaking of clothes: 
clot]e a b. Meas. III» 2, 23. bearing t]eir biÆt]rights 
proudly on t]eir --s, John II, 70. it lies as lightlg on 
t]e b. qf him, II, 143. the cloak o.f nig]t being pluck'd 
from oj t]eir --s, R2 [[[, 2, 45. I boug]t 3lou a dozen 
qf s]irts fo your b. H4A [Il, 3, 78. ]is apparel is built 
upon is b. H4B III, 2, 155. wit] mg armour on my b. 
H5 V, 2, 143. s]e bears a dvke s revenues on ]er b., 
H6B l, 3» 83. slnce you will buckle fortune on my b. 
R3 III, 7, 228. bave broke their --s wit£ laylng manors 
vl t]tem, H8 I, 1, 84. contempt and beggary hangs upon 
tlty b. Rom. V» 1, 71. we'll die with ]tarness on out b. 
icb. V, 5, 52. w]to bath ]tad three suits to Ms b. Lr. 
III» 4 141. with that suit upon mg b. Cymb. III, St 141. 
1)eculiar expressions: when Gods bave hot --s, Wiv. 
V, 5t 13» i. e. have carnal desires. ,._çteel fo tlte very 
Tit. IV, 3» 47, i. e. hot only in the edge, but als:) in 
the back, throughout; the comparison being taken 
from a knife. 
2) the rear of an army: he leaves Ms b. 
aïmed, H4B l» 3» 79. otlter foes raa.y set upon our --s t 
H6C V, 1, 61. 
3) the outward part of the hand: Caes. 
I» 2, 221. 
4) a support in reserve: thls project should 
bave a b. or second, that ff9ht hold, if this should blast 
in proof, Hml. 1V 7, 154. 
Ba¢l, adv, 1) turning or returning from 
a place or person: Ven. 557. 906. Lucr. Arg. 13. 
Lucr. 843. 965. 1583. 1670. Sonn. 126, 6. Tp. II, 1, 
259. V, 36. Gentl. IV, 4, 57. Wiv. V, 5, 89. Meas. I, 
1» 75. Il» 2» 143 (turn b.) Err. IV, 2, 55. hIids. III, 2, 
315 etc. etc. baek agaln: Sonn. 45 t 11. Tp. I, 2, 150. 
Gentl. I» 2» 51. Meas. II, 2, 58. Err. II, 1, 75. liids. I, 
1,251. Mereh.l, 1:151. II, 7,14. Lr.IV, 2,91 ete.urge ber 
to a present answer b. All's Il, 2, 67. goes to and b. 
Ant. If4 t 46. b. m. ring! Cymb. Il, 4, 118. 9ve b.  
yield, Gentl. V, 4, 126 (er. 9ire). fo go b.  to give 
way t to sueeumb, get the worst: goest thou b.. thou 
shalt go b., I warrant thee, Ant. V, 2, 155. nake lier 
go b., even to the .ielding, Cyrab. I» 4» 115. 
2) hOt coming forvard: cf. fo keep, to 
stand etc. 
Bael, vb, 1) to get upon the back of to 

mount: a colt that's --ed and burthened, Ven. 419. 
I will b. him straightt H4A I1, 3t 74. Jvpitert upon 
eagle --ed, Cymb. V, 5, 427. Figuratively: mg will iæ 
--ed with resolutlon, Lucr. 352. 
2) to support, to second: thou --est reproach 
a9ainst long-living laud t Luer. 622. call.you that --ing 
of .our friends? a plague upon such --in9! H4A II, 4 
166. --ed bg the power of Warwick, H6C I, 1, 52. 
I, 4» 73. 1I, 2» 69. IV, It 41.43. R3 I t 2 t 236. IV t 3, 
47. Tir. Il t 3» 54. Rom. I, 1, 40. 
3) to adjoin behind: a garden whose western 
side is with a vineard --ed, Meus. IV, 1, 29. 
Bachbie, to slander one absent: the are 
arrat knaves and will b. No worse than the.y are 
backbitten, for the. bave marvellous fovl linen, H4B 
V, 1, 36 (Ff. bitten for backbitten). 
Ba¢l-d««r, door on the hind part of a 
house: Wiv. III» 3 t 25. Figuratively: havin9found the 
b. open qf the un9uarded hearts, Cymb. V, 3, 45. 
Backed, having a back: b. like a weasel 
Hml. Ill, 2,397. 
Back-friend. So in Err.lV, 2, 37 the bum-bailiff 
is ealled, beeause he cornes frolll behind to arrest one; 
and in As III, 2, 167 Rosalind and Touehstone, be- 
cause they clandestinely overhear Celia's reading of 
verse (many M. Edd. how now! backfrlends!) 
Ba¢l-r¢urn, return: till Harrg's b. a9aitl to 
France II5 V Chor. 41 çb. a9ab -- repeated remru). 
BaeKside, thc ground behind: hissteel was 
in debt, if went o' the b. the town, Cymb. ]t 2t 14 (- 
round the town. As for the omitted prep. off v. of 
and side). 
Ba¢ls-ard man, fencer at single-sticks: 
I knew him a good b. H4B III, 2, 70. 
Ba¢k-|rick, a caper backwards in dan- 
cing: I have the b. simply as strong as any man la 
Illyria, Tw. I, 3, 131 (perllaps a quibble: the trick of 
going back in a fight). 
BacKvard, ado. tovard the back, back: 
b. she pvs]ted alto, Veu. 41. and b. drew tac ]teavenl.y 
rnoisture, 541. 1034. LLL V, 1, 50. Merch. II,-0,103. 
All's I, 1,214. 233. I, 2, 48. John V, 5» 3. Troil. I, 
3» 128. III, 2» 47. 1V, 1, 20. Rom. I, 2, 48. ], 3, 42. 
56. Mcb. V, 5, 7. Hml. Il, 2, -'206. Figuratively 
from the wrong end» perversely: she would 
spell aire b. Ado III» 1, 61, i. e. she would make vices 
of his virtues; cf. backwardly. 
BacK'ard, adj. t 1) being in the back: 
b. voice, Tp. II, , 95. 
2) turncd back: with a b. look, Sonn. 59, 5. 
restera t]eir b. course» Oth. I, 3, 38. 
3) unwilling, void of zeah perish the man 
whose rMnd is b. now! H5 IV, 3» 72. 
Baclward, subst» what lies behind: w]tat 
seest t]tou else in tac durit b. ald abysm of rime? Tp. 
I, 2, 50. 
Badwardi.v, perversely, ill: does he think 
so b. of me now, that l'll requite if last? OEim. 
18 (cf. baeward» Ado III, 1, 61). 
Ba¢lwards, ado.,  baekward : Jïy b. Cymb. V, 
3» 25. 
Bacll-vounding, vounding in the back 
or from behiud: . cal»mn., Meas. III, 2, 197. 
Baeon, hog's flesh pickled: ha»g-ho 
.atin for b. Wiv. IV, 1, 50. a gammon of b. H4A Il, 
1, 26. Terre for a fat person: o n t --st on ! H4A 11 , 95. 



72 B 

Bacon-fed: b. l¢naves, H4A II, 2, 88. 
Bad, opposed to good: Sonn. 67,14. 121, 8. 
140, 11. 144, 14. Tp. I, 2, 120. Gentl. III, 1, 206. 
hleas. V, 446. 456. Err. I, 1, 39. V, 67. hierch. III, 1, 
46. H6B 1, 4, 50. II, 1, 28 etc. etc. 
Substantively: 0 Time, titou tutor botit fo good and 
b. Lucr. 995. so ]ou o' ergreen my b., ç/ good allow, 
Sonn. 112, 4. creating ever] b. a perfect best, 114, 7. 
fo excitage tire b. for better, Gentl. Il, 6, 13. fo ral¢e 
b. good, hleas. IV, I, 15. and good from b. find no 
partition, H4B IV, 1, 196. renders good.for b. R3 I, 2, 
69. malte good of b. Mcb. Il, 4, 41. T]tus b. begins 
and worse remains beMad, Hml. Ill, 4, 179. let tire 
rime ruez on to good or b. Cyn,b. V, 5, 1-°9. 
Badge, subst., mark, cognizance: toclear 
titls spot b/ deatit, ai least I give a b. of faine fo slaa- 
der's liver], Lucr. 1054 (in allusion to the siL'er bad- 
ges worn by servants and engraved with the arms of 
heir masters). Iteavj tears, --s of either's woe, Sonn. 
44, 14. Tp. V, 267. Ado I, 1, 23. LLL IV, 3,'2-54. V, 
,'2, 764 (hcre, as in Tp. V, 267, the strange disguise 
of the resp. person is meant), hlids.lll, 2, 127. hlerch. 
I, 3, 111. R2 V, 2, 33. II4B IV, 3, 113. I15 IV, 7, 106. 
It6A IV, 1, 105. 177. tI6B Ill 2200. V, 1201. 202. 
Tit. I, 119. Il, 1, 89. 
Badged, marked as with a badge: titeir 
lans ad faces were ail b. witit blood, lIcb. Il, 3,107. 
Baril!, ill: John V, 3, 2 (itow goes tire dç/ wffit 
us? b., I fear). 
Badness, viciousness : allmen are bad. and in 
their b. reign, Sonu. 121, 14. Meas. V, 59. Lr. III, 5, 
9. IV, 6, 259. 
Bafl'|e "originaIly a puuishment of infamy, in- 
fiicted on recreant kuights, one part of which was 
hanging them up by the heels" (b/ares): an I do hot, 
call me villain and b. me, H4A I, 2, 113; hence  to 
use contemptuously in any uanner: I willb. 
Sir Tob], Tw. Il, 5,175. alas, poor fool, Itow fraye titej 
--d titee! V, 377. I ara disgraced, impeached ad --d 
]tere, R2 I, 1, 170. and shall good news be --d . H4B 
V 3, 109. 
Bag, sack, pouch: a b. offlax, Wïv.V,5,159. 
put ]our pipes in ]our b. Oth. III, 1, 20. babned ad 
entreasured wltit full --s of spices, Per. III, 2, 66. a 
b. of mone], Viv. H, '2,, 177. sums in sealed --s» III, 
4, 16. tire b. of gold, Err. IV, 4, 99. hlerch. II, 8, 18. 
Shr. I, _'2, 178. John III, 3, 7. H6B 1,3,131. Tit. 
-'280. Lr. II, 4, 50. Oth. I, 1, 80. Per. [11, 2, 41. ||Ttit 
b. and baggage: As fil, 2, 170. Vint. l, _'2., 206. 
Baggage, 1) the necessaries of an army, 
only in the phrase "witit bag ad b.": As IH, 2, 170. 
Vïnt. l, 2, 206. 
2) ter,n of contempt for a wo-thless woman: 
.!ou witcit, /ou Itag, ]ou b. Viv. IV, 2, 194. Err. Il|, 1, 
57. Shr. Ind. 1 3. Rom. fil, 5, 157. 161. Per. iV, 
24. IV. 6, 20. 
BagoU, a favourite of king Richard Il's: I2 I, 4, 
3. IV, I etc.* 
Bagpipe. a musical instrument consisting 
of a leathern bag and three pipes : Merch. IV, 1, 49. 
56. Wint. IV, 4, 183. tire drone of a Lincolnsitire b. 
H4A l, 2, 86. 
Baglailer, one who plays on a bagpipe: 
laugit li]«e parrots at a b. Merch. I 1, 53. 
Bail, subst., 1) the person or persons vho pro- 
cure the relee of a I)risoner from custody, by be- 

coming surety for his al)l)earance in court: .your 
good worsitip will be ny b. Meas. III, 2, 77. fetcit 
b. All's ¥, 3, 296. call la m.y sons fo be m/ b. H6B 
V, 1, 111. 1'2,0. Tit. Il, 3, 295. 
2) the security given: titatfellarrestwithout 
ail b. Sona. 74, 2. IoE/b. hleas. III, 2, 44. tlll Ig;ve 
t]iee b. Err. IV, 1, 80. I sent !Aou mne.y to be .your b. 
V, 382. l'll put ia b. All's ¥, 3, 286. fo de/ t]teir b. 
H6B V, 1,123. 
Ba|l, rb., to set free from arrest by giving 
security for appearance in court: P'lsoa rn!] Iteart 
52 th] steel bosom's ward, but titen ] friend's Iteart 
let my poor heart b. Sonn. 133, 10. ]ou will hot b. me 
hleas. III, 2, 85. let re b. titese getle titree, V, 362. 
titat (purse of gold) sitll b. ne, Err. IV, 1,107. thou 
sitalt hot b. tem, Tit. Il, 3, 299. Followed by from : 
that blow did b. if (ber soul) 95"om the deep uarest of 
titat polluted prison Lncr. 17'2,5. 
Bai|iff, subordiuate officer of justice: 
titen a process-server, a b. Wint. IV, 3, 10'2,. 
Bait, subst., ,aeat fo allure fish: slte touc]ted 
no udmwn --s, nor feared no Itoolcs, Lucr. 103. a 
swallowed b. on purpose laid fo mae tire taer mad, 
Soun. 129, 7. Pilgr. 53. Ado III, 1, 28. 33 (fo la] a 
b.). hlerch. I, 1,101. H4B III, _'2, 356. Troil. V, 8, 20 
(Ft bed, the other Ff bit, which is probably the true 
reading). Cor. IV, 1, 33. Tt. IV, 4, 91.92. Rom. 
Chor. 8. Hml. Il, 1, 63. Cymb. III, 4, 59. 
Bait, rb., 1) to allure by a bait: fo b..fish, 
Merch. III, 1, 55. hletaphorically: do titeir ça!/vest- 
ments his affections b.? Err. Il, 1, 94. 
2) to make alluring by putfing on a bait: O 
cuanb.q eneç/, titat, fo catcit a saint, witit saint dost 
b. t/Itooc, Meas. II, 2, 181. b. tire Itoocwell, titisjïsit 
will bke, Ado Il, 3, 114. cL.]ïne-baited, ïv. Il, 1, 99. 
Baii, rb., 1) to attack with dogs, to set 
dogs upon: we'll b. t]ty bears fo deatit, H6B V, 1, 
148. !tare .!ou hot set znine Itonour ai tire sta]ce and 
--ed il wkit all t]ie unrnuzzled titougts titat tyranous 
Iteart can t]tbc? Tw. III, 1, 130. 
2) to harass in a manner like that of dogs: 
Alas, poor ,1[accabaeus, Itow atit Ire been --«d! LLL 
V, 2,634. fo b. me witit t]iis foul derfsion, hlids. 
197. wito laie Itatit beat !ter Itusband and now --s me, 
Wint. Il, 3, 92. »y wretcitedness doth b. n!]sel f, R2 IV, 
238. --ed vitit ont that wants !ter wits, Cor. IV, 2, 43. 
--ed witit tire rabble's curse, Mcb.V, 8,29. Caez.lV,3, 
28. In 27 some M. Edd. with F2 bail others with FI 
which is uudoubtedly in the right, ba/. In R3 I, 3, 
109 Qq: to be so lauted scorned and baited ai; Ff: 
so balted, scorned and stormed at. 
Bai, vb., of uncertain signification: ge are laz!] 
Icmves, and Itere ye lie --ing of bombards, witen ye 
sitould do service, H8 V, 4, 85 ( to broach?). 
Baifing-plaee, place where bears are 
baited: H6B V 1, 150. 
Bajazet: tongue, I must put ]ou 5to a butter- 
woman's mourir and bu/ ryself anotiter qf Bajazet's 
mule, if you prattle me into titese perils All's IV, 1,46. 
2, passage not yet explained. 
Bake, 1) trans., a) to prepare for food by 
heating tu an oven: and titen fo be --d witit no 
dote in rite pie, Troil. I, 2, '2,80. in titat paste let titeir 
vile Iteads be --d, Tit. V, 2, 201. V, 3, 60. tire 
eats, Ilom. IV, 4, 5. Hml. I, 2 180. 
b) to dry and harden, to glue and past« 



B 73 

together: when the earth is --d with]rost, Tp. l, 2, 
256. iJ'nelancholy had --d thy blood, John III, 3, 43. 
--s the elf-locks in foul sluttish hairs, Rom. l, 4, 90. 
--d and impasted with the parchin# streets, Hml. 11, 
2, 481. 
2) intr., a) to make bread in an oven: 
wash, wrin9, brew, b. Wiv. I, 4, 101. the heatin 9 of 
the oven, and te --in9, Troil. I, 1, 24. 
b) to be hardened in heat: fillet ofafennj 
shake, in the cauldron boil and b. Meb. IV, 1, 13. 
e) to be produeed by hardening, like the 
trust of a paste: a most instant terrer --d about, with 
vile and loathsome crust, all mj smooth bod!/, Hnfl. 1, 
5, 71 (Qq and M. Edd. barked). 
Baled-meats, pastry: look iv the b. Rom. 
4, 5. the funeral b. did coldly furnish forth the marriage 
tables, Hlnl. I, 2, 180. 
Baler, one whose trade is baking: H4A 
III, 3, 80. they say the owl was a --' s dauffhter, Hlnl. 
IV, 5, 42 in alIusion to a legend, according to which 
a baker's daughter, who grudged bread to out Saviour, 
was transformed into an owl. 
Balance, subst., a pair of scales to weigh 
things: a more will turn the b. Mids. V, 324. IIot in- 
flected in tire plural: Are there b. here to wei9h the 
.flesh I have them ready. Merch. IV, 1,255 (cf. sense, 
Mcb. V, 1, 29. Oth. IV, 3, 95. Antipholus, Err. V, 
357). Metaphorically: nany likelihoods wMch hu»g 
so tottering in the b. All's I 3, 130. to whom Ipronffse 
a eounterpoise if hot iv th.y estate a b. more replete I1 
3, 183. in the b. of great Bolingbroke are all the Eng- 
lish peers, R2 111, 4, 87. II4B IV, l, 67. Tit. 1, 55. 
Oth. 1, 3, 330. -- Attribute of justice: Ado V, 1,212. 
H4B V, 2, 103. 
Bala¢e, rb., to keep in a state of just 
proportion: except a sword or sceptre b. it (my 
action), H6B V, 1 9. 
Bald, 1) destitutc of hair or of natural 
covering in gcneral: Tp. IV, 238. Err. 11,2, 71.74. 
108. 109. As IV, 3, 106. John 11I, 1,324. H4AII, 4, 
420. H4B 111, 2, 294. H5 V, 2, 169. Cor. 11, 3, 21. 
111, 1, 164.* Tim. IV 3, 160. Lr. 14,178. 2No question 
asked him by any of the senators, but they stand b. be- 
fore hirn, Cor. IV, 5, 206, i. e. uncovering their heads, 
they stand in their natural baldness before him. 
2) void of reason, unfounded: 'twould be 
a b. conclusion, Err. Il, 2 110. this b. unjointed chat, 
H4A I, 3, 65. 
Baldpate, a person vith a bald head: 
Meas. ¥, 329. 
Baldpated, destitute of hair: Meas. V, 357. 
Baldri¢l, belt: bang ny bugle in an bwisible b. 
Ado 1, 1,244. 
Baie, evil, mischief: 1?orne and ber rats are 
at the point of battle ; the vue side must bave b. Cor. 
1, 1, 166 (Ff balle; Hanmer bane). 
Baleful, pernici vus: b. soreery, I-I6A II, 1,15. 
out b. enemies, V, 4, 122. thou b. messenger, H6B 111, 
_o, 48. out b. news, H6C 11, 1, 97. b. mlstletoe, Tir. 11 
3, 95. that b. burning night, ¥, 3, 83. b. weeds, Rom. 
11, 3, 8. 
Ball to neglect, hOt to tare for, to 
throw to the winds: make slow pursultæ or alto- 
ether b. the preg, Lucr. 696 (O. Edd. bauk).* b. loic 
wlth acquaintance that .ou bave, Shr. 1, 1» 34. thls was 
lockedfor at.ourhand, andthiswas--ed, ri?W. 11I, 2, 26. 

Ball, to heap, to pile up: ten thousandbold 
,_qcots ... --ed in their own blood did Sir Walter see, 
H4A I, 1, 69 (bathed?). 
Ball, any round body: --s ofquenchlessfire, 
Lucr. 1554. two pitch --s for e.,es, LLL III, 199. a b 
ofwildfire, H4A 111, 3, 45. Particul,r significations: 
1) the round elastic thing to play 'ith: ti5 I, 2, 261. 
282. 11, 4, 131. Per. 1I, 1, 64. as swift in motion as a 
b. Rom. 11, 5, 13. 1"Il spurn thhe ejes like --s before 
me, Ant. I1, 5, 64 (quibble). these --s bound; there's 
noise in it, All's II, 3,314 ( that is well said, that is 
as it should be). 2) the apple of the eye : Compl. 24. 
Mcrch. 111, 2, 117; and quibbling in Lucr. 1554. LLL 
111, 199. H5 V, 2, 17. Ant. 1I, 5, 64. 3) the globe: 
this terrestrial b. R2 111, 2, 41. this b. of earth, H4B 
Iud. 5. 4) a bullet: the fatal --s of murderlng basi- 
lisks, H5 V, 2, 17. 5) the ensign of sovereignty, the 
apple or globe: the sceptre and the b. H5 IV, 1,277. 
Meb. IV, 1,121. 
Ballatl, subst., popular song: is there hot a 
b. of the king and the beç.qar? LLL 1, 2, 114. 117. 
All's 1, 3, 64. II, 1, 175. Wint. IV, 4, 186. 188. 26. °. 
263. 610 etc. H4A II, :, 48. II4B IV, 3, 52. H5 V, 2, 
167 (mentioned with contempt: a rh.me is bt a b.). 
Song, poem in gener,l: I will get Peter Quince 
to write a b. of this dream, Mids. IV, 1, 21. a woeful 
b. mde to his mistress" ejebrow, As 1I, 7, 148. 
Ballaà, rb., to make ballads on: scaldrh.- 
mers b. us out o' tune, Ant. V, :?,, 216. 
Ballad-n*aler, maker of ballads: pick out 
nffne e#es with a --'s peu, Ado 1, 1, 254. Wint. V, 2, 
27. Cor. IV, 5, 235. 
Ballad-moger, terre of eontempt for a b a I I a d- 
maker: 1 had rather be a kitten and cr. mew than 
vue o.f these saine metre --s, H4A I11, 1, 130. 
lallast, to load: who sent whole armadoes o.f 
caracks to be ballast, Err. 11I, _o, 141 (ballast for bal- 
lasted), then had nj prize been less, and so more equal 
--in# to thee, Posthumus, Cymb. 111, 6, 78, i. e. my 
freight would have been more equal in value to thine, 
I »hould hot have been so nmch abore thee in tank. 
Ballov, provincialism for c n d g e 1: whether .our 
costard or nj b. be the barder, Lr. IV, 6,247 (Qq bat). 
Ballo*', an unintelligible word in the jargon of 
Dr. Caius: Wiv. I, 4, 92 (M. Edd. baille or baillez). 
Bains, subst., mediein,l ointment: Ven. 27. 
Lucr. 1466. V¢iv. V, 5, 66. R- ° 1, 1, 17. H6C IV, 8, 
41. R3 I, 2, 13. Troil. I, 1, 61. Cor. I, 6, 64 (--s). 
Tire. V, 4, 16. Mcb. 11, 2, 39. Lr. I, 1, _'218. Ant. V, 
, 314. Serving to anoint kings: R2111, 2, 55. IV, 207. 
II4B IV, 5, 115. H5 IV, 1,277. H6C 111, 1, 17. 
Balm, rb., 1) to anoint with some thingodo- 
riferons: b. his.foul head in warm distilled waters, Shr. 
Ind. 1, 48. --ed and entreasured with full bags of 
Slices , t'er. 111 2, 65. 
2) to anoint with any thing medicinal, to heal: 
this test might./et bave --ed th.,v broken sinews, Lr. I11, 
6, 105. 
Balny, 1) fttll of medicinal power: with 
the drops of this most b. rime m. love looks fresh, 
Sonn. 107, 9. b. slumbers, Oth. 11, 3, 258. 
2) fragrant: b. breath, Oth. V _'2, 16. 
Balsam -- balm: is this the b. that lhe usurinff 
senate pours into captains' wounds ? Tire. I11, 5, 110. 
Balsantn, the saine: Err. IV, 1, 89. 
Balthazar, name of the merchant in Err. 111, 1 



74 

B 

19.2?,. ¥, 223 ; of Don Pedro's attendant in Ado 11, 
3, 45.86 ; of servants in Merch. 111, 4, 45. IV, 1, 154. 
Rom. V, 1, 12. 
Ban, subst. 1) curse: talle t]wu that too, with 
multiplySg --s, Tire. IV, 1, 34. wkh Hecate's b. thrice 
lasted, Hml. 111, 2, 269. sometime wit]i htnatic 
sometime wlth prmders, enforce theS" charity, Lr. II, 
3, 
1" i" only in tac plural, ba,s (O. Edd. banes)= 
notice of a matrimonial contract pro- 
claimed in the chtrch: wlien I shcdl ask the --s 
and when be married, Shr. 11, 181. make feasts bwite 
.frie»ds, and proclalm the --s, III, :, 16. contracted 
bachelors such as had been asked twice on the --s, 
H4A IV, 2, 18. I, ber husbcmd, contradict your 
Lr. V, 3, 87. 
Ban, vb., to curse; 1) trans.: --bg liisboisterous 
and utruly beast, Ven.326. Lucr. 1460. H6B 11,4,25. 
2) absolutely: though she strive to try ber strength, 
and b. and brawl, Pilgr. 318. fell --g Itag, II6A V, 
3, 42. tI6B III, _'2, 319 (curse andb.). 333. upon the 
--ing shore, Oth. II, 1, 11 (only in Q, the rcst of O. 
Edd. foam5.q). 
Ba, abbreviation for Ccdibm: Tl). Il, 2, 188. 
Banbur, naine of an English town: you .B. 
cheese, Wiv. I. 1,130 (in allusion to thc thinness of 
Slender, B. cheese being proverbially rhin). 
Baffid, subst., 1) tic, bandage: ber arms i.fold 
him like a b. Ven. 225. ivory in an alablaster b. 363. 
in b.fant --s crowned lùg (i. e. in swaddling clothes) 
H5 Epii. 9. the b. that seems fo tic their .friendship, 
Ant. Il, 6, 129. Hence -- fetters: release me.from 
my --s, Tp. Epil. 9. dissolve th« --s of lire, R2 Il, 
2, 71. die in --s, tI6C I, 1, 186. And = conjugal 
ties: to bind onr loves np b a holy b. Adolll, 1,114. 
As V, 4, 136. H6C III, 7,243. Hml. III, 2, 170. 
2) bond, any moral obligation: now will 
I cliarge you in the b. oftrutli, All's IV, 2, 56. accord- 
ing to tly ocdli and b, R2 I, 1, 2. the end qf lire can- 
cels cdl --s, H4A Ill, 2, 157. those lands lost by liis 
father, wkh cdl --s of law, Hml. 1, 2, 24 (Ff. bonds). 
such a w(fe as my farthest b. shall pass on thy approof, 
Ant. III, 2, 26 (v. approof). Especially a written obli- 
gation to pay a sum a promissory note: was he ar- 
rested on a b.? hot on a b. but on a chabb Err. IV, 
49. The same pun in IV, 3, 32. "tis nothing but some 
b. that he is entered into, R2 V, 2, 65 (Ff. bond; v. 67 
Qq also bond). e would hot take his b. and yours 
H4B I 2, 37 (Ff. bond). 
3) a company of persons joinedlu acom- 
mon design: the sergeant ofthe b. Err. IV, 3, 30. our 
fa'y b. hlids.III,2,110, the gross b. of the ufalt]iful, 
As IV, 1, 199. we b. of brothers, H5 IV, 3, 60. 
t]ireatening b. ofTyplton's brood, Tit. IV, 2, 94. Espe- 
cially a troop of soldiers, an army: the warli]ce 
b. where her beloved Collatinus lies, Lncr. 255. All's 
1¥, 1, 16. IV, 3, 227. H5 IV Chor. 29. H6B III, 1 
312. 348. H6C il, 2, 68. Tit. V, 2, 113. Tire. 1¥, 3, 
92. Cymb. V, 5, 304. .Bands :- troops: H6A IV, 
1,165. H6C III, 3, 204. Cor. I, 2 26. 1, 6 53. Ant. 
III, 12, 25. Cymb. IV, 4, 11. 
Banal, vb., to unite in troops: and 
themselees in contrary parts, H6A 111, 1, 81. 
Banditto (O. Edd. bandetto), outlaw, robber: a 
loman sworder and b. slttve mnrdered sweet Tull.9, 
It6B IV, 1, 135. 

Bandog, a fierce dog kept chained: the 
time when screec]-owls cry and --s howl, H6B I, 4, 21. 
Bady, 1) to beat to and fro, as a ball: 
m] words would b. ber to my sweet love and his to 
(viz, if she were a ball) Rom. il, 5, 14. Figuratively 
of words looks, etc.: well ied both: a set of wit 
well played, LLL V, , 29. fo b. word for word ad 
frown.for 'own, Shr. V, 2, 172. I wil hot b. with thee 
word for word, II6C 1,4, 49. do you o. looks with me? 
Lr. l, 4, 9. to b. hasty words, Il, 4 178. 
2) intrans, to contend, to strive, a) in emu- 
lation: one fit to b. with thp lawless sons, to ruffle in 
the commonweakh qf l¢ome Tir. I, 312. b) in enmity: 
[ will b. with thee b faction As V, 1, 61. this factious 
--ing of thelr .f«cou,'ites H6A IV, 1 190. the prbce 
expressly bath forbidden --ing b Iérona streets, Roln. 
III, 1, 92. 
Bae, subst, 1) poison: rats that ravb down 
teb" proper b. Meas. l 2, 133. 
2) destruction, ruin: tongh nothing but top 
body's b. would cure thec» Veu. 372. b. to those that 
for ny surety will refuse the boysY II6B V, 1, 120. 
"'twill be his death, "twill be Ms b. Troil. IV, 2, 98. 
lest Eome erself be b. unto herse( Tit. V, 3, 73. I 
will hot be afraid of death and b. Mcb. V, 3, 59. two 
boys ... was the omans' b. Cymb. V 3, 58. 
Banc, rb., to poison: to git'e ten thousand 
ducats to bave it (the rat) --d 5Ierch. IV 1 46. 
Bag sttbst. blow: you'li bear me a b. for tat 
Caes. III, 3 20. 
Bang, vb. to beat, thump: te desperate tem- 
pest bath so --ed the TurIcs, Oth. Il, 1, 21. Figurati- 
vely  t o s t r i k e: wkh some excellent jests firenew 
from the mint, yole shonld bave --ed the youth into 
dumbness, Tw. 111, 2 24. 
Banish, 1) to condemn to leave the coun- 
try: Gent. ll. 6, 38. 111, 1. 217. V, 4, 124. As I, 1, 
104.111. I,,6.85. 11, 1,8. V, 3,6. R2 1.3, 179. 
H6A IV, 1, 47. H6B II, 3, 42. H6C III. 3, 25. R3 i, 
3 167. Cr. III, 3» 123. Rom. III, 2, 112. Tim. II1 5 
98. 112 etc. etc. 
2) to dri'e avay in general: the plagne is 
--ed by thy breath, Ven. 510. b. moan, Pilgr. 379. 
Meas. II, 4, 163. V 64. All's I1. 3, 54. John Iii, 1, 
321. II4A I, 3, 181. H6A II1 1, 123. V, 5, 96. H6B 
I, 2, 18. Oth. V, , 78 etc. etc.* 
Ilt both significations followed by .front: Tp. i, 2, 
266. Gentl. IV, 1 47. H4A II, 3, 42. H6BIII, ,334. 
Tp. I1, 1, 126. Gentl. II1 1, 171. 172. 111, 2 2. Tw. 
V, 289. H(;BV, 1,167 etc. etc. Or by hence or thence: 
Genth IV, 1, 23. Shr. Ind. , 34. Rom. III, 3, 15. 
19, etc. 
Followed by a double accus.: we b. you ont terri- 
torles, R2 I, 3, 139. one of out souls ... ed this frail 
sepulchre of out esh, 196. b. hot him thy Harry's 
company, H4A Il, 4, 525. I b. ber  bed and com- 
pany, H6B II, 1 197. ed fair England's territories, 
111, 2, 245. bas ed me his bed: H8 fil, 1, 119. and 
y poor naine --ed the kbgdom, IV 2, 127. b. him 
out city, Cor. III, 3, 101. 
His banished years = the years of s banishment, 
R2 I, 3, 210. 
Banisher he who condemns another to 
leave his country: to be full quit of those my s, 
Cor. IV, 5, 89. 
Banishment, exile: Lucr. 1855. Gentl. Ill, I, 



B 75 

173. As I, 3, 140. Shr. Ind. 2, 33. P2 I, 3, 143. 212. 
III, 1, 21. III, 3, 134. H6B Il, 3, 12.14. III, 2, 253. 
R3 1, 3,168. 193. Cor. III, 3, 15. Tir. III, 1,51. Rom. 
lll, 2, 131. III, 3, 11. Tim. Ill» 5, 111. Lr. 1, 1, 184 
etc. etc. 
Banister, servant to Henry ofBuckingham, whom 
he betrayed: H8 Il, 1,109. 
Bank, subst, 1) mound, elevated ground: 
skKng on a b. Tp. 1, 2, 389. I upon this b. will test 
mg head, Mids. Il, 2, 40. how sweet the moonlight sleeps 
upon this b. hierch. V, 54. Especially a ridge of earth 
set with flowers; a flower-bed: this prbnrose b. 
whereon we lie, Ven. 151. th. --s wlth pioned and 
twilled brims» Tp. IV, 64. Mids. II, 1,249. Tw. I, 1, 6. 
Vfint. IV, 4, 130. R2 III» 4, 105. H6B Ill, 1, 228. 
Cymb. V, 4, 98. 
2) the earth rising on the side of a 
water; a) of a river: Ven. 72. Lucr. 1119. 1437. 
John Il, 442. H4A I, 3, 98. 106. III, 1, 65. H4B 
1,176YTroil. III, 2, 10. Caes. 1, 1, 50. 63. Cymb. Il, 
4, 71. Per. Il, 4, 24. b) of the sea: Sonn. 56» 11. 
H4A III, 1, 45. H6B III, 2, 83. R3 IV, 4, 525 (Qq on 
the sore), were his brain as barren as --s of Lib.a» 
Troil. 1, 3, 328, i. e. the sandy shore. 
3 Perhaps =bench (as we speak of a bank of 
rowers) in a difficult and ranch disputed passage in 
Mcb. 1, 7, 6: upon tltis b. and school of time. Ail 
Edd. write: upon this bank and shoal of rime; but 
nowhere else in Sh. the word bank oeeurs in the sense. 
of s a n d b a n k, and school is the constant reading of 
O. Edd. 
Banlt. rb. Have I hot heard these islanders shout 
out ' lïve le roi!' as I have --ed their towns? John V, 
2, 104; probably the Freneh aborder: as I landed on 
the banks of their towns. 
Banltrupt (O. Edd. often banrout), adj., i n s o 1- 
vent: the. prove b. in this poor-rieh gain, Lner. 140. 
a. b. beggar, 711. Sonn. 67, 9. Gentl. II, 4,42. LLL 
I, 1, 27. Mids. III, 2» 85. R2 II, 1, 151. 257. It5 IV, 
2, 43. Followed by of: what a face I bave» sinee if 
is b. qf his majest., R2 IV, 267. 
Ianl¢upt, subst. (O. Edd. mostly bankrout), 
i n s o I v e n t t r a d e r: blessed b. that b. love so thriveth, 
Ven. 466. Err. lV, 2, 58. Merch. lII, 1, 47. lV» 1» 122. 
As II, 1, 57. Rom. III, 2, 57. Tim. IV, 1» 8. 
Ianner, flag, standard: when his gaudj b. 
is dlsplaged, Lucr. 272. John 11, 308. H5 IV, 2, 61. 
IV, 8» 87. Cor. III, 1 8. Tim. V, 4, 30. Mcb. I, 2, 49. 
V, 5, 1. Lr. III, 1, 34. lV, 2, 56. Oth. III, 3, 353. Ant. 
l, 2, 106. I!I, 1, 32. Per. V Prol. 19. 
Ia,,nece, little flag: the scafs and the 
about thee did manifoldl. dissuade me from believing 
thee a vessel of too great a burthen, All's 11, 3, 214. 
Ba,,ns, sec Ban. 
Banque{, subst., a rich entertainment, 
feast: what b. wert thou to the faste, Ven. 445. Sonn. 
47, 6. Ado II, 1, 178. II, 3» 22. As II, 5, 64. Shr. Ind. 
1, 39. It5 I, 1, 56. H8 I, 4, 61. lV, 2, 88. Tir. V, 2, 
76. Mcb. 1, 4, 56. Ant. I, 2, 11. Joined tofeast: this 
is the feast that I bave bid ber fo» and this the b. she 
shall su:feit on Tit. V, 2, 194. free ri'oto our feasts 
and --s blood. knives» Mcb. III» 6, 35. 
Sometimes - dessert, a slight refection con- 
sisting of fruit and sweetmeats: mg b. is to close out 
stomachs up» ofter out great good chee G Shr. V, 2, 9. 
we hat, e a triflg fooliçh . towards, Rom. I, 5, 124. 

ladies, there is an htle b. attends you. Tire. I, 2, 
160. 
A running banquet, origina]ly a hasty refreshment, 
in a lascivious sense: some of these should find a run- 
ning b. ere the. rested, H8 I, 4, 12; and for a whip- 
ping: besldes the runnlng b. oftwo beadles, V, 4, 69. 
Banquet, rb., 1)inr., to feast: theminds]t«ll 
b., though the bodj pine, LLL l, 1, 25. H6A I, 6, 13. 
30. II, 1, 12. Troil. V, 1, 51. Tir. V, 2, 114. Caes. 
1, 2, 77. 
2) trans, to treat with a feast: vlsithiscoun- 
tr.men and b. them, Shr. I, 1, 202. 
aquo, naine la Mcb. I, 2, 34 etc. etc. 
Bap|ise, to christen: l'il be new --d, Rom. 
II, 2, 50. 
Baptism, christening: washed aspure as sin 
wlth b. H5 I, 2, 32. H8 V» 3, 162. Oth. I1, 3» 349. 
Iaplista, 1) B. lIinola, father of Catharine and 
Bianca in Shr. I, 1, 85. 2, 97. 118 etc. etc. -- 
2) ïemale naine in Hml. III, 2, 250. 
Bar, name of a French nobleman: H5 III, 5 42. 
IV, 8, 103 (,Edward Dnke of JB.). 
Bar, subst., origimdly a pole nsed for hinderance 
or obstruction; 1) the rail of a grate: a secret 
grate of iron --s, tI6A I, 4, 10. I could rend --s of 
steel, 51. 
2) the b o 1 t: each trifle under truest--s to thrust» 
Soan. 4S, 2. whlch obloqu. set --s before m. tongue, 
H6A 11, 5, 49. 
3) the railing that encloses a place: unto this 
b. and royal interview, H5 V, 2, 27. Especially the 
place where causes of law are tried : all several sins .. 
throng to the b., cr.in 9 all Guilt., R3 V, 3, 199. the 
duke came to the b. H8 II, 1,12. 31. And other places 
of public functioa: at which rime we will bring the 
device to the b. and crown thee for a finder of madmen, 
Tw. I11, 4, 154. 
4) any thing thatseparatesorconfines: 
so sweet a b. should sunder such sweet friends, Merch. 
III, 2, 119. lire being wear. ofthese worldl. --s, Caes. 
I, 3, 96. 
5) any impediment: those --s whlch stop the 
hourl. dial, Lucr. 327. an. cross, an. b., an. impedi- 
ment, Ado II, 2, 4. the waterff kbgdom is no b. fo stop 
the foreign spirits, Merch. !!, 7, 45. put --s between 
the owners and their rights» III, 2, 19. havlng God, her 
conscience» and these --s against me, R3 I, 2, 235. 
6) exceptioa agaiast a demand: other --s he 
la.s before me, Wiv. III, 4, 7. since this b. in law 
raakes us friends, Shr. 1, 1,139. there is no b. fo matce 
against tour highness' clalm fo France, H5 I, 2, 35. 
thefounder ofthis law andfemale b. I» 2,42, i.e. this 
exception to female succession. " 
Bar, rb.» 1) to shut with a bolt, to shut 
in general: all ports l"ll b. Lr. 11, 1, 82. fo b. 
doors, 111,4, 155. ]ou b. the door upon !]our own libert.y. 
Hml. III, 2,351. whlch with a .ielding latch bath 
him fron the blessed thlng he sought, Luer. 340. things 
hid and --ed ri'oto common sense, LLL I, 1, 57. To 
b. up = fo shut up: that is stronger ruade which was 
belote --ed up with ribs of iron, Ado lV, 1, 153. a 
jewel in a ten rimes --ed up ehest, R2 I, 1, 180. 
2) toput a stop to, to prevent: sweet re- 
creatlon --ed, what doth ensue but melanehol.? Err. V, 
78. I b. confusion, As V,4,131. merrlment, whieh 
a thousand harns, Shr. Ind. 2, 138. hspired merit so 



76 

B 

b/ breath is --ed, All's I1, "I, 151. let it be lawrd that 
law b. no wrong, John lll, 1, 186. b. I[arr/ England, 
H5 111, 5, 48. if you cannot b. ltis access to tlte king, 
H8 lli, 2, 17. purpose so --ed, it follows, nothing is 
donc to purpose, Cor. 11I, 1, 148. fo b. /our offence 
lterein, Cymb. I, 4, 1'2,2. the pangs of--ed affections, 
I, 1, 82. his greatness was no guard fo b. heaven's 
shaft, Per. I!, 4, 15. 
3) to exelnde: nor bave we herein --ed your 
better wisdoras, Hml. 1,2, 14. Followed by frora: fi'ora 
hls presence I ara --ed, $Vint. !11, 2, 99. who should 
b. raer.ora thera? R3 IV, 1, 22 (Qq ]ceep). we'll b. thee 
fi'ora succession, Wint. 1V, 4, 440. Espeeially to ex- 
elnde by express prohibition and excep- 
tion: a will that bars the tltle of thy son, John 
19'2,. b. us in our clabn, H5 I, 2,1'2,. to b. your highness 
clairaing frora the .feraale, 92. to b. ray raaster" s heirs. 
113 !11, 2, 54. for jour claira, I b. it in the interest of 
ray wife, Lr. V, 3, 85. 
Hence  to except: I b. to-nigltt, Merch. li 
, 208. 
4) to bar one ofsth.  to deprive one of sth. 
--ed of test, Ven. 784. I whora fortune of such triumph 
--s, Sonn. 25, 3. thinking to b. thee of succession, 
Cymb. !il, 3, 102. 
5) to bar one sth., a) ----- to hinder one ri-oto 
sth.: I will b. no honest raan ray bouse, II4B 11,4,110. 
thou --est us our prayers to the Gods, Cor. V,3,104. 
--est rae my way in aRorae, Tir. i, 291. 383. 
b) - to deprive one of sth.: when the heart 
--ed the aidance of the tongue, Ven. 330. raine eye ray 
heart thy picture's slght would b. Sonn. 46, 3. the 
lottery of ray destiny --s rae the right of voluntary 
choosing, Merch.llç 1, 16.--s rae the place qf a brother, 
As !, 1, 20. heaven and fortune b. rae happy hours, 
R3 IV, 4, 400. 
Barbara (Qq Ft Barbarie), female naine: Oth. 
IV, 3, 26. 33. 
]arbarian, a native of a rude uncivilized 
country: I would they were --s, as they are, thou9h 
in aRorae littered, Cor. 111, 1, 238. a ri'ail vow betwixt 
an errin 9 b. and a supersubtle lénetian, Oth.l, 3,363. 
Adjectively: thou art bou9ht ad sold araong those 
of any wit, like a b. slave, Troil. II, 1, 52. 
Barba¢ie, sec Barbara. 
Bacba¢isn,, manner and quality of a barbarian; 
either savag.e cruelty: b. itself nmst bave pkied 
hira, R2 V, 2, 36; or rude ignorance and want 
of good manners: I bave for b. spoke raore than 
.for that em9el knowled9e you can say, LLL I, 1, 112. 
lest b. should a like lan9ua9e use to all de9rees, Vint. 
II, 1, 84. the Grecians begin to proclaira b, and policy 
grows into an ill opfiion, Troil. V, 4, 18. 
larbarous, after the manner of a bru-bru'Jan 
a) savagely cruel: 0 b. and bloody spectacle! 
H6B IV, 1, 144. IV, 4, 15. Tit. I, 131. 378. lI, 3, 
118. V, 1, 97. V, 3, 4. Lr. IV, 2, 43. Per. IV 2, 70. 
b) r u d e : fit for the raountains and the b. caves 
where raanners ne'er were preached, Tw. lV, 1, 52. b. 
license, H5 I, 2, 271. a b. people, 111, 5, 4. the b. 
Goths, Tir. 1,28. a b. ][oor, 11,3,78. the b. Scythian, 
Lr. I, 1 118. thls b. brawl, Oth. 11 3, 172. b. andun- 
atural revolts, Cymb. IV, 4, 6. 
e) ignorant, unlettered: raost b. intlraatlon, 
LLL IV, 2, 13. we will be singuledfrora the b. V, 1, 
86. r«nk me with the b. raultitudes: Mereh. 11, 9, 

33. to choke his days with b. ignorance, John IV, 
2, 59. 
Bavbavy, 1) the northwestern part of 
Afriea: Merch.lll, 2, 272. H4A II, 4, 84. a . coclc- 
pigeon, As IV, 1, 151. a . heu, H4B !!, 4, 108. a B. 
horse, Hml. V, 2, 155. 168. Oth. 1, 1,112. 
2) --- Barbary horse: rode onroan13. R2V, 
5, 78. rode he on B.? 81. 
Barbason, name of a demon: Wiv. !!, 2, 311. 
H5 11, 1, 57. 
Barbed, armed and harnessed (used only 
of horses): his . steeds, 2 !11. 3, 117. instead 
raounting b. steeds, R3 !, 1, 10.* 
Barber, subst., one whose occupation is to shave 
and dress hair: ai the --'s, Ado !11, , 44. the 
raan, 45. I raust to the --'s, Mids. IV, 1, 25. like to 
a censer in a --'s shop, Shr. 1V, 3, 91. H4B !, 2, 29. 
Hml. Il, 2, 521. like a --'s chair that.]ïts ail buttocks, 
All's !!, 2, 17. like the fmfeits in a --" s shop, as rauch 
in raock as raark, Meas. V, 323 (Nares: 'those shops 
were places of great resort, for passing away time in 
an idle manner. By way of enforeing some kind of 
regularity, and perhaps at least as mueh to promote 
drinking, certain laws were usnally hung np, the 
transgression of whieh was tobe punished by speeifie 
forfeitures. It is hOt tobe wondered, that laws of 
that nature were as often laughed at as obeyed'). 
Barber, rb., to frizzle: --ed ten tiraes o'er, 
Ant. !1, 2, 229. 
Barber-monger, one who deals mueh with 
b af b e r s: jou whoreson cullionly b. Lr. 11, 2, 36. 
Baril, singer and soothsayer anmng the 
Celts: a b. of Ireland told rae once, I should hot lire 
lmg after I saw Richraond, R3 IV, 2, 109. Singer 
in general: hæarts, tongues, figures, scribes, bards, 
ooets, cannot think, speak, cast, write, sing, nuraber 
hls love to Antony, Ant. Ill. 2, 16. 
Bardolph, 1) Lord B.: H4B I, 1, 3.7. I, 3. 2. 
69. IV, 4,97.- 2) the attendant ofFalstaff: Wiv. 
I, 1, 17,9. I, 3, 10. 11I, 5, 1. H4A !, 2, 181 (Qq 
Harvey). 11, 2, 22 54. 11, 4, 330 (Qq Bardoll), etc. 
H4B !, 2, 36 etc. H5 !!, 1, 2 etc. 
Bare, a naine : H4B !11, 2, 22 (Qq Barnes). 
Bare, adj., 1) naked, without eovering: 
on ber b. breast, Luer. 439. Gentl. IV, 1, 36. 111, 1, 
27?, (a quibble). Mereh. IV, 1, 252. As !!, 7, 95. !11, 
3, 61. R2 III, 2, 46. II4B 11, 4, 394. Troil. III, 2, 99. 
Cor. !11, 2, 10. Tire. IV, 3,229. Lr. !!, 3, 15. !1I, 
11. 111, 7, 59. Oth. IV, 2, 49. With an uneo- 
vered head: how raany then should cover that stand 
b. lIerch. 11, 9, 44. Unarmed: with raj b. Jïsts, 
H6A !, 4, 36. b. hands, Ot.h.l, 3, 175. Unsheathed: 
wear thy rapier b. Oth. Vç 1, 2. In gœeneral, unfur- 
nished with what is necessary or eomfortable: what 
b. excuses raakeat thou to be gone! Ven. 188. like a 
late sacked island, b. and unpeopled, Luer. 1741. age 
like wlnter b. Pilgr. 160. b. ruined choirs, where late 
the sweet birds sang, Sonn. 73, 4. the argzment all b. 
is oçraore worth than ..., 103,3. dwell 5 this b. island, 
Tp. Epil. 8. that frora the seedness the b. fallow brings 
to teeraing foison, Meas. I, 4, 42. the sauce to raeat 
cereraony; raeeting were b. without it, Meb. I!!, 4, 37. 
left rae b. to weather, Cymb. 11I, 3, 64; cf. Tire. IV, 3, 
265. Threadbare: if appears by thelr b. liveries, 
Gentl. 11, 4, 45. Figuratively: his right check is worn 
b. All's IV, 5, 104. whilst sorae with cmmig gild their 



B 77 

copper crowns, with truth and plabmess I do wear m5e 
b. Troil. IV, 4, 108. With o.f: b. oJ ber branches, Tit. 
11 4, 17. 
2) Henee  lean poor: duty so great, which 
wit so poor as mine ma.y make seem b., in wanting 
words to show it, Sonn. 26, 6. b. and rotten polic.y, 
H4A 1, 3 108 (Ff. and M. Edd. base), such poor 
such b., such lewd, such mean attempts, 111, 2, 13. 
exceedbg poor and b. IV, 2, 75. lean, sterile and b. 
land, H4B iV, 3, 129. this b. withered trunk, H4B lV, 
5, 230. art thou so b. and full of wretchedness, Rom. 
V, 1, 68. the.y (flatteries) are too rhin and b. to bide 
o.ff'ences» H$ V, 3, 125. Cor. V» 1» 20.* the b. fortune 
ofthat beggar Posthumus, Cymb. III, 5, 119.  lean, 
emaciated: unless .you call three fingers on the ribs 
b. H4A lV, 2, 80. 
3) mere: uttering b. truth, Sonn. 69, 4. the.y live 
b.y .your b. words, Gentl. 11, 4, 46. which is much in 
a b. Christian, 111, 1, 272 (quibble). b.y b. imagination 
ofafeast, R2 1,3, 297. Rom. 111, 2, 46. Tire. 111, I 
45. Hml. 111, 1, 76. 
Used substantively: that termless skin whose b. 
outbragged the web à seemed to wear, Cmnp1. 95. 
Bare, rb. 1) to strip, to make naked: bave 
--d m.y bosom to lhe thunder-slone» Caes. 1, 3, 49. that 
dawning ma.y b. the raven's e.ye» Cymb. 11, 2, 49 (i. e. 
open; O. Edd. bear).* 
2) to shave: shave the head and rie the beard, 
and sa.y it was the desire of the penitent to be so 
before his death, Meas. lV, 2, 189. the--ing of 
beard, All's lV, 1, 54. 
Barebone, skeleton: hem cornes lean Jack, 
here cornes b. II4A II, 4, 358. 
Bareoned, eonsisting only of bones: 
shows me a b. death b.y tbne outworn, Luer. 1761. 
Barefa¢ed, 1) with the face uncovered: 
some of .your French crowns bave no hair ai ai1, and 
then you will pla.y b. Mids. I, 2, 100 (quibble). the.y 
bore him b. on the bief, Itml. IV, 5, 164. 
2) undisguised: though 1 could with b. power 
sweep hbn from m.y sighl, Mcb. 111 1, 119. 
Barefoot. with naked feet: lmusl dance b. 
Shr. I1 33. All's II1, 4, 6. Troil. 1 2, 80. Hml. 
2, 528. Oth. IV, 3, 39. 
Adjectively: lie tumbling in m.y b. wa.y, Tp. 11, 
11. a b. brother, Rom. V» 2, 4. 
Barefooted, the saine: would bave walked b. to 
Pal.stine, Oth. IV, 3, 39 (only in Q2; the other O. 
Edd. barefoot). 
Bare-guavn, eaten off, eaten lean: 
naine is lost, by treason" s toolh b. and canker-bit, Lr. 
V, 3, 122. 
Bare-headed, uncovered: R2 V, 2, 19. H4B 
11, 4, 388. H6B IV, 1, 54. Lr. 111, 2, 60. 
Barely, 1) in a state of nakedness: when 
.you bave our roses, .you b. leave out torns to prick 
ourselves, and mock us with out bareness, All's IV, 
19 (cf. coldl.y, Hml. 1, 2 181; grossi.y» 11I 3, 80). 
2) merely, only: shall Inothave b. m.y prin- 
clpal? Mcrch. IV, 1, 342. R2 1I, 1, 226. Cymb. 
4, 7. 
Bareness, 1) nakedness: beautj o'ersnowed 
and b. ever.ywhere, Sonn. 5, 8. old 1)ecember's b. 97, 
4. All's lV, 2, 20. 
2) leanness: for thelr b., I ara sure they never 
learned that of me, H4A IV, 2, 77. 

Bare-picKed, picked to the bone: for the 
b. bone of mq]est.y, John lV, 3, 148. 
Bare-ribbed, with bare ribs, like a skele- 
ton: in his forehead sits a b. death, John V, 2, 177. 
Barful, full of impediments: a b. strlfe, 
Tw. 1, 4, 41. 
Bargai, subst., 1) agreement, contract: 
so {s the b. As V, 4, 15. take hands, a b. Wint. IV, 4, 
394. no --s break that are hOt tMs da.y ruade, John 
111, 1, 93. to clap this ro.yal b. up of peace, 235. Ib.y 
b. should wear if m.yself, II5 IV, 7, 182. clap hands, 
and a b. V, _'2, 134. there's a b. ruade, Caes. 1, 3, 120. 
lest the b. should catch cold and starve, Cymb. 1, 4, 
179. A mercantile transaction: upon what b. 
do you give if me? Err. 11, 2, 95. he rails on me, 
s, and m.y well-won thr{.ft, Merch. 1, 3, 51. 111, 1, 
59. II4A I11, 1, 139. Figuratively, a eontract of 
love: pure lips, sweet seals in my soft lips imprinted, 
what --s ma.y I make, still to be sealing? Ven. 519. 
Gentl. I1, 2, 7. LLL V, , 799. Mcrch. II1, 2, 195. 
Troil. 11I, , 204. Rom. V, 3, 115. 
9) the thing stipulated or purchased: 
the devil shall have his b. II4A 1, 9, 131. she was too 
çondofher mostfilth.y b. Oth. V, 2, 157. 
To sell one a b.  to make one ridieulous, to 
mbm'rass one by an unexpected reply: the bo.y bath 
sold him a b. LLLIII, 102. to sell a b. well s as cun- 
ning as fast and loose, 104. 
Bargain, rb., 1) to stipulate: 'tis --ed 'twixl us 
twabt, that she shall still be ce'st in compan.y, Shr. 
11, 307. 
9) followed byfor  to make an agreement 
a b o u t t h e t r a n s f e r o f s t h.: so worthless peasants 
b. for their wh'es, H6A V, 5, 53. while Ms own londs 
are --ed.for and sold, H6B 1,1,'2.31. I hace --ed for 
thejoint, Per. IV, 2, 141. 
Barge, a boat for pleasure: H8 1, 3, 61, 1, 
4, 54. 11, 1, 98. Ant. I1, 2, 196. 916. Per. V Prol. 
20. V, 1, 3. 
Bargulus, naine of an Illyrian pirate: HGB IV, 
1, 108 (Cic. de off. I1, 11).* 
BarS. subst., ship: Sonn. 80, 7. llç, 7. Tp. 
1, 2, 144. Err. 1, 1,117. 111, 2, 1. IV, I, 85.99. IV, 3, 
38. Merch. 11, 6, 1. Wint. III, 3, 8. V. 2, 73. HçB I11, 
2, 411. H6C V, 4, 2S. R3 III, 7, 16.'2. IV, 4, 233. 
Troil. Prol. 1.'2. 1, 8, 40. Tir. l, 71. Rom. 111, 5, 13:2. 
V, 3, 118. Tire. IV, 2, 19. V, 1, 53. Caes. V, 1,67. 
Mcb. 1, 3, 24. Hml. lV, 3, 4ç. Lr. IV, 6, 18. Oth. 
1, 48. 189. Per. V l'roi. 22. Used as a feminine: 
Err. IV, 1, 85. Merch. 11, 6, 15. Tit. 1, 73. Lr. IV 
6, 18; as a neuter: Mcb. 1, 3, 24. "fit. I, 71. 
Barlt, subst., the rind or covering of a 
tree: Lucr. 1167. Tp. 11, 2, 128. As 111, 2, 6. -o77. 
379. Wint. IV, 4, 94. R2 111, 4 58. I[8 i, 2, 9t3. "fit. 
V 1, 138. Ant. 1, 4, 1313. Dumain is mine, as sure as 
b. on tree, LLL V, _'2, o.85. 
Bat'k, rb., 1) to peel: would b..your honour 
from that trunk .you bear, and leave .you naked, Meas. 
11I, 1, 7o.. this pine is --ed, that overtopped them all, 
Ant. IV, 1.'2, 23. 
2) to grow like the bark ofa tree: a mos 
instant terrer --ed about, 1[ml. I, 5, 71 (Ff baked). 
Barlt, rb., to cry with the voice of a dog: 
Vert. 240. Tp. 1, 2, 383. Wiv. I, 1 298. llids. I11, 
1, 113. Merch. I, 1, 94. 118 I1, 4, 1130. Cor. 11 3, 
o-24. Used of a wolf: Ven. 459; of a fox: 116B 111. 



B 

1, 55. Followed by at: Ado I, 1, 137,. H6C Il, 1, 17. 
R3 I, 1, 23. Lr. III, 6, 66. IV, 6, 158. Figuratively: 
the envious --in 9 of ilour saucil ton9ue a9ainst mil lord, 
H6A 11I, 4, 33. tfiat thon --est at him, Troil. II» 1, 38. 
Barlley, M. Edd. Berkele!/, q. v. 
Barlloughly, naine of a castle in Wales: R2 
111, 2, 1.* 
Barky. covered with a bark: thefemaleiv!/ 
so enrings the b. fingers of the elm, Mids. IV, 1, 49. 
Barley, a grain of which malt is made: 
Tp. IV, 61. 
Barley-bro|h, term of contempt for beer: can 
sodden water, a drench for sur-reined jades, their b., 
decoct thelr cold biood to such valiant leat? H5 lII, 
5, 19. 
Barre, yeast: and sometlme make t]e drink to 
bear no b. Mids. Il, 1, 38. 
Barn, subst., a building for securing thc produc- 
tions of the earth: Tp. IV, 111. Ado III, 4, 49 (quib- 
ble. Shr. III, _o, 233. H4A Il, 3, 6. Tit. V, 1, 133. 
Barn, subst., a little child: Ado III, 4, 49 
(quibble). A1Fs I, 3, 28. Wint. III, 3, 70. 
Barn, rb., to lay up in a barn: but like stili-pbdng 
Tantahts he sits, and useless 
wits, Lucr. 859. 
Barnade, a kind of goose: Tp. IV, 249.* 
Barnardin¢, urane in Meus. IV, 2, 8.63.68. 125. 
3, 22 etc. V, 472. 
Barnardo (M. Edd. Bernardo) name in Hml. I, 
1, 4 etc. 
Barnes, nmne in II4B III, _'2, 22 (Ff. Bure). 
Barne, naine of an English town: II6C V, 
110. V, 3, 20. 
Baron a nobleman next under the viscount: 
Earl of Southampton, and B. of Tichfieid, Ven. Dedic. 
Lucr. Dedic. Merch.I, 2,72. H6BI, 1,8. A power- 
fui nobleman in general: H4A IV, 3, 66. H5 III, 
5, 46. IV 8, 94. four --s of the Cinque-ports, H8 IV, I 
1, 48. 
Barony, the lordship of a bru-on: for a silken 
point l'Il give mil b. H4B I, 1, 4. 
Barrabas, the robber set free by t'ilate at the 
request of the Jews: would anil of te stock of B. ad 
been fiez" usband, Mereh. IV, 1, 296. 
Barrel, eask, tun: --s ofpite, II6AV, 4, 7. 
a beer-barrel, Hnfl. V, 1, 23. 
Barren, 1) sterile: so b. a land, Vert. Dedie. 
6. Tp. I, 1, 70. L , 338. Ro III, , 13 (te b. eart, 
i. e. the earth whieh serres for a grave) H4BV, 3, 8. 
Tir. Il, 3, 93. rnountains, Wint. III, 
3, 89. lb9. wlnter, H6B II, 4, 3. metal, Merch. I, 
13. women, Ven. lô6. Mids. I, 1, 7. Caes. I, 2, 8. 
b. deart of daugters and of sons, Ven. 74. Figu- 
ratively: b. skiii, Luer. 81. b. rage of deat's eternal 
eo/d, 8onn. 13 12. rilme, 16, 4. ate, Tp. IV, 19. 
b. practisers, scarce show a harvest of teir heavil toii, 
LLL IV 3» 325. wit, Err. II, 1,91. I am hot b. to 
brbg .forth complalnts, R3 II, 2, 67. brain, Troil. I, 
3, 327. sceptre, Mcb. III, 1, 62. Followed by of: 
trees b. of ieaves, Sonn. 12, 5. wliil is mil verse so b. 
of new prlde? 76, 1. of tliat kind out rustic garden 
is b. Wint. IV, 4, 84. b. and bereft of f fleuris, R2 III, 
3, 84. b. of accusatlons Cor. I, 1, 45. Jline ears, 
tlat long tirne lave been b.» Ant. Il, 5, 25, i. e. my 
ears which bave long been, as it were, nntilled, un- 
ploughed, having heard nothing. 

2) dull: t£e b. tender of a poet's debt, Sonn. 83, 
4. b. tasks, LLLI, 1,47. sucli b. plants are set belote 
us, IV, .'2, 29 (quibble). tlie sliallowest tMckskin 
tlat b. sort, Mids. III, 2, 13. now I let go ilour and, 
I ara b., Tw. l, 3, 84 (quibble). such a b. rascal» I, 
90. V, 383. b. ignorance, R2 I, 3, 168. sucli b. plea- 
sures. H4A III, , 14. some quantitil of b. spectators, 
Hml. III, 2, 46. ruade b. tlie sweiled boast of ]Hm that 
best could speak, Cymb. V, 5, 16. 
Barrenly, without fruit: let those whom 
ture hatli hot ruade for store, b. perisli Sonn. 11, 10. 
Barrenness, sterility: lVliere Scotland? I 
Cound it bi/tlie b. Err. III, , 123. 
Barren-Sl»iriled, dull: a b. fellow, .Caes. IV, 
1, 36. 
Barrieado, subst., a fortification ruade in 
baste, an obstruction: wbdows transparent as 
--es, Tw. IV, 2, 41. no b.for a belli/, Wint. I, 2, 20. 
Barrieado, vb., to fortify: man is enemil fo 
vir9bdtil ; how mail we b. it a9ainst Mm? All's I, 1,124. 
Barrow, a small carriage eithcr borne by 
two men, or supportcd by one wheel and rollcd by 
a siugle man: fo be carried in a basket, like a b. of 
butclier's oj]àl, Wiv. III, 5, 5. 
I|ars«n, a place in Englmd: H4B V, 3, 94.* 
Barrer, to exchange: witli a baser man of 
arms tlieil would liave --ed me, H6A I. 4, 31. 
Barflo|'mev, name of a page: Shr. Ind. I, 105. 
Bar|holomeWo the festival of St. B., the 
24 ch of August: lhtle tidy B. boar-pig, H4B II, 4, 
.oS-(roasted pigs being mnong the chief attractions 
of Bartholomew fair), iike flies at B. tide H5 V, 
2, 336. 
Basan: O, that I were upon t]e ill of B., to 
' outroar the horned herd! Aut. III, 13, 1:?,7 (cf. Psalms 
22, 12). 
Base, subst., 1) thc part of a thing on which it 
stands, the fo u n d a ri o n : laid great --s for eternitil, 
Sonn. 1"25, 3. as dotl a galled rock o'erlang and juttil 
his confounded b. I15 III, 1, 18. Troil. IV, 2, 109. 5, 
212. Tim. I, 1, 64. Caes. III, 2, 19-'2. Hml. I, 4, 71. 
1I, 2, 498. 
2) ground, reason: on b. and ground enough 
Orsino's enemil, Tw. V, 78. 
Base, subst. 1) (most M. Edd. bass), t h e I o w e s t 
part in the harmony of a nmsical composition: 
the mean is drowned with ilour unrulil b. Gentl. I, 
96. "ris now b tune. All but the b. Shr. III, 1» 46. 
means and --s, Wint. IV, 3, 46. the veril b. strin 9 of 
humilitil, tt4A II, 4, 6. b. vlol Err. IV, 3, 23. 
2) Bases, plur., a kind of embroidered mantle 
which hung down from the middle to about the knees 
or lower, worn by knights on horseback' (Iqares). 
It must have consisted of two parts: Oniil, nil friend, 
I ilet ara unprovided of a pair of bases, llé'il sure 
orovide: tlou shalt have mil best gown to make thee a 
pair, Per. II» 1» 167. 
Base, snbst., a rustie gaine won by the swift- 
est rnnner: to bid the wbd a b. he now prepares, Ven. 
303, i. e. to challenge the wind to a race.* I bid the 
b. for Proteus, Gentl. I, 2, 97 (quibble). lads more like 
to run the countril b. than fo commit such slauglter 
Cymb. V, 3, 20. 
Base, rb. (M. Edd. bass), to sound with a 
deep voice: the tlunder.., did b. mil trespass, Tp. 
III, 3, 99. 



B 79 

Base, adj., 1) low in place: the cedar stoops 
ot no rite b. shrub's foot, Lucr. 664. lest the b. earth 
s]tould from ber vesture steal a kiss, Gentl. Il, 4, 159. 
I ào affèct the very ground, which is b., where ber 
shoe, which is --r, guided by ber foot, which is --st 
dotl tread, I,LL I, _'2 173. kisses the b. gvund, IV,3 
225. fill no rite b. earth fi'om the firmament, 
-00. i rite b. court ]te doth attend no speak wlth you, 
III, 3. 176. 180 (i. e. the outer or lower court), scorn- 
ing the b. degrees, Caes. Il, 1, :26. In most of the 
passages in implies also the idea of meanness. 
2) oflowstation, ofmean account:wose 
--r stars do shut us up in vishes, All's i, I, 197. make 
concelve a bark of--r klnd by bud qf nobler race 
V¢int. IV, 4 94. neighboured bff Jruà qf --r qualitff, 
II5 I, 1.6_ °. wlth a --r man of arms, H6A I, 4, 30. b. 
metal Tire. III, 3, 6. --st metal, Caes. I, 1, 66. IIml. 
IV, 1, 26. unmlxed vith --r marner, Hml. i, 5, 104. 
ou," --st beggars are in the poorest thbg superfluous, 
Lr. Il, 4, -'267. 'ris the plague of great ones; preroga- 
ticed are they less than the b. Oth. III, 3, 274. 
other elements I give no --r lire, Ant. V, , 293. 
3) mean, vile: thvwbg the b. thong 'om 
bendlng crest, Ven. 395. hiding b. sb in plalts of ma- 
jesty, Lucr. 93. rny digression is so vile, so b. 202. 
thon nobly b. 660. 1000. 100-0. Sonn. 33, 5. 34, 3. 
74. 12. 94, 11. 141, 6. Gentl. Il, 7, 73. III, I, 157. 
IV, 1. ?9. 73. V, 4, 136. Viv. I, 3, 3.97. Meus. III, 
1.89. Ado II, 1,714. LLL I, 1, 30. 87. I, -0, 51.61. 
hIids, l. 1. -'232. hIerch. II, 7. 50. As II, 3, 32. II, 7, 
79. H6A1, 1,137. IV. 1, 14. IV, 6, -01. R3111,3,180. 
Cor.I, 1. 161. Tim. IV, 3,471. Ant. V, -'2,303, etc. etc. 
4) o f illegi limate birth: why bastard? where- 
fore b. ? Lr. I, 2, 6. wh.y brand they us with base, with 
baseness? bastardy? base, base? 10. (cf. the Trouble- 
some reign of King John p. 2.o8: base no a klng 
bastard of a kiug). 
Base-born, of low birth: contemptuous b. cal- 
let as she is, H6B I, 3, 86. berner ten thousand b. Cades 
rnfscarrg, IV,8,49. no let thff fougue detect thff b. heurt, 
H6C II. 2. 143. 
Baseless, without foundation, airy: like 
the b. fibrlc of this vision, Tp. IV, 151. 
Basely, vilely: they b. flff, Vert. 894. b. dlgnl- 
dïed, Lncr. 660. non bought b. with gold, Lucr. 1068. 
the kbg is non hlmself, but b. led bff flatterers, R2 II, 
1, -'241. 253. H4A V, , 83. H6A iV, 5, 17. Tin. 
353. 433. IV, , 38. V, 3, 101. Ant. V, 15, 55. 
Baseness, 1 low tank: reflect I non on thff b. 
court-contempt? Wint. IV, 4, 758. 
2) that which becomes a low station: 
some kinds of b. are noblff undergone, Tp. III, I, 2. 
such b. had never like executor 1. I once did hold 
a b. to wrltefab', Hml. V, 2, 34. 
3) ri leu ess, meanness: ai! the accommodations 
that thon bearest are nursed bff b. Meus. IIi 1, 15.* 
ïw. V, 149. Cor. III, 2, 123. Oth. I, 3, 332. III, 4 27. 
Ant. IV, 14, 57.77. Cymb. 1 1 142. I11, 5, 88. 
Abstr. pro concr.: thou unconfinable b. Wiv. il, 
, 21. damned b. Tim. i11, 1, 50. 
4) illegitimate birth, bastardy: thatforced 
b. which he bath put upon in, Wint. 11,3, 78. why brand 
they us wlth base, with b.» bastardff? Lr. I, 2 10. 
Base-string (thus many M. Edd., O. Edd. with- 
out hyphen), the string that gives the lowest 
ound: HtA ii, 4, 6. 

Base-viol, a stringed instrument for the 
lowest sounds: Err. IV, 3, 23. 
Bashful. shamefaced: he burns with b. shame æ 
Veu. 49. and forth with b. innocence doth Me, Lucr. 
1341. hence, b. cunnlng, Tp. III, 1, 81. b. slncer#y 
and comely love, Ado IV, 1, 55. b. modesty, Shr. Il, 
49. you vlrtuous ass, .you b. fool, H4B Il, -0, 80. where- 
fore shouldyou be so b.? H5 IV, 8, 75 (Flucllen says 
pashful), and b. Henry deposed, H6C I, 1, 41. ber b. 
.years, R3 IV, 4, 326. 
Bashfulness, S]lamefacedness: no malden 
shame, no touch of b. Mids. III, _'2, 286. 
Basilis¢o-like: knqht, knight, good mother, 13. 
John I, 244 (lqares: "This is in allusion no an old 
play, entitled Soliman and Perseda, in which a foolish 
knight, called Basilisco, speaking of his on naine, 
adds, Kuight, good fellow, knight, knight. And is 
answered immediatcly, Knave, good fellow, knave, 
knave"). 
Basilisk, 1) a fabulons serpent, called also 
cockatrice (q. v.) supposed no kill by its look: make 
me hot sighted llke the b. V¢int. I, 2, 388. H5 V, , 
17. II6B III, ?, 52.3"_)4. H6C III, 2, 187. R3 I, 2, 
151. Cymb. II, 4, 107. 
2) a kind of ordnance: of--s ofcannon, cul- 
verin, II4A Il. 3, 56.* 
Basiuecu. ternt of contempt for a Frenchman: 
.for gb'ing up of zVormandy unto ,l[ounsleur B., H6B 
IV. 7, 31 (baisez mon cul). 
Ba.i,, sec JBason. 
Basigsioke, place in England: H4B II, 1, 182.  
Basis foundation: the sore t]tat o'er his 
wave-worn b. bowed, Tp. II, 1, 120. build me thy for- 
tunes ni»on the b. qf ralour, Tw. III, 2, 36. upon this 
mountain's b. ti5 IV -0, 30. Troff, .yet upon his b., had 
been dovn, Troil. I, 3, 75. great tffrannff, laff thou thy 
b. sure, Mcb. IV, 3, 3-'2. 
Pedestal: that now on Pompeff's b. lies along, 
Caes. Iii, 1, 115. 
Basl. no warm by exposing to the sun: 
who laid him down and --ed Mm in the sun, As il, 
7, 15. 
BasKet, a vessel ruade of twigs or other 
things interwoven: Wiv. III, 3, 13. 137. 192. II1, 5, 
5. 99. 104. IV, 2, 33. 94. 121. Hml. III, 4, 193. 195. 
Ant. V, 2, 343. Youth in a b. Wiv. IV, -0, 122, per- 
haps a proverbial expression, whose sense has not 
yet been ascertained. 
BasKel-hill, the hilt of a sword with a co- 
vering like basket-work: you b. stalejuggler, H4B il, 
4, 141, i. e. bully, braggart.* 
Bason (M. Edd. basin), a vessel no hold water for 
washing or other uses: Shr. Ind. 1, 55. Shr. ii, 350. 
Tin. V, 2, 184. Tire. II1 1 7. 
Bass, v. Base. 
Bassanio, friend of Antonio: Merch. I, 1, 57. 
69 etc. etc. 
Bassiaus, brother no the emperor Saturninus: 
Tin. i, 10 etc. etc. 
Basa (from the Italian), enough: b., content 
thee, for I bave in full, Shr. I, 1, 203. 
Bastard, subst., a sweet Spanish wine: we shall 
bave ail the world àrlnk brown and whlte b. Meas. III, 
2,4. a plnt of b. H4AIl, 430. your brown b. is 
gour onlg drlnk, 82. 
Bastard, subst, a person born out of wed- 



80 I 
lock: OE »z dear love were but the child of star?, it b. thy rage, H5 I11, -9, 26. who --s mine honour slmll 
might for Fortune's b. be unfathered, $onn. 124, 2. hot know rn.y coin, Tim. lll,3,26. Hence  to blunt: 
--s of his foul adulterate heurt, Compl. 175. 9ettin9 b. his scythe's keen edge, LL L I, 1, 6 (cf. unbated and 
a hundred --s, Meus. I11, 2, 125. Ado IV, 1, 190. V, bateless). 
1,193. LLL¥, 1,79. AslV, 1,215. All'sll, 3,100 e) to deduet, to ferait» to exeept: thon 
(--s to the English). 'int. 11, 3, 73. 139. IV, 4, 83. didst promise to b. me a full /ear, Tp. I, 2» -950. b., 
John I 207 (a b. to the tbne). H6A I, 1, 93. 2» 47. I beseech ]ou, widow .Dido, II, 1» 10O. of m/ instruc- 

tion hast thou nothing --d, I11 3, 85. rather than she 
will b. on? breath of ber accustomed crossness» Ado II, 
3, 183. were this world mine, Demetrius bebg 
hlids. I» 1, 190. I will hot b. thee a scrtTle, All's II, 

Bastard, adj., 1) illegitimately begotten: 3» -934. b. me some and I will pa/ /ou some» tI4B V, 
this b. graff shall never corne to growth, Lucr. 106-9. 5, 130. nehher will the/ b. on? jot of ceremon/, Cor. 
this demidevil, for he's a b. one, Tp. V, 273. a b. 1I» -9, 144. /ou b. too rnuch of /our own rnerits, Tire. 
--. -93. [ cannot be 
son ofthe kg s» H4B II, 4, 307. II6AIV, 6» 20. H6B 1» 2» 212. no leisure --d, Hml. V _o, 
IV» lo,,)136. V 1 115. R3V, 3, 333. Cor. IV» 5» 0-40. --d on? doit ofa thousandpleees, Per. IV» 2, 55. Ab- 
spurious, adulterate: these b. signs of solutely: O let me b. Cymb. I11, 2» 56. 
fuir, Sonn. 68, 3. beauty slandered wlth a b. shame, 2) intr., a) to fall off: do 1 hot b. ? do 1 hot 
1-97» 4 (i. e. with the shame of spuriousness), b. vlr- dwindle? H4AIII,32. 'ris a hooded valour» and when 
tues, Gentl. 1II, 1,321. shame bath a b. fume» well it appears, it will b. H5 11I, 7» 1.'22 (quibble). 
rnanaged» Err.lll, 2, 19. a klnd of b. hop?» hlereh, lil b) to flap the wing% to flutter (a terre in 
5» 8. ' ïaleoury): these kites that b. and beat and will hot be 
Bastardize, to beget out of wedlock: had obedient, Shr. IV, 1, 199. like estridges that with the 
the maidenliest star twizzkled on ny --ing» Lr. I, 2 wind --d, H4A IV, 1, 99 (O. Edd. baited), a hooded 
144 (Qq bastardy), valour, and when it appears it wll b. H5 III, 7, 122 
lastardl, adj., --- b as tu r d: thou b. rogue» H4B (quibble). hood my unmanned blood»--ing in rny cheeks 
11, 1, 55 (Mrs. Qnicldy's speech).* Rom. 111, 2, 14. 

Baslardy, illegitinate birtb: Lucr. 52.'2. 
John I, 74. H6B III, 2, 223 (born in b.). R3 II1, 5, 75. 
7» 4.9. Tir. V, 1, 48 (his fruit of b.  bis bastard 
fruit). Caes. Il, 1, 138. Lr. I, .'2, 10. 144 (Ff. bastard- 
izing). 
Baste, 1) to sew slightly: the guards are but 

Batc-breeding, occasioning quarrels: tMs 
b. spy (je.-dousy) Vert. 655. cf. breed-bate. 
Baeless, hot to be blunted: hapl.ythat naine 
of chaste unhappil/ set this b. edge on his keen appetite, 
Lucr. 9. 
Baies, naine of a soldier tu H5 1¥, 1, 87. 

slightly --d on neither» Ado I, 1, -989. the proud lord Bat-fowling, a mode of catching birds at night 
that --s his arrogance wlth his own seam, Troil.ll, 3, by re?ans of torehes, poles, aud sometimes of nets: 
(perhaps to be taken in the second sigaification). /ou would lift the moon out of ber sphere ..... We 
195'2.) to drip fat upon meat on the spit: the wouldso, andthengo a b. Tp. 11, 1, 185.* 

nzeat wants --ing, Err. 11, -9, 59. the proud lord that 
--s his arrogance with his own seam, Troil.ll, 3,195 
(if hot to be taken in the first signification). 
3) to beat with a stick: another dry --ing, 
Err. II, 2, 64 (quibble). 

Bath, 1) ablution: Cor. I, 6, 63. season the 
slaves for tubs and --s, Tire. IV, 3» 86 ,as a cure of 
syphilis), hIetaphorically: sleep, ... sore labour's b. 
hIcb. Il, -9 38. 
-9) heat like that ix a bath: and in the height of 

iastinado, a sound beating: I will deal in b. to be thrown into the Thames» Wiv. 111, 5, 
poison with thee, or in b., or in ste?l» As V, 1, 60. he 1-90. 
gives the b. with hls tongue John 11463. gave Ama- 3) watering-place: grew a seetMng b, whieh 
mon the b. H4A I1, 4, 370. /et men prove against strange naladies a sovereign 
Bat, 1) the animal Vespertilio: Tp. I, -9 340. cure, Soan. 153, 7.11. 154, 11. 
V»91. Meb.lll,-9»40. IV, In 15. Hml. lll, 4, 190 (who» Bath?, 1) trans, to immerse» to wash as in 
that's but a que?n» fuir, sober» wise» would from a a bath: the crow rna/ b. his coal-black wings in ndre, 
paddock, from a bat a gib, such dear concernings Lucr. 1009. in Lucrece 'bleeding stream he falls and 
hide?). --s the pale fear in his face» 1775. these oflen --d 
2) a heavy stick: so slides he down upon his she in ber fluxive eyes, Compl. 50. when teurs out re- 
grained b. Compl. 64. wh?re go /ou with --s and countments had most kindly --d» As IV, 3 141. d 
clubs? Cor. I, 1, 57. 165. whether /our costard or m/ th] growing with out heated bloods» H6C II, -9 169. 
b. be the barder, Lr. IV, 6, 247 (Ff. ballow). --d in maiden blood» Tit. II, 3, 230-. b. thelr hands in 

Batch, baked bread; metaphorically: thou 
erust. b. of nature, Troil. V, 1, 5. 
Bat?, subst, quarrel: breeds no b. wlth telling 
ofdiscreet storles» H4B Il, 4, -971. 
Bate, rb., (cf.abate) 1) trans., a) to beat down, 
to we aken: these griefs and losses bave so --d me, 
llerch. III» 3» 32. those --d that inherit but the fall 
of the last monarchj, All's Il, 1, 13. 
b) to weaken» diminish: with --d breath, 
Merch.l, 3,125. bid the main.flood b. his usual height, 
IV» 1, 72. like a --d andretU-ed flood, John V, 4, 53. 

it, Ca?s. 11, 9, 79. b. out hands in Caesar's blood, I11, 
1, 106. b. n. d.ing honre" in the blood, Ant. IV, 2, 
6. had I this cheek to b. m. lips upon, Cymb. I, 6,100. 
2) intr., to be in a bath, to be immersed in 
a flnid as in a bath: she --s in water» yet ber tire 
rnust burn» Vert. 94. to b. in fier/ fltoods» lIeas. III, 1, 
1-92. eagles having latel. --d, H4A IV, 1, 99. in which 
so rnan.y smiling tomans --d» Ca?s. II, -9, 86. to b. in 
reeklng wounds» hIcb. I, 2, 39. chaste 1)tan ing, 
Cymb. 1I, 4, 8-9. 
Bail?t, a small bat to beat linen when taken 



out of the buck: I reraember tne kissing of ner b. As 
!1, 4, 49. 
Battalia (thusFf; Qq battalion), host, army: 
our b. trebles tnat accourir, R3 V, 3, 11. when sorrows 
corne, theg corne hot single spies, but in --s» Hml. IV, 
5, 79. 
Battaliott, v. -altalia. 
Batten, to grow fat: b. on coldbits» Cor. IV, 
5, 35. could gou on this fair mountain leave to feed, 
and b. on tnis moor? I/ml. III, 4, 137. 
Batter, to beat with successive blows, 
and hence to bruise, to shake, to demolish: Ms --ed 
shidd, Yen. 104. rude fa»t, to b. such an ivor 9 wall, 
Lucr. 464. 723. 1171. with a log b. his skull, Tp. 111, 
2, 98. tnese lt'augnty words of nets nave --ed me like 
cannon-shot, I/6A Ill, 3, 79. the rare that s down 
the wall, Troil. I, 3, 206. Achilles in commotion rages 
and --s down himself, Il, 3, 186. his --ed shield, 
Tir. IV, 1, 128. tne rare to b. tne fortress of it, Ant. 
I!!, 2, 30. tne thunderer wnose boit --s aH rebelling 
coasts, Cymb. V, 4, 96. Absol., to make attacks 
in the manner of a rare: the wreckful slege of 
--ing days, Sonn. 65, 6. so you would leave --ing, 
Err. I!, 2, 3t3 (i. e. beating), their --ing cannon, John 
11, 882. Followed by at: tne tyrant bas hot --ed at 
their peace? Mcb. IV, 8, 178. 
Battery, 1)the act ofbattering, assault: 
where a heart is hctrd theg make no b. Vert. 426. as 
they did b. to the spheres intend, Compl. 23. to leave 
the b. that you make 'gainst mine, 277. this union shall 
do more than b. can to our gares, John Il, 4413. /fl 
begin the b. once again, I/5 II!, 3, 7. where is best 
place to make our b. next, I/6A I, 4, 135. ber sighs will 
make a b. in his breast, H6C !11, 1, 37. talks like a 
knell, and his hum is a b. Cor. V, 4, 22. make b. to 
our ears with the loud music, Ant. !!, 7, 115. cannot 
keep the b. from mg heart, IV, 14, 89. ber judgment , 
whieh else an easg b. might lay fiat, Cymb. !, 4, 22. 
make raging b. upon shores of flint, Per. IV, 4, 43. 
make a b. through hls deqfened parts, V, 1, 47. 
2) unlawful beating of another: l'llhave 
mine action of b. on thee, lleas. I!, 1, 188. l'll have 
an action of b. against him, Tw. IV, 1, 36. and will 
hot tdl him of his action of b. Hml. V, 1, 111. 
Battle, subst., 1) fight, encounter between 
opposite armies: Ven. 99. Lucr. 145. 1438. Mids. 
V, 44. Shr. I, 2, 206 (pitched b.). H6A !, 1, 129. 4, 
78. IV, 1, 19 (at the b. ofPatag). H6B IV, 2, 188. 
V, 2,49, etc.etc, lqever used of a sea-fight, but placed 
in contradistinction to it: provoke hot b., till we bave 
donc at sea, Aut. !I!, 8, 3. -- To give one b. I/6A V, 
2, 13. Cor. !, 13, 11. to strike a b. I/5 II, 4, 54. to 
fight --s, I/6A !, I, 31. to bid oe b. H4A V, 2, 31. 
I/6C I, 2, 71. III, 3, 235. V, 1, 63. 77. 111. arise 
mg kni9nts o" tne b. Cymb. V, 5, 20 (created knights 
on the field of battle). 
2) a single fight: I say and will in b. prove, 
R2 !, 1, 92. tnisfeast of b. with mine enemg, I, 3, 92. 
a maiden b. ( an unbloody combat) Troil. IV, 5, 
87. Any other combat: give b. to the lioness, As 
IV, 3, 131. his cocks do win the b. still of mine, Ant. 
I! 3, 313. 
3) an army prepared for or engaged in fight: 
like heralds "twixt two dreadful--s set, John IV, 2, 
78. I/4A IV, 1, 129. I/4B !!!, 2, 1135. IV, 1, 179. 
H5 IV Chor. 9. IV, 2, 54. H6A IV, 7, 13. H6C I, 1, 
Schmldt, Shakespeare Lexicon. 3. Ed. T.I. 

B 81 

15. II, 1,121. I!, 2, 72. V, 4, 66. R3 I, 3, 130. V, 
3, 24. 88. 138. 292. Troil. I!!, 2, 29. Ant. II!, 9, 2. 
squares of b. H5 IV, 2, 28. 
4) division of an army: ourmain--'sri'ont, 
I/6C I, 1, 8. the French are bravelg in their--s set, 
H5 IV, 3, 139. their --s are at hand, Caes. V, 1, 4. 
set out --s on, V, 3,108. lead out first b. Meb. V, 13, 4. 
5) an array similar to an army drawn up: on 
hls bow-back he bath a b. set of bristlg pikes, Ven. 619. 
Battle, vb. intr. to contend in fight: lions 
war and b. for their dens, I/6C Il, 5, 74. 
lBatlle.aIe, axe used in fight: reared alof 
the bloodg b. Tir. lll, 1, 1139. 
Battlement, a wall raised on a buildiug 
with embrasures; only used in the plural: John 
Il, 374. R2 iii, 3, 52. Rom. IV, 1, 78. Caes. l, 1, 43. 
Mch. I, 2, 23. l, 5, 41. I/ml. V, 2, 281. Oth. Il, 1, 13. 
Baœety, like a bat: till o'er their brows death- 
countefeiting sleep with leaden legs and b. wings doth 
creep, Mids. !!!, 2, 3135. 
Bauble, a trifle, a useless plaything: a 
paltry cap, a custard-coffin, a b., a silken pie, Shr. 
IV, 3, 82. offwith that b. V, 2, 122. an idiot holds his 
' b.for a god, Tir. V, 1, 79. his shipping, poor ignorant 
--s, Cymb. III, 1, 27. Cassio calls Bianca so: thither 
cornes the b. and falls me about mg neck, 0th. IV, 1, 
139 ; and Pisanio the letter of Leonato: senseless b., 
art thou a feodary for this act. Cymb. III, 2, 20. 
In a restricted sense, = the fool's club: I 
would give his wife my b., to do ber service, All's IV, 
5, 32. like a great natural that runs lolling up and 
down to hlde his b. in a hole, Rom. I!, 4, 97 ; (iu both 
passages with a hidden obscenity). 
Used adjectively= insignificant, contempt- 
ible: the sea being smooth, how many shallow b. 
boats dare sali upon her patient breast, Troil. I, 3, 35. 
Baubling, insignificant, contemptible: 
a b. vessel was he captain of, Tw. V, 57. 
Bavitt, brushwood, light and combustible 
matter: shallow j esters and rash b. wits, soon kindled 
and soon burnt, H4A !11, 2, 131. 
Bavble and Baubling s. -Bauble, baubling. 
Baw¢o¢k, a terre of endearment, synonymous to 
chuck, but always masc.: ho,» now, mg b.! how dost 
thou, ehuck? Tw. I11, 4, 125.*that's mg b. Wint. I, 2, 
121. good b., bate thg rage; use lenltg, sweet chuck, 
I/5 II!, 2,213. the king's a b. and a heart of gold, IV, 1, 44. 
Bawd, procurer or procuress; 1) toast.: 
Meas. II, 1, 231. 237. 248. I!!, 2, 20. IV, 2, 15. As 
111, 2, 85. I-I5 !I!, 13, 135. V, 1, 90. Troil. I, 2, 307. 
V, 10, 37. Tire. !!, 2, 62. 89. Lr. II, 2, 21. Per. IV, 13, 
42. 2) fera.: Meas. III, 2, 133. 208. Wint. I!, 3, 138. 
Rom. II, 4, 136.*Tire. IV, 3, 114. 134. 0th. IV, 2, 20. 
t'er. V t'roi. 11. 3) of uncertain gender: lieas. II, 
1, 713 (a 's bouse). H4A I, 2, 9. Lr. III, 2, 90. Fi- 
guratively: 0 strange excuse, when reason is the b. 
to hst's abuse! Vert. 792. Lucr. 623. 768. 886. lIeas. 
III, 1, 150. John I!, 582. III, 1 59. I2 V, 3, 137. Hml. 
III, 1, 113.--* 
Bawd-bor, born as abawd, a bawd from 
b i r t h : bawd is he doubtless, and of antiquit 9 too; b. 
leas. 111, 2, 72. 
Bawdry, 1) obscenity, unchaste lan- 
guage: the prett;est love-songs for maids, so without 
b. Wint. IV, 4, 194. he's for a jlg or a talc of b. 
Hml. Il, 2, 522. 



82 B 
2) unehastity: we must be marrled, or we must French and lVelsh --ing him at the hee, II4B 1, 
lire in b. As lll 3, 99 (rhymiug to Audrey). 80. here wast thou ed, brave hart, Caes. III, 1,204. 
Bawd}', unchaste: if b. talk offendyou, Meas. Baynard's çaslle, the residence of Richard III 
IV, 3, 188. a b. planet, Wiat. I, 2, 01. a b. son9, at the rime of his usurpation: R3 11I, 5, 98. 105. 
H4A lll , 1. to hear a merry b. play, II8 Prol. 14. Bayonne, town in France: H8 I1, 4, 172. 
eve false drop in her b. veins, Troil. IV, 1, 69. the Ba}--ree, 1  u r e 1: the s in out country are all 
b. hand of the dial is ,ow upon the prick of oon, witered, R2 11, 4, 8. 
Rom. 11, 4, 118. blood b. villaitb Hml. !I, 2, 608. the Bay-in,low, a windov fornfing a recess in the 
b. wind that kisses al it meets, 0th. IV, 2, 78. room and projecting outwards frou he wall: if bath 
Bawdy-house, house of prostitution: H4A --s transparent as barricadoes, Tw. IV 2 40. 
I!I, 3, 19. 114 (his bouse is turned b.; the pick Be. As wlmt is regular and conformable to the 
pockets). 17. IIB !!, , 157. H5 11 1 87. er. IVI present use of the word may be round in every page 
of the poet, we shall only point out what is of rater 
Bau'l, to crv vith vehemence: ou in occarrence or has now grown obsolete. 
blasphemous dog, "Tp. 1, 1, 8.*those that b. out the I) Anomalies of the coajugation: 1) Is insteaù 
ruins of th linen, H4B 11, 2, 27. of are: Ill deeds is doubled with an evil word, En'. 
Bay, subst., 1) an arm of the sea, extenfling 111 2 20 (F234 anù M. Edd. are). when his disais« 
into the land: n affection h«tth an unknown bottom and he is parted, All's 111, ç I13. Iris brother is re- 
like tlte b. f Portual, AslV, 1,211. in such a des- puted one of the best that is, IV, 8, 
çold and siver ewes and rams Met-ch. I, 8, . more 
perate b. of death, R8 IV, 4, 
2) port: anchored in the b. where all men ride, lines than is in the new map, Tw. !11 2 8. that's 
Sonn. 137, ç.  an racusian born corne to the b. the waverinç commons, R2 !I, 2, 12. is all 
of Ephesus, Err. I, 1, 20. ott sent me to the b. for a well IIgB !II,  11. cf. is all thinçs read R3 111, 
bark, IV, 1» . who put unluckil i»to this b. V, 125. 4,  (Ff. are). he's inclbed as is the rareous wolves, 
the scmfed bark purs from ber native b. Merch. !!, ç IIçB !11, 1 78 (I. Edd. either are, or wo). hands, 
lb. Port le lanc, a b. in Brittan, 2 !I, 1,277. to do Rome service, is but vain, Tir. III, 1, 80 
from the Atheuian b. put forth toward Phria, Troil. Edd. are). what mamers is in this Rom. V, 8, 2i4. 
Prol. ç. returns with precious ladinç to the b. Tit. I, Especially after mnnerals, when a sure maùe up 
72. that he ma bless this b. wlth his tall ship, Oth. of several things is considereù as a whole : what 
I1 1 7. ço to the b. and disembark m coffers, 11 ten hundred touches unto thee Vert. 51. is twent 
hundred kisses such a trouble 52. fort ducats is 
1» 210. 
Bay, subst., laurel: my dish of chastlt wth too nmch to lose, Err. IV 3 97. and so to stud, three 
rosemary and s Per. IV 6, 160. years is but short, LLL !, 1, 181. how many inches 
Ba, subst., division in the architectural arrange- is in one ndle  V, 2, 188. fteen wlves  nothi, 
ment of a b&lding, nmrked by any leading feature, Mereh. !! œee 170. what is si winters? R2 I 3 260. 
most eommonly bv the single windows or o&er eight yards of uneven ground is threescore and ten 
openings: if this lÇw hoM bi lïenna ten year l"ll toiles afoot with me, It4A II, , 27. from nine till 

rent the fab'est bouse in it after three pence a b. 
1Ieas. 11, 1, 255.* 
Bay, subst., 1) barking: uncouple here and let 
ris make a b. and wake the emperor and his lovely bride, Tir. I1, 2, 3. 
2) the state of a chase, when the gaine is driven 
to extremity and tms against its pursuers: she hears 
the hounds are at a b. Vert. 877Ytis thought /our 
deer does hold !/ou at a b. Shr. V, 2, 56. to rouse 
wrongs and chase thern to the b. R2 I1, 3, 128. turn on 
the blood.y hounds and make the cowards stand aloof 
at b. H6A IV, 2, 52. 
3) the state of being in the power of another: 
Ah, that I Imd m/ la@ at this b., to kiss and clip me 
till I run awa/! Pilgr. 155. I would we had a thou- 
sand Roman dames ai such a b., b/ turn to serve our 
lust, Tir. IV, 2, 42. 
la, adj., brown; used ofhorses: l'ld give b. 
curtal and Ms fitrtlture, All's 11 3, 6. a b. courser, 
Tire. I, 2, 217. to ride on a b. trotting-horse Lr. III, 
4, 57. 
Bay, rb., 1) to bark, a) intr.: what moves Ajax 
thus to b. at him? Troil. II, 3, 98. we are at the stake, 
and --ed about with man#enemies, Caes. IV, 1, 49. 
b) trans., - to bark at: I had rather be a dog 
and b. the rnoon, Caes. IV» 3, 27. set the dogs of the 
street to b. me, Cymb. V, , 223. 
_'2) to chas% to drive to bay: the.--edthe 
bear with hounds of Sparta, Mids. IV, 1, 118. the 

twelve is three long hours, Rom. !!, 5, 11. Caes. 1, 3, 155 
And after here, there, where: here's more of 
Tp. V, 216. for th.y three thousand ducats here is six» 
Merch. IV, 1 84. here's eight that must take hands 
As V, 4, 134. here's flowersfor ou, 'int. IV, 4,10ô. 
heïe's but two and.fift.y hairs, Troil. 1, 2, 171. here' s 
man.y else, Cor. 1, 9, 49. tltou thinkest there is no more 
such shapes as he, Tp. I, 2» 478. there's but.rive upon 
this isle, 111, 2, 6. there's mmLu bave committed 
Meas. !I, 2, 89. there' s other of our friends will ffreat 
us here IV, 5, 12. there's none but witches do inhabit 
here» Err. III, 2, 161. there's two tonffues, Ado ¥, 1, 
171. there is three, LLL V, 2, 231. there is rive in 
the 3ïrst show, V, 2, 543. there is two or three lords 
and ladles more married, Mids. IV 2 16. there is two 
hard things, III, 1, 48. there's letters from rn.y mother 
All's Il, 3, 293. there's four or3ïve II!, 5, 98. there 
is no woman's sides can bide ..., Tw. 11,4»96. there's 
expenses for thee, 1II, 1, 49. there is three earters 
Wint. IV, 4, 331. there's few or none do know me, 
John IV, 3, 3. is there hot wars? H4BI,285. there's 
rive to one H5 IV, 3, 4. there's two of .you the devil 
make a thlrd! H6B 111, 2, 303. for living murmurers 
there's places of rebuke, H8 11, 2, 132. there is more 
panffs and fears 111, 2» 368. there" s some of .ye, V, 
144. there is a thousand Hectors in the.field» ŒEroil. 
V, 5, 19. there is fort#ducats, Rom. V, 1» 59. there 
is tears for hls love, Caes. III, 2, 29. there" s wondrous 
things spoke of him, Cor. 11, 1, 152. there's daggers 



B 83 

n nen's smiles, llcb. II, 3, 146. there's let!ets sealed 
t[ml. I11, 4, 20"2.. there's trlcks in the world, IV, 5, 5. 
there is no mo such Caesars, Cïaab. III, 1, 86. there is 
no more such mas!ets, IV,2,871. where is the thousand 
marks thou hadst of me? Err.l, 2, 81. II, 1, 65. where's 
the 23astard's braves. II6A Ill, 2, 123. 
2) be instead of is : Good night, good res!. Ah ! 
neither be m/ share! Pilgr. 181. I hope it be no! so, 
Viv. Il 7 17 118. Especially after to thbk: That is the 
chain which you had of me. I think it be. Err. V, 879. 
I thlnk he be angry indeed, 2tdolV72 , 141. I think he 
be transformed into a beast, As II, 7, 1. I th5k this 
Talbot be a.fiend of hell, II6A II, 1 46. that I think» 
be young Petrucio, Rom. I, 5, 133. I think if be no 
other, Hml. I, 1, 108. I thin the ki»g be touched at 
very heart Cylnb. I, 1 I0. cf. Caes. I, 1 66. 
3) be instead of are: by out ears out hearts of! 
tainted be, Lucr. 38. thy love is of more deli9ht than 
hawks or horses be, Sonn. 91, 11. since all alike my 
son9s and praises be to one, 105, 3. !bine eyes bave 
lut on black and lovbg mourners be, 132, 3. and in 
our.faults by lies we.flattered be, 138, 14. u'hen their 
deaths be near, 140, 7. mad slanderers by mad cars 
belleved be, 140, 12. there be that can rule Naples as 
well as he, Tp. II 1, -'262. these be fine things , 1I, 2, 
121. there be sorae sports, I11 1, 1. these be brave 
splrits» V, 261. say f they be !rue, V, 268. be they 09 
»uch import? Gentl. lll, 1, 55. but the doors be locked 
111. be there bears in the town? Wiv. ]» 1, 298. very 
rognes, now they be out of service, Il, 1 182. here be 
my keys7 III, 37 172. hence shall we see what out see- 
ners be, Icas. I, 3, 54. here be many of ber old custo- 
mers, IV, 3, 3. Interjections? ll'/y, some be of laugh- 
ing7 Ado IV, 1, 23. lhese be the stops that hbder study 
qui!e, LLL I, 1, 70. the cowslips tall ber pensioners 
be 7 lids. Il 71,10. those be rubies, 12. what.fools these 
mortals bel III, 2, 115. the ground whereon these sleep- 
ers be 7 IV, 1, 91. there be laad-rats and water-rats, 
Merch. !, 3 23. there be fools alive, II, 9, t38. these 
be the Christian husbands, IV, 1, 295. there be some  
women, As III, 5, 124. impossible be strange attempts 
to those, All's I, 1,239. be these sad Mgns co».firmers 
qf thy words? John 11I, 1, 24. where be /our powers? 
V, 7, 75. mi,dlng !rue tMngs by what their mockeries 
be, H5 IV Chor. 53. his fears be of the saine relish as 
ours are, IV, 1, 114. be these the wretches that we 
l)layed ai dice.forf IV, 5, 8. where be these wardersf 
H6A I, 3, 3. wake when others be asleep, H6B I, 1, 
249. here they be that date and will disturb thee, IV, 
8, 6. where be thy brothers? R3 IV, 4, 92. help you 
that be noble, Cor. 111, 1,228. such men as he be never 
at heart's ease, Caes. I, 2, 208. where be the sacred 
vials q. Ant. I, 3, 63. 
4) thou beest (or be'st) = thou be, after if: if thou 
beest ,çtephano touch me7 Tp. II, 27 104. 107. speak 
once in thy life, if thou beest a good moon-ealf, Ili, 2, 
25. if thou beest a man, show th.yself in thy likeness 
137. (f thou beest Prospero, give us particulars, V» 
134. speak, if thou beest the man, Err. ¥, 341. 344. 
f thou beest rated by thy estimation, thou dost deserve 
enough, $Icrch. II, 7, 26. OE that thou beest found... 
thou diest for if, As I, 3, 45. if thou beest no! damned 
for this, the devil himself wll bave no shepherds, III, 
2, 88. f thou beest no! an ass, I am a /outh of fourteen, 
All's II, 3, 106. if thou beest yet a fresh uncropped 
]7ower, choose thou thy husband, V, 3,327. if thou beest 

capable of things serious, thou mus! know .... , Wint. 
IV, 47 791. if ever thou beest mine, I ge! thee with 
scambling, 115 V, 2, 216. if thou here beest found, the 
world shall no! be ransom for thy lfe, tI6B III, 2,295. 
if thou beest death, I'll give thee JE»glanars treasure 
I!I, 3, 2. if thou beest no! immortal, look about /ou, 
Cacs. II, 3, 7. f that thou beest a toman, take it for!h, 
lV, 3, 103. if thou beest as poor as he, thou art poor 
enough, Lr. I, 4, 22 (Qq be). if thou beest valiant, list 
me70th. II, 17 216. disprove this villain, if thou beest 
a man, V, 27 172. 
After whether : whether thou beest he or no, I not 
know, Tp. V, 111. Beginninff the sentence, the eon- 
junetion being omitted: beest thou sad or merr, y, the 
violence of either thee beeomes, Ant. I, 5, 59. 
5) Bein 9 often a dissvllable, f. i. Vert. 18. Lucr. 
260. Tp. I, 2, 79.91. 1V,'I, 68. Gentl. II, 4, 93. III, 
1, 57. 249. 2, 45 etc. etc. But as often, at least, mo- 
uosyllabie: Ven. 24.29. 1033. 1068. Tp. I, 2, 72.74. 
76. 97. 121. 353. 438. Ill, 3, 58. V, 28. Gentl. I, 1, 
158. Il, 7, 26. V, 3, 7 etc. etc. (er. carrying, Hml. I, 
4, 31. borrowing, 1,3, 77. doing, Meb. !, 4, 23. giving, 
Cor. V, 6, 54. 9rowing, H8 I, 2, 116. la/ig, Lr. 1V, 
6, 201. Ant. Il, 2, 55. lyb9, Caes. IV, 3, 201. playing, 
Ant. II, 5, 11. seeing, Shr. Ind. 2, 134. Shr. Ill, 2, 
182. II6C I, 1, 218. 247. Hml. III, 1, 33. Oth. I, 3, 
203. throwing, I, 1, 52. tybg, Cor. II, 3, 205). 
6) I were  I was, but only in eonditional and 
subordinate clauses: OE ever I were traitor, rny naine 
be blotted.from the book of life, R2 I, 3, 201. I ara a 
rogue , if I were hot at half-sword with a dozen of 
them, H4A Il, 4, 182. if I did think, sir Iwere well 
awake, Tp. V, 229. shouldst thou but hear I were li- 
centious, Err. II, 2, 133. 
7) thou wert  thou wast: for a woman wert thou 
first created, Sonn. 20, 9. I grant thou wert hot mar- 
ried to my )tluse, 82, 1. thou truly fait wert truly 
sympathized, 82, 11. thou wert immured, LLL III, 125. 
behaviour, what wert thou till this madman showed 
thee? V, 2, 337. thou wert born a fool, Vqnt. Il, 1, 
174. hearlng thou wert dead, R2 III, 2, 73. I heard 
thee say that thou wert cause of Gloster's death, IV, 
37. I was a poor groom when thou wert king, V, 5, 
73. thou hast lost much honour that thou wert hot with 
me in this action, II4A Il, 4, 22. thou wert taken with 
the manner, 346. why didst thou tell me that thou wert 
a king? V, 3, 24. how wert thou handled, beingprlsoner? 
H6A !, 4, 24. /et tellest thou hot how thou wert enter- 
tained, 38. whj didst thou say, of laie thou wert de- 
spised? Il, 5, 42. when thou wert regent for out sove- 
reign, H6B I, 1, 197. since thou wert king, the com- 
monwealth bath run to wreck, I, 3, 116. where wert 
thou born? Il, 1, 82. no less beloved than when thou 
wert protector to thj king, II 3, 27. whom thou wert 
sworn to cherish and defend, R3 I, 4, 213 (Ff. wast). 
she was dead ere thou wert born, Il, 4, 33 (Ff. wast). 
thou wert hot wont to be so dull, IV, 2, 17 (Ff. wast). 
a dream ofwhat thou wert, IV, 4, 88 (Ff. wast), ha- 
ring no more but thought of what thou wert, 107. when 
wert thou wont fo walk alone ? Tir. I, 339. wert thou 
thus surprised? IV, 1, 51. Othello, that wert once so 
7ood, Oth. V, 2, 291. 
8) he were  he was: his giving-out were of an 
inJînite distance from ..., lIeas. I, 4, 54 (lI. Edd. 
givings-out ). so great .[ear o.[ my naine 'mongst them 
were spread, I!6A I, 4, 50 (lI. Edd. was). Adonis" 
13" 



84 13 
#arden tlat vue dag bloomed and fi.uitful were the I, 2, 21. mg being in Eg#pt ( my kind of life in 
nezt, I, 6, 7 (M. Edd. gardens), and the# it were that E.) Ant. II, 2, ôS. he quit being, Cymb. I, 1, ôS. to 
ravished out sister, Tir. V, ô, 99. this most constant shift his beig, 1, 5, 54. all the villains past, in hein#, 
wif e, who even now were clipped about with this most to corne, V, 5,212. the womb that theb'Jïrst belng bred, 
tender air, Cymb. V, 5, 451. After if: ne'er repent t'er. I, 1, 107. from whence we had out being and our 

it, if it were donc so, Gcntl. IV, 1, ô0. if there were a 
s#mpath# b choice, war, death ... did la# siege to it, 
hlids. I, 1, 141. most true, if ever truth were 
b# circumstance, Wint. V, 2, ôô. if the deed were 
be y/ou contented to bave a son .... , H4B V, 2, 83. il 
ever an# grudge were lodged between us, R3 I1, 1, 65. 
if ever Bassianus were gracious in the e#es of roy/al 
home, Tit. 1, 11. if to Jï,jht for king and commonweal 
,cere piet# in thine, if s in these, 115. Caes. I11, 2, 84. 
Again: vue would think it were Mistress Overdone" s 
awn bouse, biens. IV, ô, ô. I could sa# sle were worse, 
Ado I11, 2, 11ô. if we did think his contemplation were 
above the earth, H8 II1, 2, 131. I should think here 
were afalry/, Cynb. I11, 6, 42. 
9) the# was  they were: which of the two was 
dau#lter of the duke, tlat here was at the wrestling? 
As I, 2, 28. their states was sure, 1-{3 111, 2, 86 (Ff. 
and M. Edd. were), th# temples should be planted with 
horns as was Actaeon' s, Tit. I1, ô, 6ô. there was more 
than vue; a#, more there was, IV, 1, ô8. used to sa# 
extfemities was tle trier of spifits, Cor. IV, 1, 4 
(F,.%4 and M. Edd. extremity/). Ail these seemig 
irregularities, -hich bave been regarded by the igno- 
rant as so man blemishes, must be considered in con- 
nexion with the original forms of English eonjuga- 
tion, which, indeed, in Shakespeare's time began to 
beeome obsolete. 
10 been - are: le doing so, put forth to seas, 
where, when men been, there's seldom ease, t'er. Il 
Prol. 28. In t'er. I1, ô, 82 been may be taken as the 
partieiple. In Cymb. II, ô, 27 the O. Edd. bave: 
with every/ thing that prett# is ; which some hL Edd. 
have, for the sake of the rhyme, changed to prettl/bin. 
Il) Remarkable use. 1) as a principal verb; a) 
--- to exist: tlou nursest all and murtherest all that 
are, Luer. 929. that which is las been before, Sonn. 
59, 1. tongues to be ( to corne, future) 81, 11. ages 
y/et to be, 101, 1. truth may/ seem, but cannot be, 
Phoen. 62. an if this be at all, Tp. V, 117. such 
names and men as these which never were, Shr. Ind. 
2, 98. that that is is, Tw. IV, 2, 17. from the all that 
are, Wint.V, 1,14.for those that were, it is hot square 
to take on those that are, revenges, Tire. V, 4, 36. the 
purposes I bear, which are or cease, as y/ou shall 
9ive the advice, Ant. I, ô, 67. the most precious dia- 
mond that is, Cymb. I, 4, 81. which must hot y/et be 
but b# self-danger, 111, 4, 148. Meb. I, ô, 141. 
Being  lire, existence: tongues to be y/our 
being shall rehearse, Sonn. 81, 11. nty/ health and 
happy being at y/our court, Gentl. I11, 1, 57. Pisa 
@are me mg being, Shr. I, 1, 11. if the cause were hot 
in b. -int. II, ô, 3. would I had no being, H8 11, ô, 
102. best state, contentless, bath a distracted and most 
wretched being, Tire. IV, ô, 246. whose star-like noble- 

I, 2, 114. 
birth) to be to one  to belong to vue: I was 
then advertising and holg to y/our business, lIeas. V, 
687. y/our hand and heart should be more to me than 
any/, H8 II1, 2, 189. hall all Cominius' honours are 
to 3Iarcius, Cor. I, 1, 277. whilst this machine is to 
Mm, Ilml. 11, 2, 124. to thi»e and Albany/'s issue be 
thisperpetual, Lr. I, 1, 68. 
e to be to be the case: it is hOt that 1 
bear thee love, As II1, 5, 93. 0 absence, what a tor- 
ment wouldst thou prove, were it hot thy/ sour leisure 
gave sweet leave to entertain the time with thoughts o.f 
love, Sonn. 39, 10. were it hot that my/ fellow-school- 
toaster doth watch Bianca's steps, Shr. I11, 2, 140. 
were it not that I bave bad d,'eams, Hnd. 11, 2, 26- °. 
were't hot that we stand up agabtst them all, Ant. I1. 
1, 44. cf. Cor. 111, 2, 48. Lr. IV, 6, 144. 
.Being that  -hile: being that l flow bi grief, 
AdolV, 1, 251. y/ou loiter here too long, being #ou are 
to take soldiers up, II4B I1, 1, 199. 
d) = to happen, to eome to pass: where 
was this? Ihnl. I, 2, 212. (what is, my/ lord? 111, -0, 
127, is an elliptical que»tion, viz = what is a fait 
thought?), an "twere to me, I should be mad at it, 
hlerch. V, 176. /.f it will hot be, Ado 11, 1, 208 ; and 
lVill't hot be? Johu 111, 1, 298, are expressions of 
impatieuee, like the German: wird's bald? 
e) Let be  no matter: no longer shall y/ou 
gaze on it, lest y/our fane# ma#. think anon it moves. 
Let be, let be. Wint.V, 3,61. s,nce no man bas aught 
of what he leaves, what is't to leave betimes? Let be. 
Hml. V, 2, 2ô5 (Ff. om. 'twill be nau9ht: but let it 
be; brin9 me to Antony/, Ant. I!1, 5, 24. what's this 
Ah, let be, IV, 4, 6. Caes. I, ô, 80. let it be so ; th# 
then be th# dower, Lr. I, 1, 110. let it be so; y/et 
'rave I left a daughter, 1,4,627. Henee the following 
passage receives its proper light: the# were ratified 
as le crled 'Thus let be,' H8 I, 1, 171 çthe expresAon 
being charaeteristie of the carelessness vith which 
Wolsey hurried his business). -- Qfite different is 
the sense of Ado V, 1, 207 : but soft y/ou, let me be; 
i. e. let me alone; no more joking! -- Be it so  
no matter: Ant. II1, 12, 10. er. Cor. V, 2, 12. 
f) As will, shall etc. are used instead of will go, 
shall go etc., so is for is or bas gone: towards 
Florence is he? All's I!1, 2, 71. 
g) Followed by an infinitive,  to be bnsied: 
he bath been all this dag to look y/ou, As II, 5, ô4. I 
bave been to seek y/ou, Oth. V, 1, 81. courtesies which 
I will be ever to pay/and y/et pay/still, Cymb. I, 4, 69. 
l'll fit y/ou, and hot be all dag neither, All's I1, 1, 94. 
h)  to be written: if y/ou lave writ /our 
annals true, 'tis there, that . .., Cor. V, 6, 114. 
2) Peculial-ities of its use as an au_xiliary verb. 

ness gave life and influence to their whole being, V, 1, a Such phrases as 'that is brave, that is well" are 
67. there's noue but he whose being I do fear, lIeb, eommon enough, but the following expressions: this 
II1, 1, 55. (But er. and that thy/ bebg some say/ of was well counterfeited, As IV, 3, 167 ; 'ris well blown, 
breeding breathes, Lr. V, ô, 14ô; Ff. and bi. Edd. lads, Ant. IV, 4, 25, and: this isfought indeed! I¥, 7, 
tongue), ever# minute of his being thrusts against mgW4; well moused, Lion, Mids. V, 274; well flown, bird, 
nearest of li.[e, 117. end his bein#, Hml. II, 1, 96. I Lr. IV, 6, 92, may deserve notice. 
fetch ny/life and bein 9 from men of royal sie9e , Oth. b) be it his pleasure, All's I11, 1, 16, = let him 



B 85 

do at his pleasure, I care hot. be 't so: declare thine 
office, Ant. 111, 12, I0,  wh,'tt of that? 
c) be it possible, Shr. 111, 2, 127  if it be pos- 
sible (cf. ifs, and thus also be it so  if if be so; if: 
be it so she will hot marry with Demetrius, I beg the 
ancient privilege of Athens, Mids. I, 1, 39. be if that 
she survive me, Shr. 11, 125. 
d) how is it with you? either  how do you do? 
• rw. iii, 4, 97. Cor. l, 6, 33. v, 6, 10. Oth. III, 4, 33 ; 
or = how stmds the case with you? Itoto is it with 
ber? doth she hot thi»k »te an old murderer? Rom. III 
3, 93. cf. so is it hot with me as with that .][use stirred 
bg a pabted beautg» Sonn. 21, 1. 'tls so with me, 
Meas. I, I, 82. were he mg kinsman, it should be thus 
with hlm: he must die to-morrow, Meas. I1, 2, 82. it is 
hot so with hbn that all thfitgs knows, All's 11, I, 152. 
it had been so with us, had we been there, Hml. IV, 
1, 13. 
e) ara Ibut three inches? (se. high) Shr. lV, 1, 29. 
cf. f she sag I ara hot fourteen pence on the score» 
Shr. Ind. 2, 24. to outlive the age Iam, Per. V, 1, 15. 
f) Verbs neuter often eonjugated with to be, 
instead of to bave: this gentlemon is happily orrived, 
mj mbd presurnes, for his own good and ours, Shr. I, 
2, 213. Cardinal Campeius is arrh,ed, and latelg, II8 
11.1,160. miracles are ceased, H5 I, 1 67. what he 
.feared is chanced, II4B 1, I, 87. how everj thing is 
chanced, Caes. V, 4, 32. the deep of night is crept upon 
out tlk, IV, 3, 226. the Volsces are entered in the 
Roman terrltories, Cor. lV, 6, 40. sith I ara entered in 
tlds cause so far, Oth. II1, 3, 411. that fallen ara I in 
dork uneven wmj» Mids. 111, 2, 417. his high,ess is 
fidlen into this Opolde.rg , H4B I, 2, 122. the. are gone 
a contrarg wag, All's III, 5, 8. though he be grown so 
desperate to be honest, H8 111, 1, 86. out sister's man 
is certfid# miscarried, Lr. V, 1, 5. theg were stolen 
unto thls wood, Mids. 11, 1, 191. |Vorcester is stolen 
¢wa. to-night, H4A Il, 4, 392. Campelus is stolen 
way to Rome, II8111, 2, 57. whither are thoj vanished? 
Mcb. 1, 3, 80. his lordship is walked .[orth i»to the 
orchm'd, H4B 1, 1, 4 etc. etc. 
But the use of is instead of bas in tr,nsifive verbs 
must be eonsidered as an inadvertence in writing, the 
rather as the other forms of the two vel-bs, in hich 
there is no consonance, are never thus eonfounded:e 
the kfitg by this is set hlrn down to sleep, H6C IV, 3, 
2.* what late misfortune is befallen king 11enrg, lV, 4, 
3. mg lfe is run hls compass, Caes. V, 3, 25. he is 
entered Ms radiant roof, Cymb. V, 4, 120. 
lleavh, strand: Merch. IV, 1, 71. H5 V Chor. 
9. Cor. V, 3, 58. Lr. IV, 6, 17. Cyrnb. 1, 6, 36. 
lleavhed, formed by , fiat strand: in the 
b. rnargent of the sea, Mids. 11, 1, 85. upon the b. verge 
o.f the sait shore, Tire. V, 1,219. 
leaœehy  beaehed: the b. 9irdle of the ocean 
H4B III, 1, 50. 
llea«on, 1) a signal by a lighted lire 
II4B IV, 3 117. H6A I11, 2, 29. Per. I 4, 87. Figu- 
ratively: Troil. 11, 2, 16. 
2) lighthouse: approach» thou b. to this under 
globe, Lr. 11, 2, 170. 
lleaa, 1) any small globular body: with 
mnber bracelets, --s ( pearls) and ail this knavery, 
Shr. IV, 3, 58. these crgstal --s ,i. e. tears) John 11, 
171. --s ofsweat, H4A 11, 3, 61. --s ofsorrow .tears) 
Caes. I11 1,284. 

2) any thing extremely small: .ou b., .ou 
acorn, Mids. I11, 2, 330. Hence name of a fairy: 
Wiv. V, 5, 53 ',.Ff. Bede . 
3) Beads  rosary: Err. I1, 2, 190. R2 111, 3, 
147. H6B I, I, 27. I, 3, 59. H6C 11, 1, 162. R3 111, 
7, 93. 
Beaded, of the form of a bead: b. jet» 
Compl. 37 (O. Edd. bedded). 
Beadle, public whipper: H6BII, 1,136.140. 
148. H8 V, 4, 69. Lr. lV, 6, 164. Per. II, 1, 97. Fi- 
guratively: LLL 111, 177. John 11, 188. H5 IV, 1, 
178. 
Beadsman, a man hired by another to pray for 
him (cf. II5 IV, 1, 315): I will be thy b. Gentl. l, 1, 
18. thg verg beadsmen learn to be»td their bows against 
tht state, R2 111, 2, 116. 
Beagle, a small sort of dog; ttsed of per- 
sons who follow another as dogs do their toaster: 
she's a b., true-bred, Tw. I1, 3, 195. jet thee awag and 
take thy --s with thee, Tiln. IV, 3, 174. 
Beal, 1) the sharp and erooked bill of a 
bird of prey: Ven. 56. Luer. 508. H6B 111, 2, 193. 
Cymb. V, 4, 118. 
2) b il 1 in general: turn thelr halcgon --s with 
everg gale, Lr. 11, 2, 84. 
3) the foreeastle of a ship : now on the b., now in 
the walst, the deck, in et'erg cabb, I flarned amazement, 
Tp. I, 2, 196. 
Be-all : that but this blow mlght be the b. and the 
end-ail here, Mcb. 1, 7, 5 ; i. e. that with this blow all 
were donc and finished, no eonsequenees ensuing 
of it. 
ilea»t, subst., 1) a long piece of timber: 
the king jour nwth did see, but I a b. do find in each 
of three, LLL IV, 3, 162. a rush will be a b. to bang 
thee on, John IV, 3, 129. 
2) thag part of a loom on which weavers 
wind the warp: I fear hot Goliath with a weaver's b. 
Wiv. V, 1, 24. 
3) anything ofgreat length andweight, 
as f. i. a lleavy 1,'race: stands colossus-like, wavlng his 
b. Troil. V, 5, 9. 
4) the part of the balance at the ends of 
which the scales are suspended : which end of the b. 
should bow, Tp. 11, 1, 131. we shall weigh thee iv the 
b. All's II, 3, 162. in justice' equal scales, whose b. 
stands sure, H6B 11, 1,205. till out scale turn the b. 
Hml. IV, 5, 157. 
5) ray of light; emitted from the sun: Err. Il, 
2 31. II1, 2, 56. Mids. I11, 2 392. All's V, 3, 34. R2 
I, 3, 146. H6A¥, 3, 63. V, 4, 87. H6B 111, I, 223. 
353. H6C V, 3, 12. R3 I, 3, 268. Rom. I1, 5, 5. Tim. 
V, 1,226. Lr. I1, 2, 171. Cymb. IV, 4 42. V, 5; 472. 
or from the moon: Mids. 11, 1,162. V 277. Rom. l, 
4, 62. or from the eye: Ven. 487. Lucr. 1090. Sonn. 
114 8. Wiv. 1, 3, 68. H8 IV, 2, 89. Cor. 111, 2, 5.* 
from a candle: Merch. V, 90. from a bright sword: 
H6A 1, 1, 10. cloudg death o'ershades his --s of lire, 
H6C I1 6, 62 (cf. R3 1» 3, 268). 
llean, a kind of pulse, faba vulgaris: H4A 
II, 1, 9. 
ll«an-fea, nouri.-hed wieh beans: a fat and b. 
horse, Mids. Il, 1, 45. 
llear, vb.; Impf. bore (f. i. 8onn. 127, 2. Compl. 
300. Tp. I, 9, 141. 145. Il, 1, 266. Meas. l, 4, 51. 
Gentl. III, I, 167. Err. V, 343. LLL IV, 3 17. As IV, 



Qq bore; in Vint. l, 0", 309 O. Edd. bear, M. Edd. 
bare. Partie. bore (M. Edd. born iu the sense of 
natus), f. i. Ven. 200-. Lucr. 2. Sonn. 1'2,, 8. 36, 4. 
68, 3. Wiv. Il, 1» 134. Mcas. IV» 1, 48. IV, 2» 114. 
147. 183 etc. etc.; once bore: Hml. V, 1,205, but 
only in Qq, hot in Ff. 
I. trans. 1) to support or carry (a load)» 
to c onvey: borne by the trustless wings of false de- 
sire, Lacr. 2. no bearitag yoke they knew» 409. bore 
on the bier Sonn. 12, 8. the beast that --s me, Sonn. 
50, 5. Tp. Il, 2, 180. III, 1, 24. IV, 251. Gentl. l, 2, 
120. I1 4, 159. III, 1» 129. Err. II, l, 73. V, 143. 
Iids. III, 2, 315. As lll 2, 176. 179. All's III, 3, 5. 
II4A !» 3, 42. H6A l, 2, 139. H6B V, '2,, 64. R3 
1» 128. Ihul. IV, 5» 164. V» 1, 205. Ant. lI1, 7 9 etc. 
To b. up - to support, sustain: my sbzews, b. 
me stiffly up, Hml. l, 5» 95. As we say: to bear the 
expense of sth., so Sh.: what pemy bath Rome 
to underprop thls action John V, 2» 97. 
2) to carry, to bring, to delivcr: l'Il b. 
Mm no more sticks, Tp. 11, 2, 167. b. it (the money) 
to the Cetaur, Err. 1, 2, 9. b. it with yon, IV, 1, 41. 
and his head borne to Angelo, Mcas. IV, 2, 183. never 
to Ergland shall he b. his lire, H6A IV, 4, 38. igu- 
ratively: he --s his thoughts above Ms falcon's pitch, 
II6B Il, 1, 12. b. hls hopes 'bore wisdom, Mcb. III, 5. 
30. Especially --- to convey, to deliver, in 
speaking of letters and what is like theln: for --ing 
the letter, Gentl. l, 1» 125. III, 1, 53. Viv. 1, 3, 80. 
11, 1, 134. Meas. IV, 3, 98. As III, 5 135. Tv. IV» 
2, 120. Rom. V, 2» 13. there's the rnoney, b. it straight 
Err. IV» 2, 63. a somet LLL IV» 3» 17. b. true in- 
telligence betwixt the armies, H4A V, 5» 9. b. ber thls 
jewel, H6A V, 1» 47. an order, R3 Il, 1, 88.89. 
the king's will from his mouth expressly H8 III, 2,235. 
3) to eouduct, to bring» in speaking of 
persons: t]ey bore us some leagues to sea, Tp. 1, 
145. b. me to prison, Meas. l, 0", 121. that we rnay b. 
hhn hence, Err. V, 158. 160. b. me u»to his creditor, 
IV, 4» 123. go b. hm hence, 133. b. them to my bouse» 
V, 35. let Diomedes b. hlm ad brbg ns Cressld hither, 
Troil. III, 3, 30. Wint. I» 2» 436. H4A V, 5, 14. H5 
Il, 2» 181. H6B III, 1 212. 210. IV, 7, 64. H6C Il 
1, 115. IV» 8» 53. V, 5 4. 68.69. Cor. III, 1, 213. 
Passively: he is borne about 9tvlslble»  he moves 
about, Err. V, 187. 
4) to endure, to suffer: b. an everdurlng 
blame» Lucr. 224. they that lose hall wkh greater 
paHence b. it, 1158. so shall those blots by me be borne 
alone» Sonn. 36, 4. will b. ail wrong, 88, 14. lIeas. 
Il» 3, 20. hence bath offence hls quick celerlty, when 
it is borne in hlgh authority» IV» 2 114. Wiv. IV, 5 
112. Err. I, 1, 47. 14°-. l 2, 86. III, 1» 16. V, 89. 
Ado II], 2, 132. LLL V, _'2» 813. b. this, b. ail» As IV» 
3, 14. it is but weakness to b. the rnatter thtts, Wint. 
ll 3» 2. V, 1, 137. H5 III, 6» 134 (the losses we bave 
borne). H6B IV 1» 130. R3 I, 3, 103. never 
like labour, Cor. l» 1, 103. 
Tobearoff to go through» to stand sth.: 
ere's neither bush nor shrub» to b. off a,,u weather at 
all, Tp. I1, 2, 18.* 
To b. sth. hard or hardly  to be vexed at: 
who --s hard hls brother"s death, tt4A 1 3 270. bave 

Caesar doth b. me hard, but he loves .Brutus» Caes. 1, 
2» 317. Ligarius doth b. Çaesar hard» II» 1 215. if 
you b. me hard» III, 1, 157.* 
5) to be pregnant with: b. amiss the secotad 
burden of a former child, Soun. 59 3. the atttumn 
--ing the wanton burden of the prime» like widowed 
wombs af ter their lords" decease, 97» 7. Hence  to 
produce (asa fruit), to bring forth (as a child): 
to b. their fruits of duty, R2 lll, 4, 62. good wombs 
bave bore bad sons, Tp. l, 2, 120. that bore thee two 
sons, Err. V, 343. your father's wife did af ter wedlock 
b. him, John l» 217. the curse of ber that bare thee» 
II6B IV, 10, 83. would I had never borne thee son, 
H6C l, 1,217. the itfant that is borne to-night, R3 Il, 
1, 71. the queen that bore thee, Mcb. IV, 3, 109. /t 
were better ny mother had ot borne e» Hml. III, 1» 
she that bore you, Cymb. 1, 6, 127. 
Partic. born (O. Edd. always borne) : Sonn. 123 
7. Tp. l, 1, 35. 1, 0", 260. IV, 188. Wiv. Il, 2, 40. 
Meas. 11, 1» 202. 11, 2, 97. I11, 1, 196. 111, 2, 100. 
Err. l, 1, 17.37. LLL IV, 3, -°I7. Mids. 1I, 2, 12ô. 
H(;A IV, 7, 40. thnl. l, 4, 15 etc. etc. a beggar born, 
Sonu. 66, 2. a gentleman born, XViv. I, 1, 9. 287. 
XViut. V, 2, 141--150. a Bohemltut born» Meas. IV, 
2, 134. any Syracusian born, Err. !, 1, 19. being 
yotmger born Johnl, 71. Ge.'rey was thy elder brother 
bort 11, 104. out you»gest borz. Lr. 11, 4, 216. Figu- 
ratively: vows so bo»m, Mids. III, 2» 124. I can tell 
thee where that saybg was borb Txv. I, 5, 10. tempta- 
lios hace siwe then been born to us, Y)ïnt. !, 2, 77. 
act so evilly bor, John III, 4, 149 (pcrhaps - 
carried on, executed). I.%llowed by of: born of thee, 
Sonn. 78, 10. eonsciece is born of love, 151, 2. what 
stu.[f'tls zade of whereof it is bort, Merch. !, 1, 4. 
co»ceived of spleen and born of nm&ess, As IV, 1, 
o,17. thls man was born of woman» Tire. IX', 3, 501. 
0n instead of of: "ris a mo»zster begot upon itself, born 
on itself Oth. I11, 4, 162. Used substantively: that is 
howur's scort, whlc challenges itself as honour's born, 
All's 11, 3 141. 
6) to be charged with, to administer, 
to manage: slse --s the purse, XViv. 1, 3, 75. he 
who the sword of heaven wll b. Meas. I11, "2, '2.75. you 
would b. some sway, Err. Il, 1, 28. to b. a charge» 
All's III, 3, 5. all the sceptres and those that b. them» 
Wint. V, 1, 147. thbak you I b. the shears of destiny? 
John 1¥, 2, 91. to b. the invetatory of thy shirts, H4B 
Il» '2,» 19. b. the balatee and the sword, V, 2, 103. 114. 
where everg horse --s his eommatading rein, R3 I1, 2, 
128. cf. the hard rein which both of them bave borne 
against the old kitd kb9, Lr. lll, 1, 27. the part of 
business which I b. i' the state, H8 III, .'2, 146. b. the 
9reat sway of hls affairs, Troil. Il» 2» 35. O, if he 
had borne the business! Cor. I, 1,274. the ;'est shall 
b. the business in some other fight, 1» 6» 82. I wish gou 
had borne the action of yourself IV, 7» 15. a forerun- 
ner, which --s that office» Tim. I» 2, 125. hot b. the 
knife myself Mcb. l, 7» 16. bath borne his facuhies 
so mee6 17. to b. a part in this bjury, Lr. V» 1» 86 
(Ff. to be a party), bore the commission of my place 
atad person, Lr. V» 3, 64. a charge we b. in the war 
Ant. III, 7» 17. 
7) to carry on, to administer, to cxe- 



13 87 

eute: the conference was sadly borne, Ado II, 3, 229. 
we'll direct her fiow 'ris best no b. in, All's III, 7, 20. 
trie manner fiow this action fiath been borne, H4B IV 
4, 88. tfiis act so evilly borne, John III, 4, 149 (some 
I. Edd. born), so ma. a tfiousand actions be all well 
borne witlwut defeat, H5 l, 2, 21")_. fie --s all tfiings 
fairl., Cor. IV, 7, 21. how plainl. I bave borne this 
business, V, 3, 4. b. in as out Roman actors do, Caes. 
Il, 1, 226. thlngs bave been strangel. borne» hIcb. I11, 
6, 3. he bath borne all things well 17. being in, b. in 
(a quarrel) that the opposed ma. beware of thee, Hufl. 
1» 3, 67. to b. all smooth and even IV, 3, 7. To bear 
up ---- no arrange, no devise: 'tis well borne up, Mcas. 
IV 1, 48. 
To b. a part Lucr. 1135. 1327. Shr. l, 1, 199. 
Wint. lV, 4 298. 670 etc. (cf. part). And wit£ deep 
groans the diapason b., Lucr. 1132. and, sweet sprites, 
the burthen b. Tp. 1, , 381. the lolding every man 
shall b. Ant. II, 7» 117 (0. Edd. beat). 
Undcr this hcid the following phrases, too, nmy 
be registered: to bear one company, Gentl. IV, 3, 34. 
Shr. IV, 3, 49. H6A II, 2, 53. tI6C 1, 3, 6. R3 H, 3, 
47. H8 1, 1,212 etc. (cf. compay), no b. witness, Tp. 
111 l, 68. Err. IV, 4, 80. Ado 11, 3, 240. Ant. IV, 9, 
5 etc. (cf. whness), no b. evidcnce, R3 1, 4, 67 (Ff. 
give). 
8) to manage, no wield, to direct: b. thine 
c.,es straight, Sonn. 140, 14. thns must thou th. bod. 
b. LLL V, 2, 100. b. your body more seemi»g, As V, 
4, 72. thns  bore m. point, H4A 11, 4, 216. mark 
how he --s his course, H4A I11, 1, 108..ou b. too 
stubborn and too strange a hand over .your friend, 
Caes. 1, 2, 35 (cf. to b. a hard rein, Lr. 111, 1, 27). 
9) to be marked with, to shov: wMch like 
a waxen imaqe "gainst the tire, --s no impression of 
the thing in as, Gentl. 1I, 4, 202. the expressure that 
in --s, green let in be, Viv. V, 5, 71. --ing the badge 
qf faith, Mids. III, 2, 127. who this inscription --s, 
Merch. 11, 7, 4. nor brass nor stone nor parchment --s 
hot one (example) Vint. I, , 360. he doth b. some 
signs of me, Il, 1, 57. --s so shrewd a mabn, H6B 11, 
3, 41. the wounds his bod. --s, Cor. III, 3, 50. IV, 
2, 28. must b. m S beating to Ms grave, V, 6, 109. Cf. 
such signs of rage the. b. Lucr. 1419. b. a fait pre- 
sence çi. e. observe a decent carriage) Err. 11I, .o, 13. 
with the saine haciour that .your passion --s, Tw. III, 
4, 226. the quarrel will b. no colour for the thlng it is, 
Caes. II, 1, 29. b. welcome in .your e.e, .your hand, 
your tongue, lIcb. I, 5, 65. Cor. I1, 3, 134. 
Hence: no b. a shape, a face etc.: wIen your sweet 
issue your sweet form shonld b. Sonu. 13, 8. would 
bark .our honour from that trunk Sou b. hleas. 111, 1, 
72. what figure of us thbdc you he will bear? I, 1, 17. 
b. the shape of man, Merch.lll,2, 277. m. an Tranio, 
--ig n. port, Shr. 111, l, 36. he did b. my conntenance, 
V, 1, 129. thou --est th.father'sface, All's 1, 2, 19. 
whose form thou --est, John I, 160. b. the naine and 
port of gentlemen, H6B IV, 1, 19. a woman's face, 
tI6C 1, 4, 140. Ms image, V, 5, 54. a woman's face, 
Tit. 11, 3, 136. 
10)  no wear: belote these bastard slgns of 
fafr were borne, Sonn. 68, 3. OEe ave wit enough no 
keep Mmself warm, let Mm b. in for a dfdïerence... 
Ado I, 1, 69. te clty-woman --s te cost of prhwes 
on unworthy soulders, As Il, 7, 75. ty father's father 
wore ft, and thl fatier bore in, IV, 2» 17. b. arms, 

John 11, 346. hbnself had borne the crown, R2 III, 4, 
65..you b. a man. (stars) superfluousl., H5 Ill, 7, 79. 
she --s a duke's revemes on ber back, H6A 1, 3 83. 
this monument of the victor$ will I b., H6B IV, 3, 12. 
 will 5. upon my target three suns  H6C 11» 1 39. 
Cymb. V, 2, 6. Ant. IV 6, 7 (5. the olive). 
11) to carry, no win: His word might 5.  
wealth an an$ rime, Err. V, 8. 'll b. h all myse Shr. 
V, 2, 79. let me but 5. $our love l'll b. $our cares, 
H4B V, 2, 58. as your horse --s $our praises, H5 
III, 7 82. Ms honest rewards Mm in itse it must 
hot b. mg daughter, Tim. l, 1 131. b. the pabn alone, 
Caes. l, 2, 131. gou'll b. me a bang for that, III, 320. 
so may he with more facile question b. it (= conquer), 
Oth. l, 3, 23. To b. it  to cmwy the prize: he ne'er 
had borne it out of Coventry, H4BIV, 1,135. a should 
hot b. it so, a should eat swords first: shallpride carry 
it? Troil. ll 3, 227. To b. awag = to win: did b. 
the mald away, Pilgr. 224. (But: theg bave borne 
awag, H5 IV, 1, 181 = they came safely off). 
12) to coutain: often reading what contents 
s, Compl. 19. more feet than the verses wouM b. 
As III, 2 175. what else more serious importeth thee 
to know, this (letter) --s, Ant. I, 2, 125. his letters b. 
his mbd, hot I, II4A lV, 1, 20. 
13) to haveinherently, to havewithiu, 
to harbonr: his tender heir might b. his memory, 
Sonn. 1, 4. b the suffering pangs if (love) bears, 
Comph 272. that's a brave god ad--s celestial liquor, 
Tp. II, 2 122. all the accommodations that thou --est 
are mtrsed b baseness, hlem. III» 1, 14. 
To bear love: Sonn. 10, 1. 15, 4. Tp. 1 
141. Gentl. 111, I, 167. SViv. IV» 6, 9. As 111, 5, 93. 
Epil. 13. Shr. 1, 1, 111. IV, 4, 29. Wint. lll, 2, 229. 
IV, 4, 528. H4A 1I, 3 3. H6C 11, 1, 158. R3 I11 
65. Oth. V, 2, 40. To bear good will: Gcntl. IV, 3, 
15. the reveret care I 5. unto  lord, H6B 111, 1 34. 
the great respect ey 5. to beauty, H8 1, 4, 69. zeal 
and obedience he still bore your grace, 111» 1 63. b. 
some charity to nty wit, Oth. IV, I, 124. To bear 
haie: Mids. 111, 2» 190. Merch. IV 1 61. Tir. V, 1, 
3. hatred, Rom. 11, 3,53. the mwient gru@e I5. him, 
hIerch. I, 3, 48. for no ill will  5. ou As 11I 5, 71. 
e law I b. no malice, II8 II, I, 62. To b. a pmTose: 
fo know the purposes I 5. Ant. I» 3 67. so mortal a 
purpose as then each bore, Cymb. 1, 4, 44. $ou b. a 
graver purpose, I hope, 151. To b. a mind  to be 
of a disposition : had  mother borne so hard a mbd, 
Ven. 202. beasts b. gentle minds, Lucr. 1148. 1540. 
Tp. 11 1,266. Gentl. V, 3, 13. Tw. 11, 1, 30. IIIB 
111 2» 251. 257. H6B I 2, 62. I11, 1» 24. H8 11, 3, 
57. -- These nobles should such stomachs b. H6A 
3, 90. with such dispositions as he s» Lr. 1, 1,309. 
5. free and patient thoughts, IV, 6, 80. To 5. a hard 
opinion of Ms truC, Gentl. Il, 7, 81. b. a good opinion 
of  knowledge, As V, 2, 60. that opinion whïch ecery 
noble Roman s of you, Caes. 11 1 93. fo clear her 
$'om that spcion which e world might 5. her, Lucr. 
1321. -- To b. in mind  to remember: Ant. 111, 
3» 32. 
14) to be endowed with, to own, to 
bave: out drops this differeace bore, Compl. 300. 
she s some breadth, Err. III, 2 114. instances wMch 
shall b. no less likelihood, Ado 11, 2, 42. a heavy heart 
s hot an humble tongne, LLL V, 2 747. make the 
drink fo 5. no barre» Mids. 11» 1 38. no ruerai can b. 



88 B 

hall the keenness, Merch. IV, 1, 125. when what is 
comelg envenoms hlm that --s it, As II, 3, 15. it --s 
an angrg tenour, IV, 3, 11. truc servants that b. eges 
to sec, Wint. I, 2, 309. the common pralse it --s, III, 
1, 3. where theg should b. their faces, IV, 4, 246. will 
b. no credit, V, 1, 179. that those veins did verily b. 
blood, V, 3, 65. some sins do b. thelr privilege on 
earth, John I, 261. b. possession of out person, I1, 
366. that --s a frosty sound, H4A IV, 1, 128. the 
speech of pease that --s such trace, H4B IV, 1, 48. 
between two blades, which --s the better tempe»', 
II, 4, 13. b. that proportion to mg flesh and 
H6BI, 1, 233. to b. so low a sali, H6CV, 1, 52 
with the dearest blood .Cour bodies b. V, 1, 69. b. a 
wei#htl/ and a serlous brow, H8 lrol. 2. thelr tractices 
nust b. the saine proportion, V, 1, 130. throu#h the 
si#ht I b. in rhin#s, Troil. fil, 3, 4. the beautl/ that is 
borne here in the face, the bearer knows hot, 103. l/our 
liberties and the charters that !Cu b. Cor. Il, 3, 188. 
thl/ face --s a command in it, IV, 5, 67. there's the 
privile#e .cour beautl/ --s, Tit. IV, 2,116. I b. a brain, 
Rom. I, 3, 29. b. tire enou#h to kindle cowards, Caes. 
Il, 1, 120. everl/ drop of blood that ever!/ Roman Js 
and nobll/ --s, 137. to think that Caesar --s such 
rebel blood, III, 1, 40. that everl/ nice offence should 
b. hls comment, IV, 3, 8. under heavl/ jud#ment --s 
that llfe, Mcb. 1, 3, 110. the heartIb. V, 3, 9. Ib. 
a charmed lire, V, 8, 1°-. that it us befitted to b. out 
hearts in #riel, Hml. I, 2, 3. whose #riel --s such 
an emphasis i V, 1, 278. b. a warl/ el/e, V, 2, 290. 
doth b. an excellencl/, Oth. Il, 1, 65 (reading of the 
Qq). that the probation b. no hinffe nor loop, fil, 3, 
365. b. no lire, IV, 2, 58. b. hateful memorl/, Ant.lV, 
9, 9. l'll show the virtue I bave borne in arms, Per. 
Il, 1, 151. Concerning Meas. IV, 4, 29 (bears of a 
eredent bulk) v. Of. 
larticularly: to b. a naine, Sonn. 127 2. Meas. 
111, 1, 39. John I, 160. H6B IV, 1, 19. Tir. 111, 1, 
249. to b. the naine  to bave the first naine, to be 
the first in estimation: H6A IV, 4, 9. he --s the title 
of a kln#, H6B 11, 2, 140. b. the addition nobll/ ever, 
Cor. I, 9, 65. 
15) to b. one in hand  to abuse one with false 
pretenees or appearances: the duke bore manl/ gentle- 
men in hand and hope of actlon, Meas. I, 4, 51. b. ber 
in hand until thel/ corne to take hands, Ado IV, 1,305. 
she --s me fait in hand, Shr. IV, 2, 3. fo b. a gentle- 
nan in hand, and then stand upon securltl/, H4B I, 2, 
42. how l/ou were borne in hand, how erossed, Mcb. 
I11, 1, 81. that so his age and impotence was falsel.y 
borne in hand, Hml. 11, 2, 67. whom she bore in hand 
to love with such inte#ritl/, Cymb. V, 5, 43. 
16) to b. down  to overturn, to overwhelm, to 
erush (cf. I11, 5): nallee --s down truth, Merch. IV. 
1, 214. --s down all belote hlm, H4B I, 1, 11. to b. 
ne down with braves, Tit. 11, 1, 30. a woman that --s 
all down with ber brain, Cymb. 11, 1, 59. 
17) to b. out  a) to stand, to get the bet- 
ter of: love alter hOt with his (rime's) brief hours 
and weeks, but --s it out even to the edge of doom, 
Sonn. 116, 12. it is impossible thel/ (the Turkish fleet) 
b. it out, Oth. 11, 1, 19. let summer b. it out, i. e. get 
the better of it, make it supportable, Tw. I, 5, 21. 
b) to support or defend to the last, to 
eonntenanee: I hope l/our warrant will b. out the 

deed, ,,XohnlV, 1,6. if l cannot b. out a knave affainst 
an honest man, H4B V, 1, 53. 
II. Reflectively: to bear one's self to beha-e : 
old woes, hot ioEant sorrows, b. them mild, Lucr. 1096. 
how I malWb. me here, Tp. I, 2, 425. Meas. I, , 47 
(O. Edd. only bear, hOt bear me). IV, 2, 147. Ado I, 
1, 13. I1, 3, 233. 111, 1, 13. LLL V, 2, 744. Shr. 
Ind. l, ll0. R2V, 2,50. H4AI, 3, 285. V, 4,36. 
II4BV, 1,74. H5 II, 2,3. H6B 1,1, 184. 111, 1,6. 
H6ClI, 1, 13. IV, 3, 45. H8 I1, 1,30. Cor. IV, 7, 
8. Rom. I, 5, 68. Tire. III, 5, 65. Hml. I, 5, 170. he 
--s him on the place's privile#e, i. e. he shapes his 
conduct to the liberty the place affords him, he pre- 
sumes on the privilege of the place, H6A 11, 4, 86. 
Th« original signification may be perceived in H6A 
11, 4, 14: between two horses, which doth b. him best, 
i. e. whieh bas the best earriage (cf. I, 8). -- Henee 
the subst, bearin#, q.v., and a striking instance of 
the nse of the partie, borne: if he were proud, or 
eovetous of praise, or surll/ borne, Troil. 11, 3, .'249, 
i. e. of a surly behaviottr. 
III. Intrans. and absolutely. 1) to support 
1 o a d s: I had mlWload belote, noo press'd with 
Ven. 430. ![out mistress --s well, H5 III, 7, 48. 
2) to endnre, to suffer, to be patient: 
tempt us hot to b. above our power, John V, 6, 38. 
Jin 9 fellowship (i. e. fellowship in snffering) Lr. 
III, 6, 114. !Cu must b. ( bave patience, be indul- 
gent) II4B V, 3, 31. 0 God, seest thou this, and 
--est so lon9? H6B II, 1, 154. we'll b. with l/our 
lordship, Tire. I, 1, 177. 
Espeeially to bear with one or sth.  to be indul- 
gent towards one: wlth foul offenders thou perforce 
must b. Luer. 612. Tp. IV, 159. Gentl. I, 1, 1.'27. 
LLLV, 2,417. AslI, 4,9. John IV, 2, 137. H4B 
Il, 4, 63. lïI6A IV, I, 129. R3 I, 3, 28. III, I, 1"-97. 
128. IV, 4, 61. Cor. II, I, 65. Caes. III, 2, 110. IV, 
3, 119. 135. 255. lïlnfl, fil, 4, 2. Lr. IV, 7, 83. 
3) to be frnitful: happy plants are ruade to 
b. Ven. 165. to grow there and to b. All's I, 2, 55. 
the --ing earth, Ven. 267. --in# bou#hs, R2111,4, 64. 
4) to behave: instruct me how Imal/ formalll/ 
,n person bear like a truc friar, bIeas. I, 3, 47 (M. 
Edd. bear me). 
5) to take one's course, to sail, to drive: 
which (rock) being violentll/ borne upon, Err. I, 1,103. 
and then she --s awal/, IV, 1, 87. a Turkish fleet, 
and --in# up to C.yprus, Oth. I, 3, 8. therefore b. up, 
dnd board "cm, Tp. I11, 2, 3. ' 
To bear back  to press back in a throng: here 
one hein# thronged --s baek, Lucr. 1417. stand back; 
room; b. back, Caes. III, 2, 172 Çaence the trans, nse 
of to bear down). 
6) to be situated with respect to an- 
other place: ml/ father's bouse --s more toward the 
market-place, Shr. V, 1, 10. 
7) to bear up  to stand firm: an undergoing 
stomach, to b. up against what should ensue, Tp. l, 2, 
158. so lonç as nature will b. up wlth this exercise, 
Wint. III, 2, 241. 
Bear, subst., 1) a beast of prey, of the genus 
Ursus: Ven. 884. Pilgr. 394 (M. Edd. beasts). Tp. 
I, 2, 289. Wiv. I, 1,298. 304. Err. III, 2, 159. Ado 
1II, 2, 80. Mids. 11, 1, 180. 11, 2, 30. 94. III, 1, 11:. 
IV, 1,118. V, 22. ŒEw. ll, 5, 11. H4A 1, 2, 83 (as 
melancholl/ as a lugged b.). H6B V, 1, 144 (ml/two 



B 89 

brave--s, i. e. the Nevils, who had a bear for thelr 
cognizance, cf. v. 203). H6C II, 1, 15. Troil. V, 7, 
19. Caes. 1I, 1, -`205 (betrayed with glasses): Ant.lV, 
14, 3 etc. etc. 
_'2) a constellation: seems to cast water on the 
burnin 9 b. and quench the 9uards of the ever-fixed pole, 
Oth. II, 1, 14. 
Bear-baiting, the sport of balting bears with 
dogs: Tw. I, 3, 98. II, 5 9. Wint. IV, 3, 109. 
Beard, the hair that grows in the face: 
Lucr. 1405. Tp. V, 16. Gentl. IV, 1, 9. a 9reat round 
b. "Viv. I, 4, -`20. a little .ellow b., a Cain-coloured b. 
-`23. Meas. IV, '2,, 188. 3, 76. Err. V, 171. Ado II, l, 
32. -`277. III, 2, 49. V, 1, 15. LLL V .'2, 834. Mids. 
l. 2 50. 92..your straw-colour b.» /our orange-tawn.y 
b., your purple - in-grain b., or your French - crown- 
colour b., .our perfect .ellow, 95. IV, 2, 36. Merch. 
!. ,3, 118. il, _'2, 99. III, -`2, 85. As I, '2., 76. il, 7, 155 
(b. o.f.formal cut). ili, -`2, 218. 394. 396. Shr. III, 2, 
177. Wint. iV, 4, 728 (will make hlm scratch his b.). 
H4B V, 3, 37. H5 ili, -`2, 75. H6A 1, 3, 47. H6B III, 
-`2. 175 etc. etc. beard to beard, Cor. !, 10, 11 and 
llcb. V, 5, 6. Witehes had beards: Wiv. IV, 2, 204. 
Mcb. I, 3, 46. 
Figuratively the prickles on the ears of 
corn: with white and bristl b. Sonn. 12, 8. the 
green corn bath rotted ere his.outh attained a b. Mids. 
ii. 1, 95. 
Beard, rb., to face, to set at defiance: 
o man so potent breathes upon the ground but I will 
b. him. H4A iV, 1, 12. do what thou darest; I b. thee 
to th..face. What! ara I dared and ed to m. face? 
H6A I, 3, 44. 45. brave thee! a., and b. thee too, 
H6B iV, 10, 40. Used in jest by Hamlet: th.face 
is vManced since I saw thee last : comest thou to b. 
me in JDenmark? Hml. II, 2, 443. 
Bearded, adj. having a beard: b. llke the 
.parti. As II, 7, 150. H4B V, 1, 71. Oth. IV, 1, 67. 
Beard]ess, wanting a beard: John V, 1 
69. H4A III, 2, 67. 
Bearer, 1) one who carrles a bnrden: 
dur b. (i. e. the horse) Sonn. "31, 2. 
-`2) one vho conveys and delivers a let- 
ter or a message: LLL IV, 1, 55. Hml. I, 2, 35 
• (Ff. for bearin9). V, 2, 46. 
3) sufferer: when crouchin 9 marrow in the b. 

b. hlereh. II, -`2, -`207. Tw. IV, 3, 19. Wint. IV, 4, 
569. H4B V, 1, 84. H5 IV, 7, 185. tt6B V, -`2, -`20. 
Cor. Il, 3, 257. 
Bearing-¢loth, the manfle or eloth in which a 
child was carried to the font: Wint. III, 3, 119. H6A 
I, 3, 4-`2. 
Bear-]ike, like a bear: Mcb. V, 7, -`2. 
Bearn, spelling of some M. Edd. for barn 
little child)'q, v. 
Bearoward, see Jear-herd. 
Bear-whe]p, whelp of a bear: an unllcked 
b. H6C III, _'2, 161. Tit. IV, 1, 96. 
Beast, animal in a restrictive sense, land- 
animal, quadruped (though Evans calls the louse 
so, Wiv. I, 1, _'21); opposed to fishes and birds: the 
--s, the fishes and the win9ed fowls , Err. II, 1, 18; 
to birds: --s did leap, and birds did slng, Pilgr. 377. 
a fault done first b the form of a b., mzd then in the 
semblance of a fowl, Wiv. V, 5, 10. a bird of 
ton#ue is better than a b. of .ours, Ado I, 1, 141. 
when --s most graze, birds best peck, LLL I, 1, -`238. 
throw ber forth to --s and bb'ds of prey, Tit. V, 3, 
198. wh. blrds and --sri'oto quality and kind, Caes. 
I, 3,64. Opposed to man : that b some respects makes 
a b. a man, in some other a man a b. Wiv. V, 5, 5. 
Meas. lll, -`2, 3. Err. ll, 2,81. 111,,,2,87. V,84. hIerch. 
I, -`2, 96. As II, 7, 1. IV, 3, 49. Shr. IV, 1, -`25. Wint. 
IV, 4. -`27. Tim. IV, 
-`270 etc. A play on the word: any strange b. there 
makes a man, Tp. II, 2, 32. 
In general it is only large and powerful animais 
that are called so, as the lion: Gentl. v, 4, 34. Mids. 
'V, 140. -`230. _As IV. 3, 118. H5 IV, 3, 94. the tiger: 
Hml. I I, 2, 47'2,. the boat: Ven. 999. the griffin (gripe) : 
Luer. 545. the lion, beax and elephant: Troil. 1, -`2, 
-`20. the bull: Wiv. V, 5, 5. Ado V, 4, 47; er. Caes. 
iii, _'2, 40. the horse: Ven. 3_'26. Sonn. 50, 5. H5 III, 
7, '2,1. H6B V, o, 12. thou owest the worm no silk, the 
b. n bide, the sheep no wool, the car n perfume, Lr. 
1II, 4, 109. vast confusion waits, as doth a raven on 
a sickfallen b. John IV, 3, 153. It is but indireefly 
that it refers to a sheep: LLL Ii, -`222. Hence often 
 savage animal: since men prove --s, let 
bear gentle minds, Luer. 1148. --s shall tremble at 
thy din, Tp. I, .'2., 371. heavens keep hlm from these 
--si II, 1, 3-'24. leave thee to the merc.y of wild 
llids, il, 1, 2:]8. -`2, 95. H6C II, 2, 12. o b. sofierce 
but knows some toueh of pity, R3 I, 2, 71. 

stron 9 cries of itself iVo more, Tire. V, 4, 9. 
4 ........... As, in contradistinction to man (see above, and 
) ,vearer, owner: t ma3esty , wnen mou aost, b V " 07" nd v - - ,rr, ,.  ,o, :. 
   a e e o orse D  • D 
inch tht b ou dost st le a rich amur 4  V I  •  ) ç  ) 
ç O9 tz /thp crwn n f n • ., lea  .... [ I lS a te of contempt lt of course sexes as snch 
.... hen ap hed to men, hlCh xs done even m the 
t (om) « t«mr«t, yet OE ft,,« a«« ,t f I ....   . ............. 
the face the b. knows hot, Troll. III 3. 104. [ . _ , • . . 
" ._.. : __ _ " " "Jaithless coward, Meas. III, 1, 136. ere this ruae o. 
Bear-herd,(oEs s the Shakespearian form ofthe will»rot III o 34 O monstrous b t how llke a ine 
word, cf. 8hr. Ind. 2, 1 aud 4B I, 2, 19"; the he lsçr  ;" .... ;"  
other passages bave beord, berard and bearard, but tu art a b. to say otherwe, H4AIII3 140. wilt thou 

never bear-ward, as some M. Edd. ehoose to write), 
bear-leader: Ado Il, 1, 43. Shr. Ind. 2,21. H4B 
I, -`2. 192. H6B V, 1, 149. 210. 
Bearing, subst., 1) manner of moving, 
port: quick b. and dexterit., Lucr. 1389. I know him 
by his b. Ado il, 1, 166. lII, 1 96. 
-`2) behaviour: a man of çood repute, carriaçe, 
. and estbnation, LLL I, 1, 272. we shall see .our 

hot, b., abide? Troil.V, 6,30. what a b. was I to chide 
at him! Rom. 1II, 2, 95. what a wicked b. was I to 
dlsfurnish m.self a#ainst such a 9ood time, Tim.lll,2, 
49. that incestuous, that adulterate b. Hml. I 5, 4. 
To make the b. with two backs, Oth. I 1 117, the 
French faire la bëte à deux dos 
Beast-lilte, brutal, savage: ber lfe was b. 
and devold ofpity, Tit. V, 3, 199 (Qq beastly). 



9O 

B 

Beastliess, brutality, coarseness: that 
.olti,g-hutch of b. H4A Il, 4, 496. 
Beaslly, adj., like « beast: we bave seen 
nothing; we are b., subtle as the fox for prey etc. 
Cymb. III, 3, 40. er. Wiv. V, 5, 10. Tire. IV, 3, 3-9. 
Heaee brutal, iuhuman: hot to relent, is b., 
savage, devilish, 123 I, 4, 265. at the murderer's horse's 
rail, in b. sort, drag9ed throu9h the field, Troil. V, 10, 
5. 0 barbarous, b. villains! Tir. V, 1, 97. ber lire 
was b. and devoid of pity, V, 3, 199 Ff. beast-like). 
0ftenest  coarse, bestial: so that in the 
--lest sese l/ou are ompey the Great, Meas. Il, 1, 
0-29. theb" abombmble and b. touches. III, , 25. Err. 
III, 2, 88. H4A I, 1, 44. H4B I, 3, 95. Cr.Il, 1» 105. 
Tir. il, 3, 18:?. Tire. III, 5, 71. V, 1, 177. Lr. Il, 2, 75. 
Cymb. I, 6, 153. 
Adverbially: how b. she doth court him, Shr. IV, 
2, 34. he stabbed me b ,nine own bouse, and that most 
b. H4B Il, 1, 16 what I would bave spoke, was b. 
dumbed by hb», Ant. I, 5, 50. will give you that llke ' 
beasts wMch you shuu b. Cymb. V, 3, 27. 
Beal, rb., impf. beat: Lucr. 489. Tp. [1[, , 119. 
IV, 175. Wiv. IV, 2, 212. V, 1, 21. Err. III, 1, 7. Shr. 
IV, 1, 79. H4B l, 1, 109. H6A IV, 6, 14. H6B III, 2, 
10:?. 123 [, 9, 96. Troil.II[, 3,213. Participle beaten: 
Lucr. 175. 1563. Wiv. l, 1, 114. IV, 5, 96. 115. Err. 
Il, 1, 76. II, 2, 40. 48. V, 1, 170. Ado V, 1, 124. V, 
4, 104. 111. Merch. Il, 1, 35. Shr. Iud.2, 87. Shr. lV 
1, 3. John III, 4, 6. V, 2, 166. tI4B Ind. 25. H6B [1! 
1, 191. III, 2, 317. R3 V, 3. 334. H8 I, 3, 44. V, 5, 
3:?. Troil. Il, 1, 105. Rom. III, 1, 25. Caes. l, 3, 93. 
Mcb. V, 6, 8. Hnfl. Il, _o, 277. Lr. l, 5, 46. IV, 6, 292. 
0th. Il, 3, 380. Ant. l, 4, 57. Il, 2, 197. Ill, 1, 33. IV, 
7, 11. Çymb. IH, 1, 26. V, 5, 344 etc. Partic. beat: 
Wint. I, 2, 33. Il, 3, 91. Troil. Il, 1, 76. V, 5, 7. Cor. 
l, 6, 40. I, 10, 8. Il, 3,224. IV, 5, 127. Tit.lV, 4, 71. 
Çaes. V, 5, '23. Aut.IV,8, 1.19. Partie. beated: Sonn. 
62, 10 (h'I«flone bated, Steeveus blasted Collier bea- 
te). 
I. t'ans. 1)to treat or puaish with blows, 
to inflict blows upon: Icouldfidinmyheart 
to b. him, Tp. I1, 2, 160. 111,2, 93. 119. Wiv.l, 1,114. 
IV, , 89. 212. IV, 5, 96. 115 (b. b.ac]c and blue). V, 
1, 21. Meas. 1, 3, 30. Err. II» 1, 74. 1I, 2, 40.48. 111 
1, 7. IV, 4, 33. V, 1,170. Adoi1,1,147.207. V, 4, 
111. Mids. 1I, 1, _'204. Vriat. 1I, 3, 91. R2 1II, 3, 141. 
H6B 111, 1,171. R3 V, 3, 334. Troil. 11, 1, 105. Cor. 
1I, 3, 224. Rom. 1II, 1, 25. Lr. I, 5, 46. 0th. 1I, 3, 
380 etc. I saw him b. tle smyes under him, Tp. I1, 1, 
114 (cf. Caes. 1, 2, 107). --in 9 IHs kbd embracements 
with ber heels, Ven. 312 (cf. heel and scorn), beaten 
with bralns, Ado V, 4, 104 (i. e. mocked). I bave 
bobbed his brain (i. e. mocked him) more than he Oas 
beaten m., bones, Troil. ll 1, 76. b. hot the bones of 
the buried, LLL V, :?, 667. 
2) to conquer at play or in fight: are we hot 
beaten? John III, 4, 6. V, 2, 167. so is Alcides beaten 
b his page, Merch. Il, 1, 35. beaten a lo*g tbne out 
of pla, H8 1 3, 44.rive rimes I have fought whh thee 
so often hast thou beat me, Cor. I 10, 8. IV, 5, 127. 
Mcb. V, 6, 8 (or  treat with blows?). Ant. II, 3, 27. 
38. III, 1 33. IV, 7 11. Cymb. III, 1, -06. 
3) to turn some way, t, drive, either by 
blows, or by other means; a) by blows: and be new 
beaten home, Err. I1» 1» 76. I will b. this method b your 
seonce, Il» _o, 34. beaten out of door, Shr. Ind. 2, 87. 

l'll beat thee out of th kb,gdom with a dagger of lath, 
tt4AII,4,150, b) to drive by arms or else by superior 
force: --i*g reason back, Ven. 557. hoest fear dotlt 
too too o12 betake him to retb'e, beaten awa..u b..u brain- 
sick rude desire, Lucr. 175. 278. partance is quite 
beaten from ber breast, 1563. Pompe, I shall b. ou 
to yottr tent, Meas. 11, 1, 262. se-harming jealous ? 
fie, b. it hence Err. II, 1, 102. b. awa those blushes, 
Ado IV 1,163 (Ff. bear), we are hlgh-prof melm- 
chol and would fab bave it beaten awa, V, l, 124. 
your kindred shuns your bouse, as beaten hence b ottr 
strage &»*ac, Shr. Ind. 2, 31. he's beat 'om his best 
ward, Wint. 1, 2, 33. s his peace to heaven, John 
Il, 88. b. them hencel H6A I, 3, 54. to b. assailb,g 
death from his weak legiorts, IV, 4, 16. thus is the 
shepherd beate,t 'om th slde: H6B III, l, 191. whe, 
ff'mn th shore l,e tempest b. us back, III, 2, 102. b. 
awa the bus ,neddlbg fiend, III, 3, 21. unresolved to 
b. them back, R3 IV, 4, 436. to b. this from his brains, 
H8 III, 2, 217. we'll b. them to their wives, Cor. I, 4, 
41. the had beat you to our trenches, I, 6, 40. bave 
beat us to the pit, Caes. V, 5,23. wl, eu thou wast beaten 
from l]Iodena, Ant. 1, 4, 57. fi'om Actium b. the ap- 
Caesar, III, 7, 53. to b. me out of Egpt, 
IV, 1, 2. we'll b. 'em into berch-holes, IV, 7, 9. we bave 
beat hin to his camp, IV, 8 1. we bave beat them to 
theb" beds, IV, 8, 19. 
4) to strike; in different fonns of expression: 
as reproof ad reason b. it (my will) dead, Lucr. 489. 
th brothers b. aside the poit, R3 I, 2, 96. the bell 
then ig one, Hml. 1, 1, 39. b. your breast, R3 Il, 
2, 3. and s ber heart Hml. IV, 5 5. sparkle like 
the beaten fllnt, H6B IIl 2, 317. Very oflen to beat 
down  to strike down: to b. usurpin dow, John 
Il, 119. bath beaten down youn Hotspm" and 
troops H4B Ind. 25. whose sw([ wrath b. down the 
never-daunted Perc, I, 1, 109. b. down Aletçon, H6A 
IV, 6, 14. b. down EdwareFs guard, tI6C IV, 2, 23. 
to b. down these rebels here at home, R3 IV, 4, 532. 
b. down out .foes, Troil. Il, , 201. Ajax bravel b. 
him down, III, 3, 213. Poldamas bath beat dowr 
:x]Ieon, V, 5, 7. 
5) to knock to batter: l'll b. the door, Wiv. 
I, 1, 73 (Evans' speech), if I b. the door down, Err. 
III, 1, 59. as he would b. down the gare, Shr. V, 1, 17. 
will you b. down the door Troil. IV, 2, 44. the goldea 
buget --s it (the castle) down, Pilgr. 328. shall we. 
b. the stones about thine ears H6C V, 1 10S. -- the 
shall b. out m brains with billets, Meas. IV 3, 58. on 
the ragged stones b. forth out braises, Tit. V, 3 133. 
b. out his brains, Tire. IV, 1, 15. -- What means: b. 
Cut's saddle, H4A Il, 1, 67 (clean it by knocking?) 
6) to drive to and fro to shak% to lash 
)eaking of the wind and what is like it): an idle 
which the air --s for vain, Meas. Il, 4, 12. wln 
we shall hear the raln and wlnd b. dark December 
Cb. III, 3, 37. shake loee a field of beaten corn, H8 
V 5, 32. grass beat down whh storms Tit. IV 4, 71. 
-- with what loud applause didst thou b. heaven, H4B 
1, 3, 92. the lark whose notes do b. the vault heacen 
Rom. III, 5» 21. 
7) to hammer, to forge: walls ofbeaten brass, 
Caes. I, 3, 93. the poop was beaten gohl, Ant.ll, , 197. 
A technical word of tawers: beated and chopped with 
quity, Sonu. 62, 10.* 



8) to mark with tracks by frequent walking: 
b the beaten way of friendship, Hnd. I1, 9, 277. 
9) to strike» to play on (a drum): then lb. 
rny rabot» Tp. IV» 175. your &'ums, belng beaten, wili 
cry out, John V, 2, 166. b. loud the tabourines, Troil. 
IV, 5, 275. b. thon the drum, Cor. V, 6» 151. Tire. 
3, 96. Lr. 1I 4, 119. IV» 6» -9.92. -- In Ant. il t 7» 117: 
the holding every raan shall b. as loud as his strong 
sides can volley, M. Edd. bear. 
10) to treat rudely or ignominiously: 
beaten for loyalty excited me to treason, Cymb. V, 5, 344. 
II. absoi, and intrans.; 1) to strike, to knock: 
by --ing on ber breast, Luer. 759. the bell then -- 
one, Ihnl. I, 1, 39. b. at this gare» Lr. I, 4, 293. 
2) to rush with violence» to dash: ail which 
together» like a troubled ocean, b. at thy rocking henri, 
Luer. 590. the tide of pomp that --s upon the high 
shore of this world, H5 IV, 1,282. 
3) to bate, to flutter: these kites that bate 
and b. Shr. IV, 1,199. 
4) to more with pulsation» to throb: 
--bg heart» Lucr. 433. my boding heart pants, 
Ven. 647. ere yourpulse twice b. Tp. V» 103. 114. no 
woman's sides can bide the--bg of so strong a passion, 
Tw. il, 4, 97. when livbg blood doth in these temples 
b. John 11, 108. R.2 III» 3 140. II4B I1, 4» 26. R3 
1» 35. Troil. 111» 2, 38. Tir. 111» 2, 20. my head 
as if wmdd fall in twenty pieces, Iloln. I1, 5, 50. -- 
Hence transitively  to shake by throbbing: 
may feel ber heart --i.n 9 ber bulle, Lncr. 467. 
5) to llamnler» to ponder: do hot infestyour 
nbld with --b 9 on the straneness of this business, 
Tp. V, 246. thbe eyes and thoughts b. on a crown, 
H6B Il t 1, 20. whereon his braUs still --b9, Hml. 
III» 1, 182. Heuee absolutely  to be troubled by 
thoughts: to still my --ing raind, Tp. IV, 163. And in 
speaking of thing%  to engross the mind: for 
still "ris --bg in ny nind, Tp. 1» 2» 176. the tempest 
b my mbd doth ri'oto my senses take all feeling else 
savê what --s there» Lr. III, 4, 14. 
Bealing, subst.» reeeiving blows, a eud- 
gelling: Err. Il t 1» 79. Wint. IV» 3» 29.62. Cor. V» 
6, 109. 
Beatriee, female naine in Ado» passim; of three 
syllables: II1 1, 2. 15. 46. 50. V» 4» 72. 88. of two 
syllables: III, 1, '2.1.24. 29. 37.43. 
Beanfort (O. Edd. BeazoEord), Henry 13., bishop 
of Winchester and after'«ards cardinal: H6A I, 3, 60. 
Iii» 1, 127. H6B i, 1, 88. 3, 71. il, _o, 71. II,4»53etc. 
Beaumond; ordof.B.: R2 Il, 2, 54. 
Beaumont, French naine: H5 III,5» 44. IV, 8, 105. 
Beauteous, very fait, handsome, (of things 
and persons): Ven. 365. 862. 1107. Lucr. 18. Sonn. 
4, 5. 10, 7. 27, 12. 34, 1. 41, 6. 54, 1. 13. 84, 13. 
104, 5. Compl. 99. Tp. V, 183. Gentl. V, 2, 12. LLL 
Il, 41. IV, 1» 61. IV» 2, 136. V, 2, 41. liids. I, 1, 104. 
V, 131. Merch. III, 2,98. Shr. l, 2, 86. 255. IV, 2, 41. 
Tw. I, 2, 48. John IV, 2, 15. IV, 3, 137. R2 V, 1, 13. 
H6A V, 5, 2. H6B I, 1, 21. R3 IV, 4, 315. 405. V, 3, 
321. Tit. IV» 2, 72. Rom. I, 2, 68. Il, 2, 122. Mcb. II, 
4, 15. Hml. IV, 5, 21. Ant. Il, 6, 17 (b. freêdom). 
Beauteous-evil, beautiful and bad at the same 
time: Tw. III, 4, 403. 
Beautied, cf. .Beauty, vb. 
lleautiful, : beauteous: Sonn. 106,3. Cmpl. 
.911. Gcntl. Il, 1, 73. IV, 4, 185. LLL IV, 1, 63. Mids. 

111, 1,151. Merch. I1, 3, 11. Shr. Ind..9, 64. 1, 2, 1"20. 
IV» 3, 178. Tw. Il, 1, 27. III» 1» 157. tI6A V, 3, 7S. 
Rom. Ill, 2, 75. Tire. I, 2, 153. Cymb. V, 5, 63. 
Beauify, to tender beautifui: to blush and 
b. the check again, H6B III, 2, 167. to b. thy triumphs, 
Tir. I, 110. this unbound loyer, to b. him, only lacks 
a cover» Rom. I, 3, 88. u, hat this fourteen years no 
razor touched, ['ll b. t'er. V, 3, 76. Reflectively: each 
in ber sleep themselves so b. Lucr. 404, i. e. are be- 
,-tutiful. Partie. --ied: seeing you are --ied with goodly 
shape, Gentl. IV, 1, 55. Adjectively: the most --ied 
Ophelia; that's an iii phrase, a vile phrase; --ied is 
a vile phrase, Hmi. I1, 2, 110 (= beautiful). 
lleatlI, subst. 1) assemblage of graees 
to please the eye and mind: Ven. 70. 119. Sonn. 54, 
1. Tp. I 2, 415. II1 2, 107. Gentl. I, 3, 86. I1 1, 59. 
11I 1, 78. 11I 2, 73. IV, 2, 9.45. Mens. I1, 4, 80. III 
1, 37. 186. Wiv. 11, 1» 2. III, 3, 59 etc. etc. Plurah 
those whose --les make them cruel, Sonn 131, 2. sym- 
pathy in years, manners and beauties, Oth. Il t 1,233 
(as relating to two persons). Coneretely  the several 
parts and qualities whieh constitute the beauty of a 
person or thing: mortai stars, as bright as heaven's 
--ies, Lncr. 13. one that composed your --ies» Mids. 
I, 1, 48. I might n virtues» --ies,... exceed account, 
Merch. 111 2, 158. our good --es, Hml. 111, 1, 39. 
In the singular also  that whieh makes beautiful 
the ornament: the b. ofthe world, tlml. 11 2, 319.--* 
Used as a feminine: b. herselfis black, Sonn. 132, 
13. b. (lnay) brag, but "tis hot she, Phoen. 63. b. doth 
b. lack, if that she learn hot of ber e.e to look, LLL 
IV, 3, 251. 
2) a beautiful person: LLLV, 2, 158. Mereh. 
111, ,'2, 99 (?). Tw. 1, 5, 182. 186. H6A V, 3, 46. Rom. 
1, 1,234. 2, 89. Colleetively: there will be the b. of 
this kbgdom, H8 I, 3, 54. 
Beauty, vb., to embellish, to adorn: the 
harlot's check, beautied with plasterbg art, Hml. II1, 
1, 51, which partlciple may, perhaps, more properly 
be eonsidered as an adjeetive, : furnished with 
beauty. 
Beauty-waning, declining in beauty: a 
b. and distressed widow, R3 IlI 7, 185. 
Beaver, 1) the visor of the helmet: their 
armed staves in charge, their --s down, l=[4B IV, 1, 
120. and faintly through a rusty b. peeps, H5 IV, 2, 
44. 1'1l Mde rny silver beard b a gold b. Troil. I» 3, 
296. he wore his b. up, Hml. 1, 2, 230. 
2) the helmet: I saw young Harry, with his 
b. on, H4A IV, 1, 104. I cleft his b., II6C I, 1, 12. is 
rny b. casier than it was? R3 V, 3, 50. 
Beeahn. to keep from motion by intereept- 
ing the wind : must be be-leed and calmed by debitor 
l and creditor, Oth. I, 1, 30 (the prefix be belonging to 
both verbs. However, the simple verb to calm is round 
in the saine sense H6B IV, 9, 33). 
[by Be¢ause, by cause, on aeeount; 1) followed 
of: this swain, b. of his great limb or joint, shall 
pass Pompey the Great, LLL V, 1,135. they date hot 
dïght with me, b. of the queen rny mother, Cymb.li, 1,21. 
2) followed by that: b. that I familiarly sometbns 
do use you for my fool, your saucbess wili jest upon 
my love» Err. 1I, 2, 26. llids. II, 1, 21. As I, 3, 117. 
John V» 2, 96. R3 III, 1, 130. Cor. 11I, 2, 52. 
3) 'ithout that, in the saine sense: Ven. 378. 885. 
1094. Lncr. 35. Sonn. 42, 6. 101, 9. 102, 14. Pilgr. 



92 

B 

106. Gentl. I, .'2, 24. ii, 1, (;1.7(;. ii, 4, 173.11» 5, 
iii, 1, 147. 15(;. 345. ii1» 2, 57. IV, 1, 59. IV, 2» 28. 
,iV, 4, 84. 100. 182. ]Viv. IV, 1, 25. V, 1, 24 etc. etc. 
4) preeeded byfor, in the saine sense: hOt for b. 
your brows are blackerf Wint. Il, 1, 7. and why rail 
I on thls cornrnodity? but for b. he bath hOt woo'd me 
.et, John Il, 588. and for b. the world is populous, I 
cannot do it, R2 V, 5f 3. 
Bechance, to befall, to happen to; without 
and with to: let there b. hirn pitlful nlschances, Lucr. 
976. what bath --d thern, H6C i, 4, 6. all happlness 
b. to thee in 3[ilan! Gentl. I, 1, 61. Absolntely: such 
a thiv 9 --d would nake me sad, Merch. 1, 1, 38. 
Beck, subst., signifieant nod, as a signof 
command: thy b. night frorn the bidding of the gods 
cornrnand ne, Ant. 1 Il, 11,60. serving of --s andjutting- 
out ofburns, Tire. 1, 2, 237 (i. e. servile attention to 
becks). Ai a person's b. : at command: belng at your 
b. Sonn. 58, 5. readg at thy b. Shr. Ind. 2, 36. they 
bave troops of soldiers at their b. H6C i, l» 68. with 
more oJences at rn S b. than I bave thoughts iv put them 
i Hml. iii, 1, 127. 
Beelt, vb., to beckon, to call by a nod, 
to command: when gold and slh'er --s me to corne 
on, John i11, 3, 13. whose e.e --ed forth mg wars and 
called thern home, Ant. IV, 12, 26. 
Beelton, to make a sign: he --s wlth Ms hand 
and srniles on me, H6A I, 4, 92. this bill, with one man 
--ed from the test below, Tire. i, 1, 74 (i. e. ealled 
forth with a wink), if --s you iv go away with it, Hml. 
l, 4, 58. Iago --s me, Oth. IV, 1, 134. To b. sth. 
fo eommand sth. by a sign: Iars, ing with fiery 
truncheon mg retire, Troil. V, 3, 53. 
Become, vb., to come to be, to grow, to 
g e t: (hnpf. becarne» partic, becorne; conjugated with 
the auxiliary verb iv be): rnake the joung old, the old 
. a child, Ven. 1152. Lucr. 1479. Sonn. 120, 13. 
Tp. V, 206. Gentl. ii, 1,144. II, 5» 43. Wiv. 1, 3, 83. 
Meas. 111, 1, 120. 136. Err. I, 1, 50. Ado ii, 3, 11. 
Mids. li» 2, 120. Merch. 1,2» 88. ii, 2, 156. 11»3,21. 
IV, l, 387. H6A IV, 1, 65. V, 4, 128 etc. The predi- 
cate an adjective: your affections would b. tender, Tp. 
V, 19. Gentl. IV, 4, 161. Meas. i11, 1, 35. Err. i, 
126. Merch. V» 226. H6B iii, l, 7. R3 i, 2» 221 etc. 
The pred. a participle: the rod --s more rnocked than 
feared, Meas. i, 3, 27. for the which Antonlo shall be 
boun. Antonio shall b. bound, Merch. I, 3, 6. 
Followed by as: the tenderness of ber nature be- 
carne as a prey to ber grlefi All's IV, 3, 61. thy blessed 
youth --s as aged» Meas. i11» If 35. Troil. 11I, 3, 11-; 
cf. As." 
Followed by of: is of a Iclng b. a banished man, 
H6C ili, 3, 25. what shall b. of those in the cit.? Meas. 
i, 2, 100. what then becarne of thern I cannot tell» Err. 
V, 354. Ado IV, 1, 211. Tw. ii, 2, 37. John 111, 1, 35. 
R2 II, If 251. H6B If 4, 32. H8 il, 1, 2. Troil. V, 4, 
35. Ant. IV, 4, 29. 
Seemingly : to corne, to get, in the followlng 
passages: I vannot joy, until I be resoh,ed where out 
right vallant father is becorne, H6C Ii, l, 10. where 
IVarwick then become IV» 4, 25, which cannot be as 
nmch as: what bas becorne of Warwlck. Cf. : and here, 
iv do you service, ara becorne as new into the world» 
Troil. 111, 3» 11 (unless into be : unto). 
Be¢ome, rb.; impf. becarne: Compl. lll. Gentl. 
III, 1» 227. It4A V, 2, 61. II4B il, 3, 25. Partic. be- 

corned: Rom. IV, 2, 26. Ant. i11, 7, 26. Cymb. V, 5, 
406. cf. rnisbecorned: LLL V, 2, 778. 
1) fo be suitable, to accord with: toshun 
this blot» she would hot blot the letter with words, till 
action rnight b. thern better, Lute. 1323..et so theg 
rnourn, --in of thelr woe (cf. Of), that et'erg tongne 
sags beantg should look so, Sonn. 127f 13. the dozen 
white louses do b. an old coat well, Wiv. i, 1, 19..our 
falsehood shall b..ou well iv worship shadowsf Gentl. 
IV, 2, 130 ( if you worship shadows), ber hands 
whose whiteness so becarne thern as if but now theg 
waxed pale for woe, Gentl. i11, 1,227. the night's dead 
silence will well b. such sweet-cornplaining grievance, 
111, 2, 86; cf. sort stillness andthe night b. the touches 
of sweetharrnong, Merch. V,57. the ri9ht arched beantg 
of the brow that --s the sMptire. A plain kerchlef ; 
mg brows b. nothing else, Wiv. iil, 3, 60--63. do hot 
these fair .okes b. the forest better than the town? ¥, 
5, 112. the nlght is dark; llght and spb'its will b. if 
well» V, 2, 14. beauty's crest --s the heavens well» LLL 
IV, 3, 256. 1 ara hot tall enough to b. the function well, 
Tw. IV, 2, 8. I speak arnazedlg; and if --s rn. rnar'el 
and mg message, Wint. ,', 1,187. speaking thick be- 
came the accents of the valiant, H4B ii, 3, 25. inter 
their bodles as --s their births, R3 V» 5, 15. how the 
wheel --s it. Hnd. IV, 5, 17 ".. observe how Antong.. 
--s hlsflaw, Ant.lii, 12,34» 1. e. accommodates mm- 
self to his misfortune. 
2) to fit, fo suit: it would b. me as well, Tp. 
i11, 1, 28. hOt the rnorning sun better s the greg cheeks 
ofthe east» Sonn. 132, 6. Meas. ii, 2, 62. Vert. 968. 
iv be rnerrg best --s .ou, Ado il, 1» 346. doth hot mg 
wit b. me rarelg? i11 4, 70. nothlng --s hlrn ill, LLL 
11,46. it would ill b. me, 1V, 2»31. if hls own lire an- 
swer the straltness of his proceedln, if shall b. hirn well, 
Meas. i11, 2, 270. parts that b. thee happilg enough, 
Merch. 11, 2, 191. such fair ostents of lofe as shall con- 
veniently b..ou there, 1I, 8, 45. rnercg --s the throned 
rnonarch better than his crown, IV, 1, 188. if --s me 
well enoughf Tw. i, 3, 106. no more than well -- s so 
good a quarrel, H6B 11, 1, 27. a good rebukef whlch 
rnl9ht bave well --d the best of rnen, Ant. ili» 7, 27. 
3) without a determinative adverbf --- to set 
off, o grave, to be deeent: that cap of.ours 
--s .ou fot, Shr. V, 2, 121. as those two eyes b. that 
heavenly face, IV, 5, 32. 0 thon, whose wouns b. hard- 
favoured death, H6A IV, 7, 23. the wonns b. hirn, Cor. 
Ii» 1, 135. vilest thlngs b. thernselves in ber, Ant. 11, 2, 
244 (lend themselves a graee, are gracefitP, cf. Gentl. 
11, 7f 47. Wiv. I, 1, 241. Mids. 11» 2, 59. As i» 1, 76. 
84. 111,4, 3. liI, Sf 114. Epil. ll. H4AV,2,61. H6A 
11I, 2, 54. V» 3, 177. H6C ii, 2 85. 
Very frequently used of persons, in the sense of 
to adora, to grave: she will b. thy bed, Tp. 111, 
2, 112. b. disloyalty Err. 111, 2, 11 (-- give disloyalty 
a grave), though it be pity to see snch a sight, if well 
--s the groundf As 111, 2, 256. did ever Dian so b. a 
grove as Kate thls charnber? Shr. i1 260. 9lister like 
the 9od of war, when he intendeth to b. the field» John 
V, 1» 55. if I b. hot a cart as well as another man, 
H4A 11, 4, 545. God and his angels guard gour sacred 
throne, and rnag Sou long b. it, H5 1» 2, 8. gon island 
carrions ill-favouredbj b. the rnorning field» IV, 2, 40. 
royal fruit, which will well b. the seat of rnajestg, R3 
11I, 7, 169. how brarely tho st thy bed, fresh lilg, 



B 93 

Cymb. II, 2, 15. he would bave well --d thls place, V, 
b, 406. 
Sometimes the subject and object ought to change 
places: and controvers3 hence a question takes, whether 
the horse b I hirn becarne hls deed, or he hls anage b 
the well-dolng steed, Compl. 111. well did he b. that 
lion's robe, John II, 141. that head of thlne doth not b. 
a crown H6B V, 1, 96. outh no &ss s the liffht and 
careless liver# that it wears, Hml. IV, 7, 79. sorrow 
would be a rarit most beloved OE ail could so b. it, Lr. 
IV 3 6. how th Hercukan Roman does b. the car- 
rfae of his chafe, Ant. I, 3, 84. 
4) without an object, = to be proper, to be 
decorous: set this diamond sale in #olden palaces, 
as if s, H6A V, 8, 170. let us gve him bur{al, as 
s, Tir. I, 847. Becomin#  decent, graceful : within 
the llmh of b. mirth, LLL I1, 67. I never saw a vessel 
of like sorrow so filled, and so beconffnç, Wint. II1, 8, 
22 (ruade unintelligible by M. Edd. setting a comma 
afr sorrow). Becomed, in the saine sense: 9ave 
what b. &ve I rnlçht, Rom. IV, 2, 26. 
B¢eoming, subst., grace: whence hast thou thls 
b. of thinçs iii, that, in mff mlnd, thff worst ail best ex- 
ceeds Sonn. 150, 5. my s kill me, when they do 
hot eye well to Sou, Ant. 1, 3, 96. 
Be, sub»t., 1) an article of furniture to 
sleep on: Ven. 108. 397. Lucr. 975. Tp.lll, 9,112. 
Genfl. I, 2, 114. I1, 1, 87. Meas. I, 2, lb0. II, 4, 102. 
III, 1,375 etc. etc. the b. qf tlre (an enormous bed, 
still preserved) Tw. I11, 2, 51. to make the b. Wiv. I, 
4, 102. Shr. IV, 1, 203. to keep one's b. H4A IV, 1, 
21. on Ms b. of death, All's II, 1,107. upon his death" s 
b. Wiv. I, 1, 53. ço to thy cold b. and warm thee, Shr. 
Ind. I, 10. Lr. II1, 4» 48. when I carne unto  beds, 
Tw. V, 410 (the plural serving to indicate the unsett- 
led lire of a vagabond?), a bedv. A-bed. in b.: Err. 
Y, 63. All's V, 3, 110. Rom. II, 3, 42. IV, 1, 93. Cb. 
Il, 4, 57. to b.: Gentl. IV, 2, 94. Wiv. Il, 2, 14. Err. 
IV, 3, 32. Ado III, 3, 96. Mids. V, 371. Tw. II, 3, 7. 
8.9.207. II1,4,31 etc. etc. brou9ht to b.  delivered: 
Tit. IV, 2, 62. 153 ; followed by of: Wint. IV, 4, 266. 
brouçht to b.  ld to b.: Per. III Prol. 9. lknew of 
their çoln 9 to b. (= of their sexual commerce) Alls 
V, 3, 264. whom I can la to b. for ever, Tp. II, 1, 
284 (= put to etcrnal sleep). 
Bed as the symbol of matdmony: robbed others" 
beds' revenues of their rents, Sonn. 142, 8. Tp. IV, 1, 
91. Wiv. Il, 2, 306. Err. Il, 1, 108. II 9, 147. III, 2, 
17. 43. V, 163. Ado III, 1, 45 (as fortunate a b.). 
Mids. Il, 1, 73. All's II, 3, 97. H6C 11, 2, 154 etc. m 
b. and compan, Mids. 11, 1, 62. H6B 11, 1, 197. board 
and b. Mids. V, 31. As V, 4, 148. table and b. H6C 
I, 1,248. 
Couch in generah find Sou out a b. Mids. II, 2, 
39. 64. III, 2, 429. Symbol of a setfled lodging: rai- 
ment, b. and food, Lr. II, 4, 158. 
Figuratively any place in which something is 
couched: those sleepb,ç stones ... by this time 
their fixed s of lime had been dishabùed, John II, 
219. from thelr dark s once more leap ber eyes, Vert. 
1050. thunder shall hot so awake ge s of eels, Per. 
IV, 9,155. Frequenfly  death-bed, grave, sepulchre : 
in that oozy b. where  son lles, Tp.V, 151. his paved 
b. Meas. V, 440. wormy s, Mids. III, , 384. the 
died in honour's lofly b. Tit. Ill, 1, 11. thls b. of 
d atl,, Rom. V, 3, 28.  0 myaccursed womb, e 

b. of death! R3 IV, 1, 54, i. e. the birth-place of 
death. 
2) bank of earth: --s of roses, Wiv. III, 1, 19. 
prirnrose --s, Mids. I, 1,215. tMsflower b. IV, 1, 1. 
--s of]towers, Tw. I, 1, 40. lil --s, Troil. III, 2, 13. 
Bed, rb., 1) to take to bed, to cohabit 
with: woo ber, wed her and b. ber, Shr. I, 1, 149. 
will not b. ber, AIl's 11, 3, 287. 290. I bave wedded 
ber, hot --ed ner, II1, 2, 23. 
2) to lay as in a bed: therefore m.ç son in the 
ooze is --ed, Tp. I11, 3, 100. a thousand favours qf 
arnber, cristal, and of--edjet, Compl. 37 (i. e. put 
in a settiag; most M. Edd. beaded). 
3) to lay flat: .your --ed hair starts up, Hml. 
Ili, 4, 121. 
Bedalble, to sprinkle: --d wlth the dew, 
Mids. I11, œee, 443 (cf. I)ew-bedabbled). 
Bedash, to bespatter, to wet: ladwet thelr 
cheeks, like trees --ed with ra£., R3 I, 2, 164. 
Bedauh, to besmear, to soli: all --ed i» 
blood, Rom. III, 2, 55. 
Bedazzl¢, to dazzle, to make dira by too 
much light: --d wlth trie sun, Shr. IV, 5, 46. 
Bedehaml»er, sleeping apartment: Vert. 
784. R3 I, 2, 111. HSIII, 277. Tit.lV, l 108. Cymb. 
I, 6, 196. II, 4, 66. rnakes Mm ofhis b. I, 1, 42 (i. e. 
his page). 
Bed¢lohes, blankets and coverlets for 
beds: All's IV, 3, 287. 
Bede, naine of a falry: qv. V, 5, 53 (cf. Bead). 
Bede¢l, to adorn, to grace: such--in 9 or- 
narnents of praise, LLL Il, 79. in tlat truc use wlich 
should b. t]ï3 sape, th3 love, th3 wit, Rom. I11, 3, 125. 
Bedew, to moisten as with dew: b. fier 
9rass wlth blood, R2 111, 3, 99. the tears tlat should 
b. rn3 hearse, H4B IV, 5, 114..our larnents, where- 
wltfi /ou now b. lïin 9 ttenry's fiearse, H6A I, 1, 104. 
Bedfellow, one who sleeps in the saine 
bed: Tp.II,2,42. AdolV, l,149, lbl. Merch. V. 233. 
284. Shr. IV, 5, 41. H4B 111, 2, 6. IV, 5, 22. H5 Il, 
2, 8. R3 IV, 4, 385 (Qq playfellows). H8 II, 2, 143. 
Cor. Il, .'2, 69. Ant. I, 2, 51 (9o, .çou wild b.). Cymb. 
IV, 2, 295. t'er. Prol. 33. 
Bedford. John Duke of Bedford, brother to 
Henry V: H5 IV, l, 3. IV, 3, 8.53. H6A I, 1, 99. I, 
4, 27 (Ff. JEarl qfB.). I11, 2, 87. H6B I, 1, 83 etc. 
Bed-hangings, curtains: H4B 11, l, 158. 
Bedim, to darken: --ed trie noontide sun, Tp. 
V, 41. 
Bedlam, 1) a hospital for lunatics: to 23. 
witfi fiim! H6B V, 1, 131. Tom o' B. (the usual naine 
of a sort of vagabond beggars), Lr. I, 2, 148. Ad- 
jectively: B. beç9ars , Lr. I1, 3, 14 (q. v.). 
2) a lunatic: B., tiare donc! John Il, 183. get 
trie B. to lead hlrn, Lr. II1, 7, 103. Adjecfively: art 
tfiou b. ? H5 V, 1, 20 (Pistol's speech), the b. brainslck 
ducless, H6B III, 1, 51. a b. and ambitious humour, 
H6B V, 1, 132. 
Bedmate, bedfellow: Troil. IV, 1, 5 (fera.). 
Bed-presser: this b., riais horseback-breaer, 
H4A II, 4, 268, i. e. this hcavy, lazy and dissolute 
fellow. 
Bedreneh, to moisten: such erirnson ternloest 
should b. the 9reen lap of Kin# Richard's land, R2 
I11 8, 46. 
Bedrid, eonfined to the bed: LLLI, 1» 139. 



94 

V¢int. IV, 4, 412. Ihnl. I, 2, 29. a.fflict lhn in Ms bed 
witl b. groans, Lucr. 975. 
lled-righi, that which married people may claire 
from each other; matrimonial duty: o b. slall 
be paid till Hymen's torch be lighted, Tp. IV, 96 (some 
M. Edd. bed-rite). 
Bed-room, room for lying: then by your side 
no b. ne deny, Mids. Il, 2, 51. 
Bed-swerver, vue who is false to the 
marriage-bed: sle's ab. Wint. ll l93. 
lle«i-iime, the nsual hour of going to 
test: Err. l, 2, 28. Mids. V, 34. II4A V, 1,125. 
Bed-vow, marriage-vow: Sonn. 152, 3. 
ledward, toward bcd: tapers burned to b. 
Cor. !, 6, 32 (he two parts of the word towardenclo- 
sing, instead of preceding» the substantive; cf. Paris- 
ward). 
Bedworl, work doue in bed, ihat is without 
toi!: tley call this b, nmppery closet-war Troil. ! 
3, 205. 
Bec, the insee Apis mellific: Luer. 836. 
840. 1769. Tp. I, 2, 330. V, 88. Genfi. !, 2, 107. II4B 
1¥, 5, 75.78. tt I, 2 187. H6A I, 5, 23. II6B Ill, 2, 
125 (bees that want their leader). I¥, 2, 89. Tir. V, 
1, 14 (led b/ their toaster). Caes. ¥, 1, 34 (II.bla 
--s). C.vmb. III, 2, 36. Of femiuine gender: when 
the b. doth leave ber eomb in the dead earrion, H4B 
IV, 4, 79. rob the b. of ber hone. l'er. Il, l 51. 
Quibble beween be and bee, Shr. !1, 207. 
eef, 1) the niml Bos urus; only in the 
plural: flesh of nmttons, beefes or .qoats, Mereh. I, 3 
168. now bas he land and beeves H4B lIl, 2,353. 
2) he flesh of oxen prepared for food: Meas. 
IIl 2 59. Shr. Ind. 2» 8. IV, 3, 23.26.28.30. OEw. I 
3, 90. II5 !Il, 7, 161. H6B IV, 10 61. cf. bull-beeves, 
H6A I. 2, 9. An obseene meaning seems hidden in 
Meas. ill, 2» 59 and Shr. IV, 3, 28. Prince Henry ealls 
Falstaff his sweet b., H4A I11, 3, 199. 
Beef-w«el, with ni mire wit than an 
ox: Troil. II 1 14 (er. lso Tw. I, 3, 90). 
Beehi*, ese in whieh beis re kept: 
H6B IV, 1, 109. 
Beer, liquor made of ruait and hops; 
double b.: H6B Il, 3, 65. small b.: H4B Il, 2, 8. 13. 
II6B IV, '2_, 73. Oth. II, 1, 161. 
Beer-lal'l'el, barrel for holding beer: Itml. 
V, 1,235. 
Beesam, v. bisson. 
Beelle, subst., 1) insect of the genus Coleo- 
ptera: Tp.I, 2 340. Meas. !Il, 1, 79. Mids. Il, 2, 22. 
Mcb. III, 2 42. Lr. IV, 6 14. Ant. III, 2 20. Cymb. 
111, 3, 20. 
2) r um m e r: if I do, fillip me with a three-man 
b. H4B 1, 2, 255 (u ruminer so heuvy that it reqnires 
three men to manage it). 
Beefle, rb., to jnt, to hung over: the sum- 
mit of the cliff that --s o" er his base into the sea» ttml. 
!, 4, 71. 
lleelie-lraws prominent brows: here are 
the b. (sc.  mask) shall blush for ne, Rom. I, 4, 32. 
Beetle-headed, having a head like a rammer, 
stupid: a whoreson b. flap-eared knave! Shr. IV, 
1, 160. 
Befali. Impf. befell: Meas. !Il, 1, 227. As IV, 3, 
103. II6C III, 1, 10. laurtic, be.fallen: Luer. 1599. 
Err. I, 1,124. H4B L 1. 177. tI6C Il, 1, 106. IV, 4, 

B 
3. 1-{3 I, 4, 16. IInd. 
2,307. 
1) trans, to happen to: what uneouth ill event 
bath thee befallen, Luer. 1599. nwre blessed halo did 
ne'er b. out state, H6A !, 6, 10. Mes. !, 1, 59. Mids. 
I, 1, 63. Tw. III, 3, 8. I11, 4, 371. H6B I, 4, 37. H6C 
!I1, 1, 10. IV, 1, 76. IV, 4, 3 (is befallen instead of 
bas befallen; cf. Be). IV 6, 95. 123 !, 4, 16. Ant. !1, 
2, 42. 
Frequently used optutively: so b. n./ soul as this 
is false! En'. V, 208. nmntj /ears of happ. da.s b. 
gracions soverein! R2 I, 1, 20. H6AII, 5, 115. Cymb. 
III, 5, 9. now fait b. /our nmsk! LLL Il, 124. whom 
fait b. in heaven, ,R2 Il, 1, 129. now fair b. thee and 
théWnoble bouse, Ro l, 3, 282. This latter phrase ser- 
ving also as  congratulation: nowfair b. thee, ood 
Petruchio! the waer thou hast won, Shr. V, 2, .1_11. 
] now.fair b. /ou! he deserved his death, R.3 !II, 5, 47. 
/ 2) intr. to happen: those things do best please 
I me that b preposterousl., Mids. 111 2 121. V 156. 
As IV, 3 103. II4B 1, 1 177. H6C II, 1 106. Caes. 
V, 1, 97. Hml. IV, 3, 11. Oth. 11, 3 304. V, 2, 307. 
b. what fortune will Tit. 
V 2, 880. b. what nm. b. II6B III, 2, 402. Tir. V, 
1, 57. Followed by to: mark how heavil. this befell 
to the poor 9entlewoman Meas. II1, 1,227. and more 
such da.s as these to us b. II6B V, 3, 33. Followed 
by of: dilate at fidl what bath befallen of them and 
thee tillnow Err. !, 1,124. 
Befa, 1) to suit: an/business that we 
the hour Tp. II» 1 290. 
nnj composition! R2 II, 1 73. H6C V 7, 44. blind is 
his love and best --s the dark Rom. I!, 1, 32. Abso- 
lutely: it well --s .ou should be of the peace tI4B 
!II 2 98. 
2) to become: those pett. wron#s th. beaut. 
and th. /outh fidl well--s, Sonn. 41, 3. /ou ma/ con- 
ceal her as best --s ber wounded reputation, Ado IV, 
1 243. II6C III 3 2. Hml. I 2 2. Ant. I1 2 97. 
l»er. I» 1 120. I1 3» 66. 
lefare, I. Preposition, opposed to behind and 
af ter, locally and temporally: I drink the air b. me 
OEp. V 102. I had rather 9o b. ]ou Wiv. 3 2 5. 
other bars he la.s b. me» Wiv. III, 4 7. was carried 
with nwre speed b. the wind Err. !, 1, 110. let' s #o hand 
in hand, hot one b. another, V, 425. b. the palace gare, 
Tir. IV 2 35. I see b. ne Cymb. III 2 80 (hot what 
is behind or to the right and left), are /ou crept b. 
us? Gentl. IV,2, 18. b. their time V, 1 15. b. his death, 
Meus. IV, 2, 189. an hour b. his enterin#, IV 4 10. tf 
thou seest ber b. ne Wiv. !» 4, 168. th. vlce bud b. 
th.y sprin#, Lucr. 604. b. thejud#ment, Err. IV 2 40. 
#o b. me, Merch. II 5 38 etc. etc. 
In the saine sense in some cases where modern 
usage would prefer other prepositious: kneel down 
b. him, Meas. I1 2 44. thrice bowed b. me, Vint. IIL 
3, 24. fall b. his feet, ,ohn V 4, 13. bow m.y knee b. 
his nmjest. R2 I 3 47. Ces. I! 1,320. Ant. II 3 3. 
lets fall his sword b..your hi#hness' feet H13A III, 4 9. 
Thou runnest b. ne ( from me) Mids. II1 2423. 
who quickl. fer b. him ( by his hnds), As IV 3 
132. better to fall b. the lion than the wolf Tw. III 
1, 140. out enemies shall fall b. us, H6B IV, 2, 37. the 
klnq b. the Douolas' raqe stooped his anobted head 



B 95 

H4B Ind. 31. down goes all b. hlm» II5 III Chor. 34. 
to mow "cm down b. me» H8 V» 4, 23. the ground shrinks 
b. Ms treading, Cor. V» 4» 20. cf. I1» 2, 109. 
Frequently  i n presenee of: 1'll speak it b. 
the best lord, Wiv. III, 3» 53. know l/ou b. whom l/ou 
are ? As I» 1, 45. what colour for ny visitation shall 1 
hold up b. him? Wint. IV» 4» 567. stepped forth b. the 
klng» H4A V, 2, 46. let's beat hlm b. his whore, H4B 
11» 4, 280. b. tlds royal view» H5 V, 2» 32. what say'st 
tou, man» b. dead Henry's corse? II6-4 I e 1 62. thus 
bold b. thy sovereign, tI6C II, 2, 86. dallff hot b. your 
king, R3 I1» 1 e 12. l/our appeal to us there make b. 
H8 V 1» 153. makes vow b. Ms uncle» Hml. I1, 2» 70. 
before l/our ladyshlp she purs ber tongue a little b ber 
heart» Oth. I1» 1» 106. were cast awaff b. us» Per. I1» 
19.- Sometimes noting power and authority: take 
ber hand b. this friar, Ado ¥, 4» 57. b. this holl/ friar, 
I ara your husband» 58. she will hot here b. !Cut grace 
consent» Mids. I» 1, 39. 1 was b. l]Iaster Tisick the 
deputl/, H4B Il s 4» 92. thou wilt answer this b. the 
pope» H6A I, 3» 52. we'll hear more of !Cut marrer b. 
the king, H6B I e 3, 39. -- In like manner --- to the 
presenee of: bid corne b. usAngelo, Meas. I» 1, 16. 
he must b. the deputy, 111, 2, 35.38. he shall bring !Cu 
b. the duke» IV, 3» 147. Lr. I1» I, 33. 
JBefore heaven ----- in the face or sight of heaven 
whom I detest b. heacen and l/our honour, Meas. I1» 1 
t39. plaffs such fantastic tricks b. heacen, II, » 121. 
I co,fess b. Mgh heaven and !Cu, All's I, 3, 198. 
Hence, before God -- by God: b. God! an in 
nff mind» verl/ wise, Ado II, 3, 192 (Ff.fore). b. Gode 
Hal, if Percl/ be alive, thou get'st hot mlWpistol, II4A 
V, 3, 51. b. God, I ara exceedbg weaT, II4B II, 2» 1. 
b. God, Kate» 1 cannot look greenll/, H5 V, 2, 148. b. 
the gods» Iam ashamed on't, Tire. Ill, 2, 19.54. b. ml/ 
gode lmight hot tMs believe» Hml. I, 1» 56. -- And iu 
eonsequenee of this use, beJore ne -- by my soul: b. 
me, she's a good wench, Tw. Il s 3, 194. b. ne! look 
where she cornes» Oth. IV, 1» 149 (cf. afore and fore). 
JBe.fore ---- preferably to: b. l/ou 1 love l/our 
son, AII's I, 3, 149. iv wear out mortal state to corne 
with ber b. the primest creature, H8 II, 4, 229. whose 
false oaths prevailed b. »l/perfect honour, Cymb. 
3 67. loved b. me, I¥, 2, 29. -- To go b. one ---- to be 
better than, to excel one: OE she went b. others Ihm'e 
seen, Cymb. 1, 4, 78. if that thy gentrl/ go b. tltat lout, 
V, 2» 8 (cf. the quibble in Vir. III» 2» 5). -- Used after 
the verb to prefer: this b. all the world do l prefer, 
Tit. IV, 2, 109. prefer a noble lire b. tt long e Cor. 111» 
1,153 (cf. prefer). 
Plaeed after it» substantive: submissive fall 
prbcell/feet b. LLL IV, I e 92. 
II. Adverb, 1) in a local sense» a) in frout, 
on the fore part: near-legged b. Shr. III» 2» 57. 
had he hls hurts b.? Meb. V, 8,46. 
b) in advanee: go b. Luer. 1302. Geutl. ll, 4, 
186. Wiv. Il s 2, 175. V, 4, 3. En-. I e le 96. Ado IV», 
2» 68. Merch. I, 2, 146. II, 5, 40 etc. I corne b. to tell 
l/ou "Wiv. III» 3, 122. Merch. II, 9, 87. V e 117. get 
thee b. to Coventrl/, H4A IV, 2, 1. baste b., Johu 
3, 6. I ara sent with broom b., Mids. V, 396. whose love 
iv you, thongh words corne hindmost, holds his tank b. 
Sonn. 85, 12. thou art so far b., that swiftest wing of 
recompense fs slow to overtake thee, Meb.I, 4, 16. l'll 
awal/b. H6C II, 5, 136. awal/ b. John V 6, 43. 
ad greet Ms grace» H4B IV, 1, 22S. b., and apace, 

Rom. II, 4, 232 (Qt and some M. Edd. go b.). God 
before  God being our leader: H5 I, 2, 307. III, 6, 
165. the better foot b. -- with the utmost speed: John 
IV, 2, 170. Tir. II» 3» 192. 
2) in a temporal sense  a) in time preee- 
ding» previously: that which everl/ one had b. 
avouched, Lucr. Arg. 9. the ni9ht b. Lucr. 15. poorer 
than b. 693. Sonn. 30, 12.40, 2. 115, 1. 123» 8. Tp. 
I» 2» 219. II 1, 74. 273. I1» 2» 23. 111» 2» 48. V» 194. 
Gentl. IV, 2» 55. IV, 4» 25. Wiv. III, 3» 9. IV, 5» 62. 
Mcas.lV, 2, 121. Mids.ll, 1,167. H6AI, 2, 67. H6B 
I1» 4» 72. Tire. III» 2, 5?. Hml. Il s 2, 75. Cymb. IV, 2, 
191. V, 3, 47 etc. the dal/s b.  former rimes» H4B 
IV» 1,100. Sometimes  already before: I had 
nl/ load b.» now pressed with hearing, Ven. 430. that 
is stronger ruade which was b. barred up with ribs of 
iron, Ado IV, 1,153. we were Chrlstians enow b. lIereh. 
III, 5, 24. manl/ likelihoods informed me of this b. All's 
I, 3, 129. l/ou said so much b., and l/et l/ou Jïed H6C 
Ils 2» 106. -- Once b.  ere this: once b. he won it 
oJ mes Ado II, I» 289. 
b) in advanee, beforehand: weepi»g b. what 
she saw must corne, Err. 1, 1, 72. told out intents b. 
LLL V e 2, 467. he that ruade us with such large dis- 
courses lookbg b. and qfter, Ilnfl. IV, 4, 37 ( for- 
ward aud baek; origiually in a local sense, but figu- 
ratively applied to rime; cf. before, a jol/ proposed; 
behind, a dream, Sonn. 129, 12.). 
e) earlier: when the butt is out, we will drlnk 
water» hot a drop b. Tp. II1 2, 2. l/ou mi9ht bave corne 
b. Err. III» 1 63. 
III. Conjnnetion, 1) earlier than, ere: the 
wbd is hushed b. it rabeth, Vert. 458. b. Noah was a 
sailor, Tw. III, 2, 18. b. we met or that a stroke was 
given, H6A IV, 1, 22. Vert. 416. Sonn. 40, 4. 68, 3. 
Tp. I, 2, 39. IV, 15. 44. Meas. II, I e 177. Err. I» 1, 64. 
II, 2» 67 etc. etc. rl/absence was hot six months old, 
b. herself had ruade provision .for ber following me, 
Err. I, 1, 46. 1"ll hot be long b. l callupon thee Wint. 
II1 3, 8. 
Iu speaking of future things, it is followed by the 
subjuuetive mood : end thl/ ill aire b. thl/ shoot be ended, 
Luer. 579. let there be some more test ruade of mlA me- 
tal, b. so noble and so great a figure be stamped upon 
it, lleas, l, 1, 50. b. the tbne be out, Tp.I,2,246. kneel 
to the duke, b. he pass the abbel/, Err. V, 129. 1pardon 
thee thl/ lire b. thou ask it, Mereh. IV, 1, 369. 1 must 
awal/ to-dal/» b. night corne, Shr. lil, 2, 192. assured 
loss b. the natch be played, John 111, le 336. wilt needs 
invest thee witl mine honours, b. thl/ hour be ripe, H4B 
1¥» 5, 97. which I could with a readl/ guess declare, 
b. the Frenchman speak a word of it, H5 I» le 97. how 
canst thou tell she will denl/ thl/ suit, b. thou make a 
trial of her love? H6A V, 3» 76. I must off'end b. I be 
attainted» H6B II» 4» 59. we shall bave more wars b. 
it be long» H6C IV, 6» 91. will l/ou hence» b. the tag 
return? Cor. III, I e 248. cf. b. the rime that tomeo come 
Rom. IV, 3» 31. 
Followed by shall: Tp. III, le 22. hlerch. 111» 2, 
303. Ant. IV, 8» 3. Followed by wilh John Il s 345. 
H6A III, 2» 43. R3 III, 2, 44. Cor. V, 2, 7. 
2) rather than: he'ld l/ield them up, b. his sister 
should ber bodl/ stoop to such abhorred pollution, Meas. 
II, 4, 182. treble that, b. a friend shall lose a hair, 
Merch. III, 2» 303. take mlWbodl/, soul and all» b. that 
England gice the French the foil H6A V, 3, 23. T'rance 



96 

B 

Dould bave torn and ret nlj very heart, b. I would 
nave 2fielded to tnis league, H6B l, 1, 127. l'Il nave 
tnis crown of mbe cut .from »ly snoulders, b. l'll see 
tne crown so foul misplaced, R3 III, 2, 44 (Qq ere I 
will see). 
.Before tnat  before: a little rime b. tnat F.dward 
sick'd and died, H4B IV, 4, 127. b. tnat England give 
tne French tnefoil, H6A V, 3, 23. 
llefore-breaeh, a breach comnitted in for- 
mer rimes'- punisned for b. of tne ing's laws, H5 
IV, 1, 179. 
lleforelaand, in anticipation: I sec wnat 
crosses my attempt will brblg,.., all tnis b. counsel com- 
prehends, Lucr. 494. 0 let us pa. tne rime but needful 
woe» since it nath been b. witn out griefs, Joha V, 7, 
111, i. e. since the state of things bas anticipated our 
griefs, bas, forestalling them, engrossed all our carc 
and attention, cf. Forenand. 
llefore-lime, before this, formerly: Inave 
b. seen him thus, Cor. 1, 6, 24. 
Befortune, to betide: all good b. you Gentl. 
iV, 3.41. 
Befriend, to be kind to, to favour; in 
speaking of persons : if tnou please, tnou mayst b. me 
so much as to tnink I corne one way qf the Plantagenets, 
John V, 6, 10. cf. Tim. III, 2, 64. God b. us, as out 
cause is just, H4AV, 1, 120. if in his deatn tne Gods 
nave us --ed, great Troy is ours, Troil. V, 9, 9. 0 
happy man, tney nave --ed tnee (in banihing thce), 
ŒEit. Iii, 1, 52. I shall beseech nim to b. Mmse Caes. 
11,4, 30.  In spea'king of things,- to benefit, 
o be fortunate for: tnat you were once unkind 
s me now, Sonn. 120, 1. rny l'est and neglgence 
thee now, Troil. V, 6, 17. 0 eartn, I will b. tnee more 
with tain (of tears) tnan youtnful April, ŒEit. III, 1, 16. 
Beg, 1) trans. to ask with humility, to 
seek by petition (the object never indicating the 
lerson applied to, but only the thing requested): 'ris 
but a kiss 1 b. Yen. 96. l'll b. ner love, Lucr..'241. 
Compl. 42. Gentl. V, 4, 24. lIeas. II, 4 69. V, 379. 
LLL V, 2, 07. llids. I, 1, 41. 11, 1,120. 208. 111, 2, 
375. 1¥, 1, 63. 160. lIerch. ¥, 164. 180. As 111, 5, 6. 
John V, 7, 42. R2 1, 1, 140. IV, 302. V, 2, 113. H4A 
IV, 3, 62. It6A 1¥, 5, 32. H6B 11, 4, 92. H6C 111, 
63. R3 1, 2, 179. Troil. 111, 2, 145. Caes. 111, 1, 57. 
261. Ilml. IV, 7, 106. Ant. lI, 1, 6 etc. to ask 
something in the quality of a mendicant: 
beg my food, Asll, 3, 31. -- a race or two of ginger, 
but that 1 may b. SVint. lV, 3, 51 (probably  that 
they may give me into the bargain), you cannot b. us 
sir, I can assure you, LLL V, .'2,490 (i. e. cannot prove 
us to be idiots, and apply, as the writ de idiota in- 
quirendo prescfibed, to be our guardian), cf. fool- 
begged. 
To beg stn. of one: tnat love I begged for you ne 
ed of me, Err.lV, 2, 12. . trie altos of palsied eld, 
lleas, lIl, 1 35. Merch. lV, 1,363. V, 221. H6C Ill, 
2, 27. R3 Il, 1, 39. Troil. IV, 5, 47. Cor. II, 3, 1.'23. 
Rom. III, 3, 152. Hml. lll, 4, 172. Lr. 1, 4, 121. Per. 
II, 1, 142 etc. Similm'ly: 1 begged trie en, ire at 
,ands, Tit. l, 307. 
2) intr., a) to b. of one: bound to b. of my lord 
general, Cor. I, 9, $0. to b. of thee, it is my more dis- 
lwnour than thou of them, 111 2, 12. 1 b. of you to 
know me, Tire. IV, 3, 494. he --ed of me to steal 
Oth. V, 2: 229. 

b) to b. for sth.: --ed for that wMch thou unasked 
shalt bave, Ven. 102. b. for grace in vain, OEit. 1, 4=55. 
V, 2, 180. Ib..[orjustice, Rom. 111, 1,185. would now 
be glad of bread, and b. for it, l'er. 1, 4, 41. 
e) to b. of one for sth.: b. of ber for remedy, Mids. 
111, .'2, 109. 
d) followed by a clause: b. that thou maÆst bave 
leave to bang thyself, lerch. IV, 1,364. we b. that you 
do change this purpose, Wint.11,3, 149. I b. that you'll 
vouchsafe ... Lr. 11, 4, 157. I should bave --ed lmight 
bave been employed, H6A IV, 1, 72. Caes. 11, 2, 82. 
e) absolutely: how I would ntake him fawn and 
b. LLL V, 2, 62. bebg so great, I bave no need to b. 
R2 IV, 309. as you would b., were you bi my distress 
R3 1, 4, 273. 274. thou keepest the stroke between thy 
--ing and my meditation, IV, 2, 118. wh., b. then, Troil. 
IV 5, 48. he asks of you» that never used to b. t'er. 11, 
1, 66.  to gather altos: b. thou or borrow, Err. 
1, 1,154. I shall b. with it from door to door, IV, 4, 
40. As 1, 1, 80. As Epil. 11. H4A V, 3, 39. H4B 1, 
2 84. Rom. 111, 5, 194. Lr. IV, 1, 33. 
leget. Impf. begot: Gentl. 111, 1, 294. Meas. ¥, 
517. As 1, 1 61. OEit. V, 1, 87. l'artie, ordinarily be- 
got, f.i. Ven. 168. Meas. 111, 2, 116. LLL IV, : 70. 
V, 2, 869. hlerch. 111, 2 65. As IV, 1,216. V, 4, 177. 
John , 75. 175 etc. sometimes begotten: All's 111, 2, 
61. Wint. 111, 2 135. H6A 11, 5, 7.'2. V 4, 7 (cf. 
misbegotten, true-begotten, first-begotten ). 
1) to proereate, as a father: thou wast begot, 
Ven. 168. who begot thee 2. Gentl. 111, 1,294. I dhl b. 
ber, H6A V, 4, 11. hleas. 111, 2, 116. LLL IV, 2, 70. 
lIereh. I11, _'2, 65. As I, 1, 61. Vint. 111, :2, 135. Johu 
1, 75. 175. H4A 11, 4 250. H5 111, 1,23. H6AV, 5, 
74. R3 V, 3, 157. Tir. V, 1, 32. Lr. 1, 1, 98. Cymb. 
V, 5,331 etc. the issue was hot his begot, R3 lll, 5, 90. 
Followed by of: my trust, like a good parent, did b. 
of him a falsehood, Tp. 1, 2, 94. whose influence is be- 
got of that loose grace, LLL V, 2, 869. that was begot 
of thought, As IV, 1, 216. a child begotten of thy body, 
All's 111, 2, 61. no heir begotten of his bod.y, H6A 11, 
5, 72. begotten of a shepherd swain, V, 4, 37. beget 
mbe issue of your blood, R3 IV, 4,297. begot of nothing 
but vab« fantas., Rom. 1, 4, 98. Folloved by on: I 
begot hi» on the empress, Tir. V, 1, 87. begot upon it- 
self, Oth. 111, 4, 162. cf. 1 will b. mine issue of your 
blood upon your daughter, R3 IV, 4, 297. 
2) t o p r o d u e e : gold that's put to use more gold 
--s, Ven. 768. --s him hate, Luer. 1005. Gentl. 111, 
1,97. LLL 11, 69. AS V,4,177. Shr. 1,1,45 (fi.iends). 
Wint. V, 1, 133. R2 I1, 2, 36. V, 3, 56. H6A 111, 3, 
87. H6C ll, 5, 63.91. R3 lV, 3, 26. Lr. 11, 1, 35. 
3) to get: whom he begot whh child, Meas. V, 
517. you must acquire and b. a temperance, Hml. I II, 2, 8. 
lleggar, subst., 1) mendicant, ma.sc, and fera. : 
Tp. II, 2, 34. Gentl. II, 1» 26. Meas. lll» 2, 133. 194. 
Err. IV, 4, 39. Ado lll, 4, 30. lV, 1. 134. LLL l, 2, 
115. lV, 1, 67. Merch. IV, 1, 440. As III, 3, 85. As 
Epil. 10. All's V, 3, 335. R3 1, 4, 274. etc. etc. sonne 
she beggar, Tim. lV, 3, 273. --s mounted run their 
horse to death, H6C I» 4, 127. a ballad of the kbg and 
the b. LLL 1, 2, 115. cf. IV, 1, 67 and R2 V, 3, 80 (v. 
Cophetua). ]?ollowed by of: a b., brother? of nly kbld 
uncle, R3 lIl, 1, 112. 
2) a person extremcly poor and mean: 
Lucr. 216. 711. 985. Sonn. 66, 2. Meas. lV, ô, 13. 
Mcrch. III, 1, 48. H6C 11, 2,154. R3 l, 2, 42 etc. etc. 



B 97 

Beggar, rb. 1) to reduce to bcggary: lean, 
rent and--ed by the strumpet wind, Merch. 11, 6, 19. 
big ,]Jars seems bankrupt Us the5" --ed host, H5 IV,, 
43. à (conscience) --s an man that keeps it, R3 1, 
4, 145. bowed you to the grave and --ed y/ours for 
ever, Mcb. 111, 1 91. Metaphorically: 5. theestimation 
which you pri:ed rlcher than sea and land, Troil. I1, 
.'2, 91. it --ed all deserlptlon, Ant. 11, 2 e 203. 
2) followed by of, = to deprive, to make 
d es t i tu t c o f: now nature baukrupt is, --ed ofblood, 
Sonn. 67, 10. necessity, of marrer --ed, will nothing 
stick out person to arraign, Hml. IV, 5, 92. 
Beggar-fear, fear becoming a beggar: 
wlth pale b. impeach my hcight R2 I, 1,189. 
Beggarlr, adj. 1)becomiug a beggar: b. 
thanks, As I1, 5, 29. a b. denier, 123 I, _'2, .052. 
2) extremely poor and mean: Shr. IV, 1, 
140. H4A IV, 2 e 75. H5 IV, 8, 36. V, 1, 5. H8 11, 3, 
83. Rom. V 1, 45. Lr. Il, 2, 16. Oth. IV, .'2, 158. 
Beggarolaid: Rom. I1, 1, 14. 
Beggar-mall: Lr. IV, 1, 31. 
Beggar-vonan : H6B IV, 2, 151. 
Beggary, state of extrcme indigence: 
Meas. Ill, 2, 99. lIids. V, 53. John Il, 596. II4B 1V, 
1, 35. H6B IV, 1, 101. IV, 2, 58 (b. is vali«nt). R3 
1V, 3, 53. Rom. V, 1, 71. knt. I, 1 e 15. Cymb. l, 6, 115 
(the b. of hls change  contcmnptible meanness). 11, 
3, 1-°4. V, 5, 10. 
Begi. Impf. 5egan, f. i. Ven. 175. 367. Lucr. 
1439. 1471. 1696. Pilgr. 144 etc. etc. 5egua only 
when required by the rhyme: Vcn. 462. Lucr. 374. 
Compl. 12..'262. Tw. V, 414. R2 1, I e 158. Rom. I, 
,, 98. Hml. III, 2, 220 (in Cacs. V, 1, 114: that work 
the Ides of Iarch begun, the Ides of Iarch is  on 
the Ides of llarch). -- Partic. begun: Vert. 845. Lucr. 
26. Tp. I, 2, 34. leas. 11, 4, 159 etc. etc. (in H5 V, 
1, 75 O. Edd. began, lI. Edd. 5egun). 
1) trans, to commence; followed by an accns.: 
their copious stories oftentimes begun end without au- 
dience, Vert. 845. Lucr. 26. the strumpet that 5egan 
this stir, Lucr. 1471. 161.9. llerch. III, -0, 71. As V, 
3 27. 4, 177. H5 111, 3, 7. John 111 e 1, 94. H6A 111, 
1, 75. Caes. V, 1, 114. llcb. 1, 2, 33. 1II, _'2, 55. Oth. 
11, 3 e 178. Ant. IV, 14, 106 etc. etc. lwill, out ofthlne 
own confession, learn to b. thy health, lleas. 1, 2, 39e 
i. e. drink fo thec, but hOt airer thee, in order hOt 
to be infectedwith thydisease, cf. Sonn. 114, 14 (to 
begin to one, or to begb a health  to drink to one). 
fie (Caesar) did b. that place, R3 111, 1, 70, = laid its 
foundation, began its erection. Similarly: would she 
b. a sect ( found a sect) Wint. V, 1, 107. you might 
b. an impudent nation ( become the founder, the 
progenitor of..) All's IV, 3, 363. love is begun by 
tbne, and time qualifies the spark andjïre of it, Hml. 
IV, 7, 112. an ancient tradition, begun upon an honour- 
able occasion, H5 V, 1, 75 ( caused, occasioned). 
rime had hot seythed ail that y/outh begun, Compl. 12. 
which, out of use and staled by other men, b. hls fashion, 
C,'ms. IV, 1, 39. Followed by an infinitive preceded by 
to : to rie the rider she --s to prove, Vert. 40. 175. 554. 
Lucr. 342. 374. 1439. 1639. 1696. Compl..062. Pdgr. 
144. Tp. 1, 2 e 34. I1, 1,29. IV ,19. V, 67. 80. Gentl. 
I, 1, 10. 11, 4, 208. V, 1, 1 etc. etc. 
2) absol.; a) opposed to end,  to make a 
commencement: where she ends she doth anew b. 
Vert. 60. once more the englue of ber thoughts began, 
Sehmidt, Shakespcare Lexicon. 3. Ed. T. 1. 

367. 4(2. twce she doth begn ere once she speaks, 
Lucr. 567. 1303. 1598. i.flt Se polsoned, 'ris the lesser 
sb that mine eye loves if and dothjïrst b. Sonn. 114, 
14 (cf. le. 1, -0, 39). Tp. I, ,, 395. Gentl. 11, 4, 3. 9. 
V, 4, 113. lleas. 11, 4, 159. Err. V, 356. LLL V, 1, 
46. V, .'2, 903. Mids. 111 e 1, 76. R:2 I, 1, 158. H6A 11, 
-0e 2 -9. Troil. Prol..08. Troil. 1V 5, 93. Rom. 11, 
2.00. Hml. 111 e .0, 220. 
b) to take fise: then--s ajourneyinmyhead, 
Sonn..97, 3. there are pretty orders --i»g, lieas. 
1,249. how did thls argument b.? LLL I11, 105. and 
there --s raff sadess, As I, 1, 5. and there --s new 
marrer, IV, 1, 81. a reat while ago the world begun, Tw. 
V, 414. the report of ber is extendedmore than van Se 
thought to b. from such a cottage, Wint. IV, 2, 50. let 
if test where if began at jïrst, tI6A IV, 1, 121. there 
--s conftsion, 194. then began the tempest, 123 1, 4, 
44. sincejïrst the world begun, Rom. I, 2, 98. a curse 
! b. at very roof ou's heart, Cor. 11, 1, 20,. as the world 
were now but fo 5. Ihnl. IV, 5, 103. whe if appears 
fo you where this --s, Ant. 111,4, 33. then bean a stop, 
Cymb. V, 3, 39. 
Beginner, anthor: where are the vile --s of 
thls .fray? 12om. II1 1,146. a sb in war damned in 
thejïrst --s, Cymb. V, 3, 37. 
Begiig snbst., colnmelacement: sweet 
but unsavour# end, Ven. 1138. this pamphlet, without 
b. Lncr. Dedic. 1. Tp. II e 1,158. Viv. I, 1, .054 
the b.). llids. V, 111. Asl, .0e 119. Johul e 5. H4A 
IV, .0, 85. tI4B 111, 1, 85. I-I5 IV, 1, 91. Cor. 111 e 1, 
3:29. Tir. V, 3, .002. Caes. IV, 3, .034. Oth. I1, 3 185. 
Cymb. 111, 4, 182. 
2) enterprise: fo hlnder out --s, H5 11, .'2, 187. 
Begnav, to gnaw, corrode: 5egnawn with 
the bots, Shr. 111, .0, 55. the worm of consclence still b. 
thff soul, 123 1, 3, 222. 
Begoe (v. Go) away: As 111, 3 105. Aut. 111, 
13, 15.0. IV, 12, 17. 
Begriale, t o s o i 1: --d with sweat, and smeared 
all wlth dust, Lucr. 1381. ber naine is now--d and 
black as mine own faee, Oth. 111, 3 387. 
Beguile, 1) to deceive, to cheat; absol.: 
the 5errer to b. Ilml. I, 3, 131. trans.: the top o'er- 
strawed wlth sweets that shall the truest sight b. Vert. 
1144. if--d attention, eharmed the sight, Lucr. 1404. 
fo mock the subtle, in themselves --d, 957. thou dost 
b. the world, unbless some mother, Sonn. 3e 4. 59, 2. 
Compl. 170. Pilgr. 402. Gentl. V, 4 e 64. Vqv. 1, 3, 
95. lIeas. IV, 2, 164. lIids. 1, 1, .039. 11 e 1, 45. 8hr. 
Ind. 2, 57. Shr. 1, .0, 138. Ill e 1, 37. All'z 1V e 3, 333. 
V, 3, 306. Tw. V e 142. 143. John 111, 1, 99. R2 IV, 
281. 1:I5 IV, 1, 171. H6A I, _'2, 65. II6B 111, 1, .0.06. 
Rom. 111 e 2, 132. IV, 5, 55. Tire. IV, 3, 331. lcb. 
5, 64. Lr. 11, , 117. IV, 6, 63. V, 3, 154. Oth. IV, 1, 
98. Ant. 111, 7 78. V, .0, 3"_)6. 
Followed by of,  to cheat one of sth.: 
--d hlm of a chaln, Wiv. 1V, 5, 33. 38. y/ou owe me 
money, anbl now y/ou plck a quarrel to b. me of if, FI4A 
111, 3, 77. whoe'er he be that in thls foul proceedlng 
bath thus -- d your daughter of herself and you of ber, 
Oth. 1 e 3, 66. Sometimes -to rob one of sth.: light 
seekbg light doth light of light 5. LLL I, 1, 77. would 
b. ature of ber custom so perfectly he is ber ape, 
Wint. V, .0, 107. b. them of commendation, H4A I11, 1. 
189. where injury of chance rudely --s out lips of all 
rejoindure, Troil. IV, 4, 37. so let the Turk of Cyprus 
7 



98 

tes b. Oth. I, 3, '2.10. In a good sense, --- to take or 
draw from one in a pleasing manner: and often 
b. ber of ber tears, when I dld speak. .. , Oth. I, 3,156. 
Followed by to, -- to betray: --drae to the very 
heart of loss, Ant. IV, 12, 29. 
2) to deceive pleasingly, to drive away 
by an agreeable delusion: ow shall we b. the 
lazy tlme? Mids. V, 40. 374. to b. two hours in a sleepl 
All's IV» 1 25. Tw. III, 3, 41. R2 II, 3, 11. IIml. 
2» 9-36. take cholce of ail ray library» and so b. thy 
sorrow, Tit. IV, 11 35. I ara hot merry» but I do b. 
thig I ara» by seenffng otherwise» Oth. II» l, 123. so 
--d with outward honestyl but yet defiled wlth inward 
vice, Lucr. 1544» i. e. the thing he was being ruade 
away with, as it werc» by the appearance of honesty. 
"But may be the word must be takcn here as an adjec- 
tire, in the sense: armed with guilc» able to deceive. 
Behalf. 1) nse, purpose: in th«t b. (riz to 
know his pleasure) we sSgle 1o os out sollcltor, 
LLL Il, ,'27. the sands that run ha the clock" s b. Cymb. 
III, 2» 75» i.e. which, by their rnnuing, do the service 
of a clock. 
2) affair» canse: the somet youwri't to Dlaa 
in b. of the courir Rousillon (riz to warn her ff-oto his 
practices), All's IV, 3, 355. y meaning la it was very 
honest in the b. of the mald, 247. in right and truc b. 
of thff deceased brother Geffreff s son» John 1, 7. that 
raen o.f your vobility and power dld gage thera both in 
an u,just b. H4A 1, 3» 173. In b. of in the naine 
of: demanded mg prisoners in your ajesty's b. H4A 
I 3 48. in out king's b. I ara commanded to klss your 
hand, H6C III, 3» 59. in the duke's b. l'll give ray voice» 
I3 II1» 4, 20. which in ray lord' s b. I corne to eatreat 
your honour fo supplff, Tire. II1» 1» 17. 
3) cause, interest: cannot insinuate with you 
in the b. of a good play, As Epil. 9. to speak in the 
b. of ny daughter, All's IV, 5, 76. a trace gentleraan 
raa. swear it in the b. of his fi'iend» Wiut. V, 2, 176. 
I bave rauch to say in the b. of that Falstaff H4A 1I, 
4, 532. rob in the b. of charity, Troil. V, 3, 22. the 
emperor's comi»g in b. of France, H5 V Chor. 38. 
even in thy b. l'll thank nyself, H4A V, 4, 97. bearlng 
the klng in mg b. along, H6C 11, 1» 115. /ou shall glve 
me leave fo play the broker b ralne own b. IV, 1, 63. 
you in out b. go levy men» 130. shall your city call us 
rd, in that b. whlch we bave challenged it? John I[, 
:64 (riz in the interest of Arthnr). 
Hence in b. of= in favour of: letraehave thy 
volce in ray b. Viv. 1, 4» 168. Mids. 1112,331. Merch. 
I, 3, 74. All's IV» 4, 28. John II, 8. H6A II, 4, 1:'0. 
H6B III 2» 208. IV, 1» 63. I3 IV» 1» 51 (only in Ff.). 
IV» 4, 357. V» 3, 12'2.. Troil. III 3, 16. Cor. IV, 2» 3. 
V» 2» 0-5. Rom. III, 1, 116. Tire. I, 0-,97 (in your own 
b.). Lr. IV,2,20 (in your own b.): Oth.IIl» 3, 2. whls- 

self, with respect to external deportment: thou--dst 
thysel.f as if thou hadst been in thine own slaughter- 
bouse, H6B IV, 3, 5. -- 2) intr., in the saine sense: 
how bave I then --d, that he nlght..., 0th.l¥,0-, 108. 
-- 3) the partic, behaved--having a behaviour: 
and gather by hlm, as he is behaved, if it be the of- 
¢tlction qf his love or no, Hml. III, 1, 35. 
In Tire. III, 5» 2,'2 O. Edd. bave: with such sober 
und lassion ,nnoted he did behoove his anger ; which 
bas by M. Edd. been changed to behave, and inter- 
pretcd in the sense of to govern, to mariage. 
lehaiour, external carriage and deport- 
ment, as it is expressive of sentiments and dispo- 
sition: ber sad b. feeds his vulture folly, Lncr. 556. 
he lends thee vrtue and he stole that word.from thy b. 
Sonn. 79, 10. for thyface and thy b. Gentl. IV, 4, 72. 
the hardest voice o.f er b., to be Englished rlghtly, is 
"I ara Sir John Falstaff's," Wiv. 1, 3, 52. II, 1, 3. 
LLLV, 1, 13. b.» what wert thou till thls nadman 
showed thee? V, 2, 337 (-- good manners). Merch. I, 
2» 81. 1I, 0-» 196. those that are good manners at the 
court are as ridiculous in the countr!/ os the b. of the 
cowffry fs raost mockable at the court, As II1» 2, 4S. 
Shr. Ind. 1, 95. Shr. I 1» 71. I, '2., 169. I1, 50. III, 
13. Tw. I, 2, 47. practlsbg b. to hls own shadow» 
11, 5, 0-0. III, 4, -°03. II4A !, 2, 232. II8 IV, 0-, 103. 
Cor. II, 3» 45. Ihnl. II1  338. Ant. II» 6» 77. 
markable passage: thus, airer greeting, speaks the klng 
of F,-ance in mg b. to the majesq/, the borrowed majesQ/ 
of England here John I, 3, i. e. in the tone and cha- 
racter which I here assume. 
"The plural behavlours  gestures, manners, 
exterrtal appearance: I will teach the children 
thelr s, Wiv. IV» 4» 66. a fool when he dedicates his 
--s fo love» Ado I1» 3, 9. whora she bath in ail outward 
s seemed ever fo abhor, I1» 3, 100. all hls --s did 
raake their retire fo the court of hls eye, LLL II, 0-34. 
thine eyes sec if so grossly shown in thy --s, Airs I, 
3, 184. inferlor e!/es» that borrow their --s from the 
great» John V, 1, 51. whlch give some soil perhaps to 
m --s» Cms. I 0-» 42. poor Çasslo's smiles, gestures 
and light --s, 0th. IV, 1» 103 (Qq behavlour). 
Sometimes coming hem" the sense of moral 
:onduct: what cause bath m!/ b. glven fo !/our dis- 
leasure? H8 11» 4, '2.0. if you should lead ber into a 
fool" s paradlse, as the!/ say, it were a very gross klnd 
of b., as the. say» Rom. 11,4,177 (the nurse's speech). 
to raake inquire of hls b. Hml. 1I, 1, 5. when we are 
slck in fortune often the surfeit of out own b. Lr. I, 
0-» 130. 
iehead, to execute by cutting off the 
head: Meas. V, 462. Err. V, 127. tt6A 11» 5, 91. 
H6B IV, 7» 0-6. 102. R3 III» 2, 93. Tit. V, 3, 100. 
i¢hes, commandment: or klngs be breakers 

per him in your behalfs» Wint. IV, 4, 827 (Autolycus' of thelr own --s, Lucr. 852. opposition fo you and 
speech), your --s, Rom. IV» 2, 19. let us with tare perform his 
On b. of, in the saine sense: this shall on ber b. great b. Cymb. V, 4, 120-. 
change slander to remorse, Ado IV, 1»21-'2. towhetyour Behind. I. Adverb, 1) on the baek part, 
gentle thoughts on hls b. Tv. III» 1» 117 (or is if, in in the back: the scalps of raan!/, alraost hld b. 
these two psages, --- concerning him?) rausterlng Lucr. 1413. himself, b.» was lej unseen, 1425. and 
in his clouds on out b. armies of pestilence» R2 11I I 3, break it in your face, so he break if (his wind) hot b. 
86. to engross up glorlous deeds on mg b. H4A III 0-, Err. III, 1, 76. an two men ride of a horse» one raust 
148. that you on ra!l b. would pluck a flower» H6A II, ride b. Ado III, 5, 41. a coward which boxes honesty 
4, 129. 1bave nwved mg lord on his b. Oth. III, 41 19 b. Wint. 1, 2,244. he» belng in the vaward, placed b. 
(Qq in). on purpose, H6A I, 1, 13,'2. corne fi'ora b. I, 2, 66. lag 
iehae, 1) reflectively» --- to conduct one's b. III, 3, 34. Casca» like a cur, b. struck Caesar on 



B . .99 

the necIc, Caes. V, 1, 43. trlpped me b. Lr. Il, 2, 126. 
as we taIce hares, b. Ant. IV, 7, 13. look b. = look 
back, 0th. Il, 1,158. Applied to time: belote, ajoy 
Troposed, b. a dream (= when past) Sonn. 129» 12. 
my grief lies onward, and my joy b. 50, 14. 
2) following another, preceded or out- 
stripped by another: I thy babe chase thee afar 
b. Sonn. 143, 10. so shall I o whit be b. 5 duty» Shr. 
I» 2» 175. 
3) remaining afterthe departure of an- 
other: thou shalt live in this fab" world b. IIml. 11[, 
2, 185. to leave b.: Lucr. 734. Sonn. 9, 6. Tp. III, 3, 
41. IV, 156. hlids. III, 2 319. R2 Il, 3, 97. H6C Il, 
2, 49. R3 IV, 4, 496. to stay b.: John V, 7» 70. Aut. 
III» 7, 20. 
4) hot yet happcncd» or not yet pro- 
duced to view» future: there's more b. that is 
»rare gratulate, Meus. V, 535. where we'll show what's 
et b. 545. two lads that t]mught there was no more b. 
but such a dag to-morrow as to dag, XVint. I, 2, 63. 
Glamls» and thane of Cawdor ; the greatest is b. lIcb. 
I, 3, 117. bad begbs and worse remains b. thnl. Ill, 
4, 179. 
II. Preposition, 1) on tlle back part, ai thc 
back of: te lion waI]ed alo»g b. some hedge» Ven. 
1094. b. the arras, Viv. 111, 3, 97. they threw me o." 
from b. one ofthem, IV, 5, 69. Err. IV, 3, 19. V, 122. 
Ado I, 3, 63. Mids. IV, 1, 53. V, 397. Merch. II,8,47. 
As II, 1,30. H4A I11,3112. II4B V, 5, 10. 13 I, 4» 
275. to corne b. folks, I'I6B IV, 7, 89 (= to attack 
them ri-oto behind), no glory lires b. the aclc of such, 
Ado III, 1, 110 (i. e. they are ill spoken of in their 
absence), it will be of more prlce, beig spore b. your 
baclc, ttian to your .face, Rom. IV, 1, 28. 
2 left at a distance, colning after: sle 
will outstrip all praise ad malte it huit b. ber, Tp. 
IV» 11. Gcntl. H, 4, 71. hIerch. HI, 2, 130. or corne 
one minute b. your bout» As IV, 1» 195. a mot]i b. the 
gest prefixed.for Ms parti»g, Wint. I, 2, 41. 
3) remaining after the departure of: 
and left b. Mm Richard, It6B Il, 2, 19. ad leave me 
here in wretche&ess b. ye, H8 IV, 2, 84. she would bave 
died fo stay b. ber (= not to accolnpauy her) As l. 
1, 115. Troil. I, 1, 83. l'Il leau upon oe crutch and 
fight wlth t'other, ere stay b. this business» Cor. [, 1,247. 
Behind-door-work, what is made bchind 
the door: Wint. lll, 3, 76. 
Behindhand, being in arrear: these thy offi- 
.ces are as ittetTreters of mg b. slaclcness, Wiut. V, 
1» 151. 
Behold, impf. and pa'tic, beheld; I) tl-ans, a) to 
sec: b. two Adores dead: Ven. 1070. whea he beheld 
Iris shadow, 1099. 1129. Lucr. 416. 447. 451. 746. 
800. 1115. Sonn. 106, 13. Tp. I, 2,491. V, 18. 106. 
236. Gentl. Il, 4, 209. V, 4, 101. Wiv. IV, 2, 125. 
Meus. I, 2, 45. Err. IV, 4, 108. V, 330. LLL I, 1, 247. 
IV, 3, 36. Mids. I, 1,209. Merch.II,7,68. It5 IV Chor. 
42. 46. H6A Il, 2, 10. 42. R3 Il, 4, 56. (::or. III, 1, 21. 
Ant. III, 3, 8, etc. etc. beheld the Icing myfather wreclced, 
Tp. I, 2, 435. to b. desert a beggar bor*, Sonn. 66, 2. 
I might b. addrest the kb*g and his companions, LLL 
V, 2, 92. --s ber bleed, Lucr. 1732. can the son's eye 
b. hls father bleed? Tit. V, 3, 65. To b. and to see 
joined : ou saw the mlstress, I beheld the maid, lIerch. 
III, 2» 200. prithee, se,.'- there! behold, look» loi llcb. 
fil, 4, 69. b. a»d see» Ant. I, l, 13. 

b) to regard, to look on: who (viz the sun) 
doth the world so gloriously b. that cedar-tops and hills 
seem burnlshed gold, Ven. 857. that eye whlch looks 
on ber confounds Ms wits; that e.e 
Lucr. 291. will you go with us to b. it (---- to be spec- 
tators of it) SViv. Il, 1» 214. cf. Err. V, 128. Meas. 
1, 3, 43. hiids. I," 1, 10. H6A I, 4, 96. Troil. fil, 3, 
91. IV, 5» 236. V, 2, 69. Oth. V, 1, 108. ail his oir- 
tues, hot virtuously of hls own part beheld, do in out 
eyes 5egin to lase their gloss» Troil. Il, 3, 127, i. e. his 
virtues» hot regarded by himself as it becomes a vir- 
tuous nan, but with pride and arrogance. 
2) absol, to sec: what dost thou to mbte eyes» 
that they b., and see hot wtiat they see? Sonn. 137» 2. 
corne down, b. no more» Caes. V, 3» 33. I can b. no 
longer, Ant. III» l0 t 1. a mother should hot sell him an 
ltourfrom her --ig, Cor. I, 3, 10 ( from her sight). 
Very remarkable, though unnoticed by the commcn- 
tators, is fle following passage: I ara wild in mg be- 
holdi»g : I look wild, Per. V, 1, 224. cf. Lucr.1590. 
Beholden, v. eholdi»g. 
Behohle¢, spectator, witness: As l, 2, 139. 
Wiut. V, 2, 18. II6A I, 4, 46. R3 IV» 4, 68. Troil. 
Prol. 26. --- he who looks on sth.: was thls 
Cace that lile the sua did make --s wil:? R2 IV, 284. 
Beholding (most bi. Edd. beliolden) obliged: 
he is b. to you, Gentl. IV, 4, 178. a justice of peace 
sometimes may be b. to Ms friend for a man, Wiv. I, 
1,283. hIcas. IV, 3, 166. hIerch. I, 3, 106. As IV, 
1, 60. Shr. l, 2, 274. l[, 78. John I, 239. R2 IV, 160. 
tI4A Il, l, 98. R3 Il, I, 129. 
41. IV, 1, 21. V» 3, 157. V, 5, 71. Tir. I, 396. V, 3, 
33. Caes. III, 2, 70. 72. Per. Il, 5, 25. 
Behoof, advantage, benefit: to be forbod 
the sweets that seem so good, for fear of barres that 
preach in out b. Compl. 165. thls togue bath parleyed 
unto forelgn kbtgs for your b. H6B IV, 7, 83. 
Behoof-ful, v. behooveful. 
Behooe or Beho-e, subst. : behoof, in-an 
old song, Hml. V, l, 71. 
Behooe or Beho-e, rb, 1) to be advanta- 
geous to: if you Icmw auqht 
kowledge thereof to be ioEormeè, Vint. I, 2, 395. there 
are cozeners abroad; therefore 
IV, 4, 257. -- 2) to become: wMle these do labour 
for thelr own preferment --s it us to labour for the 
reabn, H6B l, 1, 182. you do hot understand yourself 
so clearly as it --s mg daughter and your honour, Hml. 
I, 3, 97. wMch --s me l:eep at utterance» Cylnb. III, 
l, 73. In Tire. III, 5, 22 : wlth such soSer and unnoted 
passion he did b. 
had but proed an argumet» bi. Edd. have changed 
the word to behave, but cf. to become Lr. IV, 3, 26 
and Ant. I, 3, 84. 
Behooveful or Behoveful (Qq belioofefu) fi t- 
ting, becoming: Rom. IV, 3, 8. 
Behowl, to howl at: the wolf --s the moon, 
Mids. V, 379 (0. Edd. beholds). 
Being, subst, v..e. 
Bel, the God of the Chaldaeans: like god 
oriests in the old churcli-wbdow, Ado III, 3, 144. 
Belarius, naine in Cymb. III, 3, 106. V, 5, 317. 
333. 455. 
Beleh, name in Tw. I, 3 47. 
BelCh, vb., 1) absol, to vomit: the --ing wliale, 
Troil. V, 5, 23. Per. fil, 1, 63. 'tis a good constraint 
7* 



100 

B 

of fortune it (the sea) --es upon us, Per. 11I, 2, 55. 
ty food is such as hath been --ed on bg bfected lungs, 
IV, ,) 179. 
trans, to vomir forth: m.y pantig bulle 
which almost burst to b. it in the sea, R3 I, 4,41. when 
the`c are full» the`c b. us, Oth. Ill, 4, 106. the bitterness 
of it I now b. from tg heart, Cymb. III, 5, 137.  
to belch up, in the saine sense: Tp. 111, 3, 56. 
Beidam or Beidame, 1) grandmother: to 
show the b. daughters of her daughter Luer. 953. 
shapes ber sorrow to the --'s (IIeeuba's) woes 1458. 
the old b. earth, H4A 11I, 1, 32. 
2) terre of eontempt for an old woman: old 
men and --s in the streets do prophesy upon it John 
IV, 2, 185. b. I th5dc we watched !Aou at an inch 
H6B 1, 4, 45. --s as !Aou are, Meb. 1II, 5, 2. 
Belee, to place on the lee, or in a position 
unfavorable to the wind: --d and calmed by debitor 
and creditor Oth. I, 1 30. 
Belfry, that part of the steeple where 
the bell is hung: Per. Il, 1, 41. 
Belgia, 13clgium: Err. III, 2, 142. H6C IV, 
8, 1. 
Belie, to tell lies about, to misreprc- 
sent: I thbd: `C love as rare as any she --d with 
false compare, Sonn. 130, 14. that I a`c hot be so 
nor thou --d, 140, 13. y cousin is --d, Ado IV, l, 
148. V, l, 42. 67. 222. 274. All's 1V, 3, 299. £w. I, 
4, 30. John 1II, ŒEE, 44. R2 Il, 2, 77. H4A l, 3, 113. 
tt4B l, l, 98. Oth. 1V, 1, 36. V 2» 133. Cymb. lll 
4, 38. V. 2, 2. 
Belied. adj, full of lies: she concludes the 
picture was b. Luer. 1533. 
Belief, 1) eredit given: Wiv. V, 5, 132. As 
¥, 2, 63. John III, 1, 31. lIeb. 1, 3, 74. IV, 3, 184. 
]:[ml. 1, 1, 24. Ant. III, 7, 7(;. ['er. IV» 4, 23. to be 
in the b. Tw. 11I, 4, 149. b. of it» Oth. I, 1,144. his 
b. in her renown» Cymb. V, 5, 202. 
2) opinion: holds b. that» hein 9 brou9ht into the 
open air, if woul4 alla`c .... , Johu "' 7, 6. she's b a 
wron 9 b. II6A II, 3» 31. if tMs but answer to »lg just 
b. Per. V» 1,239. 
Belic-e, 1) absol, to bave faith: how strange 
it seems hot to b., and get too credulous, Ven. 986. 
--bg souls, H6B I1, 1, 66. glce theb" noey out of 
hope the`c may b. II8 l'roi. 8. so lb. (= [ b. it), 
Gentl. I1[, 2, 16. ef. Meas. IV, 1, 12. Followed by 
in: his blessbgs ad his curses touch e alike, they're 
breath I hot b. in, H8 11, 2, 54. 
2) trans., a) to give eredit to; the objeet 
either denoting the person or thing on whose antho- 
rity one relies, or the thing taken to be true : ) I do 
well b. gour highness, Tp. II, 1, 172. would the`c b. 
me? Ill, 3» 28. Sonn. 17, 1. 138, 2. Compl. 262. 
Wiv. I1, 1, 148. hicas. 1, 2, 19. II, 4, 172. IV, 1, 12. 
Err. V, 306. Mids. III, 2, 347. H6B IV, 8, 22 etc. etc. 
he--s himself, Tw. III,4,408 (thinks to be ta-ue what 
he says). To be --d: Sonn. 140, 12. Meas. 1I, 4, 
149. V, 31. R3 IV, 4, 372. Meb. V, 8, 19. Believe 
me r sometimes  truly, indeed: b. e it carries 
a brave ]orm, Tp. 1, 2, 410. do !Aou not perceive the 
jestf 1ro, b. me, Gentl. II, 1 161. Shr. II1» 2» 116. 
Tw. l, 4, 8. Vint. IV» 4 203. H6C IV» 5» 22. H8 
1V, 1, 37. 
ff) l'll b. both, Tp. Ill, 3, 24. I do b. it» IV, 11. 
will hot let .Cou b. thigs certain, V, 125. Wiv. Il, 1» 

129. Meas. II, 2, 58. 1I, 4, 55. llI, 2, 162. Ado III, 
1, 116. Mids. V, 2. R3 I, 3» 25. Tir. V, 1, 71. Bevis 
was --d, H8 1, 1, 38. b. so much in him that he 
`coung, Hml. 1, 3, 124 etc. etc. b. this of me, All's II, 
5, 47.  to b. in sth.: thou --st no 9od, Tir. V, 1, 
71. let pity hot be --d, Lr. IV, 3, 31. Followed by 
a clause: now I shall b. that there are unicorns, Tp. 
III, 3, 21. 44. Mids. III, 2, 52. Err. 111, 2, 21. As V, 
2, 64. F3 111, 5, 35 etc. do hot b. but I shall do thee 
ischief,  b. that I shall do etc., Mids. Il, 1, 236. 
l'Il hot b. but the`c ascend the slcg, R3 I, 3, 287. could 
hot b. but that I was in hell, I, 4, 62. 
b) to think, to be of opinion: the silly boy, 
believbg she is dead, claps ber pale cheek, Ven. 467. 
ever b. that it could so preposterously be staied, 
Sonn. 109, 9. he did b. he was indeed the due, 'p. 
I, 2, 102. b. hot that the dribblSg dart qf love can 
pierce a complete bosom, Meas. I, 3, 2. I, 4, 39. II, 1, 
9. III, 2, 27. 139. LLL I, 1, 160. hiids. III, 1, 15. 
As I[,2, 15. Tw.l, 3, 91. F3 1II, 2,39. Caes. l, 3, 
31. Oth. III, 3, 40 etc. Ido make mgselfb, that 
ma`c do ... Meas. III, 1, 205. 
Belile, as it seems, it should seem, 
supposc: b. it hath some burden then, Gentl. I, 2.85. 
b. then gou are in love» I1, 1» 85. she is dead b. IVv 
4, 80. b. she thins that Proteus bath forsoo ber, IV, 
4, 151. Viv. III, 1, 53. Meas. 1V, 2» 118. V, 126. 
131. Err. IV» 1, 25. IV, 3, 91. LLL II, 52. IV, 1,. 
137. Mids. l, l, 130. Shr. Ind. 1, 75. Shr. I, 1, 104. 
Il, 16. 1V, 3, 103. All's 1V, 5, 106. Tw. III, 3, 29.. 
III, 4, 268. R2 II1, 3, 30. H4B II, 2, 11. H5 11I, 
55. H6A III, 2» 62. tt6B III, 2, 186. H6C I, 1» 51. 
Il, l, 148. IV, 1, 96. 106. 118. IV, 3, 7. V, 1» 14. 
R3 1, 1, 49. I, 3, 65. £it. IV, 2, 50. Caes. III, 2,275. 
Hnfl. III, 2, 149. 305. Lr. 1V, 5, 20. Oth. V, 2, 317. 
Ant. l, 2, 35. IV, 3, 5. 
Followed by that: b. that now she bath etfranchised 
them, Gentl. Il, 4, 90. 
Bell, a hollow body ofmetal formaking 
s o un d s ; used on the steeples of churches for different 
kinds of service: bells set on vbgin 9, Lucr. 1493. Err. 
1V, 2, 53. Ado V, 2, 81. John 11, 312. H6A I» 6, 11. 
H6C V 1, 3. Tit. ¥, 3, 197. the cloclc bath struc]cen 
tweh'e upon the b. Err. I, 2, 45. the ||ïndsor b. hath- 
struclc twelve» Wiv. V, 5, 1. the b. then beating one, 
IIlnl. l, 1, 38. till the b. bave told eleven» Oth. lit 2, 
11. the midnlght b. John III, 3, 37. Ant. lIl 13, 185. 
awae the cltizens with the b. Oth. I, 1, 90. where 
bave nolled to church» As II, 7, 114. 121. the sacring 
b. H$ 
42. b. and burial» Hml. V, l, 257. a heav`c-hanging b. 
Lucr. 1493. the surly sullen b. Sonn. 71» 2. H4B l, 
1, 102. Rom. IV, 5, 86. curfew b. Rom. IV» 4, 4. 
funeral b. H6C Il t 5, 117. Rom. ¥, 3, -'206. a warn- 
ig b. H6A IV, 2, 39. the alarum b. Mcb. 1I, 3, 79. 
H4B III, 1, 17. See besides R2 V, 5 57. H4B IV» 2, 
5. Per. 1I, 1, 38.45. b., boolc and candle shall lOt 
drive me baclc, John III, 3, 12 ("in the solemn form 
of excommunication the bell was tolled, the book of 
offices for the purpose uscd, and three candles ex- 
tinguished with certain ceremonies." bares). Used 
in bouses: Mcb. II, 1, 32. 62. II, 3, 79.85. Oth. ll. 
3, 175. The chiming of --s a delightful music: 
atched in outh lie --s hIids. IV, 1, 128. gou are 
--s in gour parlours, Oth. il, 1,111. lie sweet 
led Hlnl. 111, 1, 166. -- .D5g don 9 bell the bur 



B 101 

en of a song: Tp. I, 2, 40I. Merch. III, 2, 71. he 
bath a heurt as sound as a b. Ado II1, 2, 13 (in allu- 
sion fo the proverb: as the fool thinketh, the bell 
clbdceth). Put on the neeks of some animais: falcon's 
--s. Luer. 511. As III, 3, 81. tI6C I, 1, 47. mg 
wether's b. Pilgr. 272. Worn by Moriseo daneers, 
H6B III, 1, 366. 
2.) the cup of a flower: a cowslip's b. Tp. 
V, 89. 
l]ellario, naine in Mereh. III, 4» 50. I¥» , 105. 
119. 143. 167. V, 268. 
Bell-man, a kind of watchtnan, part of whose 
office was to bless the sleepers: the owl the fatal 
6, which 9ives the sternest good-nlght, Mcb. II, 2» 3. 
Bellmla, the Goddess of war : Meb. I, 2, 54. not 
named, but alluded to in H4A IV, 1, 114. 
lCellow, rb, to rouf; nsed ofbulls: Mereh. V 
73. Vint. IV, 4, 28. of bulls and lions: Tp. 11, 1, 
311. of men: Hnfi. 111,2,36. Lr.¥,3,212 (--edout). 
che eroakb,g raven doth b. for revenge , Hml. III, 2,265. 
lellovs, instrument used to blow the 
lire: Aut. 1, 1, 9. l'er. 1, 2, 39. 
BellÇws-mender: Mids. 1, 2, 44. IV, 1, 207. 
Bell-wetller, a wcther which leads the 
flock, with a bell on his neck: a jealous rotten b. 
Wiv. III. 5 111. to be bawd to a b. As 111, 2, 85. 
l|ell.v, the part of the body from the breast to 
the thighs: Vert. 594. Viv. I, 3, 69. II, 1, 66. Iii, 5, 
23. 37. V, 5, 149. Mens. IV, 3, 160. LLL V, 2, 683. I 
698. Mereh. I!I, 5, 42. As I1, 7, 154. II1, 2, 215. Shr. 
IV, 1. 8. Wint. I, 2, 204. II4A II, 4» 499. II1, 3, 57. 
IV, 2, 23. H4B I, 2, 165. IV, 3, 23. H6Cil, 3,20. 
Cor. i, 1. 100. Tire. i, 1,210. Lr. II1, 6, 33 etc. etc. 
Bell.v. vb, to make like a ronnd belly, to swell: 
gour breath qf.full consent --ied his sails, Troil. 11 
2, 74. cf..Big-bellied, Great-bellied. 
Belly-do«blet, the doublet eovering the 
b elly; jestingly used for the belly itself: with your 
arms crossed on jour rhin b. LLL 111, 1, 19 (O. Edd. 
thinbellies doublet and tMnbellie doublet), turned awa. 
¢he.fat knlght with the great b. H5 IV, 7, 51. 
Bell.vfcl. as mueh as satisfies the appe- 
rite: rumble thy b. Lr. II1, 2, 14. bath his b. qf fight- 
ing Cymb. II, 1, 23. 
lelly-pinehed, pinehed with hunger, 
starved: the b. wol.f, Lr. III, 1, 13. 
II, ehnan, naine of a dog: Shr. Ind. I, 22. 
lelnlOll, name of the countrv-seat of Portia iu 
Merch. 1, 1, 161. 171. Il, 2, 188. l'V, 1,457. V, 17. 
Belaclk, to enclose: tMs is the hand wMch, 
u, it a vowed contract, was fast --ed in thine, Meas. 
V, 2!0 (cf. Lotie). 
Belong, 1) to be the property of: to theel 
so b. Souri. 88, 13. a better state to me --s than that 
whieh on th. humour doth depend, 92, 7. the broken 
bosoms that to me b. Compl. 254. LLL II 224. V, 2, 
ô81. Tw. V, 9. R2 fil, 4, 93. H4B IV, 5, 233. tI4A 
V, 5, 26. tt6A 111, 1, 165. H6B II1, 2, 140. H8 I, 1 
ôg. Rom. fil, 2» 103. Tire. 1 2, 95. Ant. I, 3 78. 
2) to be the qnality or business of: to 
lear with eyes --s to love's fine wit, Sonn. 23, 14. 
to gou it doth b. gourself to pardon, 58, 11. we know 
what --s to a wateh» Ado I11 3» 40. there is no need 
qf ang such redress, or (f there were, it hot IS to you, 
H4B IV, 1, 98. and know the office that --s fo sueh 
I!6A fil. l, 55. 

3) fo be due: to thbgs of sale a seller's praise 
--s, LLL IV, 3, 240. t/y beautj sounded, get hot so 
deepbj as to thee --s, Shr. II, 194. all apertinents 
--ing fo Ms £onour, II5 II, 2, 88. dlsdain[ng &*tj tlat 
to us --s H6B III, 1, 17. lere is more -- s to £er, Tir. 
II, 3» 129. tle &toj wMcl to a rnot£er's part --s, Cor. 
V, 3, 168. no blame --s to thee» Tire. II,2,231. knows 
w]at--s to reason, Iii, 1, 38. a solemn earnestness» 
more tlan indeed --ed to sucl a trille, 0th. V, 2» 228. 
4) to make part of: we know w£ats to a 
.frlppetT, Tp. IV, 224. all t£ings t£at b. to £ouse and 
louse-keeping, Shr. 11, 357. this tlorn dot£ fo out rose 
qf youtl rigltbj b. All's I, 3, 136. I b. to te larder» 
tI8 V, 4, 4. mv noble steed witl all Ms trim --in g, 
Cor. 1, 9, 62. amj otler part --in to a man, Rom. 
I1, 2, 42. 
5) to be appendant to, connected with: 
sucl danger to resistance didb. Lucr. 1265. lere if is, 
and all t£at --s to it, All's Ii, 2, 38. I am proof against 
tlat title and w£at s£ame else --s to it, Wint. IV, 4, 
873. an i.f t£ere be no reat offence --s fo if, ive jour 
fr[end some touch of .your laie business, II8 V, 1, 12. 
and showed what necess# l --ed to it, Tire. 111, _9, 15. 
u'i!t thou lear more? all t£at --s to tMs, Cymb. V, 
5, 147. 
Belanging, subst., that which belongs to 
one: t£jsel.f and thj --s are hot tMne own so proper 
as to waste thjsel.f upon t£. virtues, Meas. I, 1, 30, 
i.e. whatever is in thee, thy endownents. Ccr. I, 9, 62 ? 
Belovedo loved: £er b. Collatinus, Lucr. 256. 
lappj I t£at love and ara b. Sonn. 25, 13. 89, 10. mj 
b. 105, 2. Gentl. I, 3, 57. V, 4, 44. 45. Err. V, 6. 
Merch. I11, 2, 181. As IV, 1, 82,. Shr. 1, 2, 3. V, l, 
26. Tw. I1, 4, œee0. Il, 5, 101 (t£e unknown b.). Wint. 
IV, 4, 503 (t£is mj dr b.). II4A I, 3, 267. H6B II, 
3, 26. H6C III, 2, 163. IV» 8, 17. V, l, 103. H8 
l, 92. Troil. I, 2, 314 (t£at s£e b.). IV, 5, 292. Cor. 
I11, 1,315. V, 2, 99 (this man was rmj b.  my friend). 
Tit. IV, 2, 47. Rom. Il Chor. 5. 12. Tim. I, 1, 85 
(£er late b.). I, 2, 136. I11, 6, 85. Hml. Iii, 2, 186. 
Lr. I, 1, 140. I, 2, 57 (t£e b. of.our brotler). Ii, 4 
135. IV, 3, 25. V, 3, 239. Oth. I, 2, 12. Ant. I, 1, 
16. I, 2, 22. Cymb. IV, 2, 384. Per. V, 1, 30. 
Followed by qf (never b.,v): tlou art b. of mamj, 
Sonn. 10, 3. 150, 14. Mids. I, 1,104. As I, 1, 116. 
174. Shr. I, 2, 176. Wint. III, 2, 4. H6B I, 2, 44. 
Cor. III, 2, 133. Caes. II 1, 156. Ant. I, 4, 37. 
Beloving, lo v i n g : .you s£all be more b. t£an be- 
loved, Aut. I, 2, 22. 
Belaw, adv., in a lower place, relatively to 
something higher: clapping t£eir proud tails to tle 
ground b. Ven. 923. coucleth tle.fowl b. witl Ms wings' 
s£ade, Lucr. 507. keep b. (in the cabin) Tp. I, 1, 12. 
nilt kelgt c£ained b. (in hell) IV, 31. t£ere' s one toaster 
Brook b. (downstairs) Wiv. II, 2, 151. II4B 1I, 4, 74. 
H6B I, 4, 11. 123 IV, 4, 86. 301. Troil. I 3» 4. 130. 
Tit. ll, 3,244. IV, 3, 43. V, 2, 3. Rom. I11, 5 55 
(readiug of the spnrious QI and M. Edd. The other 
O. Edd. so low). Tire. I, 1, 74. IV, 3, 17. Caes. V, 
108. Hnfl. II, 2» 507. III, 3, 97. Lr. Ii, 4 58. IV 
69. Ant. IV, 15, 13. 
Belaw, prepos., beneath, lower than: Ms 
thinkings are b. the moon, H8 111, 2, 134. b. th 9 sis- 
ter's orb (the moon), Tire. IV, 3, 2. all the aborred 
bb'ths b. crisp heaven, 183. b. trie beam of sight , Cor. 
III, 2, 5. fell b. his stem; II» 2» 111. b. their cobbled 



109, 

B 

shoes, I, 1, _'200. te the dust b. ring foot, Lr. V, 3, 137. 
place gour lands b..your husband's foot, Shr.V,0", 177. 
pluck stout men's pillows from b. their heads, Tire. IV, 
3, 82. buckled b. fait knighthood's bending knee, Wiv. 
v, 5, 76. one .yard b. their mines, Itml. 111, 4 s .'208. 
zepliyrs blowing b. the violet, Cymb. IV, 2, 172. shall 
I alwa.ys keep b. stairss Ado ¥, 2, 10. a league b. the 
city, Meas. IV, 8, 103. a place b. thetirst, Cor. I, 1, 
270. wlio were b. Mm, Ail's I, 2, 41. ri'oto b. tlie duke 
te beneattt.your constable, II, 2, 32. 
Belt, cincture, girdle: Pilgr. 365. H4B I, 2, 
158. Mcb. V, 2, 16. 
Belzelmb, the prince of devils: Tw. V, 291. II5 
IV, 7, 145. ]Icb. Il, 3s 4. 
Bemad, te madd en: --in sorrov, Lr. III, 1, 38. 
Bemee. te meet: our verj loving sisters well 
berner t. Lr. V, 1, 20. 
Bemeteo to measure: I shall so b. thee wlth 
thg.ard, Shr. IV, 3, 113. 
Bemoan. to bewaii: was ever fatlter so--ed 
his son? H6C Il, 5, 110 (cf. Fore-bemoaned). 
Bemo¢lt. te treat with mockery: b. tliemo- 
dest moon, Cor. I, 1, -°61. 
Followed bv ai: wound tlie loud wlnds, or witli 
bemocked at stbs kill tlre still-closbrg waters, Tp. 111, 
3, 63. 
Bemoil. to bemire, to bedraggle: in liow 
mir.y a place, how slie was --ed, Shr. IV, 1, 77. 
Bemott.ter. te make like a monster: b. net 
tltg.feature, Lr. IV, .'2, 63. 
Ben¢h, subst. 1) a long seat: Tw. I, 5, 158. 
lI4A I, 2, 4. Rom. Il, 4. 37. Caes. III s 2s -063. 
2) the seat ofjudges, of senators: to pluck 
clown justice from .your awful b. II4B V, 2, 86. pluck 
the grave wrinkled senate from tlre b. Tire. IV, ls 5. 
senators on tlie b. IV, 3, 37. 
3) the sonate itself: a graver b. than ever 
frowned in Greece, Cor. III, 1, 106. tlieir obedience 
fails fo the greater b. 167. 
Bet¢h, vb., 1) intr., to sit on a seat of justice, 
te be judge: b. by his side, Lr. III, 6, 40. --2) 
trans, te seat on a bench, te raise te authority:' 
whom I 'om meaner ferre bave --ed and reared te 
worship, Wint. I, 0", 314. 
Beneher, rnember of u court or conncil, senu- 
ter: a perfecter giber for the table than a necessarg 
b. in the Capitol, Cor. Il, 1, 9- 9. 
Beneh-hole, the hole of a privy: we'll beat 
'em into --s, Ant. IV s 7, 9. 
Bend, subst., look: tlrat saine ege whose b. doth 
awe tlie world, Cacs. I, 2, 123. tended lier i' the eges 
and ruade their --s (riz the bends of their eyes) adorn- 
ings, Ant. II, 2 s 213 (cf. adorning), v. Bent. 
Bend rb. s impf. bended: Cor. Il s 1. 281 and 
Hml. 11, 1, 100; bent: H6C V, .'2, 22 and l'er. II, 5, 
48. Partic. bended: Genti. III, 1, 0-29. R2 V, 3, 98. 
H5V Cher. 18. H6B I, 1, 10. Ant. II, 5, 1- °. bent: 
Ven. 618. Sonn. 90, 0-. 143, 6. l'ilgr. 68. 311. 417. 
John Il, 37. H4B Il s 4, 55. Lr. I. 1. 145 etc. etc. 
I. trans. 1) te crook, te inflect: lie--s lier 
tingers, Vert. 476. v¢ --ed hook, Ant. 11, 5, 10-. his 
brulsed helmet and his --ed sword H5 V Cher. 18 (i. e. 
bent out of shape), cf. te corne off tlie breacli wltli lils 
pike bent bravely, H4B Il, 4, 55. Heuce te b. the bow 
:- te make the bow ready for shooting: Lncr. 580. 
R2 III, '2_, 116. Lr. I, 1 s 145. 

0-) used of other instruments of war, --- te di- 
rect, te turn, te point: ourcannonsliallbebent 
agaiost the bvows of thls reslsting town, John I1, 37. 
te b. the.fatal instruments of war agalnst liis brotlier 
H6C V, 1, 87. the wliicli (falchion) tliou once didst b. 
agalnst ber breast, R3 I, 2, 95. --ing hls sword te Ms 
great toaster ( against his rnter) Lr. IV, 0-, 74. cf. 
than mldday sun tierce bent agalnst theb" faces, H6A 
I, 1, 14. the revenging gods "galnst parricides did alI 
'helr thunders b. Lr. Ils 1, 48. ]Ietaphorically: b. net 
all the harm upon .yourself, Ado V, 1,39. my revenges 
were Mgh be»t upon him, All's V, 3, 10. b. your 
est deeds of malice o, this town, John 11, 379. -- 
--ing all my loving thouglas on thee, Sonn. 88,10. we 
b. te that the working of the heart, LLL IV, 1, 33. b. 
thoughts and wits te acMeve ber, Shr. I, 1, 148. for 
the wMch myself and them b. tlieir best studies, Jhn 
IV s 0-, 51. bent all offices te boueur ber, Per. II, 5, 
48. -- liomeward dld they b. tlieir course, Err. I, 1, 
118. towards Coventrg b. we our course, H6C IV, 8, 
58. R3 IV, 5, 14 (Ff power instead of course), these 
!hree lead on tMs preparation wMther 'ris bents Cor. I, 
2. 16. --ing theb" expedition toward Pldlippi, Caes. 
IV, 3, 170. -- I de b. mg speech to one, Meas. I, 1, 
41. te our own selves b. we our needful talk, Troil. 
IV s 4 s 141. my sanctity will te m.y sense b. no llcen- 
flous ear, l'er. V, 3, 3o. -- Chiefly used of the eyes: 
the eyes of men are idly bent on liim, Re- V, _'2. 
dost thou b. tMne eges upon the earth? H4A II, 3.45. 
no gaze sucli as fs bent on sun-like majestg, III, '2., 79. 
wh.y sucli unplauslce eges are bent on Mm, Troii. III 
3, 43. --ed tlieir light on me, Ihnl. I1.1,100. b..your 
ege on vacancg, III, 4, 117. new b., new turn the o.ffice 
and devotion of their view upon a tawny front, Ant. I, 
1, 4. -- Similarly of the brows (-- te knit): wh.y de 
you b. sucli solemn brows on me? John IV, .9, 90. or 
b. one wrlakle on mg sovereign's fitce, 122 11. 1, 170. 
how tlie ugly wench dotli b. ber brows, H6A V, 3, 34. 
bent liis brow, II6C V. 0-, 20-. thougli her f rowning brows 
be bent, l'ilgr. 311. 
The partie, bent  inelined, proue, lutent: like te 
a mortal butclier bent te kill, Ven. 618. the world 
bent mg deeds te cross, Sonn. 90, 2. bent to follo,v 
whicli flies, 143, 6..you all are be»t te set against 
]lids. 111 2, 145. bent te hear.. John II, 4-02. beat te 
. dira his glorg, R2 I11, 3, 65. bent te know tlie worst, 
Mcb. III, 4s 134. mg best spirits are bent te prove upon 
tliy heart .... , Lr. V, 3, 139. -- net te auget bent, 
Pilgr. 68. if te women he be bent, 417. all his mind 
ent te hollnesss H6B I, 3, 58. bent te meditatlon, R3 
III, 7, 60". bent te tlie spoil, Tir. I¥, 4 s 64. thelr mind 
is bent agabst Caesars Caes. ils 3, 6. and madlg bent 
on us, cliased us away, Err. V, 152. every thing is bent 
for .Englands Hml. IV, 3, 47. a sort of naugM.y per- 
sons lewdly bent, H6B II. 1, 167. how Tlialiard carne 
full bent with sins Per. 1I Prol. 23s i. e. fnlly lutent 
upon sin. 
Reflectively: .you ... towards York sliall b. !leu, 
H4A V, 5, 36, i. e. direct yourselves, take yonr way. 
we beseech .you, b. gou te remaln here, Hml. I, 2, 115, 
i. e. be inclined. 
Te bend up  te strain (like a bow): b. up every 
splrit te his full height, H5 111, 1, 16. b. up each cor- 
poral agent te tMs terrible feat, ]Icb. 1, 7, 79. 
3) te bow: --ed knees, Gentl. III s 1, 20-9. b. 
lbnbs R2 IV, 165 (Ff knee). [b. mg knee, V, 3,97.98 



B 108 

H6AV, I, 61. H6B I, 1, 10. V, 1, 173 (b. th.knee 
to me). II6CII, 3,33. v, 1,22. must b. his body, Caes. 
I, 2, 117. b. the dukedom to toast ignoble stooping, Tp. 
I, 2, 114. we'll b. it to our awe, H5 I, 2, 224. --ing 
down fiis corrigible neck» Ant. IV, 14, 73. except she 
b. ber humour» Cymb. I, 5, 81. 
II. intrans. 1) to be crooked: hls--lng crest 
(of a horse) Vert. 395. hls --ing sickle, Sonn. 116, 
10. his crest that prouder than blue Irls --s, Troil. 
I. 3. 380. 
2) to bow, to bow down, properly andfigu- 
ratively: --ing twlgs, R2 I!I, 4, 32. whose boughs did 
b. witfi fruit, Cymb. III, 3, 61. a cliff whose Mgfi and 
--ing head . . . , Lr. IV, 1, 76. and--ing forward struck 
hls fieels ... H4B I, 1, 44. --inç knee, Wiv. V, 5, 76. 
» --ing down, lXleas. III. 1, 144. 1 would b. under 
an. weight, Ado V, 1, 286 ( submit to). b. low, 
lXlerch. I, 3, 124. cf. R2 III, 3, 73. H4B IV, 5, 149. 
H5 IV, 1,272. H6CIII, 1,18. Troil. III, 3, 71. Cor. 
III, 2, 119. Caes. III, 1, 45. Lr. III, 6, 116. Followed 
by fo: the nobles --ed as to Jove's statue, Cor. II, 1, 
281. toast fiumbly --ing fo your state» 0th. I, 3, 236. 
.Bending  courteous: as--ingangels, Troil. I, 3, 
236; or  submissive: the --ing peers that fiat- 
tered thee» R3 IV, 4, 95. our --ing author, H5 Epil. 2 
(or = bowed down by his too heavy load?). 
3) to take one's course, to turn: thlther 
we b. a9ain , All's III, 2, 57. who for .Bohenda b. Wint. 
V, 1, 15. Figuratively,  to tend: n.,u tfioughts and 
wishes b. again toward France, Itml. I, 2, 55. always 
--ing towards tfieir project» Tp. IV, 174. or --s wltfi 
the remover to remove, Sonn. 116, 4. 
BeneaflL 1) Adv., below: it droppeth as the 
gentle rain from fieaven upon the place b. Merch. IV, 1, 
186. that next (is disdained) b. him b. Troil. I, 3, 131. 
hears it roar b. Hml. I, 4, 78. b. is ail tfie fiends ; Lr. 
IV, 6, 19. Adjectively: thls b. world, Tire. 1, 1, 44 
(cf. U»der). 
2) Prepos. lower than, below, under: b. 
the sk, SVint. I, 2, 180. b. the moon, Lr. IV, 6, 26. trie 
dust b. th. foot, V, 3, 137 (Ff below), whose fieads 
grow b. thelr shoulders, 0th. I 3, 145. sinks b. tfie yoke, 
Mcb. IV, 3, 39. fvra below your duke to b. your con- 
stable, All's II, 2, 32. damned b. all deptfi in hell, 0th. 
V, 2, 137. sa far b. your breeding» Tw. V, 331. flatter 
b. abhorring» Cor. I, 1, 172. it smites me b. tfie fall I 
tiare, Ant. V, 2, 172. hot b. hlm infortunes, Cymb. IV, 
1, ll. 
Ben.edi¢ile, ecclesiastical salutation: Meas. Il, 
3, 39. Rare. II, 3, 31 (v. Appendix). 
Benedick, name in Ado I, 1, 35 and passim. 0. 
Edd. once .Benedict: I, 1» 89. 
Benedie[io, b 1 essi ng: Wint. IV, 4, 614. lXlcb. 
IV, 3, 156. Lr. IV, 3, 45. IV, 7» 58. Cymb. V, 5, 350. 
thou out of heaven's b. comest to the warm sun, Lr. II, 
'2,, 168 (modification of the proverb: out of God's bles- 
sing into the warm sun). 
Bene dictus; Carduus 13., t h e b ] e s s e d t h i s t I e, 
a medicinal hcrb: Ado III, 4, 74. 77. 
Benefaelor, he who confers benefits: 
Tire. !Il, 6, 79. Used blunderingly by Elbow in lleas. 
II, 1, 50. 
Benefice, an ecclesiastical living: tfien 
dreams fie of another b. Rom. I, 4, 81. 
Benefieial, 1) beneficent: to seek thy lire b. 
b. help, Err. I, 1, 152 (the help given thee by saine 

benefactors among thy friends), take up the ra.s of 
the b. sun» H8 I, 1, 56. --2) advantageo us, pro- 
fitable: these b. news, 0th. !!, 2, 7. 
Benefit, subst., 1) something good donc 
to one, an act of kindness: tfirowing him into 
the water will da ldm a b. Wiv. III, 3, 195. da a poor 
wronged lad9 a merlted b. Meas. III, 1,207. 268. As 
I, 2, 36. II, 7, 186. give me now a little b., out of tfiose 
man9 registered in promlse Troil. III, 3, 14. we are 
born to da --s, Tire. I, , 106. then is death a b. Caes. 
III, 1, 103. Cor. I, 1, 156. Lr. I, 4, 308. IV, 6, 61. 
0th. !, 3, 314. but to know sa must be raff b. III, 4, 119. 
The original signification yet discernibl% though 
approaching to that of a d v a n t a g e in general, in the 
following instances: 0 b. of ill! Sonn. 119, 9. De- 
barred the b. of rest, Sonn. 28, 2. omlttlng the sweet 
b. of tbne to clothe mine age wltfi angel-llke perfection» 
Genfl. II, 4, 65. b.¢ the b. of his llgfit, Err. I, 1, 91. yet 
have I trie b. o.f n. senses as well as your lad.¢sldp, 
Tw. V, 313. H6A IV, 1, 100. lï3 I!I, 1, 48. Mcb. V, 
1, 11. as the winds glve b. IIml. I, 3, 2. with te next 
b. of trie wbzd, Cymb. IV, 2, 342. IV, 4, 42. 
2) as a terre of law,  a bestowal of pro- 
perty or rights upon one: accept te title tou 
usurpest, of b. proceeding from our king, II6A V, 4, 
152. take to .our royal self this proffered b. of dignit., 
R3 III, 7, 196. 
3) advantage, profit: is likewise your own 
b. hleas. III, 1, 157. of whom I hope fo make rnueh b. 
Err. I, 2, 25. that would bave done trie time more b. 
Wint. V, 1, 22. V, 2, 119. R2 Il» 3, 14. for thelr 
country's b. H6A V, 4, 106. l'll lop a member off and 
give it you in earnest of a further b. V, 3, 16. H6B 
1,3, 101. lï3 IV, 4, 36. Cor. IV, 5, 96. V, 3, 142. 
V, 6, 67. Tire. IV, 3, 526. reeeive the b. of Ms d.ing 
Caes. III, 2, 47. Ant. V, 2, 128. --for the b. of silence 
 for the sake of silence, Meas. V, 190. 
4) benefits -- natnral advantages, endow- 
ments, accomplishments: dlsable all the --s qf 
/our own countrff, As IV, 1, 34. when these sa noble 
--s shall prove not well disposed, H$ I, 2, 115. 
Benefit, rb., 1' trans, a) to da good to: a 
man, a prince, b him sa --ed, Lr. IV, 2, 45. b) to 
advantage, to be ofuseto: what course lmean 
to hold sfiall nothing b. /our knowledge, Wint. IV, 4, 
514. 
2) intï. t o p r o fi t: but b. no further than valnll/ 
longing, H8 I, 2, 80. 
Bene, to snare: benetted round with villanies, 
Hml. V, 2, 29. 
Benevolence, a tax, nominally a gratuity: 
blanlcs, --s t i2 II, 1, 50.*-- Evans nses the word 
in a rather vague sense: to do ». b. fo make atonements, 
Wi.v. I, 1, 33, i. e. to do a good nd pious work. 
Bènign, kind: a better prbtce and b. lord, Per. 
Il Prol. 3 (accent on the first syll.). 
Benison, blessing: God's b. go witfi.ou, Mcb. 
II, 4, 40. Lr. I, 1, 268. IV, 6, 229. Per. Il t'roi. 10. 
Bennet, = Benedick. 1) trie bells of Saint 13. 
ma. put you in mind: one, two, three, Tw. V, 42.-- 
2) Sir B. Seel., R2 V, 6, 14. 
Bent, subst., 1) tension, straining (properly 
an expression of archery, but used tropically of men- 
tal dispositions): fier a.ffèctions bave tfieir full b. Ado 
II, 3 232. th. affection cannot fiold the b. Tw. II, 4, 
38. and here gve up ourselves» in the fur b. to la!A out 



104 B 

service freelg at gour feet, Hnfl. I!, 2, 80. theg foot 
me to the top of mV b. !11» 2, 401. and everg thin 9 at 
b. for .England, IV, 8, 47 (Qq and M. Edd. is bent). 
2) tendency, a leaninff or bias of the mind, in- 
clination, disposition: two of them bave tle 
verg b. of honour, Ado IV, 1, 188. to gour own --s 
dispose you, Wint. !, 2, 179. to set his sense on the 
attentive b. Troil. I, 3, 252. if that thg b. of love be 
honotrable, Rom. !!, 2, 143. I can give his humour 
the truc b. Caes. Il, 1,210. 
3) cast of the eye, look (cf. Bend): that 
met them in their (thc eyes') b. H5 V, 2, 16. gives all 
gaze and b. of amorous view on the fait Cressid, Troil. 
IV, 5, 282. they u, ear their faces to the b. of the kbtg's 
look» Cymb. I, 1, 18. -- Sinfilarly of tire forehead: 
eternity was in our lips and eges, bliss bi out brows" 
b. Ant. !, 3, 36. 
Bentii, name in All's IV, ô, 188. 
Bentivolii, name in Shr. 1, 1, 13. 
lenumb, tO make torpid, to dcprive of sen- 
sation and action: of partial indulgence to theb" --ed 
wills, Troil. Il» 2» 179. 
Igettolio. nmne in Rom. l, l, 74. Il, 4 71 etc. 
Belmint, d o dye: whose fi'othy mouth, --ed all 
whh rcd, Ven. 901. else would a maiden bhtsh b. mg 
cheek, Rom. 11, 2» 86. 
Bei*ray : pray: LLL V, 2, 702 (Ff Q' prag). 
Bequeath. to leave by will: Lucr. 5:54. 1181. 
1184. Pilgr. 142. _As 1, 1, 2. All's !, 1, 44. !, ô, 105. 
IV, 2, 43 (--ed down fron nany ancestors). John 1, 
109. R2 !1I, 2, 149. OEroil.V 10,57. Caes. lll, 2,141. 
Per. I, 1, 50. II, 1, 130. 
2) in a wider seuse, to leave, to yield, 
to bestow npon: ber contrite sighs unto the clouds 
--ed ber wlnged sprite, Lncr. 1727. mg horns I b. 
gour husbands» Wiv. V, 5, 30. and gours of Helena 
to me b. Mids. 111, 2, 166. his crown --i 9 fo hls ba- 
nished brother, As V, 4,169. gon to gour former honour 
I b., 192. b. to death your mtmbness, V¢int. V, 3, 102. 
b. thg land to him and follow me, gohnl, 149. to u, hom 
I do b. mg faithful services, V, 7, 104 a sister I b. 
ott, Ant. Il, 2, 152. 
Bequest, I egacy : Nature's b. 91res nothin 9 but 
doth lend, Sonn. 4, 8. 
Berattle, to cry down: and so b. the common 
stages , Hml. 11, 2, 357. 
Bereave, impf. berejt: H6B III, 2, 41. R3 !, 2, 
188. pat'tic, bereaved: H6C I!, 5, 68 and Lr. IV, 4, 
9; bereJt= Vert. 381. 439. Lncr. 835. Sonu. 5, 11. 
Tp. 111» 3» 76 etc. etc. 
1) fo b. one of sth. - to deprive, to strip 
one of: thee of thg son theg bave berej, Tp. !11, 3» 
76. 5Ierch. III, 2, 177. Shr. V, 2, 143. R2 Il, 1,237. 
!!!, 3, 84. H6A V, 3, 195. H6B 111, _'2, 269. H6C 
11, 5, 68.93. R3 I, 2» 138. Troil. 111, 2, 57.59. Cor. 
111, 1» 158. Tir. Il, 3, 282. Tire. V, 4» 70. _Aut. V» 
2, 130. Per. Il, 1» 9. IV» 1, 32. 
2) to b. one sth., in the saine sense, used ouly in 
the passive form; the subject beiug either the person 
deprived or the thing taken away: 'ris gour fault I 
ara berefl him so, Ven. 381. sag that the sense of feel- 
ing were bereft me, 439. ail gour interest in those ter- 
ritories is utterlg bereft gon, It6C I11, 1, 85. the rites 
for whlch I love him are bereft me, Oth. 1, 3, 258. 
3) to b. sth. ri'oto one: from me bg strong assault 
if is bereft, Lucr. 835. 

4) to b. sth. -- to take from, to impair, to 
spoih the sun --s out sight, Lucr. 373. beautg's 
effect with beautg were bereft, Sonn. 5, 11. which 
(beauty) the hot tgrant (lust) stains and soon 
Ven. 797. if thon live to sec like right bereft, Err. I1, 
1, 40. whose dismal tune bereft mg vital powers, H6B 
111, _'2, 41. I think his understanding is bereft, H6C 11, 
6, 60. in the restoring Ms bereaced sense, Lr. IV, 
Berganlo, tOwn in Italy: Shr. V, 1, 81. 
lcl'gOllaSh: a B. dance, Mids. V, 360. 368. 
Nares: "a rustic dance, fi-amed in imitation of the 
people of Bcrgamco, a province in the state of 
Venicc, who are ridiculed as being nmre clownish 
in their mauners and dialect thau any other people 
in Italy. All the Italian buffoons imitate them." 
Bel'hyme, to make rhymes upon: As 111, 
186. Rom. Il, 4, 43. 
BereIey (O. Edd. now Barkley, now Berkley); 
1) name of a place: R2 Il, 2, 119. 11, 3, 1.33. II4A 
!, 3, 249. 2) name ofpersons; a) Lord B., R2 !1, 3, 
55. 68. b) attendant of Lady Anne in R3 !, 2, 222. 
erlady, v. Lady 
Bermoot h es, Ihe B e r m n d a s : to fetch dewfrom 
the still vexed B., Tp. l, 2, 229. 
Bel'nardo, name in Hml.l, 1,4sq. O. E. Barnardo. 
Berout (the Inter Ff and M. Edd. Biron, but 
the name bas always the accent ou the last syllable, 
and rhymes to moon, IV, 3, 232), um in LLL !, 1, 
15. 53. 100. 110. Il, çG. 215. IV, 1, 58. 10. IV 
123. 145. 284. V, 2, 84. 0. 133. 272. 288. 457. 851 
eteY cf. ,l[elun. 
Berl'ord, v. Bearherd. 
Berry, small frnit: Ven. 4ç0. ç04. 1104. Tp. 
1,2, ô84. Il, 2, 14. Mids. !!1, 2, 211. tI5 !, 1, 1. 
Tir. IV 2, 117. Tire. IV, 8, 425. Ant. !, 4, ç4. Per. V 
Prol. ç. 
Berry, Freuch naine: H3 !!, 4 4. 111, 5, 41. 
Bertram, naine in All's I, 1, 88 and passim. 
Berwick (O. Edd. Barwioe), town in England: 
HçB il, 1, 83. 159. HC Il, 5, 128. 
Bescreen, to shelter, to conceal: thon that 
thus ed in ni#ht so stumblest on » counsel, Rom. 
ll , 52. 
Beseeeh (impf. beseeched, IIml. III, 1, 22. pmoEic. 
beseeched, Compl. 207), to entrent, to ask; 1) 
with an accus, deuoting the person applied to: I 
heartil b. thee, Ven. 404. Tp. !!, 1,100. III, 1, 84. 
!11, 2, 72. 111 8, 10. Gentl. ll 4, 100. V, 4, 149. 
Wiv. !, 1, 72. I, 4, 79. II!, 2, 80. Mens. 11, 1, 12. Il, 
2,35. !1, 4,89. IV 8,0. IV, 4,17. V, 520. Err. V, 
251. Ado III, 8, 100. V, 1,315. LLL I, 1,282. IV, 
94. IV 8, 193. V, 1, 103. 155. Mids. 111, 1,194.5Ierch. 
IV, 1, 23. HB I, 3, 198. HC 11, 8, 88. R3 !, 1, 84. 
1,2 218. !,8, 25. HSIV, 2, 185. Caes. ll, 4, 80. Hml. 
!11, 1 22 etc. etc. I shall b. #our hi#hness, All's Il, 8, 
118. I b. çour #race that Imaç know the wors G Mids. 
1 1, 2. 1 b. #ou a word, LLL !1, 197. Very often 
without the pronoun I: b. ou Tp. !, 2, 413. 11, 1, 1. 
Wint. !, 1, 11. lI 1, 112.11. Cor.lll, l 149. Cb. 
1, 1, 153. !!!, 5, 88 etc. cf. I. 
2) to b. one of sth.: I humbl# do b.ott 
pardon, Oth. fil, 8, 212. 
8) to b. somethin#: theb" kiad acceptance 
beseeched Compl. 207. 1 b. #our worship's pardon, 
5lids. III, 1, 188. I b. our societff LLL IV, 2, 1. b. 



B 105 

listening, Shr. IV, 1, 68. I b. yourpardon, Lr. I, 4, 90. 
b..your patience, Cymb. I, l, 153. 
4) absolutely: haie patience, I b. Err. IV, 2, 16. 
I earnestly b. Ant. ll, 2, 23. O, no» no. lC, I b. 
Cymb. I, 6, 200. 
Beseech, subst., e n t r e a t y : acMevement is coin- 
»and; ungained» b. Triil. I» 2,319. 
BeseeCher, one who entreats: Sonn. 135, 13. 
Beseel« for beseech: tI4B iI, 4» 175 (Mrs. 
Qulckly's speech). 
Beseem, to become: sad pause a»d deep re- 
gard b. the sage, Lucr. 277. Sonn. 132» 10. Gentl. lI. 
7, 43. III, 1, [36. Err. V, 110. LLL Il, I08. Shr. IV, 
5, 65. John II, 196. R2 III, 3, 7. IV, 116. H6A lI[, 1, 
19. IV, 1, 31. IV» 7, 86. H6C Iii» 3 122. IV, 7, 84. 
I{om. I, 1,100. 
Beseeming, subst, seeming, appearance 
I ara the soldier t]at did cornpa»y these three in poor 
b. Cymb. V, 5, 409. 
Beset. used only as a participle» 1) enclosed 
so as to prevent escaping: the thicket is b.» he 
cannot scape, Geufl. V» 3, 1 I. 
2) pressed hard, in distress: tellher she is 
b'eaddly b. Lucr. 444. now, daughter Silvia, you 
are hard b. Gentl. II, 4, 49. 0 God defend mel how 
ara I b.! Ado IV, 1, 78. I »vas b. with shame and 
courtesy, Merch. V, 217. we are b. with thleves » Shr. 
IIl, _'2, 238. drew to defe»d him when he was b. Tw. 
V, 88. 
Beshrew, rb. (0. Edd. somefimes beshrow); once 
nsed in the infinitive: she will b. me rnuch, Rom. V, 2, 
26 ; generally only in the first person of the present, 
and with one exception (I b. all shrews, LLL V, 2, 
46) without fle pronoua/. 
Originally a mild, indeed very mild, form of im- 
precation, ----- woe to: b. that heart that rnakes mg 
heart to groan, Sonn. 133, 1. b. Ms hand, I scarce 
eould understand it» Err. Il, 1, 49. b. ny hand, if it 
shouht glve your age such cause off car, Ado V, I, 55. 
Mids. Il, -'2, 54:. Tw. IV, 1, 62. Wint. Il. _'2, 30. John 
¥, 5. 14. R2111,2,204. H5 V» 2,241. H6B III, 1,184. 
Troil. IV. 2, 12. Rom. Il, 5, 52. III, 5, 229. Ihnl. 11, 
1,113. Oth. IV, 3, 78. III, 4, 150. 
Sometimes it is so far from iml)lylng a curse as 
to be uttered coaxingly, nay eveu with some tender- 
ness: b. your heart» fair daughter, you do draw rny 
sp5"its from me» H4B Il, 3, 45. f thou wantest an.y 
thing and wilt hot call» b. thy heart, V, 3, 59. coin G 
corne, b. your heart» you'll never be good, Troil. IV, 2, 
29. b. him for it! how cornes this trick upon hbn? Oth. 
1¥, 2, 18. b. your eyes they bave o'erlooked »ne, Merch. 
11I» 2, 14. 
OEhe phrases b. me, b. rny heart, used as forms of 
simple asseveration ( indeed): b. me, the knîght is 
b ad»dïable fooling, Tw. I1, 3, 85. b. me, I would (be 
a queen) H8 1I, 3» 24. b. m.y very heart» I thbk you 
are happy in this seco»d match, Rom. 11I, 5, 223. The 
following clause frequently preeeded by but: b. me, 
but you bave a quick wit, Gentl. I, 1, 132. b. me, sir 
but if he rnake this good, he is as worthy for an ernpress" 
love, II, 4, 75. b. mg heart, but I pity the man, Mids. 
V, 295. b. me, but I love ber heartily, Mereh. II, 6, 52. 
John V, 4, 49. H6C I, 4, 150. 
Beside, I. Adv. 1) to the side: someK»nesfalls 
an orle»t drop b. Ven. 9S1. 
_'2) raoreover, to boot: the argument allbare 

is of more worth than when it bath rny added praise b. 
Sonn. 103, 4. b., she bath prosperous art ..., Meas. 
I, 2, 189. Shr. IV, 5, 66. John I, 137. H6A III, 1, 24. 
IV, 1, 25. 143. V, 1, 15. V, 5, 46. Cor. II.3,254. Caes. 
IV, 3, 213. Ant. II, 5» 71. 
3) else: if1 had self-applied love to rnyself and 
to no love b. Compl. 77. and one dag b a week to 
touch no food and but one rneal on every day b. LLL 
I, 1, 40 ( on every other day). when she (nature) 
did starve the general world b. and prodigally gave 
them (graces) all to you, II, 11. we pray wilh heart 
and soul and all b. R2 V, 3, 104. his insolence is more 
intolerable than all the princes in the land b. H6B I, 
I, 176. to frustrate both his oath and what b. may rnake 
aga5st the bouse of Zancaster, H6C II, 1» 175. your 
charms and every thing b. Mcb. 11I, 5, 19. save him, 
a»d spare no blood b. Cymb. V, 5, 92. 
II. l'repos. 1) by the side of: at the Sabot 
•'rancis hem b. the port, All's 1II» 5, 39. some (hair) 
ha»gin 9 ber pale check b. Colnp1.32. foes that strike 
b. us (-- strike the air Mcb. V, 7, 29. 
2) out of: very many bave been b. their wit, Ado 
V, 1,128. to put him quite b. his patience, It4A III, 1, 
179 (only in Qe; the other O. Edd. besldes), b. them- 
sclves withfear, Cues. 11I, 1» 180. 
3) abstractedly from: b. the charge, the 
sha»e, the i»prisonment, you bave ... Err.V, 18. LLL 
IV, 2, 4S. H6A 111, 4, 8. H6B I, 3» 71. HWProl. 19. 
over and b. Shr. I, 2, 149. 
lesides. I. Adv. 1) moreover: b., his soul's 
laS" te»ple is defoced, Lucr. 719. 845. 1317. Gentl. 
III, 1, 64.86. 233. 245. V, 2, 41. Wiv. III, 1 67. IV, 
6, 55. Mens. 1,2, 78. IV, 2, 101. IV, 6, 5. V, 185. 
Err. le, l, 35. V, 259. Mcrch. Il, I» 15. 11, 8 10. III, 
2,275. As II, 4, 83. 111, 2, 60. III, 4, 33. ill, 5, 74. 
Tw. I, 5, 46. John V, 4, 41. H6A III, 3» 60. R311I» 2, 
12. V, 3, 12. Cymb. 1, 5, 25. 
2) else: you are so strongbj in mg purpose bred 
that all the worldb, methinks are dead, Sonn. 112, 14. 
all parts b. H4A III, 1, 188. zoert thou the son of 
Jupiter and no more but what thou art b. Cymb. II, 3, 
131. 
II. Prepos. 1) by the side of: b. the grores, 
the skies, the founta5ts, every region near seemed all 
one rnutual cry, Mids. IV, 1, 120 (unless it be here  
over and above). 
2) out of: who with his fear is put b. his part, 
Sonn. 23, 2. la»»» an ass, I an a woman's man dnd 
b. myself. |Vhat woman's man? and how b. thyself? 
3[arry, sir, b. rn/self, I ara due to a woman, Err. III, 
2, 78. how fell you b. your rive whs? Tw. IV, 2» 92. 
H4A III, I, 179 (Q2 beside, q. v.). quke b. the govern. 
ment of patience» Cymb. II, 4, 149. 
3) abstractedly from, over and above: 
nor tan imagination form a shape, b. yourself, to like 
of, Tp. III, 1, 57. b. your cheer» you shall bave sport 
Wiv. III, 2, 81. 4, 7. IV, 2, 13. Err. IV, 3, 88. V, 359. 
Mereh. 1I, 9» 90. As I, 1, 17. Wint.IV, 4, 828. R2 III, 
4, 88. Tire. II, 1» 2. Mcb. I, 3, 1.'22. Lr. III, 1 1. Ant. 
11I» 13, 118. 
Besldes that heading a sentence, --- hot taki ng 
into account that: b. that they are fair with their 
feed:ng, they are tau9ht their mariage, As I» 1, 12. Tw. 
I, 3, 31. I, 5, 184. 
Besiege, vb. 1) to lay siege to, to surrotmd 
with armed forces: to b. Ardea, Lucr. Al-g. 4. Lucr. 



106 

B 

1. John II, 489. II5 111, 2, 115 (Macmorris prononn- 
ces beseeched). II6A I, 1, 157. 1, 4, 1. H6B I, 3, 175. 
tI6C I, 2, 50.  to make an assanlt upon: the 
famlshed .Engllsh faintly b. us one hour in a onth, 
H6A I o, 8 Metaphorieally: whenfortg winters shall 
" -" [-."and di  dee trenches in thybeautysfie{d, 
till thus he 9an b. ne, Compl. 177. he rather eans to 
lodge gou in the field like one that cornes here to b. his 
court, LLL Il, 86. 
2) to beset, to harass: all frailHes that b. 
ag kinds of blood, Sonn. 109, 10. the fire and craes 
of sulphurous roarin9 the most n@htg bptune seem to 
b. q'p. I, 2 205. d wlth melancholy, LLL I 1,233. 
the malady that doth mg life b. All's 11, 1.10. the wo- 
men so b. us, tI8 V, 4, 35. 
Beslulder, to daub, to smear: to make them 
(out noseQ bleed, and then to b. out 9arments with it 
H4A II, 4, 341. 
Besmear, to danb, to soil: Sonn. 55, 4. 
Merch. V 219. ŒEw. V, 55. John III» 1 236. II8 1, 2, 
124. Caes. III, 1, 107 ( to dye). 
Besmirh, to soil: H5 IV, 3, 110. Hml.l. 3 15. 
Besotn. broom: II6B IV 7 34. 
Bes«nian, v. ezonian. 
Bes«rl. vb. to suit to be in accordanee 
with: snch men as nay b. gour a9e, Lr. I 4, 272. 
Besorl, subst. suitableness, conveniencc: 
wlth such accommodation and b. as lels with ber 
breedln9, Oth. I 3 239 (accommodation and besort  
besorting, or convenient, conodation). 
Besolled. infatuatcd: gou speak llke one b. on 
gour sweet delights, ŒEroil. II, 2, 143. 
Bespea. Impf. bespoke: En'. III, 2, 176. V 233. 
H6A IV, 6 21. bespake: ŒEw. V. 192. R2 V 2, 20. 
artic. bespoke: H4A I, 2, 144. Lr. V, 3, 89. 
1) to speak to: I bespake you.ffr and hm't 
gou nt, ŒEw. V, 192. besp«ke them thus: I thank you, 
countrnen, R2 V, 2, 20. H6A 1V, 6 21. IIml. II, 2 
140. then fairly I bespoke the Ecer to 9 o in person 
with me to mg bouse, Err. V, 233. 
2) to order or engage ainst a future rime: 
I bespoke it hot, Err. II1,, 76. IV. 3, 62. IV. 4, 139. 
blerch. II1, 1,131. Shr. IV 3, 63. ŒEw.lll, 3,40. H4A 
I2 144. ng lady is bespoke Lr.¥,3,89 ( engaged). 
Bespice, to season with spices: mi9htst b. 
a eup, Wint. I, 2, 316 (= poison). 
Bespol, in blood-bespotted. 
Bess, diminutive of Elisabeth: H6C V, 7, 15. 
Bess»', the same: corne o'er the bourn ., iv 
Lr. I11» 6, 27 (mad Tom and mad ess b¢ing uslly 
companions). 
Best. adj., superl, of good: I ara the b. of them 
that speak this speech, Tp. I, 2 429.430. mg b. way 
is ... I1, 2 39. 164. V, 58. 221. Genfl. !, 2, 21. 111 

ends llou adopt, Cor. III, _'2, 47. dignlties whlch vacant 
lie for thy b. use and wearing» ŒEim. V, 1,146. at llour 
b. leisure, Caes. III, 1, 5. 
It is best followed by a elaue: 'tls b. we stand 
upon our 9uard, ŒEp. Il, 1, 321. Meas. iii, 1, 1'51. 
Rom. III. 5, 219. eountin9 b. tobe with llou alone, 
8onn. 75, 7. Elliptieally: b. you stop llour ears, 8hr. 
IV, 3 76. Followed by the infinitive withont to: it 
is b. put finger in the elle, Shr. I, 1: 78. Elliptieally: 
b. sln 9 it to the tune of Light o' love, Gentl. 1,2, 83. 
b. beware raff stln 9, Shr. lb 211. b. ri»st go sec your 
lodgb9, ŒEw. III, 3, 20. b. hot wake hbn, H8 I, 1,121. 
b. pla.y with l][ardian, Ant. II. 5, 4. b. draw nll sword, 
Cwnb. III, 6, 25. To belote the infinitive: b. to take 
tl;em up, Gentl. l. 2, 134.  Cf. 'twere b. poundyou 
Gentl. l, 1,109-'twere b. he spealc, Caes. III, 2. 73. 
Oftener personally: be quiek, thou'rt b. ŒEp. l, 2, 
366. you 're best eonsider Cymb. III,2, 79. Espeeially, 
when joined with were, either without or with to 
before the infinitive: you were best stlek ber, Gentl. I, 
1,108. Wiv. III. 3, lt;5. LLL V, 2, 171. As l 1,154. 
Shr. V 1, 15. 106. All's lI 3, 267. Wint. V, 2, 143. 
Lr. I, 4. 109. Oth. I, 2, 30. Cynb. III, 6, 19. whither 
were I b. to send him? Gentl. I, 3, 24. Mids. I. 2, 2. 
93. Iereh. Il, 8, 33. 
3, 83. H6B V, 1,196. RA !, 1,100 (Qq he do it). IV, 
4, 337. With the clause preeeding: »ake your 
euse wisely, you were b. ŒEw. l. 5, 34. tI6B il, 1,189. 
Caes. III. 3.13. Oth. V, 2, 161. 
33. substantively used; 
be lloked with his that did betray the b. (riz the 
deemer), Wint. !, 2, 419.  persons of highest 
quality: l'Il rnake the b. in Glostershire know on't, 
Wiv. ¥ 5, 190. send us to Rome the b. Cor. I, 9. 77. 
 the b. thing: the b. is, she bath no teeth to blte 
Gentl. III. 1,348. Meas. IV, 3, 167. feast with the b. 
Shr. V, 2, $ ( feast on the best things in my bouse; 
ef. lVith). 9ood as the b., OEim. ¥. 1, 24 ( it eannot 
be better), what is b., that b. I wish in thee, Sonn. 
37, 13. all my b. fs dressln9 old words new, 76, 11. 
all these I better in one 9eneral b. 
nevor intermized, 101, 8. in the blazon of sweet beautll's 
b. 106, 5. creating everll bad a perfeet b. 114, 7. all 
my b. doth worship thy defeet, 149, 11. thll worst all 
b. ezeeeds, 150, 8. llou are ereated of everll ereatm'e's 
b. ŒEp.III, 1,48. invert what b. is boded me to miscMefi 
71. the b. is past, III, 3, 51. thou, b. of dearest, Sonn. 
48, 7. b. ofrallflesh, Cor. V, 3, 42. est off--- best: 
!hll b. of rest is sleep, Meas. iii, 1, 17. worse essalls 
oroved thee ny b. of love» 8onn. 110, 8. b. of coin fort, 
Ant. III, 6, 89. Inversely: I bave bred ber in qualities 
ofthe b., ŒEin. 1, 1,125 (= in the best qualities). 
Oneis best  what is in one's power: do 
thy b. to pluck this serpent f,'om 
145. ŒEw. I, 4, 40. 'int. !, 1, 27. H4A V, 2, 93. H5 

2, 31. Ileas. IV, 2, 76. Mids. I, 1, 170 etc. etc. nake !I, 2, 19. Troil. I, 3, 274. All one's bz, in the same 
llour b. baste, Wint. I!I, 3 10. let llour b. love d«aw to sense: I bave spoken for llou all rny b. Oth.lll,4 127. 
that point (  greatest), Ant. III, 4, 21. full many a I shall in all raff b. obell llou, Hml. 1, 2. 120. -- Let 
lady I bave eyed with b. regard, Tp. 111, 1, 40. us make the b. of it, Cor. V 6, 148 -- let us hot take 

Sometimes -- g o o d: how is" t with you b. brother ? 
Wint. I, 2 148. raff b. Camillo, IV 2, 61. see out b. 
elders, Cor. I, 1,230. 
Sometimes added in courtesy, without a distinct 
sense: I corne to answer thy b. pleasure» '1713. I 2, 190. 
at llour b. command, John I, 197. therefore to out b. 
raercy gice llourseles, H5 III, 3 3. which for llour b. 

it too grievously, put a good face on if. l'll none of 
it: hence! raake llour b. of it, Shr. lV, 8, 100, probably 
= do vith it as you please. 
To bave the b.  to carry the day, H6C V, 
8, 20.  I advise llou to the b. Lr. I, 2, 188 = to 
what is best for you. -- I hope all' s for the b. (= all 
is well) H6C IlI 8: 170. I thought all for the b.  ! 



B 107 

meant well, Rare. 1II, 1, 109. we dldfor the b.  we 
meant well, Cor. IV, 6, 144. -- Aire we ai the b. H6C 
III, 1, 8 (---- to the best of out powers), the sport is 
at the b. ( at the toast advautageous turn of fortune) 
Rare. I, 5, 121. ]/ou take ris even at the b. Tire. I, "O 
157 (----- at best advantage), how fare ]/ou? .Ever 
the b., hearing well of ]/our lordsMp, III, 6, 29. ( as 
well as possible), take up this mangled marrer at the 
b. Oth. I, 3, 173. -- In the best  in auy case: 
was thls a laver, or a lecher whether? bad in the b., 
but excellent bz neither, Pilgr. 102. murder toast foul, 
as in the b. it is, but thls toast .foul, IIml. I, 5, 27. -- 
T]e best  best: the b. persuaded of hlmsel.f Tw. II, 
3, 162. how likest thon thls picture? the b., for the 
innocence, Tire. I, 1, 199. 
Best, adv. Lucr. 1111. Sonn. 43, 1. Tp. I, 2, 286. 
Gentl.I, 2,102. III, 1, 93. 128. Meas. ll, 2,74 etc. etc. 
to love b. Ven. 77. Sonn. 115, 10. Gentl. I, 2, 28. 
Wiv. 1v, 4, 87 etc. b. alarumed, Le. II, 1, 55. 
Best, a name: HGB IV, "O, 23. 
Bestain, to spot: we will hOt llne hls rhin --ed 
cloak with out pure honours, John IV, 3, ,'24. 
Best-eonditioned, of the best cast ofmind 
ZIerch. III, 2, 295. 
Bested (O. Edd. bestead): I never sau, a.fellou 
worse b., tI6B 11, 3, 56, i. e. in a worse plight; cf. 
Stead. 
Bes-esteemed, toast respccted: my b. ac- 
quaintance, Merch. 1], 2, 181. 
Bestial, becoming a beast: Ids b. appetlte 
R3 III, 5, 81. Hml. lV, 4, 40. Oth. II, 3, 264. 
BesfiHed, reading of Ff. in Hml. I, 2, 204 ; Qq 
and M. Edd. dlstilled; but cf. bestraught  distraught, 
and distan  bestain. 
Besfi¢, to stir, 1) trans, to put in motion, to 
agitate: th]/ spirlt bath sa --ed thee in thy sleep, H4A 
II, 3, 60. ]/ou bave sa --ed ]/our valour, Lr. II, 2, 08. 
-- 2) intr.: Tp. I, 1, 4 (tire ship-master's speech). 
Best-tllotittg, best persuading: we Mngle 
]Cu as our b. fait solicitor, LLL Il, 29. 
Bestow, 1) to stow, to lodge, to place: 
saine good concelt of thine in th]/ soul's thoug£t will b. 
it, Sonn. 26, 8 (= will treasure it np in thy heart). 
b. ]/our luggage w]ere ]/ou found it, Tp. V, 999. how 
should I b. him ? Wiv. IV, , 48. the devil take one 
part.y and his dm the other ! and so the]/ shall be both 
--ed, IV, 5, 109. in what place ]/ou bave --ed m]/ 
ne]C Err. l, 2, 78. Merch. H, 2, 179. H6A Iii, 2, 88. 
Caes. 1, 3, 151. Mcb. Ifl, 1, 30. Hml. Il, 2, 547. III, 4, 
176. IV, 3, 12. Lr. Il, 4, 292. IV, 6, -o93. I will b. 
]/ou wlere you shall bave tbne to speak ]/our bosora 
.fceel.y, Oth. 1II, 1, 57 (i. e. conduct you to a place). 
Rêflectively: can ]/ou tell where he --s hmself? llcb. 
111, 6, _'24 (= where lle lires at prescrit), ber father 
and m]/self will sa b. ourselves ..., Hnll. III, 1, 33. 44 
(---- place, bide ourselves), b. ]/ourselfwith speed, H5 
IV, 3, 68 (--- repaie to vaut post). -- In spea'king of 
a marri,qgeable girl, i passes into the sense of to 
marry: hot to b. mlW]/oungest daughter belote I bave 
a husband for the elder, Shr. I, 1, 50. to bave ber sa 
--ed, IV, 4, 35. 
2) tO employ: that (rope) will I b. araong 
wife and her confederates, Err. lV, 1, 16. 'ris labour 
well --ed, Wiv. 1I, 1,248. labour ill --ed, Ado III, 
103. in heedfullest reservatlon to b. them, Ails I, 3, 
231. what pains I haie --ed, H4B lV, "O, 74. whose 

lire weïe ill --ed.. . where Ilelen is the subject? Troil. 
11, 2, 159. good deeds evill]/ --ed, Tim. IV, 3, 467. 
Absolutely: all m,y powers da their --ing lose, Troil. 
I11, 2, 39, i. c thcir fnnctions. 
Hcnce  to spend, to lay out: labouringin 
moe pleasures to b. them (the estates of others) than 
the truc gout, y landlord whlch doth owe them, Comi)l. 
139. how llttle is the cost I have --ed in purchasin 9 
the semblance of mlWsoul Merch. III, 4, 19. I would 
] had --ed that time in the tongues, Tw. I, 
would bave --ed the thousand pound, H4B V, 5, 12. 
I will b. a breakfast to make]/oufriends, H5 II, 1, 12. 
b. if at ]/our pleasure, Ant. ¥, 2, 182. wilt thou 
tlme with me? Caes. V, 5, 61. 
Reflectively, = to deport one's self: how 
and which way I malWb. ,]/self to be regarded in her 
eye Gentl. 1II, 1, 87. the boy --s himself like a ripe 
sister, As IV, 3, 87. tell me how ]/ou would b. ]/oursel.f, 
John III, 1. "O25. sec Falstaff b. hbnself in hls truc 
colours» lI4B 1I, -o, 186. 
3) to grant, to give, to afford; a) absolute- 
ly: this ]/oung parcel o.f bachelors stand ett ray --inq. 
All's II, 3, 59. though he were unsatisfied in getting 
yet fi --i»g he was toast princel.y, 118 IV, _'2, 56.- 
b) followed by an accus.: the kiss l gave ]/ou is --ed 
in vab, Ven. 771. that fi'esh blood which youngl]/ thon 
--est, Sonn. 11, 3. that sad breath his spo»g. hmgs 
--ed Compl. 3-o6. favours which t]ey did b. LLL V, 
-o, 1-o5. Gcntl. II, 4, 79. Asl, 2,35. Shr. Il, 100. All's 
Il, 1, 203. III, 7, 12. Tw. I, 5, _'200. Cor. I, 1, 1"O9. 
Tim. I, 1, 145.  c) foIlowed by a dative and au 
accus.: b. her funera, Tit. IV, 2, 163. b. ]/our neëdful 
counsel to our business, Le. 11, 1, 1"O8. -- d) mostly 
followed by on: I must b. upon t]e e]/es of this ]/oung 
couple saine vanit]/ of nffne art, Tp. IV,40. b. th.y smiles 
on equal mates, Geutl. III, 1, 158. to b. her on Thurio, 
II1, 1, 13. 162. Viv. 11, _'2, _'202 (--ed much on ber, 
spent much to win her). Err. II, 2, 80. III, 1, 117. 
Ado I, 1 10. II, 1, _'237. II, 3, 175. 111, 5, -06. LLL V, 
2, 670. Merch. II. _'2, 145. V, 101. As V, 4, 7. Tw. II. 
4, 86. III, 2, 8. H5 IV, 1, 313. H6B IV, 7, 76. H6C 
IV, 1, 56. It8 II, 1, 163. II, 4, 14. 11I, 1,182. III, 
159. Troil. V, 2, 25. Tit. 1, 219. Hml. lV, 1,4 (b. this 
tdace on us a little while). Le. 1, 1, 16. Oth. 1I, 1, 102. 
145. IV, I, 13. Ant. III, 13, 84. Per. II, 5, 77. IV, 
41. --ed ber on ber own lamentation Meas. III, 1,237, 
i.e. left ber to her lamentation. -- e) followed by 
of (as of and on are throughout confounded by the 
old writers): to b. if all of ]/our worship, Ado III, 5, 
24 (Dogberry's speech). I will b. sone precepts o.f 
thls virgbt, All's III 5, 103. what b. ofhlm? Tw. II1, 
4, 2. of him b. ]/our sued-for tongues, Cor. II, 3, 215. 
Bestaught, distracted: 1ara hot b., Shr. Ind. 
2, 26 (Sly's speech). 
Besl-¢egaeded, of highest tank and estima- 
tion: Mereh. II, 1, 10. 
Bestrew, to scatter over, to strow: Tp. 
IV, 1, -o0. Shr. Ind. I, 56 (part. bestrewed). 2, 42. 
Bestride, (impf. and partie, bestrid) 1) to step 
on or over: b. the rock; the ride will wash ]/ou off 
H6C V, 4, 31. when I Jïrst mlWwedded mistress saw 
b. mlWthreshold, Cor. IVr 5, 1'2-4. 
2) to stride over with the legs extended 
a c r o ss, like the Colossns of Rhodes: b. the narrow 
world llke a Colossus, Caes. I, 2, 135. his legs bestrid 
the ocean, Ant. V 2, 82. cf. II4A V, 1,123. 



108 

B 

3) to mount as a rider: that horse that thou sa 
ften hast bestrid, R:? V, 5, 79. when I b. Mm, I soar, 
[5 III, 7, 15. H6C II, 1, 183. Cymb. IV, 4, 38. when 
he --s the lazy-pacing clouds, Rom. II, _'2, 31. a loyer 
na.y b. the gossamer, I1, 6, 18. 
4) to defend one fallcn in battle: when 
[ bestr{d thee in the wars, Err. V, 192. II4A V, 1,122 
a quibble). H6B V, 3, 9. Cor. II, 2, 96. Figuratively: 
he doth b. a bleeding land, II4B I, 1,207. like good 
men b. out down-fallen blrthdom, Mcb. IV, 3, 4. 
Bestrow, see Bestrew. 
]Best-tempered, of hardest metal: the b. 
courage, H4B I, 1,115. 
Ber, rb., to lay wager: I won qfyou ai 
--ing, H5 Il, 1, 99. llî. Transitively:--ed much 
money oa his head, II4B 11I, 2, 50. 
lIet. subst., wager: IIml. V, 2, 170. 
lIetale (impf. and partic, betook: LLL l, 1,°-37. 
Per. 1, 3, 35), refl. rb., to compose one's self, 
to prepare, to think of, to enter on; always 
followed bv fo: ever oae fo rest themselves b. Lucr. 
125. 174. "Per. I1, 3, 115. whenas himself fo singing 
he --s, Pilgr. 114. betook msel.f fo walk, LLL l, 1 
237. b. thee fo thy falth, All's IV, 1, 83. that de.fence 
thou hast, b. thee fo if, Tw. III, 4, 240. 252. b. thee fo 
nothlng but despair, Wint. lll, 2, 210. b. me fo my 
heels, II6B IV, 8, 67. everff man b. him to his legs, 
1-,ont. I, 4, 34. hath betook himsel.f to travels, Per. l, 
3. 35. 
Beeem, to grant, to allow: rai, vhich I 
could well b. t)em 'om the tempest of my eyes, Mids. 
l. l, 131. sa loving to ny mother that he mlght hot b. 
the wlmts of heavea visit ber face too rovghly, Hml. I, 
2, 141 (Qq beteeme, Ff. beteene). 
Beihin] (impL and parfic, bethought). I. to 
-think, to consider: troEles umvknessed vkh eye 
or car thy coward heart with.false --ing grieves, Ven. 
1024. bade Mm b. hov ice the quarrel vas, Rare.III, 
1,158. -- FoIIowed by an accus., : to think of: 
while we b. a means, tt6C III, 3, 39. vell bethought, 
Hml. I, 3 90. Per. V, 1, 44. 
II. used reflectively, 1) -- to think, usually 
followed by of, and once by on : b. you of some con- 
ve.yance, Wiv. III, 3, 135. and not b. me stralght of 
dangerous roc}s, Merch. l, 1, 31. b. thee qf thy brt]b 
Shr. Ind. 2, 32. b. you of the .young prince your so, 
R3 Il, 2, 96. b. thee on er virtues, H6AV, 3, 191. -- 
Followed by a clause: I b. me what a wear. va.y ... 
R2 Il, 3, 8. -- If ma.y be I s)all otherw;se b. me, Caes. 
iV, 3, 251. 
2) to consider: good my lord, b. you, lIeas. 11, 
, 87. 144. that Imay be assured, Iwill b. me, Merch. 
I, 3, 31. John III, 1,204. Rare. III, 5, 197. Pet'. I, 2, 
83. Followed by of: 'twas bravely donc, if you b. you 
of ff, Ado V, 1, 279. he lath better bethought Mm of 
his quarrel, Tw. 11I, 4, 327. 
3 to recollect: and now do lb. me, lIids. IV, 
1, 155. Tw. V, 356. b. thee once again, and in th 
thought o'errua my former rime, H6C I, 4, 44. as I b. 
me, 101. b. yourself wherein .you may bave offended 
hbn, Lr. I, 2, 174. Followed by of: I bave bethought 
me of another fault, Meas. V, 461. if .you b..yoursel.f: 
of any crime, Oth. V, 2, 25. 
Bethought, adj, havlng a thought; mean- 
ing: and ara b. fo take the basest and toast poorest 
shape Lr. Il, 3, 6. 

Bethump, to cuff: I was never so ed with 
words, John II, 466. 
Betide, pat'fie, betid: Tp. I, 2, 31. R2 V, 1, 42. 
Cymb. lV, 3,40. 1)intr. to happen, to corne to 
pass: what news else --th here, Gentl. I, 1, 59. tales 
of voeful ages long ago betld, R2 V, 1, 42. a salve 
.for any sore that may b. tt6C IV, 6, 88. Followed by 
fo: there is hot sa much perdition as an hair betld to 
any, Tp. I, 2, 31. and so b. fo me as well [ tender you, 
R3 Il, 4, 71. what is betid fo Cloten, Cylnb. IV, 3, 40. 
Followed by of ( to beeome) : ifhe were dead, what 
would b. of me ? R3 I, 3, 6. 
23 trans., to happen to, to befall: what 
me, Gentl. IV, 3, 40. woe b. thee, Tit. IV, 2, 56. more 
health and happiess b. mg liege, R2 III, 2, 91. H6B 
1, 4, 69. R3 I, 2, 17. 112. 
Betime, vb., to betide, to chance: no rime 
shall be omitted that will b. and may by us be fitted, 
LLL IV, 3, 382 (O. Edd. and many M. Edd. be rime). 
Beime, adr., 1) soon, before it is too late: 
put up thy sword b. John IV, 3, 98. H6B III, 1,285. 
2) early: all b the mornlng b. Hml. IV» 5, 49. Ant. 
IV, 4, 20. 
Berlines, the same, 1) soon, before it becomes 
too late: let me say amen b., lest the devil cross raff 
prayer, Merch. I11, 1, 22. Wint. I, 2, 297. It6B III, 1, 
297. H6C IV, 8, 6?,. V, 4, 45. Troil. Il, 2, 106. Cae». 
Il, 1,116. IV,3,308. Mcb. IV,3, 162. Cymb. V, 2, 17. 
2) early, at an early hour: is hmged b. in th 
mornin.q, Meas. IV, 3, 49. IV, 4, 18. V, 101. Tw. II, 3, 
2. II Il, 1, 36. II4A Il, 4, 600. R3 Ill, 1, 199. Mcb. 
III, 4, 133. Hnfl. V, 2, 235. Oth. I, 3, 383. II, 3, 335. 
Ant. IV, 4, 27. 
Bet-oken, fo foreshow, to slgnify: a red 
morn, that ever yet --ed wreck fo the seaman, Vert. 
453. this doth b. the corse they.follow did with despe- 
rate hand fordo ifs own lire, Hml. V, 1, 242. 
Betoss, to toss, to agitate: m. --ed soul 
did hot attend him, Rom. V, 3, 76. 
Betray, 1) to de.c, eive: wouldyetaganb, the 
] fore-betrmded , Compl. 028. da hot b. me, sir; If car 
l'you love 3Itress Page, Wiv. III, 3, 82. we'll b. him 
Ifinely, V, 3, .2.24. hot .you fo me, but I --ed by you, 
LLL IV, 3, 176. b.y oppressin 9 and in 9 me, Tire. 
IV, 3, 510. wln us with honest trifles, to b. us in deepest 
consequence, Meb. I, 3, 125. she must die, else she'll 
b. more men, Oth. V, 2, 6. never was there queen sa 
ml9htily--ed, Ant. I, 3, 25.  Absolutely: wear them, 
b. with them (false hait) Tire. IV, 3, 146. Per. IV, 
3, 47. 
Especlally  to entrap, to ensnare: labin 
ambush to b. my life, Lncr. 233. whff bath thy servant, 
Opportunlt.y, --ed the hours thou 9avest me fo repose? 
933. how manj lmnbs ml9ht the stern wolf b., if llke a 
lamb he could his looks translate, Sonn. 96, 9. the letter 
that I dropped to b. him, Tw.III,2,83. that thou--edst 
Polixeaes, Wint. III, 2, 186. bave all limed bushes to 
b. thy win9s, tt6B II, 4, 54. wouldst thou b. me? R3 I, 
1, 102. to la.y a complot to b. th.y foes, Tit. V, 2, 147. 
unicorns ma.y be ed with trees, Caes. II, 1, 204. 
I will b. tawny-fimedfishes, Ant. 11, 5, 11. who are in 
this relieved, but hot --ed, V, 2, 41. the shes of Ital.y 
should hot b. mine interest and his honour, Cymb. 1, 
3, 29. 
Sometimes almost  to seduce: can it be that 
modest.y ma.y more b. out sense than woman's Hghmess? 



B 109 

Meus. II, 2, 169. ttese b. nice wenches, ttat would be 
--ed witout tese, LLL III, 23. some ja. of Itabj ath 
ed him, Cymb. III, 4 52. 
) o deliver by fraud into the pover of 
encmies: to b. yu, All's 1II, 6 32. to b. te Floren- 
tine, IV, 3, 326. Vint. I, , 419. V, 1,193. lI4A I, 3, 
81. II5 III, 6, 143. II6A III, 2 82. II6B IV, 4, 58. 
10, 28. 34. H6C IV, 4, 8. II8 Il, 1, 110. III, 1, 67. 
Cr. ¥, 6, 92. Tir. IV, 2, 106. 0th. V, 2, 77. Ant. 
12, 10. 24. IV, 14, 6. Cymb. III, 4, 87. Followed by 
to: those thhe ees b. thee unto mine, Lucr. 483. are 
we ed tus to t ocerview? LLL IV, 3, 175. would 
hot b. the decll to Ms fellow, Mcb. IV, 3, 128. cf. All's 
IV, 1, 102. II6A I, 1, 144. Lr. 11I, 4, 98. 
3) to dcliver, to expose: 'hen he Mmse 
Mmse cofounds, s to slanderous to»yues and wret- 
ched das, Lucr. 160. tou in ne, I do b. my nobler 
part to m yross bod's treason Sonn. 151 5. to b. 
im to ano,er pmdsment, Wiv. III, 3, 08. she did 
b. me to m own reproof, Err. V, 90. to b. a se-lamb 
to a rare, As III, , 85. b. themselves to eve T modern 
censure IV, 1, 6. he his onour s to slander, 
Il, 3, 85. doth b. to loss the conquest, II6A Iv, 3, 49. 
ed to fortune, IV, 4, 39. b th yuile --ed to deat, 
R3 V, 3, 133. to b. ou to sorrow, H8 III, 1, 56. 
4) to reveal xha honld be kcpt secret: Ido b. 
myself wlth blushing, LLL I, 2, 138. how sometimes 
nature will b. ils folly, Wint. I, , 151. tat c'er y 
longue hath so --ed thine act Ant. lI 7 84. Tit. IV 
2 117. 149. 
eiim, to deck, to adoïn: whlch spongy 
April al thp hsst s, Tp. IV, 65. 
e re{h, t o a ffi a n c e: --ed ner to County Paris, 
Rom. V 3 238. --s h9nse to unquietness, Ado I, 3, 
49. Generally in the païtic. --ed: to whom i ara 
Gentl. IV, 2 111. Mids. IV ] 177. Tw.V 270. tI6A 
V» 5 26. R3 IlI 7, 181. we are --ed Gentl.II4 179. 
--ed lovers H5 II, 4 108. Tir. I» 406. his old --ed 
Ieas. III, 2 293. Tir. I 286. 
Beer, adj. compta-, of good: Sonn. 59 11. 
Tp. I 2» 496. Il» 1, 281. Geatl. I, 1 159. Il 1 145. 
III 1 276. 385. Vi-. I 1 121. II  172. hIeas. II 
4 77. Eïr. Iii» 1 29. IV  25. Merch. I»2 96. V96 
As III, 2, 155 etc. etc. the b. foot before  »vitll ail 
speed: John IV 2 170. Tit. II 3 192. still b. and 
worse, Hml. 1II, 2, 261. 'ris b. using France tan trust- 
ing France, H6C IV, 1, 42. b. il were a broer died 
al once, Meus. I1, 4, 106. Elliptically: b. forbear ( 
il is b. to forbear) Gentl. II, 7, 14. b. bave noue tan 
plural falth, V, 4, 51. b. three ours too soon than a 
minute too late, Wiv. II, 2, 327. b. shame than murder 
1V, 2 45. H6B IV, 8 49. H6C IV, 5 26. H8 II, 3, 12. 
Mcb. III, 2, 19. Ant. III, 4, 23. -- he ad b. starve 
tan but once thb&, H8 V, 3, 132. e were b., in the 
saine sense: you were b. speakfirst, As IV, 1, 73. se 
were b. love a dream, Tw. II, 2, 27. John IV 3 95. 
H4B I, 2, 102. Troil. I 3, 370 (Q it were b.). Hml. 
II 2, 550. The infinitive preceded by to: I were b. 
fo be married of im, As III 3 92. I were b. to 
be eaten to death, H4B I, 2, 245. -- tou adst been 
b. ave been born a dog, 0th. III 3, 362. tou wert b. 
thou adst struck thff mother, H4B V, 4, 11 (Doll's 
specch).  Te b.  better: it sall be the b. for you 
Meus. 1I, 1, 233. how much ge b. to fall before te 
lion Tw. III 1, 139. ou are te b. al proverbs, H5 
III, 7, 131. -- e b. part  the greater part: how 

thy worth with manners may I sbg, when tou art ail 
the b. part of me. Sonn. 39, 2. ara b. liban thff dear 
self s b. part, Err. II, 2, 125. vere I hot the b. part 
ruade ofmercff, As III, 1, 2 (but III, _'2, 155 in ils ori- 
ginal sense), cf. she will but diseuse out b. mirt, Cor. 
1,3, 117, i. e. our mirth which would be greater 
without her company. -- 3Tore b. cf. ][ore. 
Better, adv., compar, of we 11 : Tp. IV, 197. Gentl. 
V, 2 18. r 4, 3. Meus I 3, 7. Il, , 268. Ado III, 
116. lIids. I11, 2, 35 etc. etc. )fe could never corne b. 
(= more wclcome) Wint. IV, 4, 187. makes me the 
b. to confer with you, Gentl. III, 2, 19. 
13etter worth  more worth: hls health was never 
b. worth than now, H4A IV, 1 27. te very train of er 
vorst weoring gown was b. worth tan all mff fater" s 
lands, tI6B 1, 3 89. -- To dure b.  to dure rather: 
dures b. be damned thau to do k, -411'sI[I,6,96. Surrey 
durst b. lave burut lirai longue t]tau said so, II8 III, 
253.  It can be no b. = it must, alas ! bave been 
Meus. Y, 189. 
lelle, subst., 1) - somcthing better: sel- 
don cornes de b. 123 1I, 3, 4. exchange the bad for b. 
Gcutl. II, 6, 13. b. is by ecil still ruade b. Sonn. 119. 
10. did you ever ear b. LLL IV, 1, 97. I never lookec? 
for b. al Ms hands, 123 fil, 5, 50. wo seeks.for b. 
thee, Tire. IV, 3, 24. 267. Cor. Il, I, 255. gel the 
b. of then  to vanquish them, Caes. Il, 1,026. 
2) supcrior, one to whon precedence 
due, cithcr on account of higher qualitms (as in 
H6B I, 3, 113: m. b. in te field; cf. Shr. IV, 3, 75 
R3 I, 2, 140. Troil. V, 2, 33) or of higher rank: 
courtes. ofnatlons allows.ou my b. As I, 1, 50. Il, 4. 
68. under the degree of my --s, Tw. I, 3, 125. Joh 
I, 156. II4B IV, 3, 71. H6B I, 3, 112. 114. V, 1, 119. 
H6C V, 5, 36. Tin. I, 2, 12. Hml. III, 4, 152. Lr. I, 4. 
277. III, 6, 109. -- (When betterfall, All'slll, 1 22. 
they'll fill a pit as well as b. H4A IV, 2, 73. This sub- 
stantive use the word has in cornmon with all other 
adjectives). 
lele¢, verb., 1) to improve: dedicated to 
closeness and the --ing of raff mind, Tp. I, 2, 90. )fe is 
furnised with my opinion, wMch, --ed with Ms own 
learning, contes with Mm, 1Ierch. IV, 1, 158. his lands 
and goods, which I ave --ed rather than decreased, 
Shr. II, 119. we will b. il in Pisa, IV, 4, 71. --ing 
loss makes the bad causer worse, R3 IV, 4, 12_ ° ,i. e. 
magnifying), but slnce he is --ed, we bave therefore 
odds, Hml. V, 2 274 (- si,nec he has perfected him- 
self in his art). strivbzg to b.» oft we mar what's well, 
Lr. I, 4, 369. The following passages lead over to the 
second signification: being red, se loves him best, and 
being wMte» ber best is --ed wlth a more dellght Ven. 
78. now counting best to be with /ou alone» then 
that te world ma. sec m. pleasure, Sonn. 75 8. ai1 
these I b. in one general best, 91, 8. 
2) to surpass: he bath --ed expectation, Ado 
I, 1, 16. I will b. te insttctlon, Merch. III, 1, 76. 
what .ou do still --s what is donc, Wint. IV, 4, 136. 
each day still b. oter's happiness, R2 1, 1 22. /ou are 
like to do such business. 1Vol unlike, each wa. to b. 
Cor. III, 1 49. te.g do b. thee, Per. IV 6, 172. 
lettering, subst., improvement, progress: 
them (my verses) wlth te b. of te lime, Sonn. 
32, 5. 
]ete¢-SlaOlel, "speaklng in better phrase and 
malter": Lr. IV 6, 10; cf. 7. 



B 

Betumble, to disorder by tossing: from 
er --d couch she startet], Lucr. 1037. 
Between, prepos., 1) in the intermediate 
space (locally as well as temporally): I fie b. that 
sun and t]ee, Ven. 194. b. ten and elevene Wiv. 
86. Lucr. 390. Pilgr. 92. Wiv. I, 4, 27. 111, 5, 47. 
Meas. le 2, 29. I11, 1,223. Err. I11, 2e 132. Mids. II, 1, 
156. V, 34. 176. 208. speak b. the change of man and 
boy, Merch. 111, 4, 66 etc. etc. Implyiug hiaderauce : 
the locks b. ber cltamber and his will, Lucr. 302. to 
Rave no screen b. tMs part he played and Mm Re played 
it for, Tp. I, 2» 107 (i. e. wi.-hing to play it for him- 
-c'lf). b. my soul's deske and me is Clarence H6C 111, 
2, 128. corne b. us, Rom. I!, 4, 71 (--- assist nm). stood 
b. much heat and him, tlml. II1, 4, 3. step b. ber and 
]ter fightbig soul, 113. corne hot b. rite dragon and Ms 
wrat]t, Lr. I, 1, 124. to corne b. out sentence and out 
power» 173 (-- to cross). 
2) noting comparison or distinction: tossed b. de- 
sire and dread, Lucr. 171. weig]ted b. loathzess and 
vbedience, Tp. 11, 1, 130. ruade compare b. our statures 
Mids. III, 2, 291. H6A II, 4, 10. Aut. l 2 e 143 etc. 
3) noria intercourse: what a war of loo]cs was 
then b. them, Ven. 355. heavez tain grace on that with 
breeds b. tltem, Tp. III, 1» 76. Lucr. 405. Phoen. 33. 
Gent.l. Ill, 2, 23. Wiv. l, 1, 34. 57. 102. II, 1, 208. 
I11, _9, 25. Mcas. III, l, 162. IV, 1, 42. Ado l, 1, 64. 
LLL Il, 41. V, 1, 102. Mcrch. I, 3, 84. Il, 2, 159. III, 
2, 321. All's 111, 2, 36. what is b. you? IIml. I, 3, 98. 
l, 5, 139. he ma.f corne avd go b. ,you, XViv. Il, 2, 130. 
,kll's V, 3, 259. Oth. Iii, 3 100. Ant. III, 4, 25. 
4) noting partnership: lest b. them both it should 
be killed, Lucr. 74 (--- by flmm), he was begot b. two 
stockfishes, Meas. Iii, 2, 116. I have some marks 
.fours upon my pare, some of m.f mistress' marks upon 
my shoulders, but hot a thousmzd marks b. ,you 
Err. le 2, 84. b. you I shall have a hol.f head, Il, l,80. 
b. them they will kill the conjurer, V, 177. a .Bergo- 
mask dance b. two of out compan.f Mids. V, 361. that 
b..fou and the womet the pla.f ma.f please, AsEpil, 17. 
shall hot thou and I b. Saint Dennis and Saint George 
compound a o.f, tI5 V, 2,220 (i. e. under the colonrs 
of S. D. and S. G.). b. us we can kill a ff.f, Tir. III, 
2, 77. he shallfall b. us, Oth. IV, 2, 245. Icrave out 
composition ma.f be written and sealed b. us, Ant. Il, 
6, 60. the unlawful issue that their lust bath ruade b. 
them, III, 6, 8. 

b. t]ieir love and me, R3 IV, 1, 21. thou leepest tire 
strolce b. th.f begging and my meditation, IV, 2, 119. 
2) just the di ff ereuce b. the constant red and mingled 
damaslc AsIII, 5, 123. All's I, 3, 116. Wint. I, 1, 4. 
11» 1, 87. H4A III, 1, 220. R3 I, 4, 8?, etc. 
3) b. mixte e.fe and heart a league is toolc, Sonn. 
47, 1. Meas. V, 218. Ado 1, 1, 62. Mids. I, 1, 84. As 
IV, 3, 141. Wint. I, 1, 25. R2 1, le 50. III, 1, 12. Ve 1, 
73. H4A V, 5, 10. H6A 1, 1, 106. 111, 1,139. 189. IV. 
1, 96. 131. V, 4, 99. R31, 1, 73. I, 3, 37. H8 I, 1, 
180 etc. 
4) share the advice b. you, All's 11, 1, 3. things 
known b. us t]b'ee, Vint. IV, 4, 571. b. ourselves let us 
decide it t]ten, H6A IV, 1, 119. 
Bevei, crooked: I ma.f be stralg]t tlough 
themselves be b., Sonn. 121, 11. 
Be,'erage, drink: wholesome b. Wint. I, 2,346. 
Be'is, a ïabuloas knight in the time of William 
the Conqueror: II8 1, 1, 38. (In H6B Il, 3, 93 the 
spurious Qq add: as JB. of Southampton fell upon 
,iscapart). 
Bey, troop, flock: none hem in all tMs noble 
b. Is brought wkh ber one care abroad, H8 1, 4 4. 
e and man.f more qf t]e sa»te b. that I ]cnow the 
drossy age dotes on, Hml. V, œe, 197 (Qq breed). 
Bewa|i, to lainent: Mids. IV, le 61. H6B IIl 
1,217. H8 I11, 2,255. Cor. V, 6, 154. JBewailed, ad- 
jectively, - lamentable : lest mg --ed guih should do 
thee s]ame» Sonn. 36, 10. 
Beware, vb. (only used in the imperative and 
infinidve), to take hced: 1) absolutely: s]alce off 
dumber and b. Tp. 11, 1,304. R2 V, 3, 39. H6C V, 6, 
84. ŒEroil. 111, 3e 228..ŒEit. 11, 1 69. IV, 1, 96. Infini- 
rive: hadst t]wu but bid b. Vert. 943. 
2) ïollowed by an accus.: b. t]e rope's ed» Err. 
IV, 4 45. Merch. III, 3, 7. As IV, 1, 200. H4A Il, 4, 
299. Caes. 1, 2, 18. Mcb. IV, 1, 71. Lr. 111, 4, 146. 
111, 6, 9. Iufinitive: best b. m.f sHn.f, Shr. 11, 11. bids 
you b. t]e ldes of larch, Caes. I, 2, 19. 
3) followed by qf: b. ofbebq cptives, All's Il, 1, 
21. b. of them, III, 5 19. R3 I, 3, 292. Caes. 11 3 1. 
Hml. l, 3, 65. Oth. III, 3, 165. Infinitive: .fou would 
Iceep from my ]eels and b. of an ass Err. III, 1, 18. 
Cor. IV, 6, 54. Hml. I, 3, 67. 
4) followed by a clause : b. you lose it hot, H8 
le 172. 
In one passage it bas the sense: to take care 

Between, adv., in the same sense: these shrugs, of, to guard: priest» b. your beard; I mecm to 
when you bave said she's goodly" corne b. ere you can tug it, H6A 1, 3e 47. 
sa.f 'she's honest'» Wint. 11, 1, 75. as you had slept b. Bewaste, in time-bewasted q. v. 
IV, 1, 17. the river bath thrice flowed, no ebb b. H4B Beweep, 1) to weep over: Sonn. 29, 2. R3 
IV, 4, 125. no impediment b. Cor. 11, 3, 236. a more I, 3, 328.1 4, 251 (Ff. he bewept re.f fortune; Qqwhea 
unhappy lad.f ne'er stood b. Ant. I11, 4, 13. corne you I parted with hlm). 11 2 49. Tire. V, 1, 161. Lr. I, 
b., and save poor me, Per. IV, 1, 90. else he never 4, 324. 
would compare b. R2 Il, 1» 185. gone b. and b. Troil. 2) to bedew with tears: sweet.flowers» which 
I e 1, 7'2,. cf. Goer-between, JBrolcer-between. bewept to the grave did go with true-love showers» Hml. 
Between, subst., interval: there is nothing in IV, 5, 38. 
t]e b. but getting wenc]es with child, Wint. III e 3 e 62 Bevet, to wet, to moisten. Partic. bewet: 
(the shepherd's speech), his naplcin, with his true tears all bewet ŒEit. lll le 146. 
Betwixt, prepos., of the saine use as between (in Bewhore, to call whore: my lord bath so d 
R3 Qq nsually betwixt, Ff. between), ber, Oth. IV, 2, 115. 
1) b. twelve and one, Ado IV, 1, 85. each soil b. Bei¢h, to charm by witchcraft: Ven. 
that ttolmedon ad this seat of ours H4A 1, 1, 65. As 777. Lucr. 173. Compl. 131. Mids. 1, 1, 27. Tw. III, 
1,1»52. H4Al, 3,45. 111,3,49. IV, 2, 44. R3111,7, 4, 113. H4AIl, 2,18. H6AIlI3,58. H6BI e1»157. 
48. Ant. 111, 2, 29 etc. Idea of hinderance: I will H6CIlI, 3, 112. R3 I11, 4, 70. Rom. Il Chor. 6. Tir. 
stand b. you and dager, Wint. 11, 2, 66. set bouds V, 3, 85. Per. Il, 5, 49. 



B 111 

Bewitchment, power of charming: Iwill 
countefeit the b. of sorne popular man, Cor. I1, 3, 108. 
Be,vrar, to discover: longing to heur the hate- 
fid foe --ed, Lucr. 1698. fo heur ber secrets so --ed, 
Pilgr. 352. H6A IV, I, 107. H6C I, 1, 211. 111, 3, 97. 
ïit. ll, 4, 3. V, 1, 28. Cor. V, 3,. 95. Lr. ll, 1»109. 
111, 6, 118. 
Beyond, prepos., 1) on the other side of: 
it the pool b..your cell, Tp. IV, 182. as I came 5. Eton, 
Wiv. IV, 5, 68. H4A 111, 1, 76. IISl, 2, 63.11[,6»180. 
H6B I, 3» 128. R3 IV, 2, 48. 
î) ïarther than: 5. all date, Soins. 122, 4. she 
that dwells ten leu9ues 5. rnan's life, Tp. lI, 1,247. is 
quite b. rnbte arrn, Wint. I1, 3, 5. rny grief st»etches 
itself S. the hour of death H4B 1V, 4, 57. I alm a toile 
b. the rnoon, Tit. IV, 3, 65. fitr b. rny depth (to swim) 
It8 111, 2, 361. 
Various mctaphorical use: an earnest fnvit5tg, 
which many rny near occasions did urge me to put oJ] 
bat he bath conjured rne b. thern, Tim. 111, 6, 13 (past 
them, out of hem). you look 5. hlm  you construe 
him amiss, II4B IV, 4, 67. cf. to cast 5. ourseh,es in 
out opbtions, Ihnl 11, I, 115. the k5g bath gone 5. me 
 bas disappointed, overreached me, II8 111, 2, 409. 
f it be so far b. hls health  if he is so iii, Titn. 111, 
4, 75. that wound, b. the5" feeling, to the qulck, Tit. 
IV,2, 28, i. e. though their rude itmensibility my hot 
feel it. 
Mostly  surl)ssing , above: extremes 5. ex- 
tremit., Lucr. 969. out escape is rnuch b. out loss, Tp. 
1I, 1, 3. b. all credit, 1I, 1, 59. 111, 1, 7:. V, 207. Wiv. 
IV, 2, 186. Err. V, 201. Ado 1, I, 14. Shr. 1, 2, 90. 
SViat. I, 2, 144. 11, 3, 198. IV, 2, 45. John IV, 3, 117. 
II4A 1, 3, 200. II4B 1, 3, 59. tt6C 11, 5, 51. H8 II1, 
I, 135. ïroil. 11,3,254. Cor. 11» 2, 93. II1, 1, 245. 
Caes. 1I» , .'25. Mcb. V, 1, 65. Hml. 1, 4, 56. Lr. 1, 1, 
58. Ant. 111, 6, 87. III, 7, 76. Cymb. 111, 3, 86. 4» 8. 
IV, I, 12. V, 5,165. I, 6, .0. 
Be)-ond, adv.: amSition cannot pierce a wlnk b. 
( frther), Tp. 11, 1, 24. mbe is beyond 5eyond, 
Cymb. III, 2, 58, i. e. surpasses all that is surpas_ing. 
B¢zoaian, base fellow: H4BV, 3, 118. H6B 
1V, I, 134.* 
B|all¢a, female naine: Shr. 1, I, 75 and passim. 
Oth. 111, 4, 170 and passim. 
Bias, subst, tht which draws to a particuIar 
direction, preponderant tendency: study hls b. 
l, aves and rnakes his 5ook thlne e.yes, Pilgr. 61 and 
LLL IV, 2, 113. nature to ber b. drew in that, Tw. V, 
67. cornrnodity, the b. of the world, John 11, 574. this 
vile-drawlng b.» tMs swaff of rnotlon, 577. 581. the 
fittheï falls ri'orn b. of nature, Lr. 1, 2, 120. -- A 
weight on one side of a bowl which turns it 
a certain way: thus the bowl should run, and hOt un- 
luckily ag«inst the 5, Shr. IV, 5, 25. rnff fortune runs 
against the b. 1R 111, 4, 5.*-- In a bad sense, that 
which is from the straight line, indirect ways, 
shifts: and thus do we with wlndlasses and with 
assays of b., by b, directions find directions out» Hml. 
I1 1.65. 
Adjectively: thy sphered 5. cheek, Troil. IV, 5» 8 
(Intpp.: swelled as the bowl on the biassed side). 
IHas, adv., out of a straight line, awry: every 
• action whereof we bave record, trial did draw b. and 
thwart, Troil. I, 3, 15. 
Bias.draving, subst, a turn awry: falth and 

troth, strained purely fi'om all hollow b. Troil. IV, 5, 
169. 
Bil»ble-bal»ble, idle talk: Tw. IV, 2, 105. H5 
IV, 1, 71 (Fluellen says plbble pabble). 
Bielering, quarrel: we shall begfn out ancrent 
--s, H6B 1, 1, 144. 
IHd (hnpf. bld and bade; bid: Ven. 946. Luer. 
1268. Meus. l, 3, 37. Err.IV, 3, 120. Mids.IV, 1,200. 
As IV, 3, 7. Shr. I, _'2, 30. II, 179. IV, 3, 94, etc. etc. 
bade: Pilgr. 182. 204. Tp. I, 2, 194. 219. Gentl. I1, 
1, 9. I1, 6 6. IV, 4, 50. Wiv. 11 2, 104. Shr. 1, _'2, 37. 
All's 11, I, 111. V, 3, 84 etc. etc. -- Partie. once bicl- 
den: Ado 111, 3, 32 (Verges' speeeh); everywhere else 
bid: Ven. 943. Sonn. 57, 8. Meus. V, 78. Ado V, 1, 
155. Merch. 11, 5, 11. As I, 2, 63. All's IV, 2, 53. 
John IV, 2, 63. R2 I, 3, 238. H6B II, 4, 85. R3 IV, 3, 
39. Tir. I, 338. V, 2, 193. Caes. IV, I, 35. Hml. Il, 2, 
372. Oth. I, 3, 15. Per. I, 3, 5). 
1) fo invite: fo b. you corne in fo dinne G Ado 
I[, 3, 956. b. the Jew fo sup to-nlght with .... Merch. 
II, 4, 17. I ara hot bld fo wait ni»on thls 5ride, Tit. 1, 
338.- Followed by  simple accus.: b. ffourfrlends, 
As V, 2, 79. provlde the feast and b. the guests, Shr. 
11, 318. 5. all rny fi'iens agaio, Tin. 111, 4, 111. 
Followcd by to before a noun: he bath bid me to a 
calf's head, Ado V, 1, 155. rn eye to the paUted 
banŒEuet --s my heart, Sonn. 47, 6. I ara bid forth to 
supper, Mereh. I1, 5, 11.5. the duke to the nuptial, As 
"¢, 2, 47. theff b. us to the Enflish dancing-schools, H5 
III, 5, 32. the feast that I bave bld ber to, Tit. V, 2» 
193. kill them and b. me to thern, Tim. 1, .'2, 85. thou 
--est me to rny loss, Cymb. 111, 5, 165. 
2) to offer: there was no moneff bid for argu- 
ment, Hml. 11, 2, 372. I b. for you as l'ld buy, Cymb. 
111, 6, 71. -- b. them 5attle, H4A V, , 31. H6C 1, .'2, 
I. 111, 3, 35. V, 1, 63. 77. to b. the wbd a base, 
Vert. 303. I b. the 5ase for Pcoteus, Gentl. I, 2, 97 
(cf. Banns). 
3) to wish: to b. adieu: Sonn. 57, 8. LLL 
V, 2, 241. H6C IV, 8, 29. fare,cell: Viv. III, 3, 1"-)7. 
1R2 Il, 2, 8. tt6B Il, 4, 85. R3 1, _'2, 2-'23. III. 5, 71. 
Rom. Il, 3, 34. Mcb. I, 2, 21. good rnorrow: Shr. III» 
, 124. R3 111, 4, 52. good night: Ven. 534. Pilgr. 
182. Ado 111, 3, 156. John V» 5, 6. R3 IV, 3, 39. wel- 
corne: Tp. V, 110. Wiv. I, 1, 01. Err. 111, I, 68. Ado 
1, 1, 155. Merch. I, 2, 140. 111, 2, 225. As V, 4, 40. 
H6A IV, 3, 40. Cymb. 1, 6, 30 etc. b. God speed him 
well, R2 I, 4, 32. 
4) to order, to command; a)followed by a 
simple aceus. : l'Il Se bid by thee, All's IV, 2, 53. if 
honour b. rne on, H4A IV, 3, 10. 5. thern all borne, Cor. 
IV, 2, 1.5. 
b) followed by a simple infiuitive: hadst thou but 
bid beware, Ven. 943. the rnessenger who --s beware, 
Cor. IV, 6, 54. the lady bade take awa the fool, Tw. 
1, 5» 57. tirne --s be gone, H4B I, 3, 110. wisdorn --s 
leur, Lr. II, 4, 310. ttector bade ask, Troil. IV, 5, 71. 
with to: R2 1[, 9, 115. -- ttence passively: we b. this 
Se donc, Mes. 1, 3, 37. what he --s be done, Cor. V, 
4, 93. 
c) followed by an accus, and infin, wlthout 
fo: theff b. thee trop a weed, Ven. 946. Lucr. 434. 
1268. 1292. Cmnpl. 46. Tp. I, 2, 37. IV, 72. Gentl. 
lin 1, 9. Il, 6, 6. 111, I, 258. IV, .'2, 10. IV, 4, 39. Vi¢. 
lI, 2, 104. III, 2, 47. 111, 5» 51. IV, 2, 112. Meus. I, I, 
16. 186. l, 3, 37. IV, 5, 9. V, 29. Err. lI, 1, 35. 11, 2» 



112 

B 

189. III, 1, 30. IV, 1, 37. IV, 3, -00. V» 166 etc. etc. 
Passivelv: he rnust 5e bidgÇforth, Caes. IV» 1, 35. so 
was Ibit report, Oth. I, 3, 15. -- Sometimes the infin. 
supplied from what precedes or follows: hast thon 
performed the tempest that I 5ade theeæ Tp. 1, 2, 194. 
as thon badest me » in troops I have dispersed tlem, 
219. 11, 2, 7. 111, 2, 9. Gentl. IV, 4, 50. Ado III, 3, 
32. hIerch. I1, 5, 53. H8 V, 1» 157. Ant. IV» 14, 82. 
d) followed by an accus, and an infin, preceded 
by to: tlat whicl I would discover tle law of friendship 
--s me to conceal, Gentl. 111, 1, 5. hlostly in the pas- 
sive: .you were not bid fo speak, Meas. V, 78. I was 
bid to corne, As I, .'2, 63. being bid to ask, Per. I, 3» 5. 
e) followed by a clause: obedience --s I slould 
hot b. again, R2 1, 1, 163. b. lim a should not think 
of God, H5 II, 3, 21. b. thy ffstress, when .y drink 
is read.y, she strike upon the bell, Icb. 11, 1, 31. The 
passage in All's V, 3, 84 is an anacoluthon. 
Bitllillg, subst., command: to thy strong b. 
task Ariel, Tp. I, 2» 192. hlerch. H, 5, 9. All's Il, 5» 
93. Wint. 11, 1, 125. 11, 3, 168. 207. II5 III, 7, 30. 
Cor. v, 4, 24. Tir. IV, 4, 107. Cacs. v, 3, 87. Oth. IV, 
3, 15. Ant. I, 4, 34 (pluï.). III, 11, 60. III, 13, 87. 
Cymb. 111, 4, 67. 73. Per. V, 1,248. at a person's b.: 
All's 11 1 18. 67. rJlll. 1, 1, 278. Lr. IV, G, 104. ai 
out great b. hIcb. Iii, 4, 129. 
l$iddy, .'t call to allure chickens: ay, b.» corne wlth 
me, Tw. III, 4, 128. 
Bide (the saine as abde» q. v.); impf. bid R3 
IV»4,304. 1) intr. to stay, to remain, to dvell: 
some (hairs) in ber threaden Jïllet still did b. Compl. 
33. tiat to close prison he commanded ier, witi rnany 
bitter threats of--ing there, Gentl. fil, 1, -036. cf. Tir. 
Il, 3» 284. hIids. III» 2, 186. Tit. V» 2, 137. hIcb. III. 
4, 26. /knt. IV, 14, 131. Cynb. 111, 4, 131. 138. the 
gold --s gold tttat others touctt» Err. Il, 1, 110. in wiose 
cold blood no spark of lionour --s, H6C I, 1» 184. to 
b. upon't» thon art hot honest, Wint. I» 2» 242 ( to 
say it once more). 
2) trans.» a) to endure, to bear: andpatlence 
b. each check» Sonn. 58, 7. 139» 8. LLLI, 1,115. Tw. 
Il» 4, 97. 127. R3 IV, 4, 304. Lr. III, 4, 29. 
b) to undergo, to meet: l'll b..yourproo 
Tw. I» 5» 71. b. the touch, H4A IV» 4, 10. b. the rnortal 
fortune of the Jïeld, It6C 11, 2, 83. b. the encounter of 
assaili»g eyes» Rom. l, 1, 219. 
Bidilg, subst, abode: blows these ptc].y va- 
pours from their b. Lucr. 550. l'll lead .you to some 
b. Lr. IV, 6, 228. 
Bier a fraane of wood to convey dead bodies to 
the grave: SOli. 12, 8. R2 V, 6, 52. Rom. III, 2, 60. 
IV, 1, 110. Hnfl. IV» 5 164. Cymb. IV, 2, 22. 
Bifold twofold, double: Troil. V» '2 144 
(dubious; O. Edd. bj-fould and by foui). 
Big, 1) large; used of any dimension: ]ow to 
naine the --er light» and how the less» Tp. 1» 2,335. 
the more if seeks fo bide itself, the --er bulk if shows, 
Ill 1, 81. a dog as b. as ten of .yours» Geutl. IV, 4, 62. 
there is no wornan" s gown b. enough for h5a, Wiv. IV, 
-0, 72. this --er key, Meas. IV, 1, 31. ifh (the apparel) 
be too b. for .your thle IV, 2, 48. he /s hot so b. as 
the end of hls chb, LLL V, 1,138. let me bave a --er 
(cap) Shr. IV» 3, 68. b. round tears, As Il, 1, 38. no 
woman's heart so b. fo hold so rnuch, Tw. 11, 4, 99. 
the husband is the --er (fool), III, 1, 40. ahhough the 
shect wre b. enough for the bed of Ware» I11, 2» 50. 

whose (the crown's) compass ls no --er th.n thy head 
R2 I1, 1,101. the spoons will be the ---er, H8 V, 4» 40. 
a carbuncle entire as b. as thou art» Cor. I, 4, 55. l"ll 
run awa.y till I ara --er, ¥, 3, 128. he seems no --er 
than Ms head, Lr. I¥, 6, 16. a bump as b. as a.young 
eockerel's stone, Rom. I, 3, 53. no --er than an agate- 
stone, I, 4, 55. another stabb as b. as hell van hold, 
Cymb. II 4, 140. a court no --er than this cave» II1 
6, 83. with --est tears o'ershowered, Per. IV, 4, 26. 
2) bulky, thiek: he is too b. to go in there, 
Wiv. I11, 3, 142. IV, -0, 80. she is too b. for me to eom- 
pass, Err. I¥» 1,111. nay, --er; women grow b.y men, 
Rom. I, 3, 95. With the idea of eon'esponding strength: 
Ms leg is too b. for Heetor's» LLL¥, 2,644. the centre 
is hot b. enough to bear a schoolbo.y's top» Wint. II, 1, 
10-0. with hearts b their bellles no --er than pbs" 
heads, II4A 1¥, 2, 23. eare l for the limb» the thewesr 
the stature, bulk» and b. assemblanee of a man? H4B 
111, 2, '2.77. an arm as b. as thlne, Cymb. IV, , 77. 
3) pregnant: let ber sport herself with that she's 
b. wilh, Wiut. I1, 1, 61. b. of this gentleman, C)qnb. 
I, 1, 39. autumn, b. with rlch berease, Sonn. 97, 6. 
the b. year, swobt with some other grief, is thought with 
chihl, II4B Ind. 13. Tropieally: his eye being b. with 
tears, hlcrch. 11, 8,46. how b. imagbatlon raoves in this 
lip, Tire. 1, 1, 32 (which may be also: a mighty, 
powerful imagination), thd heart is b., get thee apart 
and weep, Caes. I11, 1, 282, i. e. full, fraught with 
grief, er. b. discontent, Comp1.56. 
4) swelled, inflated, haughty: my raind 
bath been as b. as one of .yours, Shr. ¥, 2, 170. wear 
the surplice of humility over the black gown of a b. 
heart, All's 1, 3, 99. theS" rhymes, fidl of protest, of 
oath and b. compare, Troil. I11, 2» 182. thy words are 
--er, Cymb. IV, -0, 78. A b. look is an angry and 
threatening look: shall lessen this b. look, H8 I, 
1. 119. 0fteuer fo look big: look hot b., or stamp, 
Shr. I11, 2, ,'230. OE .you had but looked b. md spit 
at him, he'ld bave run, V'int. IV, 3, 113. i.f that the 
devil and mischanee look b. upon out affairs, H4A 
IV, 1, 58. cf. to look wùh forehead bold and b. 
enou9h upon the power of the king, H4B 1, 3, 8. 
 A b. heart -- a stout heart: I raock ai death with 
as b. heart» Cor. II1, 2» 128. a heart as b. Cymb. IV, 
2, 77. Hence in general  stont, manly, power- 
lu 11 y a e t i v e: b. ]Iars seems bankrupt in their beg- 
gared host, H5 IV, 2, 43. the b. wars, that raake ambi- 
tion virtue, Oth. I11, 3, 349. A b. voice  a loud and 
manly volte : his b. manly voice, turni»g again toward 
childish treble, As 11, 7, 161. bords with women's voices 
strie to speak b. R2 II1, .'2» 114. Henee in general - 
loud : wMlst I was b. in clamour, Lr. V, 3, 20S. 
Costard aud Fluellen use the word instead of 
Great. Pompe.y the JB. and Alexander the JB. LLL 
V, 2, 553. H5 IV, 7, 14. 
Bigam.v, the marrying a widow: RA III, 7 
189 (which was prohibited by a canon of the council 
of Lyons, A. D. 1274). 
Big-bellied» big as if with child: to see 
the sails conceive and grow b. with the wanton wind 
5lids. 11, 1,129. cf. .Bell.y, rb. 
Big-Ioned, having large bones: no b. rnen 
framed of the Cyclops" size, Tir. 1¥, 3, 46. 
Biggen, nighteap: as he whose brow with 
homely b. bound snores out the watch of night, H4B IV, 
5, -07. 



B 113 

Bigness, thickness: thelr legs are both of a b. 
H4B II, 4, 265 (= of the saine b.; cf. A). 
Bigot, a name; ZordB.: John IV 2, 162. 3,103.* 
Big-sWOhl, greatly swelled: the sea, threa- 
ten5g the welkin with fils b. face, Tit. 111, 1, 224. 
ready to burst: top b. eart H6C II, , 111. 
Bilberry, whortleberry: pinch te maids a 
lue as b. Wiv. V, 5, 49. 
Bilbo, 1) a Spanish blade, a blade in 
general: to be compassed, lilce a good b., in the circum- 
ference of a peck, Wiv. I11, 5 112- 1combat challenge 
oftMs latten b. I 1, 165. 
2) Bilboes, a kind of fetters annexed to bars 
of iron, used at sea for mutinons sailors: I lay worse 
than the mutines in the b. Hml. V, , 6. 
Bile (M. Edd. boi inflamed tumor: Troil. 
I1, 1, 2. Cor. 1 4 31. Lr. II, 4 226. 
• ill, subst. the mouth of a bird: Ven. 1102. 
Mids. III, 1, 129. Cymb. IV, 2, 225. Used for the 
month, with allusion to the sense of the verb to 
bill: Wint. I, 2, 183. 

Billlngsgate, place in England: II4B 1I 7 1,182 
(Ff and M. Edd. Basingstoke). 
Billow, great wave: Tp. III, 3, 96. II4B III, 
1722. H5 III Chor. 15. R3 l, 4, 20. H8 III, 1, 10. 
Caes. V, 1, 67. Oth. II, 1, 12. Per. I[l Prol. 45. IIl 7 1, 
46. III, 27 58. 
Bind (impf. and partic, bound, but bounden in As 
I, 2, 298 and John III, 3, 29), 1) to fasten or 
restrain by a tic: he will hot in ber arms be bound, 
Ven. 226. Lucr. 1501. they must be bound, Err. IV, 4, 
97. 109. V, 145. Ado IV, 2, 67. V, 1, 233. LLL II1, 
126. Rom. I, 2, 55 etc. Absolutely:fast b, fast.find, 
Merch. II, 5, 54. Followed by to: thosefab, arms wMch 
l»oundhim to ber breast, Ven. 812. Err. I, 1, 82. John 
IV, 174. H6A1717.'22. "rit. il 7 1716 etc. Tob. in  
to confine: cribbed 7 conjqned 7 bound in to doubts and 
fears, Meb. III, 47 24. to b. up  to paralyze, to 
resta-aih: rny spirits are ail bound up, Tp. I, 2, 486. 
when poisoned hours had bound nie up ri'oto mine own 
knowledge, Ant. 11, 2, 90. 
2) to tic, to confine with any ligature: 

Bill, subst., "a kind ofpike or halbert, for- they that reap must sheaf and b. As 111, 2, 113. the 
merly earrled by the English infantry, and afterwards packet is hot corne where that and other specialties are 
the usnal weapon of watehmen" (Nares): Ado III, 3, I bound, LLL 11, 165. l"ll b. il (the wounded leg) with 
44. R2 III, 2, 118. Rom. 17 1, 80. Tim. 11I, 4, 90 (a I my shirt, Oth. V, 1, 73. let me but . it (your forehead) 
quibble). Play upon the word : a goodly commodity, I hard, III, 3, 286. bound with victorious wreaths, R3 
being taken up of these men's --s, Ado 11I, 3, 191. [ I, 1, 5. bound with triumphant garlands, IV, 4, 333. 
when shall we go to Cheapside and take up commodi. I his brows ound with oak, Cor. I, 3, 16. bound with 
t;.es upon out --s? H6B IV, 7, 135. Brown bill, a par- ] laurel boughs, Tit. 1, 74. Used of books ( to put in 
ticular sort of halbert for the use of wm-: H6B IV. la cover): 1'li bave them fairln bound, Shr I 9 147 
10, 13. Lr. IV, 6, 9.'2. Rom. III, 2, 84.  " ' "' " 

Bill, subst., 1) any written paper, note, billet: 
with --s on their necks 'le it known etc.,' As I 2, 131 
(erroneously taken by some commentators in the 
sense of halbert), error i' the bill, Shr. IV, 37 146. 152 
(what v. 130 had been note'. give these --s unto the 
legions on the other slde7 Caes. V 7  1. 
2) an order drawn on a person, directing him to 
pay money to another person: in any b. warrant7 
quittance, or obligation, Wiv. I, 17 10. I bave --s for 
mone.y by exchange from Florence, Shr. IV, 2, 89. 
3) a reckoning (cf. tavern-bill): why thenpre- 
ferred you hot your sums and --s, Tire. III 7 4, 49. 90. 
4) a list, specification: 1'li draw a b. oj 
properties, Mids. 1, 2, 108. receiveparticular addition 
from the b. that writes them ail alike Mcb. III. 
1, 100. 
5) a public advertisement, placard: he 
set up his --s here in lIessina and challenged Cupid 
at the fli9ht , Ado I, 1, 39.*by proscription and --s of 
outlawrg, Caes. IV, 3, 173. 
6) a draft of a law, presented to the parlia- 
ment, but not yet enacted: l"ll exhibit a bill in the 
parliamcnt for the puttin 9 down of men, rlv. Il 7 17 29. 
that sel.fb, is ur9ed 7 H5 17 1, 1. cf. 19. 70. 
Bill, vb., to join bills: two silver dores that 
sit a --in97 Ven. 366. as pigeons b. As III, 3, 82. 
Troil. III, 2760 (where a quibble seems to be intended). 
Bille subst., a small log of wood: theg 
shall beat out m.y brains with --sT Meas. IV, 37 58. 
Billet, rb, to direct by a ticket where to lodge; 
to quarter: the centurions and their charges 7 dis- 
tlnctly --ed, already in the entertainment, Cor. IV 7 3, 
48. 9o where thou art --ed, Oth. Il 7 37 386. 
Billiads, gaine played on a table wlth balls: 
2nt. Il 7 5 3. 
chmidt, bhakespeare Lexicon. 3. Ed. T.I. 

To bind up, in the saine sense: havin 9 bound up 
the threatenln 9 twigs, Meas. I, 3, 24. to b. him up a rod, 
Ado II, 1, 226 (Ff to b. him a rod). to b. our loves up 
in a holy band, II1, 17 114. b. up those tresses, John 
111, 47 61.68. b. up yon dan91in 9 apricocks 7 R2 III, 4, 
29. -- bound up his wound, As IV, 3, 151. R3 V, 3, 
177. And fignratively: b. up the petty difference, Ant. 
II, 1, 48. -- to see his work so noble vilely bound up, 
Wint. IV, 4, 22. 
To b. in  to enclose, surround: bound in with the 
triumphant sea, R2 II, 1, 61.63. a hoop of gold to b. 
thy brothers in, H4B IV, 4, 43. a costl. jewel, bound 
in with diamonds, H6B III 7 2, 107. 
3) to knit: b. this knot ofaraity, H6A V, 1, 16. 
4) to oblige, to engage; a)to engage by a 
legal tie, fo pawn, to pledge, to mortgage: 
he learned but surety-like to write for me under that 
bond that him as fast doth b. Sonn. 134, 8. in surety 
of the which one part of Aquitaine is bound to us, LLL 
II, 136. for the whieh Antonio shall be bound, Merch. 
I, 37 5. 6. 10. V 7 137. bound to himself! what doth he 
wkh a bond that he is bound to? R2 V, 27 67. llon- 
tague is bound as weli as I, Rom. I, 2, 1. 
To b. to one = to engage in the service of one: 
mg dutg is bound to .your lordship, Luer. Ded. 5. bound 
to ber imposition, Luer. 1697. how much b dut.y 1ara 
bound to both, H6A II, 1, 37. so shall gou b. nie to gour 
Mghness' service» H6C III, 2, 43. the f'agments of ber 
faith are bound to JDiomed, Troil. V, 2, 160. nature, 
to thg law mg services are bound, Lr. I, 2, 2. he's bound 
unto Octavia, Ant. Il, 5, 58. tinie bath rooted out m.y 
parentage and to the world and awkward casualties 
boundme in servitude, Per. V, 1, 95. The partie, with- 
out to: bound servants, steal! Tire. IV, 1, 10. with all 
bound humbleness, All's II, 17 117. 
8 



114 

B 

b) te engage, te tie by any other obli- 
gation, especially a moral one: te b. lffm te remem- 
Ser m/ good will, Gentl. 1¥, 4, 103. te b. ne, or undo 
ne, Ado IV, 4, 20. if most of all these reasons --eth 
us, in out opbdons she should be preferred, H6A V, 5, 
60. /our lordship ever binds hbn, Tim. I, 1, 104. in 
which I b., on pabz of punishment, the world fo weet 
we stand up peerless» Ant. I, 1, 38. Absolutely: nar- 
riage s, As V, 4, 59. Very frequent is the partie. 
bound  obliged : bound b/ 7n/ charitl and blest order, 
I come, Meus. 11 3, 3; I ara bound by oath, R3 IV, 1, 
28. mostly folloued by fo and an infin.: b/ law o.f 
nature thou art bound fo breed, Ven. 171. Sonn. 58» 
4. Meus. IV,3, 100. Err. V,305. LLL IV, 1,56. Merch. 
IV, 1, 65. Shr.V, 2 161. John 111, 1, 65. Lr. 111» 7, 8. 
Aut. I1, 6 1'2.1. Cymb. I, 6, 81 etc. I will be bomd fo 
pa/ it, Merch. IV, 1,211. I dure be bound agab, that 
lour lord will never more break faith, V, 251. I dure 
be bound he's true, Cymb. IV, 3, 18. how eau we .[or 
out countT pra/, whereto (riz to pray for out coun- 
try) we are bound, together with thy victory, whereto 
we are bound? Cor. V, 3, 108.  Followed by fo und 
a noun: to plabmess honour is bound, Lr. 1, 1, 150. -- 
Followed by agabtst: how much I could despise this 
nan, but that I ara bound in eharitl a#abst if, II8 III 
2» 298. 

end, used to kill birds without piercing: Ado 1, 1, 
42. LLL IV, 3, 25. Tw. I, 5, I00. 
Birding, bird-shooting: we'll a b. togetber, 
ïv. III, 3 247. II1, 5 46. 131. IV, 2, 8. 
Birding-l»ieee, a gun to shoot birds with, fo w l- 
ing-piece: Wiv. IV, 2, 59. 
Birdlime, a glutinous substance to catch birds: 
,n/ bwention cornes from rny loate as b. does from frize 
Oth. 11, 1, 127. 
Birnan, name of z forest in Scotland: lIcb. IV, 
1, 93. ¥, 2, 5. V 3, 60 etc.* 
Bil'oll, narlle, sec Berowne. 
Birh, 1) the act of coming lute lire: 
truer stars did govern Proteus" b., Gentl. 11, 7, 74. 
Wiv. V, 5, 87. LLL IV, , 36. V, 2, 521. Wiut. IV, 
4, 80. H6C V, 6, 44. Troil. IV, 4 40 etc. Plur. births: 
Wint. V, 1, 118. R3 IV, 4, 215 (Ff birth). 
2) the act of bringing forth: two childien 
ai one b. tI6B IV, 2, 147. both ai a b. 0th. II, 3, 212. 
a grievous burtlen was tht b. te ne, R3 IV, 4, 167. ara 
I a mother te the b. of thïee? Cymb. V, 5, 369. 
3) that which is born: a dearer b. tlan tbis 
h;s love had brought, Sonn. 32, 11. Tp. 11, 1,230. Ado 
IV, 1, 215. LLL l, 1, 104 etc. Plur. bU-ds: H4B IV, 
4, 12- °. H5 V» 2, 35. 
4) extraction, descent: seine glort in their 

Bound fo one = obliged to one, owing him grati- b. Soan. 91, 1. 37, 5. 76, 8. Gentl. 1, 3, 33. V, 2, 22. 
tude: so shall I evermore be bound fo thee, Wiv. IV, Wiv. 11I, 4, 4. Ado 1I, 1, 172. Merch. 11, 7, 32. As 1, 
6, 54. Meus. IV, 1, 5. LLL I, 2, 156. Merch. IV, 1, 1, 10. Shr. Ind. 2, 20. H6A I, 2, 72. II, 4, 28. 11, 5, 
407. V, 135. Wint. IV, 4, 575. H4B III, 2, 181. H6A 73. 11I, 1, 95. 11I, 3, 61. V, 1, 59. H6B 1¥, 2» 152. V, 
1I, 4, 1.'28. H8 I, 2, 112. 11I, 2, 165. ¥, 3, 114 (bound 1, 119. R3 111, 7, 120. V, 5, 15 (--s) etc. a match 

to heaven in daill thanks). Cor. V, 3, 159. Rom. IV, 
2, 32 cte. Bound fo onefor sth.: As 1, 1, 16. Tw. III. 
4, 297. Oth. I, 8» 182.  Bounden: As I, 2 298 aud 
John 11I, 3, 29. For bound -- prepared» ready (as 
perhaps also in Meus. II1, 2, 167. John 1I, 522. H6C 
II, 4, 3. Hml. I, 5» 6. Lr. 111 7» 11. Cymb. I 6» 81) 
sec the article Bound. 

of b.  a high-born match, John 1I, 430. 
Birth-ehild, a child adopted on account of its 
being born withiu a certain domain: Thetis" b. Per. 
IV, 4, 41. 
Birth-day, the day ou u-hieh a person was born: 
Caes. V, 1, 71. Ant. I11, 13, 185. Per. 11, 1,114. 
Bithdorn, that which belongs to one by birth. 

Bionde||o, name in Shr. I, 1, 42. 213 etc. especially the mother-country: let us rather hold 
Bireh, the tree betula: the threateninff twiffs of fast the mortal sword and like #ood men bestride our 
b. Meus. l, 3, 24. down-fallen b. Mcb. IV, 3, 4. 
Bird, 1) a feathered flying animah Ven. Birl.h-hour, the heur in -hich one is born: 
67. 455. 532. 1101. Lucr. 88. 457. 871. 1107. 1121. than a slavlsh wipe or --'s blet, Lucr. 537. 
Sonn. 73, 4. 97, 12. 113, 6. Pilgr. 282. 377. Wiv. Birth-llaee, the place where one is born: Cor. 
lIl 1» 18. Ado lI, 1, 30. LLL I, 1, 103. V 2» 933. 4, .'23. 
Mids. III, 1» 138. V, 401. Merch. lIl 1 32. As 11, 5, Birthriglt, a privilege te -hich one is entitled 
4. H6B Il, 1 8 etc. etc. birds ofpret, Meas. Il, 1, by birth: his b. te the crown, H6B 11, 2, 62. te lose 
2. enticiag --s = decoy-birds, H6B 1, 3, 92. b. of b. tt6C I, 1 219. II, 2, 35. bearing their --s on their 
nlght : owl, Caes. I, 3, 26. the Arabian b. (Phoenix backs, John II, 70 (i. e. their patrimonies), tht good- 
Cymb. I, 6, 17. therodandb, ofpeace (i. e. the dove) ness share wlth tht b. Ail'si, 1» 73, i. e. thy goodness 
H8 IV, 1, 89. I heard a b. se sini, H4B V, 5, 113. may partake of thy inheritance, may be as great as 
Allusion te the proverb "ris a bad b. that fouls ifs the nobleness of thy birth. 
own nest', As IV, 1 208; te t.he proverb «bb'ds of a Birth-strangled, strangled in being born: lIcb. 
feather flock to#ether': H6C Il, 1, 170. Iii, 3, 161. IV, 1, 30. 
2) the young of any fowl: as that ungentle Biscuit, hard dry bread baked for sea- 
gull, the cuckoo's b., useth the sloarrow , H4A V, 1, 60. voyages: as dr# as the remainder b. after a vo.¢affe 
f thou be that princelt ea#le's b. H6C II, 1 91. ravens As II, 7, 39. as a sailor breaks a b. Troil. II, 1, 43. 
.foster forlorn children, thewhilst thelr own --s famish Bishop, spiritual governor of a diocese: 
in their nests, "rit. il, 3, 154. R2 IV, 101. H4A Iii, 2, 104. H6A llI, 1, 53.76.78. 
3) used as a terre of endearment: this was well 131. IV, 1, 1 (ord B.). V, 1, 60. H6B I, 1, 8. IV, 
doue, rn.y b. OEp. IV, 184. ara Itour b.? I mean te sh/ft 4, 9. R3 III, 5, 100. IV, 4, 503. tt8 Il, 4, 172. 111 
mt bush, Shr. V, 2, 46. I would I were tht b. Rem. 312 etc.  archbisllop: H4B I, 1,200. III, 1» 95. IV, 
11 2, 183. corne, b., corne, Hml. I, 5, 116. the b. s , 15 (ord b.). H6C IV, 4, 11. IV, 5, 5. 
dead that we bave ruade se much on, Cymb. IV Bisson, purblind: touï b. conspectuldes» Cor. 
2, 197. Il, 1, 70 (O. Edd. beesora), threatenfng theflames with 
Bird-bolt, a short arrow with a broad fiat b. rheum, Hml.II 2, 529 (i. e. blinding teurs). In Cor. 



III, 1, 131 O. Edd. bosom multlpHed, some M. Edd. 
blsson multitude. 
Bit, 1) the iron part of a bridle which is 
put in the mouth of the horse: the iron b. he crusheth 
'tween Ms teeth, Ven. 269. Meas. 
57. H5 [V  49. H8 V 3 23. 
2) morsel: LLL l, 1 26. As Il, 7 133. Troil. 
V, 2, 159. V, 8,20 (Qbak, Fl5ed). Cor. lV, 5, 36. 
• im. Il, 2, 174. 
Bil¢h, female dog: Wiç. fil, 5, 11. the son 
and helr of a mongrel b. Lr.II,  24. 
• i1¢h-wlf female wolf: thou 's son Troil. 
I[ 1 11. 
Bite, vb. (partic. bat: H-lA 
157. Lr. l 4 236. IV 7 37. bitten: H8 V, 4, 
and in-bltten and weather-bitten q.v. Of the impL 
no instance). 
1) to seize or crush with the teeth; a) 
absolutely: se th no teeth to b. Genll. I[[, 1 349. 
«Msfish will b. Ado Il, 3, 114. 1, 3, 37. R2 I, 3, 303. 
H5 V 1,46. H6B V , 152. H6CV, 677. R3 
3 290. Lr. l[[ 6 70. Ant. V 2, 247. 
b) trans.: he stamps and s t£e poor flles Ven. 
316. Tp. Il, 2, 10. ll[  38. Ado l[l 2 80. HIA 
Il, 1 19. Troil V 7 19. Lr. lll 6 18. IV 7 37. 
Ant. Il, 5. 80. wheref the ewe hot s p. V 38. 
to b. o Lr.I4236. atwab b ll  80. lt and 
bltten  injured by biting gnawn: the bud bat 
n evlous worm, Rom. I 1 157. bltten apples H8 V 
4, 64. -- To b. one's tongue  to b. off one's tongue: 
shall we b. out tongues it. lll» 
to be silent: so ]r must Mt 
tongue, H6B [ 1 230. vlew tMs face and b. ty tongue 
that slanders dm wkh cowarlce II6C I, 4, 47. 
To b. te llp a sign of commotion : 
 polltlc regard TroH. III, 3 254. e --s Ms Hp and 
starts, HS [ll 2 113. articularly of anger: t£ou 
canst not fi-own, or b. te lip, as grywenches wll 
Shr. Il, 250. R3 Iv, 2, 27 (FL aws). Cor. V, 1, 48. 
-- I will b. m. thumb at them Rom. I 1, 48--58 
(i. e. «defy them by pntting the thumb-nail into the 
mouth, and with ajerk ri'oto the upper teeth make it 
to knack." Cotgrave). -- To b. o,e 5y the ear, an 
expression of endearment: Rom. [l 4 81. -- To 
t£e law bythe nose  to mock the law: Meas. III, 
1 109. 
2) figratively used, a) absol.; of the weather: 
te wS£ter's u, ind, wen it --s ad blows upon 
AsIl, l 8. ll7+ 185. H6B III 2 337. H6CIV 8 
61. Hml. I, 4 1. of a cutting sword: I bave a sword 
end k shall b. Wiv. [I 1, 136. R 1 3, 303. Lr. V, 
3, 276. iting  bitter: a --ing jest, R3 Il, 4, 30. 
 sharp, severe: most --ing laws, Meas. l, 3, 19. 
--in.q statures, H6B IV» 7 19.  -ieving, mortifying : 
 --ing qffliction» Wiv.V,5178. a --ing eo 5 Ado 
1V, 1, 172. to b. at sth.  to inveigh against sth.: 
Troil. I1+ 2 33 (quibbleL 
b) trans.»  t o n i p: a fi'ost that --s the first- 
bo ifants of the spring+ LLL 1 
139. H4B 1 3, 41.  to cut: my dagger muzzled 
lest it should b. ifs master+ Wint. 1 2+ 157. Troil. V 
 171.  to grieve, to pain: the5" guilt now 
ins fo b. the sprits Tp. 111 3 106. R2 I, 3 292. 
= to hurt+ to injure: thou camest to b. the world 
H6C V 6+ 54. exceeding mad+ in love too+ but 
wouM b. none H8 I 4 29. date b. the best V 3 45 

(the image in most of the last passages being taken 
from a dog). cf. Flç-bitten. 
Bitter, having an acrid taste, like worm- 
wood: b. wormwood, Lucr. 893. sauces, Sonn. 118, 6. 
pills, Gentl. Il, 4, 149. physlc, Meas. IV, 6, 8. gall, 
LLL V, 2, 237. Rom. I, 5, 94. taste, H4B IV, 5, 79. 
sweetbg, Rom. 11, 4, 83. Metaphorically used of any 
thing disagreeable, painful, mortifying or injurious: 
a b. del»utç , Meas. IV, 2, 81. a b. fool, Lr. I, 4, 150. 
çour b. foe, Mids. Ill, 2, 44. the base, thou9h b. dispo- 
sitlon of l3eatrice, Ado 1I, 1, 215. no bltterness that I 
will b. thfik, Sonn. 111, 11. consecrate commotion's b. 
edge, II4B lV, 1, 93. thou b. sky, As 1I, 7, 184. sweet 
and b. fancy, IV, 3, 102. read in the b. letter, Oth. 1, 
3, 68. b. b+tsiness, IIml. III, 2, 409. b. words, Lucr. 
1460. As III, 5, 69. Shr. 11, 28. terres, H5 IV, 8, 44. 
Tit. 1I, 3 110. names, R3 1, 3, 236. breath, Mids. 1II 
2, 44. taunts, H6C 1I, 6 66. scoffs, R3 I. 3, 104. 
threats, Gentl. 11I, 1, 236. bwective, Lucr. Arg. 24. 
wron9, Mids. !!1, 2, 361. jest, LLL IV, 3, 174. inju- 
ries, II6A I!, 5, 124. a b. thlng, AsV, 2,48. b. shame, 
John !!1, 4, 110. the b. bread of ban;shment, R2 I11, 
1, 21. b. fasts, Gentl. 11, 4, 131. the b. sentence, R3 
I, 4, 191. consequence, IV, 2, 15. b., black and tragi- 
cal, IV, 4, 7. --est enmitj, Cor. IV, 4, 18 etc. etc. 
Followed by to: flou are too b. to your country-woman, 
Troil. IV, 1, 67. makes the world b. to the best of out 
rimes, Lr. I, 2, 49. to make this b. to thee, Oth. I, 1, 
104. Followed by with: do not be so b. with me, llids. 
III, 2, 306. As II1, 5, 138. 
Adverbially : "ris b. eold, Hml. 1, 1, 8. 
Substantively: fo talk theb'--est, Wint. 11I, 2, 217. 
itlerl.v, adv., 1) in a manner expressing 
poignant grief: wept b. Gentl. lV, 4, 176. crled 
b. Rom. l, 3,54. -- 2) with acrimony: speakb. 
Meas. V, 36. 123 III, 7, 142. 192. IV, 4, 180. H8 1, 2, 
24. -- 3) sharpl v: the north-east wind blew b. a9abst 
out faces, R21,Ï, 7. -- 4) calamitously: some 
eonsequence yet hangSg in the stars shall b. begb hls 
fear.ful date, Rom. I, 4, 108. 
Bierness, 1) vexation, grief: the b. of 
absence, Sonn. 57, 7. no b. that 1 will bitter tMnk, 
111, 11. joy could not show itself modest enou9h with- 
out a badge of b. Ado 1, 1, 23. Johnlll, 4, 111. Oth. 
1, 1, 163. 
2) acrimony: say hot so in b. AsIl[, 5,3. eon- 
tempt nor b. were 5 his pride or sharpness, All's [, 2, 
36. you do.measure te heat of out liers with te b. 
oftour galls H4B I, 2, 198. R3 l, 3 179. Tir. IV, 4, 
1.'2. Cymb. III, 5, 137. 
Bi4ter-searching, thrilling: b. terms H6B 
III, 2,311 tFf. without the hyphen). 
Bitumed, pitehed with bitumen: t'er. III, 
1, ï2. III, 2, 56 (O. Edd. bottomed). 
Blab, 1) absol, to tell what ought to be 
kept secret: these blue-veined violets whereon we 
lean never tan 5. Ven. 126. when raff tongue --s, then 
let mine eyes hot see, Tw. 1, 2 63. tI6B IV, 1, 1. Troil. 
111, 2, 132. Oth. IV, 1, 29. 
2) trans. : .Beaufort' s red sparklfig eyes b. 
heart's malice, H6B !11, 1, 154. Tir. III, 1, 83. 
Black, adj. (Compar. blacker: As IV 3, 35. Wint. 
1I, 1, 8. II1, 2, 173. Oth. V, 2, 131. Per. I» 1, 135. 
Superl. blackest: Lucr. 354. Gentl. I11, 1, -'285. Hml. 
IV, 5, 131. Oth. ll, 3, 357). 1) of the eolour of 
night: Lucr. 1454. Sonn. 127, 9. Gentl. 11I, 1, -'287. 



116 

B 

Viv. V, 5, 20. 41. Mens. 1I, 4, 79. LLLV,2,266.844. 
Iids. Il, 2, 22. III, 1,128. III, 2, 357. V, 171. Wint. 
11, 1, 8. R2 IV, 95. H6C |I, 1, 161. Rom. l, 1, 237 
etc. etc. The ./3. Prince, All's IV, 5, 44 (a quibble). 
R211, 3,101. H51,2,105. II, 4,56. IV, 7,97. H6B 
II, 2, 11. b. chaos, Ven. 1020. b. cloud, Tp. Il, 2, 20. 
b. storm, H6B III, 1,349. b. vesper's pageants, Ant. 
IV, 14, 8. beaten b. and blue, Wiv. IV, 5, 115. pinch 
us b. and blue, Err. II, 2, 194. we will fool Mm b. and 
blue, Tw. 11, 5, 12. 
2) of a dark complexion; often opposed to 
falr: I/tare sworn thee fair and thought thee bright, 
who art as b. as hell Sonn. 147, 14. cf. 127, 1. 131, 
12. Gent]. V, 2, 10. Ado iii, 1, 63. LLL IV, 3, 253. 
261. Rom. I, 1, 237. Oth. l, 3, 291. Il, 1, 130 etc. 
laroverb: b. rnen are peaïls in beauteous ladies" eyes, 
Gent]. V, 2, 12. Synonymous to ngly: though te'er 
so b, say they have angels' faces, Genfl. III, 1,103. 
the air hath starved the roses in ber cheeks and pinched 
tIe lil-tincture of ber face, that ow slte is become as 
b. as 1, IV, 4, 161. cf. Ant. I, 5, 28. all the pictures 
falrest lined are but b. to Rosalind, As III, 2, 98. 
LLL IV, 3, 247. H6A I, 2, 84. 
3) Figuratively,  evi], wicked, horrible, 
disma]: so b. a deed, Lucr. 2-°6. Vint. III, 2, 173. 
R2 IV, 131. --est sin, Lucr. 354. Oth. II, 3, 357. b. 
lust, Luer. 654. words --er in their eff ect than in theh" 
countenance, As IV, 3, 35. actions --er than the nigltt, 
Per. I, 1, 135. thougltts b. Hml. III, 2, 266. b. scandal, 
R3 III, 7, 231. b. enr, II8 II, 1, 85. my b. and deep 
desb'es, lIcb. I, 4, 51. b. veneance, Oth. III. 3, 447. 
b. Nemesis, II6A IV, 7, 78. the --est devil, Hml. IV, 
5, 131. Oth. V, 2, 131. b. Iacbeth, llcb. I¥, 3, 52. 
Sou secret, b. and midnight hags, IV, 1, 48. hell's b. 
intelllgencer, R3 IV, 4, 71. b. magician, I, 2, 34. hol 
seems the 9uarrel upon your grace" s part, b. and fear- 
ful on the opposer, All's 111, 1, 5. thou" rt damned as 
b. --, nay, nothing is so b., John IV, 3, 121. if will be 
a b. marrer for the king that led them to it, H5 IV, 1, 
151. he haît a b. mouth that said otlter of Mm, H8 I, 
3, 58. thls b. strife, Rom. III, 1,183. as b. defiance 
as heart can thtk, Troil. IV, 1, 12. in out b. sentence 
and proscription, Caes. IV, 1, 17. reward hot hospita- 

blacks Wint. 1, 2, 132, i. e. black things dyed over 
with another colour. 
Blaeltamaar, negress: I care hot an slte were 
a b. Troil. l, 1, 80. 
Blaeltberry, the berry of the bramble: 
shall the blessed sun of heaven prove a rMcher and eat 
--les? H4A Il, 4, 450. Used to denote a thing oflittle 
worth: if reasons were as plent(ful as --les, H4A Il, 
4, 265. is r.otproved worth a b. Troil. V, 4, 13. 
Blacldrowed, blackfaced: b. night, lIids. III, 
2, ô87. Rom. III, 2, 20. 
Blaclt-cornered, hiding things in dark 
corners: when the day serres, before b. night, Jïnd 
what thou wantest by free and oJTered light, Tire.V, 1, 47. 
Blacltfaced, having a black face, gloomy: b. 
night, Ven. 773. cloud, Lucr. 547. storms, 1518. b. 
Clifford, R3 I, 2, 159. 
Blacllfriars, naine of a quarter of London: HS 
Il, 2, 139. 
Blaclthealh, a heath near London: H5 V 
Chor. 16. 
Blacltmere: Lord Strange of JB. (one of Tal- 
bot's rit]es), H6A IV, 7, 65. 
Black-monday, Easter-lIonday: lIerch. II, 
Blacltnes, 1) black colo ur: the raven chides 
b. Troil. 11, 3, 221. a white that shall ber b. fit, Oth. 
II, 1, 134. night's b. Ant. 1, 4, 13. 
2) wickedness: to keep his bed ofb. unlaid ope, 
Per. 1, 2, 89. 
Blaclt-oppressing, harassing with dark 
thoughts: LLL I, 1, 234 (O. Edd. without the 
hyphen). 
Bladder, the bag in the body which sees as 
the receptacle of the urine: --s full of imposthume, 
Troil. V, 1, 24. Taken out and inflated with air, il 
serres for several purposes: blows a man up like a. 
II4A Il, 4, 366. swim on --s, H8 III, 2, 359. --s avd 
musty seeds, Rom. V, 1, 46. 
Blade, 1) the green shoot of corn before 
it grows to seed; used as an emblem of youth: donc 
in the b. ofyouth, All's V, 3, 6 (M. Edd. blaze, on ac- 
count of the following simile). 

lity with such b. payment, Lucr. 576. the --est news, 2) the cutting part of a weapon: you break 
Gentl. 111, 1, 285. b. tldings, R2 III, 4, 71. that b. jests as braggarts do their --s, Ado V, 1, 190. H6A 
naine, JEdward black prince of IVales, H5 11, 4, 56. 1I, 4, 13. HC I, 3, 50. Rom. I, 4, 84. lIeb. 11, 1, 46. 
that b. word death, Rom. I11, 3, 27. b. despair, H6B V, 8, 11. Used for the whole sword: he shakes aloft 

III, 3, 23. R3 1I, 2, 36. a b. da.y, I3 V, 3, 280. Rom. 
IV, 5, 53. b. funeral, IV, 5, 85. b. stage .for tragedies, 
Luer. 766. bitter, b. and tra91eal, R3 IV, 4, 7. b. and 
portentous must this humour prove, Rom. I, 1,147. die 
under their ,my eurses') b. weight, John III, 1,297. 
Adverbially: looked b. upon me, Lr. Il, 4, 162. 
Blad% subst., black eolour: cladinmournin 9 
b. Luer. 1585. in the old a9e b. was hot counted falr, 
Sonn. 127, 1. thy b. is fairest in m9 jud9ment's place, 

his Roman b. Lucr. 505. hlids. V, 147. 351. R3 I, 4, 
211. Rom. I, 1, 85. 
3) a fencer: a very good b.: a very tall man! 
Rom. Il, 4, 31 (expïessions ridiculed by Mercutio) 
]laded, having blades: deckg with liquid 
pearl the b. grass, Mids. I, 1, 211. though b. corn be 
lodged and trees blown down, lIcb. IV, 1, 55.* 
Blain, a bo tch : itches, --s, sow all the Athenian 
bosoms, Tire. IV, 1, 28. 

Sonn. 131, 12. bave put on b. 132, 3. in b. mourn 1, Blame, subst., 1) reprehension, disappro- 
l'ilgr. 263. b. is the badge of hell, LLL IV, 3, 254. in bation: whose crime will bear an ever-during b. Lucr. 
b. mg lady's brows are decked, 258. 261. put on sullen 224. hot that devoured, but that which doth devour, is 
b. R2 V, 6» 48. hung be the heavens with b. H6A 1, 1, worthy b. Luer. 1257. lilgr. 301. Err. III, 1, 45 
1. we mourn in b. 17. all in b. Rom. 111, 2, 11. suits H6C V, 5, 54. R3 IV, 1, 25. Cor. V, 3, 90. V 5, 147. 
ofsolemn b. Hml. I, 2, 78. let the devil wear b. III, 2, Hml. IV 7, 67. Lr. II, 4, 147. Oth. I, 3, 177. Cymb. 
137. -- whlch is hot under white and b. (-- hot written V, 3, 3. shall render you no b. All's V, 1, 32. he bath 
clown) Ado V, 1,314. though the truth of it stands off much worthy b. laid upon him, All's IV, 3, 7. his ab- 
as gross as b. andwMte, H5 1I, 2, 104. -- llur, blacks sence lays b. upon his promise, Meb. I11, 4, 44. la..a 
--- black stuffs or elothes: were theyfalse as o'erd.ed not gour b. on me, Oth. IV, 2, 46. 



B 117 

2) that which deserves disapprobation, crime,' 
sin: blottb 9 it with b. Yen. 796. authoritt for sin, 
warrant for b. Luer. 620. vast sb-concealing chaos, 
nurse of b. 767. 1343. Soun. 129, 3. H6A IV, 5, 47. 
R3 V, 1, 29. Plural: n3t high-repented --s, All's V, 
3, 36. the taints and--s I laidupon mtself, hIeb. IV, 
3, 124. --- fault: "tis his own b. Lr. Il, 4, 293. to 
ta..u the b. upon ber own despab', V, 3, 254. 
Blame, rb., fo censure, fo final fault with: 
Ven. 53. Sonn. 40, 6. 58, 14. 70, 1. 103, 5. Tp. 
III, 3, 4. "Viv. V, 5, 16. Mids. V, 364. As V, 2, 109. 
All's Il, 1, 88. H6A II, 1, 57. IV, 1, 178. H6B I, 1, 
220. H6C Il, 1, 157. IV, 1. 101. lV, {3, 30. R3 I, 2 
44. Cymb. IV, 2, 197 etc. but tet be --d, Sonn. 40 
7. this was hot to be --d, All's III, 6, 54. But usuall 
to blarne in the passive sense, -- blameable: those 
proud lords to b. make weak-made women tenants to 
their shame, Luer. 1259. death is hot fo b. Ven. 992. 
Luer. 1278. Err. IV, 1, 47. LLL I, 2, 108. Mereh. 
III. 5, 23. V, 166. Shr. IV, 3, 48. All's V, 3, 129. 
II4B lI, 4, 390. R3 Il, 2, 13. I-I8 IV, 2, 101. Rom. 
III» 5, 170. Caes. il, 2, 119. Hml. III, I, 46. Oth. III, 
3, 211. Cymb. III, 5, 51 (ruade me to b. in memorj). 
Always of persons, exeept Lr. I, 2, 44: the contents 
are to b. Hml. V, 2, 331: the lcing is to b., --the king 
is in fault. (O. Edd. sometimes too blame, f.i. Ven. 
992. Err. IV, 1, 47. Mereh. V, 166. Lr. 1, 2, 44. 
Caes. Il, 2, 119. Cymb. III, 5, 51. cf. wilful-blame). $ 
Blameful, reprehensible, guilty: with 
blood.q b. blade, Mids. V, 147. ber b. bed, H6B III, 2, 
212. as b. as..., R3 I 2, 119. 
Blameless, hot meriting censure, guilt- 
le.s: so far b. proves mj enterprise, Mids. III, 2, 350. 
tte,'mione is chaste, Polixeness b. Wiut. III, 2, 134. 
Blan¢: Port le B., a bay in Brittany, R2 II, 
1, 277. 
BlanCh, 1) Ladg .B., nieee to king Johu: John 
II, 64. 423. III, 4, 142 etc. -- 2) naine of a dog: Lr. 
Ill, 6, 66. 
Blan¢h, rb., to make p al e: when mine (eheek) 
is --ed withfear, Meb. III, 4, 116. 
Blanlt, subst., 1) a paper unwritten: what 
thy ernory cannot contain commit to these waste --s, 
Sonn. 77, 10. what's ber histor.uS a b. Tw. II, 4, 113. 
his thoughts, would they were .... , rather than filled 
with me, 111, 1, 115. 
2) a lot by which nothing is gained: it 
is lots to --s ( if is very probable) Cor. V, 2, 10. 
3) a white paper given to the agents of the crown, 
which they were to fill up as they pleased, to autho- 
rize their demands: new exactions, as --s, benevolen- 
ces, R2 1I, 1, 250. 
4) the white mark in the centre of a butt, th e 
aire: out of the b. and level oJ ;niWbrain, Wint. Il, 3 
5. a b. of danger, Troil. 111, 8, 231. as level as the 
cammn to hls b. Hml. IV, 1, 42. let me still remain the 
true b. of thine ete  Lr. I, 1, 161. stood within the b. 
ofhis displeasure, Oth. III, 4, 128. 
Blanlt, adj. 1) white, unwritten: with b. 
space for different humes, Wiç. II, 1, 77. out substi- 
tutes shall bave b. charters, R2 l, 4, 48. 
2) void of anything, enlpty, of no con- 
ten ts: in the extremit. of great and little, valour and 
pride excel themselves in Hector, the one almost as 
6oEnite as all, the other b. as nothbg, Troil. IV, 5, 81. 
3) without rhyme: in the even road of a b. 

verse, Ado V, 2, 34. an you talk  b. verse, As IV, I, 
32. the b. verse sholl halt for it, Hml. II, 2, 339. 
Blanlt, rb., = to blaneh, to make pale: each 
oposite that--s the face of jol/, Hnll. III, 2, 230. 
Blanliet, subst., 1)cover for the bed: H4B 
II, 4, 241. Hml. II, 2, 532. Lr. III, 4, 67. Cymb. lIl, 
1, 44. 
2) curtain: nor heave peep through the b. of 
the dark, Mcb. 1, 5, 54. cf. Cymb. 111, 1, 44. 
BlanKe¢, rb., fo cover with a blanket: 
b. nj loins, Lr. I1, 3, 10. 
Blasplteme, 1) trans, fo speak with impious 
irreverence of: gou do b. the good in mockin ;ne, 
Meus. 1, 4, 38. --ing God, H6B III, 2, 872. does b. 
his breed, Mcb. IV, 3, 108. 
2) absol, to utter blasphemy: you b. in this, 
John II1, 1, 161. llver of--bg Jew, lIcb. IV, 1, 26. 
Blasphemous, inlpiously irreverent: !Cu 
bawlin9 b., incharitoble dog, Tp. I, 1, 48. 
Blasphemy, impious and irreverent language 
about what ought to be held sacred: that b the cap- 
tain "s but a choleric word, which in the soldler is fiat 
b. Meus. I1 2, 131. Iwouldspeak b ere bidl/oufl.q, 
II6B V, 2, 85. -- Abstr. pro concreto: now, b., that 
swearest grace o'erboard, hot an oath on shore? Tp. 
V, 218 (= blasphemous fellow). 
Blast, subst., 1) cold and violent gust of 
wind: unrubj --s wait on the tender spring, Lucr. 
869. 1385. Wint. IV, 4, 111. 376. R3 1, 8, 259. Mcb. 
I, 7, 22. Lr. IlI 1, 8. IV, 1, 9. Oth. 11, 1, 6. symbol 
of destruction: airs fi'om heaven or --s from hell, 
Hml. I, 4, 41. --s and fogs upon thee! Lr. I, 4, 321. 
virtue preserved from fell destruction's b. Per. V, 8, 89. 
2) the blowing of a wind instrument: 
when the b. of war blows bt out ears, H5 III, 1, 5. let 
the general trumpet blow his b. H6B V, 2, 43. Cor. 
l, 4, 12. for one b. of th. minikb mouth, Lr. III, 6,45. 
Blast, rb., 1) trans., a) to blight, to make 
to wither: bud and be --ed in a breathing while. 
Ven. 1142. he --s the tree» Wiv. IV, 4, 32. H6B III, 
1, 89. H6C IV, 4, 23. V, 7, 21. R3 III, 4, 71. Tim. 
IV, 3, 538. Mcb. I, 3, 77. Hml. III, 1, 168. 11I, 
65. Lr. II, 4,170 (Ff. blister).  to strike with 
any pernicious influence: the injure] of nan:j 
a --ing bout» Compl. 72. a--ing and a scandalous 
breath, Meas. V, 122. ever] part about ]ou --ed with 
antiquitj, H4B l, 2, 208. l"li cross if, though it b. ne. 
Hml. I, 1, 127. with tIecate's ban thrice --ed, Ill, 2, 
269. fo see it nlne e]es are --ed, Ant. Ill, 10, 4. 
were half --ed ere 1 knew ]ou, III, 13, 105 (hall 
withered), when he shall dïnd out paragon to all re- 
:ports thus--ed, Per. IV, 1, 36. 
b) to split, to burst: with brazen din ..ou 
the cit.'s ear, Ant. IV, 8, 36. 
2) intr., a) to be blighted, to wither: thj 
hast. spring still --s, and ne'er grows old, Lucr. 49. 
--ing in the bud, Geutl. I, 1, 48. 
b) to burst: this project should bave a ack or 
second, that :night hold, if thls should . in proof, Hml. 
IV, 7, 155. 
Blastment, blast, pernicious influence of 
the wind and weather: in the morn and liquid dew of 
çouth contagious --s are nost imminent, Hml. I, 3, 42. 
Blaze, subst, flaring flame; always used 
figuratively: in the b. of]outh, All's V, 3, 6 (O. Edd. 
blode), his rash `tierce b. of riot cannot last, R2 Il, 1, 



118 B 
.... wrath Troil IV, 5,105 theirb, shall 4, 341. IV, 1, 115. V, 4, 2. 137. H4BIV, 4, 
33 inhisb o , • . " . . o 5 o 4 IV 
a_.7.M .:». r^)rfver Cor II 1 274 the mctm b. oft [ II 4, 50. 52. II6B 11I, 2 188. R3 I, 
; ". o tz««-, , ,,«.,çz, tt,[,7. -«.v, 3, s-. ,t.,5:v,6 
;s ast, I, 3,.  .. ,_ r_.. «.gHu I 3 117 I Ill, 1, 194 (lie a ing). V, , 170. "m. h_ï . 
lame tWO redfires in both the5 faces d, Lucr. I 2, 315. Ant. v, 2, 341 etc. no b. no aeatlq ltercn. 
353 as in d the threw on hlm 9reat pails of...,[ 1,258. Troil. 11, 3, 80. Oth. V 1, 45. no b. away, 
,'r  17" on' evéïÇ --ing star, ll's 1, 3, 91 (i. e./John V, 4, 4. v,y nose feu a. mg 
" "     ,, o  rro u   v a /s.methin«ofconse«ucncewasto 
71 Tire 11, 2 170 Hml IV, 7, 191. The following 5, 25. bleedng stream  sueam ox 

passages lead over no the second signification: red 
eheeks and fiery eyes b. forth her wrong, Ven. 219. the 
heavens themselves b. forth the death of princes, Caes. 
Il e 2, 31. 
2) trans, to make public: till we van jïnd a 
tlme no b. your marriage» Rom. lll, 3 151 (cf. Emblaze). 
Blazn, subst., 1) eoat of arms: each fait 
instalment, coat and several crest, with loyal b., ever- 
more be bleste Wiv. V, 5, 68. thy tongue 7 thy .face ... 
91ve theejïve-.fold b., Tw. I, 5,312.* 
2) interpretation, explanation: I think 
!tour b. no be truc» Ado Il, 1,307. 
3) publieation proclamation: but this 
eternal b. (i. e. publication of eternal things) must non 
be no ears of flesh andblood, Ihnl. l, 5, '2,1. Originally 
 trnmpeting forth: in the b. of sweet beauty's 
best. Sonn. 106, 5. 
Biazon, vb., 1) no trumpet for th, no Fraise: 
if the measure oJ thy joy be heaped like wine and that 
thy skill be nore no b. in, Rom. Il, 6 e 26. excels the 
qub'ks of --in9 pens, Oth. II, 1, 63. no proelaim 
in general : libelli» against the senate, and --in 9 out 
injustice every where, Tit. IV, 4 18. 0 thou 9oddess, 
thou divine lVaturee how thysel.f thou --est in these two 
priucely boys, Cymb. IV, 2, 170. 
2) to interpret, to explain: each several 
stone, with wit well --ed smiled or ruade some moan, 
Compl. 217. 
Bleaeh, no whiten (used of linen)7 1 trans.: 
maidens b. their summer smocks, LLL V, 2, 916. -- 
2) intr. what honest clothes you send forth no --ing, 
Viv. IV, 2, 126. the white sheet iug on the hedge, 
Wint. IV, 3, 5. 
Bleal, 1) cold chill: thou liest in the b. air 
As 11, 6e 16. no make hls b. winds klss n i parched lips, 
John V, 7740. Tire. IVe3» 222. Lr. Il e 4, 303 (Ff 
igzO. 
2) exposed no the cold, open to thecold 
wind: out lodgings standing b. upon the seae Per. 
Ille 2e 14. 
3) pale with froste chilled: look b. in the 
cold wind All's l» le 115. 
Blear vb. to make (the eyes) watery: the 
JDardanian wives, wkh--ed visages, corne forth ..., 
lIereh, llle 2, 59. Henee  to din: while counter- 
feit supposes --ed thine eye, Shr. V, 1,120. the --ed 
sights are spectacled no sec hbn, Cor. Il, 1,221. 
BIeat, snbst., ery of a ealï: Ado V, 4, 51. 
Bleat, rb., to cry as a sheep: Merch. IV, 1, 
74. Wint. I, 2, 68. IV, 4, 29. as a calf: Ado I11, 
3, 76. LLL V, 2, 255. 
Bleed (impf. blede Cor. I e 9, 48. partie, blede As 
Ire 3, 149. Cor. Ve le 11) 1) intT. no lose blood. 
no run with blood: Ven. 924. 1056. Lucr. 1449. 
1551. 1732. 1824. Merch. fil e 17 67. As IV, 3» 149. 
Shr. Ind. _o, 60. John II, 86. R2 I e I e 194. H4A Il 

1774. bleediug freqnently  bloody: on the --ing 
gronnd, Johu Il e 304. --ing war, R2 III e 3 94. that 
never war advance his --ing sword, H5 ¥, _o, 383. 
unscarred of --bg slaughter, R3 IV, 4, 209. the --ing 
business they bave done, Caes. Ili, 1, 168. their dear 
causes would no the --in 9 and the grim alarm excite 
the mortijïed man, blcb. V, .'2, 4. -- Dismiss the con- 
troversy --ing, Cor. II, 1, 86, i. e. without having, 
as in were, dressed aud cured in. 
Figuratively: the heart--s, no denote a pain or 
scrrow touching the core of the hem-t: the thought qf 
in doth make my faint heart b. Ven. 669. will hot my 
tongue be mute, my.frail jo5ts shake,.., my.false heart 
b..q Lucr. 228. Pilgr. 267. Tp. I, 2, 63. Wint. llle 3, 
52. H6B le, le 85. now all these hearts ... with --ing 
groans they pine, Compl. 275. wt heart --s inwardly 
that myfather is so sick H41 II, 2e 51. cf. I b. 
inwardly for my lord Tire. 1, 2e '211. the testimonies 
whereof lie --bg b me, Cymb. llle 4, 23. 
To b. -- no be let blood, figuratively: thls is no 
month no b. R2 I, 1, 157. bave brought ourselves into 
a burningfever, and we wust b. for in, H4B IVe 1, 57. 
2) trans., no shed like blood: she did, 
would fain say, b. tears, Wint. V, 2, 96. the drops that 
we bave bled together, Cor. V7 17 11. 
Blem|sh, subst., anythiug that disfixres, spot 
stain: on their garments non a b. Tp.I» 2, 218. speak- 
ing thick, which nature ruade his b. H4B 1I 3» 24. 
Mostly in a moral sense: the b. that will never be for- 
gon, Lucr. 536. he spied in her some b. 1358. lIeas. 
108. Tw. Ili, 4, 401. Wint. I, o_, 341. llural: Wint. 
V, 1, 8. Ant. 117 3 e 5. I11 13» 59. 
Blenish. rb. e to injure or impair the beauty of, 
no disfigure: beauty --ed once's .for erer lost, 
Pilgr. 179. you should hot b. in (your beauty) R3 l 
128. I shall glve thee thy deservlng, and b. Caesar's 
trlumph, Ant. IV, 12, 33. In a moral sense,  to 
staine no dishonour: in this --edfort, Lucr. l175. 
a gross and.foolish sire --ed Ms gracious dam Wint. 
Ill, 2, 199. R2 Il e le 293. R3 llle 7 122. IV 4e 370. 
Ant. I, 4 e 23. 
Ble¢h, subst., ineonstancy, aberration: these 
--es gave my heart another youth, Sonn. 110, 7. 
Bleh, vb. no start: if he but b., 
course, Hnfi. 11, _'2, 626. patience hersel.f doth lesser b. 
at sufferanee than 1 do, Troil. 17 1, 28 (v. less and 
lesser). Hence--- to fly off, no be inconstant: 
hold you ever no our special drifl, tho,gh sornetnes 
you do b. ri-oto this no that, hleas. IVe 5, 5. could man 
so b.? Wiat. I, 2, 333. there van be no evasion no b. 
from this and no stand jïrm by honour, Troil. 11, 2.68. 
Bleud (partie. Heuded, Troil. IV, 5e 86 and Cor. 
1II e 1, 103; blente lIerch, llle 2, 183 and Tw.l, 5e257) 
1) no mix: Merch. Ili, 2 e 183. Tw. 17 5 257. Troil. 
IV 7 Se 86. Cor. I11 1» 103. 
2) intr. no mingle: the heaven-hued sappMr 



md te opal b. with ob'ectsg mmio]d, Compl..o 
(according to Walker, bled is herc a particil% 
blent). 
less (imp£ and partic, monosyllablc and dis- 
syllab]c without any différence). I) to wish happi- 
ness to, to pronounce a benediction upon: 
Tp. IV, I0. Gentl. llI I 146. Wiv. V 5, 68. Meas. 
V, 137. Mids. V, 407.411. IV, 1,95. II6AI, 1,28. 
H6B ll l 35. R3 I 4, 24 etc. God b. $our house 
Wiv. I l, 74. Il,  53. God b. the ing» LLL IV 
189. 0 Lordb. me H6B Il 3, 7 ( soEnd by me). 
ant Denis b. tMs happff strataem, H6A 111 2 18. 
Jesu b. him, H6B I, 3, 6. Jesus b. us ( prescrve 
H4A Il, 2, 86. H6C V 6, 75. a paramour is, God b. 
us, a thb 9 of au9ht , Mids. IV, 2, 14. she for a wo- 
an, God b. us, V, 327. God b. mg ladiesY are they 
all in love LLL II, 77. God b. me from a challenge 
( preseTe me from) Ado V, I, 145. God b. the 
prince ri'oto all the paclc of ou, R3 III, 3, 5 (Qq lceep). 
heaven b. thee from a tutor, Troil. 11, 3, 32. heavens 
b. m lord-omfell AtoEdiu, Cor. I, 3,48. And with- 
out the word God or heaven: b. out poor vb'inlt$ 
from underminers, All'sl, I, 131. b. me fi.om 
a usurer, Vint. IV, 4, 271. b. thee ri'oto whb'lwinds» 
Lr. III, 4, 60. b. theefrom thefoulfiend, IV, I, 60. 
Similarly: God b. the marlc (er. God save the mark, 
v. mark) an exclation used in the sense of'saving 
your reverenee': the ew raff »tester, who God b. the 
marlc» is a Icbd qf devil, Mereh. Il, 2, 25. and I, God 
b. the mark, hls ll£oorship's ancient, Oth. I, 1» 33. God 
omitted: he h«d not been there  b. the marlc  a 
pissin 9 while, Gentl. IV, 4, 20. 
God likewise omitted in other ees: b. çou, sr, 
Wiv. 11» 2 160. Il, 3 18. III, 5, 61. biens. IIl 2 12. 
81. hIids. III, 1, 121. All's II, 4 14. b. ou with sh 
9race as ..., Shr. IV, 2, 44. b. m$ soul» Wiv. Il, 1, 
11.16. Lr. III, 4, 60 (Ffbliss). 
2) to praise, to glorify: God be blest, Shr. 
1V, 5, 18. ed be the rt Apollo, Wint. III, 2, 138. 
3) to eonseerate, to make happy in eon- 
eqnence, to turn to advautage: the dedlcated 
wor& which wrlters use of their falr subject, --ing 
ever$ book, Sonn. 82, 4. naming th$ ame --es an ill 
report» 95, 8. it (mercy) --eth hlm that glves and 
that talces, Merch. IV 1,287. what daed error, but 
some sober brow will b. it and approve it with a text, 
III 2, 79. likel$ in tlme to b. a regal throne H6C IV, 
6, 74. if hot to b. us and the land R3 llI 7 192. soe 
splrit put this paper in the paclcet, to b. your e$e 
H8 lll 2, 130. you b. me Gods, Cor. IV, 5, 141. 
Followed by with: never did he b.  gouth with 
Ven. 1119. wouM hot b. our Europe whh $our daughter 
Tp.ll, I 124. the grace that wlth such grace bath blest 
them Gentl. III, I 146. he will b. that cross wlth other 
beatlng, Err. II, I, 79. the$ did hot b. us with one happ$ 
word, LLL V 2 370. hIids. 11, I, 102. Vint. V» 
33. 174. H6A I, 2, 86. H6C I1 2, 23. R3 I 3» 9. V 
3 321. H8 II, 4 36. Oth. II I» 79. Ant. I, 2» 161. 
To b. one's self  to esteem one's self happy : 

thls --ed league fo ]ill, Lncr. 383. means more 
tan rn. barren r.me, Sonn. 16, 4. 43, 9. 52, 1. 56, 
12. it (my heart) bath thought itself so --ed never, 
119, 6. that --ed wood, 128, 2. wh«t foul pla. had 
we that we came from thence? or --ed was 't we did? 
Tp. I, 2, 61. IV, 86. V, 202. Gentl. V, 4, 117. Wiv. 
I|, 2, 279. fil, 3, 48. Mens. |Il, 1, 34. Mids. Il, 2» 91. 
IV, I, 79. Merch. I, 3, 90. Il, 1, 46. As 1|1, 3, 59. 
Shr. IV, 2, 45. Wint. Il, I, 36. IV, 4, 858. John III» 
I, 251. H6A I, 6,I0. Cor. II, 2, 62. Ant. Il, 2, 248. 
Cymb. I, 6, 159. V, 4, 121. with a --ed and unvexed 
retire, John 1I, 253. barred him from the --ed thing 
he sougt, Lucr. 340, i. e. blest with beauty ; cf. and 
ou in ever. --ed shape we Icnow, Sonn. 53, 12. 
b) full of blessings bestowing health 
and prosperity: withfair--ed beams, Mids. III, 
2, 392. sucli force and --ed power, IV, 1, 79. it is 
twice blest ; it blesseth hlm that gives and him that talces, 
Mereh. IV, I, 186. the blest in.fusions that dwell in 
ve9etives , Per. Iii, 2, 35. the blessed sun, Shr. IV, 5, 
18. tI4A I, 2, I0. 11, 4, 449. Tire. IV, 3, 1. moon, 
Rom. Il, 2, 107. Ant. IV, 9, 7. 
e) blissful; holy: l'Il test, as after »uch tur- 
moil a --ed soul doth in Elyslum, Gentl. I1, 7, 38. 
God's --ed will, Wiv. I, 1, 273. bound by mg charity 
and my blest order, Meas. II, 3, 3. 0 you --ed minlsters 
above, V, 115. some --ed pover deliver us, Err. lV, 
44. Mereh. ¥, 220. H6A I11, 0 15. R3 III, I, 42. 
H8 IV, 2, 30. Rom. Il, 3, 53. she's full of most --ed 
condition, Oth. Il, I, 255. so free, so Icind, so apt, so 
--ed a disposition, II, 3, 326. when you are desirous 
fo be blest, l'll blessing beg of gon, Hml. III, 4, 171, 
i. e. whcn yon retnrn to virtue. 
Blessed-fair, happy as well as beautiful: 
wliat's so b. tliat fears no blot? Sonn. 92, 13 (O. Edd. 
without the hyphen). 
Blessedly, I) fortunately: b. holp hither, Tp. 
I, 2, 63. 2) holily: the rime was b. lost, H5 IV, 1, 
191. 
Blessedness, 1) happiness: and found the b. 
o] eng lhtle, H8 IV, 2, 66. -- 2) the fayot of • 
God, the state of being blessed by God: so shll she 
leave ber b. to one, H8 ¥, 5, 44. -- 3) holiness, 
sanctity: llves and dies in sngle b. Mids. I, I, 78. 
Blessing, 1)benediction: Tp. V, 179. Gentl. 
Il, 3, 27. Wiv. I, 1, 76. Merch. I, 3, 91. II, _'2, 83.89. 
Ail'si, 3,27. H6AV, 4,-oS. R31, 2, 69. ll,-o, 106 
etc. etc. b. onone: Tp. 1 , 109. 117. Wiv. II, , 11ff. 
All's II, 3, 97. tI8 Il, 1, 90. lIcb. IV, -o, .'26. blessing 
of your heart, you brew good ale, Gentl. III, I, ô06. 
cf. Viv. IV, I, 13; I4B 11, 4, 329 (f. on) and Off 
on his b.  as he wishcd to bave his b., As I, 1, 4. 
H6A IV, 5, 36. sleeps in --s, H8 III, 2, 398. dld the 
third a b. Lr. I, 4, 115. when thou dost aslc me b. Lr. 
V, 3, 10. l'll b. beg of.ou, Lhnl. IlI, 4, 172. 
2) the state of being blessed, divine grace: b. 
agabst this cruelt fight on th. side, Wiut. 11, 3, 189. 
I had most need of b., and Amen stuck in m. throat, 
lIcb. II, 2, 3-o. 

Ican cross hlm an. wa., Ib. m.self every wa., Ado 3) means of happiness, gift, benefit: you fo 
I, 3, 70. now b. tli.self: tliou mettest witli things dging, ] your beauteous --s add a curse, Sonn. 84, 13. a b. 
I wltli things new-born, Vint. III, 3, 116. you would[ tliat he bestows on beasts, Err. Il, 2, 80. wliat b. brlngs 
b..outo liearwliatnesaid, H4BII»4»103. lit? Ado I, 3,8 II, 1 30 Merch 11I, O, 114 I11 5 
The partie, blest or blessed a) -- happy, fol'- 80. All's I, 3, ½8. ]rint:e III, 2, '08. -H6B l] 1, 2: 
tnnate: tliat love-slclc love bgpleadlng ma. be blest, H8 II, 3, 30. lom. III, 4 141. Cymb. III, 5, 161 
Vert. 328. --ed banrult that b. love so thriveth, 466. and steal immortal b. fro» ber lips, Rom. III, 3 37. 



120 

B 

R|ind, adj., 1) destitute of the sense of 
seeing; properly and figuratively: Lucr. 378. 758. 
Sonn. 27, 8. 113, 3. 136» 2. 148, 13. Tp. iV, 90. 
194. Gentl. lit 1» 76. Il, 3» 14. II, 4, 93. 212. iV, 4» 
4. Wiv. III, 5, 11. Ado Il t 1, 205. LLL iV» 3, 22-24. 
334. Mids. I» 1, 235. hierch. II, 1, 36. Il, 6» 36. Tw. 
V, 236 (.the b. waves, i. e. the regardless w.). H6B 
III, 2, 112 (b. and dusk.y spectacles). 13 I, 4 259 
(to thy own soul so b.,  so regardless of ...). Cor. 
V, 6, 118 (Ms b.fortune). H5 III, 3, 34 etc. 
2) dark, obscure: folded up in b. concealing 
nigt, Lucr. 675. b.for#etfulness, R3 II1, 7, 129 (Ff. 
dark), the b. cave of eternal nlglt, V, 3, 62. 
Blind, vb. to deprive of sight, to dazzle: 
eyes be#an to wink, bein# --ed with a greater light, 
Lucr. 375. in# tears, R2 Il, 2, 16. such a sigt will 
b. a.father's eyG Tit. il, 4, 53. LLL I, 1, 76.83. IV, 
3, 228. R2 IV, 245. It6A I, l, 10. II6B III» 3, 14. 
Lr. II, 4, 167. a blinded #od -- a blindfolded god, 
Gentl. iV, 4, 201. 
Blindfohl, adj., = blind: b. fur.y, Ven. 554. 
deatl b R2 I, 3, 224. 
Blindly, regardlessly: the brother b. shed the 
brother's blood, R3 ¥, 5, 24. 
IHindman-" now jou strike llke the b., Ado II, 1, 
205. if will glimmer through a 's e.ye» H6 II, 4, 24 
(M. Edd. in two words. In Merch. V, 112 and Lr. 
Il, 4, 71 O. Edd. also in two words). 
Blindness, want of sight: Gentl. IV, 2, 47. 
II5 V, 2 344. Cymb. V 4, 197. muff'le!/ourfalse love 
with some show of b, Err. III, 2, 8 i. e. vith some 
blinding show. 
Blind-orm, slow-worm: Mids. II, 2, 11. --'s 
sting, Mcb. IV, 1, 16. 
Blink, to twinkle with the eye: theportrait 
of a --in 9 idiot, Merch. Il, 9, 54. adoptious christen- 
dores, that --ing Cupid gossips, All's I, 1, 189. to 
steal an amorous look: show me th.y cMnlc, to b. 
through with mine e.ye, Mids. V, 178. 
B|iss, subst.» the highest degrce of happiness, 
absolute felicity: Lucr. 389. Sonn. 129, 11. Err. 
I, 1, 119. hids. Iii, 2, 144. V, 181. hIerch. II, 9, 67. 
iii, 2, 137. Shr. V, 1, 131. H6A V, 5, 64. It6B iil, 3, 
27. H6C I, 2, 31. Ill, 3,182.1V, 6,70. Tir. iii, 1, 149. 
273. Rom. I, 1, 228. V, 3, 124. Lr. IV, 7, 46. Oth. 
iii, 3, 167. V, 2, 250. Ant. I, 3, 36. ]3liss be upon 
!/ou» an ecclesiastical salutation: hleas. III, 2, 228. 
Rom. V, 3, 124. 
Blister, subst., a pustule, an nlcer: a b. on 
his sweet ton9ue! LLL V, 2, 335. which oft the an9ry 
ab with --s pla9ues, Rom. 1, 4, 75. for each true 
word a b. Tim. V, 1, 135. takes off the rose ri'mn the 
fait" forehead of an bmocent love and sas a b. there 
Hml. III, 4, 44. 
Blister, rb., 1) trans, to cover with blisters: 
a southwest blow o ge and b. jou all o'er, Tp. 1, 2, 
324. a gentlewoman who, falling in the flaws of her 
own jouth, bath --ed ber report, Meas. Il, 3, 12. --ed 
e th.y touffue for such a wish, lom. 11I, 2, 90. this 
tjrant whose sole ame --s out ton#ues, hlcb. IV» 3, 12. 
lu Lr. II, 4, 170 Ff tofall and b., Qq tofall andblast 
ber pride. 
2) intr. to rise in blisters: iflFrovehone.y- 
nouthed, let m. touffue b. Wint. 1I, 2, 33. 

Blistered: the faith the.y hare in tennis, and tall 
stoclcin9s , short b. breeches, and those types qf travel. 
H8 I, 3, 31, probably --- garnished with puffs. 
Blithe, gay, mirthful: be you b. and bonn.y 
Ado II, 3, 69. H5 Il, 3, 4. Tir. iV, 4, 111. sobuxom, 
b. and full of face, Per. Prol. 23. crickets sinç at the 
oven's mouth» e" er the --er for their drouth t'er. III 
t'roi. 8. 
Blithihl  descended of 13., wh:ch was dau#hter to 
king Ulothair, H5 I, 2, 67. 
Bloat -- bloated, swollen; introduced into the 
text but by conjecture: let the b. kO# tempt you again 
to bed, Hml. lil 4, 182; Qq blowt, Ff blunt. 
Bloclt, a piece of timber rather thick than 
long; 1) the wood on wh:ch criminals are 
beheaded: Mcas. ll, 4, 181. IV» 2» 55. IV, 3, 39. 
69. V, 419. II4B IV» 2, 122. II6B IV, 1, 125. 131II» 
4» 108. V, 1» 28. 
2) the wood on wh:eh bats are formed: 
he wears his faith but as the fashion of his hot; it eve 
changes with the next b. Ado I, 1, 77. Henee the form 
and fashion of a bat: this" a 9ood b., Lr. IV» 6» 187. 
3) a stupid or insensible fellow: whata 
b. art thou that thou cacst hot (understand lne)? Gentl. 
II, 5, 27. thE conceit will draw in more than the coin- 
mon --s, Wint. I, 2, 225. how thou stirrest, thou 5. 
l'er. III» 2, 90.  Transitional: past the endurance 
of a b. Ado II, 1» 247. ifs:lent, whE, a b. moved with 
noue (wind) III, 1, 67. that which hem stands up, is 
but a qui»tain, a mere lifeless b. As I, 2, 263. what 
tongueless --s were theE! R3 Iii, 7, 42. yo --s, you 
stones, l/ou worse than senseless thigs Caes. I, 1» 40. 
4) something to obstruct the passage: 
who like a b. hath denied n.y access to thee Cor. V» 
2, 85. 
Bl»ldlead, a head like a wooden bloek." your 
wit will hot so soon out as another ma»'s will ; ' tis strongl. 
wedged up in a b.» Cor. Il» 3» 31. 
lfldsh, elumsy» stupid-" b. Ajax, Troil. 
I» 3, 375. 
B|is, Freneh town: H6A IV, 3, 45. 
lme-" Sir |Villiam B. H8 I» 2, 190 (O. Ed. 
Blumer ). 
lml, the fluid wh:eh circulates through the 
arteries and ceins: Gentl. II 4» 28. Viv. IV, 4, 33. 
Meas. I, 3, 52. II, 4» 20. Err. II, 2» 143. V» 193. Ado 
IV» 1» 38. Tw. III, 2» 66. Iil, 4, 22. IV» 1» 47. tI4A 
11, 3, 47. H5 IV, 4, 68. H6A I, 5, 6 etc. etc. Plm'al 
bloods: Err. I, 1» 9. hlereh. Iii, 1» 43. All's II» 3, 125. 
Wint. I, 2, 109. R2 Iii, 3» 107. H6C Il, 2, 169. R3 
Iii, 3, 14. 21. IV, 4, 50 (in these three last passages 
Ff blood). Troil. IV, 1, 15. Tire. 1¥, 3, 539. Per. I, 
2, 113. -- to letap, b.: LLL II, 186. R2 I, 1, 153. 
R3 III, 1, 183. Troil. II 3, 222. Caes. III» 1, 152. 
Cymb. IV, 2» 168. --flesh and b.: Tp. V, 74. 114. 
Ado V, 1» 34. LLL I, 1» 186. IV, 3» 214- Meeh. Il, 
2, 98. 111, 1, 37.40. Shr. Ind. 2» 130. All's I, 3, 38. 
Tw. V, 36. Wint. 1V, 4, 705. H6B I» 1, 233. ttml. I 
5, 22. Lr. II, 4, 224. III, 4, 150. no hand of b. and 
boue» R2 III, 3» 79. m breath md b.! Lr. Il, 4, 104. 
-- man of b. ( murderer), Meb. Iii, 4, 126. o'er 
shoes in b. hlids. IIl 2, 48. cf. hlcb. III, 4, 136. -- 
a drop of blood ( a trifle): a rush, a hair, a drop 
qfb., a pin» Err. IV, 3, 73. -- Figurativelyz the subtle 
b. ofthe 9tape, Tire. iV, 3, 432. 
In blood a terre of the chase,  in a state of per- 



B 121 

fect heMdl and vigour: the deer was, as .you know, 
san9uis , fit b. LLL IV, _'2, 4. if we be Enpllsh deer, 
Ce then bt b. ; hot rascal-like to fall down with a pinch, 
but rather, moodff-mad and desperate stags , turn on the 
bloodg hounds, H6A IV, 2, 48. thou rascal, that art 
worst in b. to run, leadest first to wbt some vantage , 
Cor. !, 1,163. but when they shall see his crest up agabt , 
end the man bt b., theg will out of their burrows, IV, 
5, 225. 
8erving to denote relation and eonsanguinlty: sueh 
a warped slip of wilderness ne'er issuêd ri'oto his b. 
lIeas. III, 1, 143. you are raff eldest brother, and in the 
9enfle condition of b. gon should so know me, As I, 
48. had it been the brother of raff b. Tw. V, 217. fare- 
well, raff b. R2 17 3» 57. he is hot Talbot's b. H6A IV 
5, 16. b. agab»st b., self agabst self, R3 !!, 4, 62. near 
in b. Meb. Il, 3, 146. er. that b. which owed the breadth 
of all this isle, John IV, 2, 99. Caes. !, 1, 
Henee, emphatieally,-_ noble birth, high 
extraction: a 9entleman of b. Geutl. III, 1, 12,1. 
H5 Iv, 8, 95. it (love) was dijTerent hz b. Mid.. I, 1, 
135. to be restored to »ff b. H6A Il, 5, 128. III, 1, 
159. a prince of b., a son of Primn, Troil. III, 
3, 26. 
8ymbol of the fleshly nature of man : allfi'ailtles 
that besiege all kbds of b. 8onn. 109, 10. mff sportve 
b. 121, 6. nor 9ives it satisfaction to out b. Comp1. 
162. the stron#est oaths are straw to the fire i' the b. 
Tp. IV, 53. the resolute aetb 9 of your b. Mens. il, 
12. b., thon still art b. Il, 4, 15. 178. V, 477. beautff 
is a witch agabst whose charms .faith melteth into b. 
Ado il, 1, 187. !!, 3, 170. IV, 1, 60. LLL IV, 3, 96. 
V. 2, 73. Mids. !, 1, 68. 74. Mereh. I, 2, 20. All's 
lit, 7, 2 I. As V, 4, 59. Troil. Il, 3, 33. er. Lr. fil, 5, 24. 
IIenee = disposition, retaper: it betterfits 
nff b. fo be dlsdained o.f all Ado 1,3, 30. runs hot this 
speech like iron through your b.. V, 1, 252. fetehi» 9 
nad bounds, whieh is the hot condition of their b. Mereh 
V, 74. when !ton perceive his b. inclined to mirth, H4B 
IV, 4, 38. mg b. begins to [latter me that thon dost (love 
me) H5 V, 2, 239. strange  unusual b., when man's 
worst sut is, he does too ranch 9ood Tire. IV, 2, 38. 
blood andjudgrent , Hml. fil, 2, 74. the b. and base- 
ness qf out natures, Oth. I, 3, 332. out bloods no more 
obeff the heavens than out courtiers still seem as does 
the lcZg's (se. blood) Cymb. !, 1, 1. Emphatieally, 
high retaper, mettle: thg Fates open their hands; 
let thff b. and spfi'its embraee them» Tw. Il, 5, 159. 
though sometimes it show 9reatness, courage , b. H4A 
I!!, 1, 181. his vow mde to m. father, while his b. 
was poor, IV, 3, 76. can lift gour b. up with prsua- 
sion, V, 2» 79. out --s are now in cal»n, Troil. IV, 1, 
15. Or =- passio n, auget: thon heatest my b. LLL 
!, 2. 32. V, 2, 697. to let these hands obeg my b. Lr. 
IV, 2, 64. Caes. IV, ô, 115. 
2) a young man: youn 9 --s look for a rime of 
test, Caes. IV, 3, 262. all the hot --s between fourteen 
andfive and twentg, Ado III, 3, 141. Espeeially 
a man of mettle, a spirited fellow: sweet 
s, LLL V, 2, 714. as many and as well-born 
John !I, 278. what cannoneer begot this lust# b.. 461. 
the breed of noble --s, Caes. I» 2, 151. 
Blood-bespotted. spotted with blood: H6B 
V: 1. 117. 
Blood-boltered, having the hair clotted 
with blood: Mcb. IV» 1, 123. 

Blood-consundng, preying on the blood: 
b. sl9hs , H6B !I!, 2, 61. 
llood-drinKing; 1) preying on the blood: 
b. sighs , H6B !!I, 2, 63. 2) bloodthirsty: mg b. 
hate, H6A !!, 4, 108. 3) soaked with blood: in 
this detested, dark, b. pit, Tir. !!, 3, 224. 
Bloodhound, a fieree hound that follows 
by the soeur of blood: corne, you starved b. H4B V, 
4, 31. 
Bloodied, made bloody, bloody: to breathe 
his b. horse, H4B I, 1, 38. how his sword is b. Troil. 
I, 2, 253. 
Bloodily, in a bloody manner: how b. the 
sun begins to peer, H4A V, 1, 1. the 9ashes that b. 
did yawn upoa his lute, II5 IV, 6, 14. how the.y at 
PonoEret b. were butchered, 123 I!!, 4, 92. that thou so 
ma». princes so b. hast struck, Hml. V, 2, 378. 
IHoodless, 1) void of blood, pale: b. fear, 
Ven. 891. at last he takes ber by the b. hand, Luer. 
1597. in b. white and the encrlmsoned mood, Compl. 
201. meagre , pale and b. II6B !11, 2, 162. thou 
remuant of that royal blood, R3 !, 2, 7. pale and b. 
emulation» Troil. !, 3» 134. struck pale and b. Tit. !11, 
1, 258. 
2) without shedding blood: with b. stroke 
m!t heart doth 9ore, Tw. !!, 5: 117. 
Blood-sa«rifi«e, sacrifice of the blood: 
cannot m. body nor b. entrent .ou fo !tour wonted further- 
ance. H6A V, 3, 20. 
Bloodshed, shedding of blood, slaughter: 
John IV, 3, 55. H4B IV, 5, 195. 
Bloodsheddillg, the same: H6B IV, 7, 108. 
BIoodstained, stained, coloured with 
blood: everu's Jïood... b. with these vali«nt comba- 
t«nts» H4A I, 3, 107. this unhllowed and b. hole, Tit. 
Il, 3, -°10. thy b..face, V, 3, 154 (0. Edd. blood-slain). 
BIoodosuCKer, 1) the vampire: pecnicios 
qf sleepin 9 men, H6B III, 2, 226. 2,) murderer: a 
knot you are of damned --s, R3 I!I, 3, 6. 
Blood-sueKiug, preying on the blood: 
si9hs , H6C IV, 4, 2:'. 
BIoodthirsty, desirous to shed blood: H6A 
!!, 3, 34. 
Blood-, (comp. bloodler, Mcb. V, 8, 7, superl. 
bloodiest, John IV, 3, 47) 1) stained with blood: 
here friend by friend in b. channel lies, Lucr. 1487. 
Sonn. 50, 9. hlids. V, 144. As IV, 3, 94. 139 etc. etc. 
2) consisting of blood: b. drops, As iii, 5, 
7. lust is but a b. 3îre, Wiv. V, 5, 99 (i. e. a tire of or 
in the blood), to break withbt the b. bouse of lire, John 
IV, 2, 210 (rather to be explained by a prolepsis). 
3) attended with bloodshed: b. death, Lucr. 
430. in b. fight  Pilgr. 280. Tp. [, 2, 142. Mens. 
4, 181. John I|I, 4» 148. H4B V, 4, 14. H5 Il, 4, 51. 
H6A ], 1, 156. Il, 2, 18 etc. the bloodiest shame 
the most shameful bloodshed, John IV» 3 47. in such 
b. distance, 5Icb. II|, 1,116. 
4) bloo dthirsty, cruel: the boat, that b. beast, 
Ven. 999. Lucr. 1648. Sonn. 16, 2. 129, 3. Tp. IV, 
220. Merch. ||I, 3, 34. IV, 1, 138. Tw. |I|» 4, 243. 
As I|, 3, 37. John IV, 1» 74. H6A ||, 5, 100. IV 2, 8. 
51. ¥, 4, 62. H6B III, 1, 128. H6C V: 5, 61. R3 IV, 
3» 6. Mcb. IV, 1, 79. V» 8, 7. 0th. V, 2, 44. 
5) blood-red: unwindgour b.jïag, H5 |, 2, 101. 
set up the b. flag, Cor. H, 1, 84. Caes. V. I, 14. 
B|0dy°fn«ed, of bloody appearauce: 



B 

« tlerne so b. as tMs (sc. war against tire king) : I-I4B 
1, 3, 22. 
Bloody.hunling, pnsning with blood- 
thirstlness: H«rod's . siçh:ermen, H3 III, 3, 41. 
Bloody.minded, bloodthirsty: H6B IV, 1, 
36. 6C 11, 6, 33. 
Bloody-seeptred, governed with a sceptre stained 
with blood: 0 nation miserable, with an uutitled 
ti/rant b. Mcb. IV, 3, 104. 
Bloom, snbst., 1) blossom: shall lave no sun 
to ripe the b. that promiseth a miht!l ri'uit, John I1, 
473. 2) state of youth and growing vigour: 
his ,l[a!l of i/outh and b. of htstlhood, Ado V, 1, 76. 
Biomn, rb, to flower, to put forth blos- 
soins: AdoMs' .qardens that one &ti/--ed and fruit.fui 
were the next, II6A I, 6, 7. 
Bl«ssmn subst., the flower of a plant: 
Pilgr. 229 and LLL IV, 3 103. Tp. V, 94. LLL ¥ 
2, 812. As 11, 3 64. H6A 11 4, 47 (a rose). 75. HçB 
111, 1, 89. Figuratively, a hopeful ehild: b., speed 
thee well, Wint. I11, 3, 46. O that this ood b. could be 
kept frora cankers» H4B 11, 2, 101. there died m!t Ica- 
rus, mlWb. It6A IV, 7, 1. whose rarest havb#s ruade 
the --s dot,', Compl. 235, i.e. those xvho were fttll of 
youth and rare promise (cf. R2 V, 2, 46). Ironi- 
cally: I/ou are a beauteous b. Tit. IV, 2, 72. In the 
--s  in the prime: already appearln in the --s of 
theb" fortune, Wint. ¥, 2, 135. eut off even in the --s 
of raff sln, Hnfl. I, 5, 76. 
BI«ssmn, rb., to put forth blossoms: H8 
II1, 2, 353. Oth. 11, 3, 383. --in# rime, Meas. 1, 4, 41. 
rnelt theb" sweets on --in# Caesar, Ant. IV, 1 °, 23. 
BIoI, subst., 1) a spot or stain on paper: 
nature, drawin# of an antick, rnade a foul b. Ado 111, 1, 
64. with ink!l --s and rotten parchraent bonds, R2 11, 
1, 64. 
) anything disfiguring: worsethan asla- 
vish wlpe or birth-hou," s b. Lncr. 537. the --s of Na- 
ture's hand Mids. V, 416. full of unpleasiny --s, John 
I11, 1, 45. 
Espeeially in a moral sense, = s t a i n, d i s g r a e e, 
reproaeh: Luer. 1322. Sonn. 36, 3.92, 13. 95, 11. 
Gentl. V, 4, 108. Err. I1, 2, 142. John 11, 114. R2 
IV, 3-95. V, 3, 66. H4A 1, 3, 162. H5 11, 2, 138. H6A 
11, 4, 116. H6B IV, 1, 40. R.3 Ill, 7, 234. Tit. I1, 3, 
183. Lr. I, 1, -930. rime bath set a b. upon n»!l prlde, 
R_ o III 2, 81. marked with a b, damned b the book 
ofheaven, IV, -036. 
Blot, rb., 1) to spot with ink: she wouldnot 
b. the letter with words, Luer. 132-'2. lere are a few 
of the Unlleasantest words that ever--ed paper, Merch. 
III, 2, 55. 
2) to stain; a) properly: llke rnsti/ vapours 
when thei/ b. the skiC Ven. 184. when clouds do b. the 
heaven, Sonn. 28, 10. b) flguratively: --in if (beauty) 
with blame, Ven. 796. before i/ou b. with i/our unclean- 
ness that which is divine, Luer. 19:2. b. with lell-born 
sln such saint-like forras, 1519. who can b. that naine 
with ani/ just reproach? Ado IV, 1, 81. a #ood raother 
that --s thi/ father, John II, 132. Absolutely: praise 
too short doth b., LLL IV, 3,241. 
3) to obliterate with ink; and henee to 
efface, to erase, to destroy: fo b. old books 
and alter their contents, Luer. 948. what wh sers down 
is --ed straiht with will, 1299. miWnaine be --ed from 
the book of llfe, R2 I, 3, '2-02. H6B I, 11 100. if --s 

tIi/ beauti/, Shr. V, -9, 139. forth of 
charms, tldne elles, are --ed, 0th. V, 1, 35. To b. out, 
in the saine sense: Hero itself can b. out Hero's virtue, 
Ado I¥, l, 83. to b. out me, a»d put his own son in» 
H6C II, 2, 92. as shall to tlee b. out what wron#s were 
theirs and write in thee the .figures of theb" love, Tire. 
¥, 1, 156. 
Bl«w, subst., violent application of the 
hand, ïist, or an offensive weapon: Tp. 111, 
 7_ 9. Err. Il, 1, 53. 11, , 37. 160. III, 1, 13.56. Tw. 
1 b 5, 75. R2 Il, l, _954. 11I, , 189. H5 IV, 8, 15. H6A 
I, 3, 69. III, 4 40. IV, 6, 19. H6B 1I, 3, 93. H6C 1, 1, 
12. l, 4, 50. Il, 1, 86. Il, 5, 81. R3 1¥, 4, 516. Cor. 
ll, 1, 268. Caes. ¥, 1, 7 etc. etc.; nsed even of a 
dagger: Lucr. 1725. 1823. totight a b. II6B l, 3, _920 
(Peter's spcech), fo strike a b. H6B 1¥, 7» 84. chop 
'.his hand off ai a b. H6C ¥, 1, 50..fall fo--s, H6B 
Il, 3, 81. were ai --s, Ant. Il, 6,44. Ifound them 
b. and thrust, Oth. Il, 3,238. 
Fi«nratively, anv injury or infliction of 
pain: how raan.y bcar sueh shameful --s, Lucr. 832. 
falls under the b. of thralled disconlent, Sonn. 124, 
what a b. was there given! Tp. 11, 1,180. LLL 
291. that gives hot Imlf so great a b. fo hear as will 
a ehestnut n a farrner's tire, Shr. 1; _'2,_909. how I took 
the b. Troil. l, .o, 294. 
Hence - punishment: meet the b. of just[cc 
Meas. Il, 2, ô0. that keeps I/ou from the b. of the law, 
Tw. lll, 4, 169. though fidl of out displcasure, i/et we 
çree thee from the dead b. of it, Wint. l'f, 4, 445. 
BI«w, rb., to flower, to bloom (partie. 
blown ; ofthe impf. no instance): eaten biWthe canker ere 
if b. Gentl. 1, 1, 46. LLL V, 2, 293. Mids. I1, 1,249. 
Per. III, .'2, 95. to b. up, Troil. I, 3, 317. JBlown  in 
full blossom: as chaste as is the bud ere if be blown, 
Ado IV, l, 59. roses blown, LLL "f, _9, 297. blow* 
I/outh, Hml. III, 1,167. with all his crimes broad blow», 
as flush as ][ai/, III, 3, 81. against the blown rose ma.y 
thei/ stop their nose that kneeled unto the buds, Ant. 
III, 13, 39 (-- the rose that bas done blossoming?) 
Blow, rb. (ilnpf. blew: John "f, 1, 17. R2 1, 4, 
7. H4B "f, 3, 89. II8 V, 3, 113. partie, blown: Ven. 
778. 826. 1071. Lucr. 647. 1330. Ado fil, 1, 66. 
LLL "f, 2, 409. Wint. l'f, 4, 8_'20. H4A IV, 2, 53. H4B 
Ind. 16 etc. etc. blowed: H5 III, 2, 96, in Macmorris' 
speech, and Oth.lll, 3, 182, in the readig ofthe Ff.). 
1) to more as air; a) intr.: b., till thon burst 
th. winil, Tp. 1, 1, 8. Err. III, 2, 153. IV, 1, 91. LLL 
"f, 2, 931. As Il, 7, 174. Wint. Il, 3, 154. l'f, 4, 552. 
R2 l, 4, 7. H6C Il, 5, 55. fil, 1, 86. 87. Iom. lll, 
6-L Cymb. l'f, 2, 172. followed by on: Tp. l, 2, 3:23. 
As Il, 1, 8. Il, 7, 49. followed by ai: to b. ai tire, 
Per. I, 4, 4. 
b trans.,a) to driveaeurrentofairnpon: 
I thon --est thefire, Lncr. 884. sorrow ebbs, bein blown 
with wind of words, 1330. air thl/ cheeks raa.y b. Iilgr. 
235 and LLL l'f, 3, 109. as thou#hts b. thern, Wiv. 
V, 5, 102. a vane blown with all winds, Ado III, 1, 66. 
--in# the tire, Shr. l'f, 1, 9. would b. I/ou throuh and 
throuh, Wint. l'f, 4, 112. I/ou bave blown this eoal» 
H8 Il, 4, 79. I/e blew thefire, "f, 3, 113. the ver.ports 
thei/ b. Mcb. I, 3, 15. do but b. them fo their trial, the 
bubbles are out, Hml. "f, 2, 201. fo blow one's halls: 
LLL V, 2, 923 and H6C Il, 5, 3 ; an expression also 
nsed to denote patient endurance: we raai/b, out halls 
toether and fast it fab'l.y out, Shr. I, 1, 109. 



B 1'2-3 

ff) to drive by a current of air: the wind 
wonld b. it off, Ven. 1089. --s the smoke fnto his face, 
Lucr. 312. 550. till ft b. up tain» 1788. blow hot a 
word awail, Gentl. I, 2, 118. blown round aSout the pen- 
dent world, Meus. I11, 1, 125. would b. me to an 
Merch. I» 1, 23. 168. Shr. I, 2, 49. All's 1, 1, 134. 
Wint. V, 3, 50. John III, 4, 128. v, 1, 17. V, 2, 50. 
H4B I, 1, 80. V, 3» 90. I!5111,6,161. H6BIII, 1,350. 
IV, 8, 57. H6C I, 4, 145. 11, 5, 86. III, 1, 84. 85. V, 
3, 11. ¥, 4, 3. Cor. V, 2, 80. Hlnl. 11» 2» 599. Oth. 11I, 
3, 445. Per. 1, 0`, 39. 
y) to pnt in some statc by a entrent of 
air or breath: to fan and b. them dril, Vert. 52. 
their ligl, t 5lown out, 826. small liffhts are soon blown 
out, Luer. 647. Shr. II, 136. John 
86. Cor. V, _'2, 48. 
2) to breathe, to pant, to pnff; a) intr. 
sweating and --ing and lookbg wildIIl, Wiv. III, 3, 94. 
-- b) trans.: mil sighs are 5lown awail, mil salt tears 
#one, Vcn. 1071. from lips new-waxen pale be#ins fo 
5. the #rief awail that stops hfs answer so, Lucr. 1663 
(i. e. begins to speak), titles blownfi'om adulation, 115 
IV, 1,271. that breath lame --s, Troil. |, 3, 244. the 
devotion which cohl lips b. to their deities, IV, 4, 29. 
when I shall turn the 5ushess qf mail soul to such ex- 
sufflicate and blown surmlses, Oth. III, 3, 182, i. e. 
perhaps = puffed out, empty; sec sense 3. 
3) to inflate, to swell: how imagination 
hlm, Tw. I1, 5, 48. fl --s a man up like a bladder, 
H4A 11, 4, 366. 5lown Jack» IV, 0`, 53. ne'er through 
an arch so hurried the blown ride, Cor. V, 4, 50. blown 
amabition, Lr. IV, 4, 27. this --s mil heart, Ant. IV, 6, 
34 (makes it full to burstlng), a vent of blood and 
somethlng blown,V, 2,352. out blown sails, Per.V, 1,256. 
4) to sound a wind-instrument, toproduce 
the sound of a wind-instrnment: a) trans.: ri'oto mine 
ear the tempting tune fs blown, Vert. 778. fo b. a horn 
5efore ber, John I, 219. a pipe blown bil surmises, 
H4B Ind. 16. let the gênerai trumpet b. his blast, H6B 
V, 2, 43. b. tlii blast, Cor. 1, 4 12. 'tls well blown, 
Ant. IV, 4, 
b) intr.: when the 5last of war --s b out ears, 
115 I11, 1, 5. trumpet b. loud, Troil. I, 3, 256. IV, 5, 
11. 275. 
c) having as object that which is the effect of the 
sound: the loud trumpet --fng them together tt4B 
1» 122. 
5) to throw up into the air: the cannon, 
when it bas 5lown his ranks into the air, Oth. 11I, 
135. he stands there like a mortar-piece to 5. us, H8 
V, 4, 48. and 5. them at the moon, tI:nl. 111, 4, 209. 
2" 5. up, in the same sense: will undermine Ilou and 
b. Ilou up, All's i, 1, 130. /I5 111, 2, 68.96. rail heart 
wfll be 5lown up 5il the foot, Troil. lV, 4, 56 (a quibble). 
6) to foui, to sully with ordure, applied 
to flics: to suffèr the flesh-flil 5. mail maouth, Tp. 11I, 1, 
63. with flles 5lown to death, Wint. IV, 4, 820. let the 
water-flies b. me fnto aShorrfng, Ant. V» 2, 60. Also, 
to deposit eggs: summerflies that quicken even with 
--ing, Oth. IV, 2, 67. these summerflies bave blown mue 
fidl of ma99ot ostentation, LLL V, 2, 409. 
Blo,çer-up, one who blows sth. up by the force 
of gunpowder: 51ess our poor vb'ginitil from under- 
mh*ers and blowers-up! All's I, 1,132. 
Blov$e a ruddy fat-faced weneh: Tit. 
I¥, 2 72. 

Bluhber, to weep so as to wet the mouth 
and cheeks: --ing andweepin#, weeph and 
om. II1» 3, 87. In H4BII, 4,40`1 it is nsed only in a 
stage-direction. 
B|«e, adj., one of the seven original colours: 
Viv. V, 5» 74. LLL V, 2» 904. Wint. II» 1» 13. 15. 
Shr. III, , 69. Tim. IV, 3, 181. B/ne the colour 
the drcss of servants: Shr. IV, , 93. H6A I, 3, 47. 
I to phch or beat black and blue: Wiv. IV, 5, 115. Err. 
II» 0`, 194. Tw. I1, 5, 1.'2. blue alone: pinch the maids 
as b. as bilberT, Wiv. V, 5, 49. The rainbow called 
blue: Lucr. 1587 (cf. All's I, 3, 157). Tp. IV»80. Troil. 
I, 3» 180. Light amidst darkness callcd blue: the liflds 
burn b.; il is now dead midniht, R3 V, 3, 180. the 
cross b. ligtnb, Caes. 1, 3, 50. Mountains : the skilish 
head of b. Olilmpus, Ilml. V, 1,277. or b. promontoril 
with trees upon't, Ant. IV, 14,5. Veins shining through 
the skin: ber two b. windows (riz. the eyclids)faintlil 
she up-heaveth, Vert. 482. b. vefns, Lucr. 440 (cf. 
Sonn. 99, 3). ber b. blood changed to black fn everil 
vein, 1454. and here mil bluest veins to kfss, Ant. I1, 
5, '2.9. cf. Cymb. II» _'2» _03. -- The black circle round 
the eyes causcd by much wcepng or sorrow: round 
about ber tear-distained elle b. ch'cles streamed» Lucr. 
1587. a lcan check, a b. elle and sunken, Asi11»_'2»393. 
Bine, subst. : ber breasts, like fvorff fflobes c5"cled 
with b. Lucr. 407. the aerial b. Oth. 11 1, 39. the en- 
closed llghts, now canopied under these windows, white 
and azure laced with b. of heaven' s own tinct, Cymb. 
I1» .'2, 0.3. -- Name of a certain flower (corn-flower?) : 
the Ilellows, the 51ues, the purple volets, Per. IV, 1, 15. 
Blue-l»ottle, a fly with a large bine belly: 
b. rogue, II4B V, 4, 0.0. (Ff. blue-bottled), an allusion 
to the blue dress of the beadles. 
Bine-cap, a naine given to the Scotch ff'oto their 
blue bonnets: II4A Il, 4, 390.. 
Blue-eyed, having a blueness, a black circle 
abou the eyes (cf. As III, 0., ô93" : this b. ha#, Tp. I, 
2, 269.* 
BI«e-veined, having blue veins: b. vfolets Vcn. 
10.5. 
Bluish, blue in a small dcgree: b. tnsel, Ado 
III, 4, 0.2. 
Bluner, see Blomer. 
Blunt, adj., 1) having a thick edge, not 
sharp: thil (love's) edffe should --er be than appetite, 
Sonn. 56, 2. as b. as the fencers" foils, Ado ¥, 2, 13. 
R3 IV» 4, 226. Troil. I, 3, 316. 
2) dull in understanding: b. Thurfo, Gcnfl. 
II, 6, 41. of so easil and so plain a stop that the b. 
monster with uncounted heads can plail upon it, tt4B 
Ind. 18. Err. IV, 2» 0`1. 
3) rough, regardless, harsh: nogentle chase, 
but the b. boat, rough heur, or lion proud, Ven. 884. 
a shm T wft maatched with too b. a will: whose edge 
bath power to cut, whose will still wills it should none 
's pare that corne within his power, LLL II, 49. wfth 
hastil Germans and b. Hollanders, H6C IV, 8, 2. that 
Clarence is so harsh, so b., unnatural, to bend the fatal 
instruments of war agalnt hls brother, V, 1, 86. Ihave 
too lon 9 borne .your b. upbraidings , R3 1, 3, 104. 
4) plain, nneeremonions: a9oodb..fello , 
John I, 71. Ijudge 5il his blunt bearin 9 he will keep 
his word» H5 lV 7, 185. a plafn b. man Caes. fil» 2, 
222. (Shr. Il» 45 and III, 2, 137) 
5) elumsy, awkward: tMs fs too curious-9ood , 



124 

tMs b. and ill, Lucr. 1300. 1504. Sonn. 103» 7. Ado ! 
II1» 5» 12 (in Dogberry's speech). Merch. I1» 7» 8. Shr. 
i1» 45. III, 2» 13. H6B IV» 1, 67. H6C III, 2» 83. Caes. 
I, 2, 299.«Hml. III, 4, 182 (Qq blowt, M. Edd. bloat). 
Cymb. V» 5» 325. 
Blunt, vb, to dulltheedgeof» to repress» 
weaken» impair: devourfng rime, b. thou the lion's 
paws, Sonn. 19, 1. --ing the fine point of seldom 
pleasure» 52» 4. b. the sharpest iutents» 115» 7. b/ 
--in 9 us to rnake onr wits more keen, Compl. 161. b. 
his uatural edge» Meas. I» 4, 60. Err. IL 1» 93. II4A 
III» .'2» 77. H4B IV, 4» 27. V» 2» 87. Mcb. IV» 3» 229. 
ttml. III, 4 111. 
Blunt, naine: 1) tle Ieads of Ox.ford, Salisbur., 
B. and Kcnt, R2 V, 6, 8. 2) Sir Walter B., H4A 1, 
1.63. II1 .'2, 162. IV, 3 32. V, 3 20. II4B I, l» 16 
(both te --s). 3) H4B IV, 3, 81. 4) Sir James B. 
R3 IV, 51 1 l. V» ôl 30 êtc. 
Bluntly, uncercmoniously, impolitely: 
no more but plain and b. 'to the kiug ; tI6A IV, 1 51. 
good news or bad, that thou cou, est in so b.? R3 IV» 3» 
45. deliver a plaiu message b, Lr. I» 4, 36. 
Bluutness, uncerelnoniousness » rude 
l, lainness: who, having been praised for b, doth 
affect a saucj roughness» Lr. II, » 102. 
Bluu¢-vilted rude and stupid: H6B 111 2, 210. 
Blur, subst., ablot, a stain: Lucr. 222. 
,Blur, rb, to stain, to dsfigure: th.issue 
-- d with nameless bastard., Lucr. 522. never jet did 
base dishonour b. out naine, H6B IV, l, 39. such an 
act that --s the grace and blush of modest.» Hml. III» 
4, 41. rime bath nothing --'d those lines of favour 
which then he wore, Cymb. IV, 2» 104. 
Blurt, rb., followed by at  to pish at, fo 
hold in contempt: whilst ours was --ed at» Per. 
IV, 3, 34. 
Blush» rb, to redden in the face: Ven. ô3. 
Lucr. 54. 479. 792. 1344. Sonn. 67,10. 99, 9. Pilgr. 
130. 351. Gentl. V, 4, 104. 165. Ado IV, 1, 35. 161. 
LLL I, » 106. 138. IV» 3, 129. lôl. Merch. II, 6» 38. 
As l, 1, 163. Il, 7, 119. All's 11»3»76. V,3, 140. Wiut. 
!11, 2 32. 1¥, 4» 12. John IV» 1» 113. V, 2, 153. R2 
III, 2» 51. H4A I1, 4, 344. V» 2, 62. II4B II, 2, 81. 
H5 V» 2» 117. tt6A II, 4, 66. IV, 1» 93. H6B III, 1, 
95. I11» 2, 167. H6C I, 4, 46. 115. V, 1, 99. R3 I, 
2, 57. I, 4 141. HS 11, 3, 42. Troil. I, _'2, 180. III, 
2, 10S. Tir. 111, 1, 15. lom. 11I 3» 39. Lr. I» 1» 10. 
Ant. I» 1, 30. III, 11, 12. V» 2» 149. Per. 1, 1, 135 
etc. --ing red, Lucr. 1511. tle--ing morrow» 10S2. 
cf. John V» 5» 2. R2 III, 3» 63. t]e --btg rose, Vert. 
590. lis --ing honours :i. e. blossoms) H8 III, 2, 354. 
to b. like a black dog (  to bave a brazen face) Tit. 
V, 1» 122. Followed by at: Lucr. 1750. Sonn. 128, 
8. Compl. 307. John IV, 3, 76. H5 I» 2» 299. H6B 
II, 4» 48. Cor. V, 6» 99. Oth. I, 3, 96. Followed by 
ou: --i,g on Ier ( --ing in looking at ber) Lucr. 

Bluster, rb., used only in the partic, blustering 
 boisterous, tempestuous: storm., 
weather, Lucr. 115. rnake fair weather in jour 
land, John V, 1, 21. a tempest and a --ing daj, H4A 
V, 1, 6. earl. in --ing rnorn, Per. V, 3, 22. 
Bluster, subst., boisterous tempest: threaten 
present --s, "Vint. III, 3, 4. in the b. of th. wrath, 
Tire. V, 4, 41. 
Blusterer, a boisterous fellow: a reverend 
man,.., sornetime a b. tat the ruffle knew of court, of 
cit., Compl. 58. 
BlusCerous, tempestuous: a more b. birth ad 
never babe» Per. III, 1, 28. 
Boat, the maie swine: Ven. 410.588. 589. 
641. 884. 1115. Pilgr. 126. Mids. II, 2» 31. Shr. 1, 
2, 203. H4B I1» _'2» 159. R3 II1» 2, 11.28.75. III, 4, 
84. IV, 5» 2. V, 2, 7. V, 3, 156. Tit. IV, 2, 138. Tire. 
V, 1, 168. Ant. I1» 2, 183. IV, 13, 2. Cymb. II, 5, 16. 
lloard, subst. (cf. aboard). 1) a piece of titu- 
ber sawed rhin: slips are but --s, Merch. 1,3, 22. 
2) tab le: fed from my trencler, kneeled down at 
tle b. H6B IV, 1, 57. I would bave left it on tle b. 
Cymb. III, 6» 51. at b. Err. III» 2, 18. v. 64. b. and 
bed: Mids. V, 31. As V, 4, 148. Oth. I11 3, 24. 
3) an authorized assembly: te Ionourabte 
b. o.fcounil, H8 I, 1, 79. 
Board, b., 1) fo enter (a ship) by force: 
--ed the king's ship, Tp. I, 2, 196. Wiv. 11, 1, 93. Tw. 
V, 65. tI6B IV, 9, 33. IIml. IV, 6, 18. Oth. l, 2» 50. 
Figuratively,  to accost, t« address, to woo: 
he would never bave --ed me in thls fur., Wiv. 11, 1, 
,92. I ara sure he is lu the fleet: 1 would he had 
I me, Ado lI, 1,149. LLL Il» 218. 8r. I» 2, 95. AIl's 
V»3, 211. Tw. I, 3, 60. Hml. Il, 2, 170. bear up and 
b. "em ( drink). Tp. III, 2, 3. 
2) to furnish with food: we cannot lod9e 
and b. a dozen or fourteeu 9entlewom«n, H5 Il, 1, 35. 
Boarish, appertaining to a boar: b. fangs, 
Lr. III, 7, 58. 
Boar-p|g, a y o u n g b o a r: Bartholornew b. H4B 
Il» 4, 251. 
Boa¢-slea¢, a spear used in hunting boars: 
Asl, 3, 120. R3111,274. 
Boast, rb., to brag, to make an ostent- 
atious display of sth.; 1) absolutely: w. s]tould 
proud summer b., LLL I, 1, 102. out --ing enem, 
6- III, 21 103. Troil. IV, 5, 290. Cor. Il, 1,23. Mcb. 
IV, 1, 153. Oth. I, _'2, 20. Cymb. V, 5, 18. upon 
death the French can little b., in dours the. will H6A 
IV, 5, 24. 
Followed by a superfluous it: nor should that nation 
b. it so with us, H6A III, 3» 23. 
2) followed by a elause, or by an infinitive: he 
shall hot b. that thou art ...» Luer. 1063. thou shalt 
not b. that I do change, Sonn. 123, 1. she rna d b. she 
bath beheld the man» H6A II» 2» 42. to b. how I do 

1339. love thee, Sonn. 26, 13. the patience that you so oft 
With an ,acus. indicating the effect;  to express bave --ed to retab» Lr. III, 6, 62. III» 7, 19. 
by blushes- I 11 b. you thanks, Wint. IV, 4, 595. I 3) followed by of: of publlc houour and proud titles 
Blush: subst., red eolour suffusing the[b., Sonn. 25, 2. 86, 11. 91, 1"2. Gentl. lI, 4»lll. John 
eheeks: Ven. 558. Ado 1¥, 1, 43. As I» 2, 31. H6C III, 1, 53. R2 I, 1, 52. I, 3, 273. H4A I, 1, 77. H51¥, 
III» 3» 97. Troil. I, 3, 228. Rom. II, 2» 86. Tire. IV» 8» 120. H6A IV, 1, 44. H6CI, 4, 159. Cymb.lI, 3,85. 
3, 386. Hml. 111, 4, 41. 82. Plur. --es: Lucr. 55. 4) followed by an accusative denoting the effect: 
Compl. 200. 304. Meas. lI, 4, 162. Ado IV, 1, 163. when beaut.--ed blushes ( showed ostentatiously) 
All's ll 3, 75. 1¥» 3, 373. Wint. IV, 4, 67. H5 V, Lucr. 55. do hot stalle at me that I b. ber off, Tp. 
2. 2,53. 9, i. e. cry her up for your acceptance, t'hat caust 



B 125 

thou b. of tMngs long Mate, or an S thing ensugn9. Ven. 
1077 (here what may be interpreted otherwise; cf. 
What). 
5) reflectively: --s himself to bave a worths feed- 
ing» SVint. IV, 4, 168. ever. present time doth b. itself  
above a better gone, V, 1, 96. now b. thee, death, Ant. 
¥, 2, 318. 
Boast, sub»t.» expression of ostentation 
or pride: n. b. is true, Compl. 246. Mids. I, 1, 103. 
As IV, 3, 91. Oth. V, 2, 264. Cymb. 1I, 3, 116. V, 5, 
162. Per. IV, 6, 195. m S resolution shall be th. b. 
Lucr. 1193. I could make as true a b. as that, H5 
III, 7, 66. when ever., thing doth nake a gleeful b. 
Tir. II,3, 11, i. e. shows its joy exuhingly. Followed 
by of: hls b. of Lucrece' soverelgnt., Lucr. 36. nake 
no b. of if, Ado III, 3, 20. As II, 5, 38. Followed by 
an infin.: cannot nake b. fo bave, Troil. I!!, 3, 98. 
Boastful, vaunting: steed threatens steed in 
hlgh and b. neighs piercing the night' s dull ear, H5 IV 
Chor. 10. 
BDat, a small vessel: Sonn. 80,11. OEp. l, 
2, 146 (O. Edd. butt). Gentl. II, 3, 60. Err. 1, 1, 77. 
Tw. 1, 2, 11. H6A IV, 6, 33. R3 IV, 4, 524. Troil. I, 
3, 35.42. Il, 3, 277. Cor. IV, 1, 6. Lr. III, 6, 28. 
Oth. II, 3, 65. Ant. II, 7, 136. Cymb. II, 4, 72. III, 
1» 21. IV, 3, 46. Per. III, 1, 13. 
Boatsxvain, an officer on board a ship: Tp. I, 1, 
1.10. 13. !!» 2, 48. V» 99. Per. IV, 1, 64. 
Bob, rb., 1) to more in a short, jerking 
manner: when she drinks against her llps lb. lIids. 
Il, 1 49. 
2) to drub, to thump: beaten--ed and 
thumped» R3 V, 3 334. I bave --ed his brain more 
than he bas beat n.y bones Troil. Il, 1, 76. 

Bodied. having a body: ill faced»'worse b. 
Err. IV, 2, 20. 
Bodiless, incorporeal, unsubstantia!: thls 
b. creation ecstas.y is ver.y cunning in Itml. III 4, 138. 
Bodily, adj., 1) concerning the body: 
b. heallh, H4B II, 2, 111. some b. wound» Oth. I!, 3, 
267. the dearest b. part of .your mistress, Cymb. I, 
4, 162. 
2) hot only thought» but real: what (counsels) 
ever bave been thought on in this state» that could be 
brought fo b. act ere Rome had circumvention? Cor. I, 
2, 5. 
Bodkin, a sharp instrument to make holes 
by piercing: what is this? a clttern-head; the head 
a b. LLL V, 2, 615. betwixt the jïrmament and hSOU 
cannot thrust a ---'s point» Vint. III, 3, 87. when he 
himself night his quietus nake wlth a bare b. Itml. 
III, 1, 76. In HmL Il, _'2, 554 Qq God's bodkin, f. 
bodykins. 
Body, subst., 1) the frame of an animal: 
though nothi»g but m S --'s bane would cure thee, Ven. 
372. Lucr. 1266. Tp. IV, 191. V, 109. Gentl. V, 4. 
134. Wiv. II, 2, 145. I!, 3, 40. hIeas. Il, 4, 54. III, 
, 188. V, 97. 210. Fer. I 2 100. II, 2, 134. lll, 2, 
118. IV, 3, 9. LLL V, 2, 100. Met-ch. I» 3, 152. III, 
2 267. All's I¥, 5» 86. tI6B !I!, 2, 34. Tit. !! 4, 17. 
Oth. IV, 1, 217 etc. etc. of his own b. he was ill 
he himself was given to fleshly sia) II8 IV, 2, 43. till 
I bave issue of m., b. All's I, 3, 27. R3 IV, 4 57. a 
child begotten ofth. b. All's III, 2, 61. II6A II, 5, 72. 
first-fruits of n. b. Wint. I!I, 2, 9$. -- squires of the 
night's b. H4A I, 2 28. -- God's b.! II4A II l, 29 
(oto. Ff.). b. o' ne, where is if? II8 V, 2, 22?-- Used 
as masc. and fera. according to the gender of the 

3) to get cunningly: gold and jewels that 1 )erson: Sonn. 151, 7. Tit. I!, 4, 17. 
--edfrom him, as gifts to JDesdemona, Oth. ¥, 1, 16. 2) corpse: H6A II 2, 4. lV 7» 57. II6B IV» 1, 
Sou shall hot b. us out of our nelbd.» Troil. III, 145. Hnfl. IV, 2, 28.*1V, 3, 1. V» 2 411 etc. etc. 
1, 75.  3) shapc in general: th. captain is even such a 
Bob, snbst., a rap, a dry wipe: he that afool b. Ant. IV, 14, 13. 
doth ver S wisel. hit doth ver. foolishl. , although he 4) person: unworth S b. as I ara, Gentl. I, 2, 15. 
smart hot to seen senseless of lhe b. As Il, 7, 55. lhe damned'st b. hlcas. I11, 1, 96. aa eminent b. IV 4 
Botail, with a tail cut short: b. tike or, 25. V, 210. a reverentb. Err. III, 2, 91. n S little b. is 
trundle-tail» Lr. III, 6, 73. ] awear. of this great world, Merch. 1, 2, 1. a b. would 
. Boeehus (O. Edd..Bochus): .B. the king ofLib.a, I think, As IV, 3, 166. an hast.witted b. Shr. V, 2, 40. 
2nt. III, 6, 69. I nock .our workings in a second b. H4B ¥, 2, 90. I 
Bo.de, 1) absol, t o b e o m in o u s; in a bad sense: I commit n. b. to sour mercies, V, 5, 130. and bave out 
n S --ng heart pants, beats, and takes no rest, Ven. --ies slauhtered H6A III, 1,101. to attach the --ies 
647. --ing screech-owls, H6B III, 2, 327. I would of the duke's confessor etc. H8 I, 1, 217. an. nortol 

croak like a raven, I would b., I would b. Troil. V, 2, 
191. the raven o'er the infected bouse, --ing fo all, 
Oth. I¥, 1, 22. 
2) trans., fo portend, to foreshow (in a 
good as well as a bad sense): ITra. God his bad voice 
b. no mischie Ado I1, 3, 83. he brushes hls bat o'norn- 
ings; what should that b. ? Ado III, 2, 42. Shr. V, 2, 
107. 108. H6B I, 2, 31. IIl, 2, 85. H6C II, 1, 39. Tit. 
II, 3 195. Rom. I, 4, 91. Oth. IV, 3, 59. V, 2, 246. fo 
b. sth. fo one: invert what best is --d me to nischie.f 
Tp. III, 1, 71. this --s some strange eruption to out 
state, Hml. I, 1, 69. 

b. Tit. 11, 3, 103. to keep those man.y --ies sale, Hml. 
III, 3 9. cf. ansbods, somebod.y and nobod.y. -- fo corne 
under one --'s hand, SViv. I 4 105. 
5) the main part, the bulk: the b. ofj/our 
discourse is sometime guarded with fragments, Ado I» 
1,287. the.y would blnd me here unto the b. of a dismal 
.yew Tit. II 3» 107» i. e. to the trunk. Hence  any- 
thing that constitutes the essential and vital part of 
sth. : thus most invectivel.y he pierceth through the b. of 
the country, citg, court, gea, and of this out lire, As II 
1 59. I will through and through cleanse the foul b. 
of the infected world, 11, 7» 60. Sou perceive the b. o.f 

Bodement, presage: thls foolish girl makes ail our kingdom how foul if is, H4B II1, 1, 38. to show the 
these --s, Troil. V, 3, 80. sweet --s! Mcb. IV, 1, 96. I ver.y age and b. of the time his form and pressure r 
Bodge, eridently  to badge (cf. H4A II, 4, 388. [ I4_ml. 1II, 2, 26. $$:ith a play upon the word: such a 
Cor. I, 6, 44, mad budget), to yield, to give way: I deed as from the b. of contraction plucks the ver. soul, 
with this, we charged again: but, out, alas ! we --d[lll, 4, 46. « 
agab,tI6CI, 4,19. I 6) the whole of. collectivc mass: nerer 



B 

such a power was levied in the b. of a land, John IV, 
2, 112. in the b. of this flesM3t land, 245. the voice 
md ielding of that b. whereof he is the head (i. e. the 
state) Hml. I, 3 23. the charters that you bear n the 
b. of the weal, Cor. Il, 3 1S9. whether that the b. public 
be a horse whereon t£e governor doth ride heas. I,  
163. t£e public b. Tire. V l, 148. the common b. ( 
the pcoplc)» Cor. ll  57. Ant. I 4 44. Per. lll 3» 21. 
 arlned force, arlny: we a»e a b. strog 
enou9h to equal whh the king, H4B I, 3, 66. 
Body, rb., to shape, to invest with a body: as 
imctgination ies forth the form of things unknown, 
hlids. V, 14. 
Boy-eurer, a physician for the body: 
soul-curer and b., Yiv. III, 1 100. 
Boê-Kis, a scurrilous exclamation: Wiv. 11, 3 
46. God's b. tIml. Il, 2, 554 (Qq bodkin). 
Bog, quagmire: Tp. 11» 2, 2. Err. III, 2» 121. 
hIids, lll 1» 110. It5 111, 7, 61. Lr. 111, 4 54. 
Boggie, to start off» to swerve, to be in- 
consistent: you b. sl»'ewdly every feather starts 
you, All's V, 3,232. 
Boggler, a swerver, inconstant woman: 
you bave been a b. ever Ant. 111, 13, 110. 
Boemia, naine of a Gean country: Wint. l, 
1, . 1, , 39 (at B.). 11I, 3, 2 etc.  king of B.: l, 
1, 24. 1, 2, 230. 334. IV, 4, 599 etc. 
Bohemian, adj. pertaining to Bohemia: here's 
a B. Ta»tar Viv. IV, 5 21. subst.: a B. bo»n Me. 
IV, 2, 134. 
Bohun naine: now, poor dwa»d B. H8 ll l, 
103. 
Boii subst., see Bile. 
Boii, vb. 1) intr. to svcll with heat; pro- 
perly and figuratively: ber blood doth b. Ven. 555. 
thy b»ains, now useless b. within thy skull, Tp. V, 60. 
where I bave seen corruption b. a»d bubble hleas. V» 
320. his --i 9 bloody breast, Mids. V, 148. in 9 
choler H6A V 4 120. b. thou fi»st i' the charmed pot» 
Mcb. IV, 1, 9. b. and bake, 13. b. and bubble 19. 
2) trans, to steep or cook in heated wa- 
ter: let me be ed to death with melancholy, Tw. Il, 
5 3. what flaying --ing Wint. 111, 2, 177. these 
ed brabs of nineteen and two and twenty, 111,3,64. 
choice doth b. as "twere from forth us all, a man 
distilled out of oto" vrtues, Troil. 1, 3,349 ( iu a 
retort), he might have ed and eaten him too Cor. 
IV, 5 01 (M. Edd. broiled), such --ed stuff, Cymb. 
1, 6 125 (i. e. cvlne out of the powdering-tub). 
Boisterous, the very contrary to 9entle; wild, 
intractable, rudely violent, noisy and tu- 
multuous: his b. and unruly beast, Ven. 326. with 
a base and b. sword,  11 3 32. "ris a b. and a cruel 
style, IV 3, 31. feelin 9 what small things are b. there 
(in the eye) John IV, 1, 95. to ake 9ood the b. te 
appeal, R2 l, 1, 4. roused up with b. untuned d»»ns, 
l, 3 134. the harsh and b. tongue of war, H4B IV, 1 
49. an honour snatched with b. hand, 1V,5, 192. 0 b. 
Clord thou hast slain the ower of Europe, H6C 
Il, 1 70. the waters swell belote a b. storm, R3 II, 3 
44. it (love) is too rou9h too rude, too b. Rom. I, 4, 
26. the bleak air thy b. chamberlain Tire. 1V, 3, 222. 

snatched wlth an unrul. hand must e as b. maintained 
as gained, John 11I, 4, 136. 
Boisterous-rough, rudely violent: what 
need tou be so b.? John IV, 1, 76 (O. Edd. without 
hyphen). 
Boht, adj., 1) of high courage, daring; in 
a good sense: b. Ifector» Lucr. 1430. b. Leanderæ 
Gentl. III, 1, 120. Ven. 401. Lucr. 1559. Pilgr. 163. 
Tp. Il, 1, 117. As 17 2, 184. Meas. III, 1, 215. H6B 
IV, 4, 60. H6C IV, 8, 10 etc. etc. rin9"d about with b. 
adverslt.y, H6A IV, 4, 14. -- Used of an imposing ex- 
ternal appearance: b. oxlips, Wint. IV, 4, 125. who's 
that that bears the sceptre? ][arquess 19orset. A b. 
brave 9entleman, II8 IV, 1, 40. 
o) impudent: men can cover crimes with b. stern 
looks, Lucr. 1252. as bad as those that vulars 9ire 
--est titles7 Vïnt.ll, 1,94. these --er vices, III, 2, 56. 
John IV, 3, 76. R2 V, 3, 59. H6A IV, 1, 103. H6B 
111, 2, 238. H6C 11, 2, 85. 118 V, 3, 84. Lr. I, 4, 263. 
IV,6, -035. Oth. 1,1,129 etc. make his b. waves tremble, 
Tp. 1, 2, 205. the b. winds speechless, Hml. II, 2, 507. 
3) hot timorous, confident: defect ofspirit, 
lire, and b. audacit.y, Lucr. 1346. wMch ma!ces me the 
er to chide tou, Gentl. 1I, l, 89. be b., I pra. 
Wiv. V, 47 2. let me be b.; 1 do arrest 3tour words, 
Meas. 11, 4, 133. maki»9 the b. wa 9 b3t their Fraises 
--er, LLL V, 2, 108. Mids. I7 1, 59. Merch.ll, 27 190. 
-011. II, 7, 70. All's IV, 5, 97. H6A 111, 1, 63. H6B 
1, 1, 29. Troil. 1,3, 192. Tobesob.totakethe 
liberty: if your maid ma3t be so b., she would request 
..., Lucr. 1282. to sa3t the3t err 1 date hot be so b. 
Sonn. 131, 7. l'll be so b. to break the seal, Gentl. 
III 7 1, 139. l'll be so b. as sta.y, Wiv.IV, 5, 13. let me 
be so b. as ask you, Shr. l, 2, 251. ma.y I be so b. to 
know the cause of 3tour coming? Shr. Il, 88. H5 III, 
2» 152. V, 17 12. 116AII, 1,78. Tit. IV, 3,90. To 
be b., in the saine sense: »a.y I be b. to thlnk these 
spirits? Tp. IV, 119. I date be b. whh our discourse 
to make .yeur 9race fo stalle, Gentl. V, 4, 162. iv. 
IV, 5, 54. Shr. 1, 2, 219. Il, 51. All's III, 6, 84. H=A 
111,2, 134. 116A11,3,25. H6BI, 3, 96. H811,1, 
72. IV, 1, 13. Cor. II, 1, 106. Tire. Il, 
Sometimes  confident : be b. to pla3t, out Iola3t is hot 
in si9ht, Vcu. 124 (--- play confidently), therefore to 
glve them from me was I b. Sonn. 1227 11. then be 
b. to say 3assanio's dead, hlerch. 111, 2, 187. that 
mcty you be b. to sa.y, Tw.175, 12. To make so b. 
and to make b., in the smne sense: l'll make so b. to 
call, Mcb. ll 3, 56. mokin 9 so b. to unseal their grand 
commission, Hml. V, 2, 16. I make b. to press upon 
you 7 Wiv. 117 2, 162. you ruade b. to carry into Flan- 
ders the great seal, 118 1117 2, 318. Oth. III, 17 35. 
Cymb. l, 6, 197. To be b., or to make b. whh  to 
make free with: I will first make b. with your 
money, Wiv. Il, 2, 262. I will only be b. wlth Benedick 
for his company, Ado 111, 2, 8. if I eut my finger, 1 
shall make b. with you, hlids. III, 1, 187. I will be b. 
with rime and your attention, H8 Il, 4, 168. that (one 
of your nine lires) I mean to make b. withal, Rom. 
1117 1, 81. (to be b. with one  towaxds one: Shr. 1, 
2» 104. Oth. 1117 3, 228). In a similax sense: we are 
too b. upon tour test» Caes. 11, 1, 86. 

each small annexment attends the b. ruin, Ihnl. 111, 3 4) confident, trusting: be b. tou do so 9row 
22. this more stubborn and b. expedition» Oth. 17 in m3t requital, All's V, 1, 5. I ara b. ber honour will 
3, 228. remain hers, Cymb. 11, 4, 2. m3/ hopes, hot surfeited 
Boisterousi.v, with rude violeuee: a sceptre to death, stand in b. cure, Oth. Il, 17 51. Followed 



B 127 

by qf: b. of gour wortMness, we single gon ..., LLL 
lI» 28. Followcd by in: be b. in us» Tit. V» 1, 13. /te 
is b. in his defence, Lr. V, 3, 115. -- 3"0 make b. ---- 
to confidc: w/tlc/t l'll make b. your /tig/tness cannot 
deng, Cymb. V, 5, 89. 
Bold» rb.» to embolden» encourage: 
touchet/t us, es France invades out land, hot --s t/te 
king, Lr. V, 1, 26. 
Bold-beaing, apparently - browbeatlng: 
.your b. oat/ts, Wiv. Il, 2, 28. 
Bolden, to embolden, encourage: art t/ton 
thus --ed b. t/t. distress, As II» 7, 91. but cm --ed 
under gour promisedpardon, H8 1, 2, 55. 
Bold- faeed, of a courageous and confi- 
dent look: and like a b. suitor 'gins to woo /tlm, 
Ven. 6. b. victor., tI6A IV, 6, 12. 
Bohlly, 1) courageonsly: leas. V, 299. 
I, 1» 145. II, 1, 233. IV, 133. H4A V, 1, 40. H6B 
V, 1 86. tI6CIII, 3, 44. R3 V, 3»269. H8 III, l, 
39. V, 3, 56. Ces. II, 1, 172. Ant. III» 13, 47. 
2) confidently: t/tus far I will b. publis/t /ter, 
Tw. 11, 1, 30. we ma. b. spend upon t/te/tope of w/rat 
is to corne in, II4A IV, 1, 54. Wiut. I, 2, 74. 
Boldness, 1) courage: if wit fiow'om it as b. 
from n*. bosom, Wint. II, 2, 53. John V, 1, 56. Troil. 
III, 2» 121. 
2) freedom from timidity, assurance: 
wMlst my poor lips at t/te wood' s b. bu thee bhshing 
stand, Soun. 128, 8..ou call /tonorable b. bnpudent 
sauciness» H4B 11, 1, 134. 8hr. II» 89. Tw. V» 73. 
Wint. 1II» 2» 219. H8 V» 1, 161. 
3) confidence: in te b. of m. cunnivg, Meus. 
IV, 2, 165 ( confidence in my cunning), cf..Bold 
sub 4. 
4) impudence: a strumpet's b. AIl's II, 1, 174. 
III, 2, 79. Tw. III, 4» 41. Wint. I, 2» 184. R3 I 2, 
42. Cymb. I» 6, 18. 
Bolin» bowline: slack t/te --s t/tere, Per. III 
1» 43. 
Bolingbroke (0. Edd. mostly .Bulllngbroe). 
//cm T B., afterwards King Henry IV: R2 I» 1» 124 
etc. etc. H4A I» 3» 137. III» 1, 64 etc. H6A II» 5, 83. 
H6B II» 2, 21. -- 2) Roger B., the conjurer: H6B I, 
2 76. 
Bollen, swollen: /tere one befng tronged bears 
back» all b. andred» Lucr. 1417 (O. Edd. boln). Some 
lI. Edd. in hlerch. IV 1» 57 a b. bagpipe; 0. Edd. 
woollen. 
Bolster, subst, c us h i o n (to support the head?): 
/tere l'll fiing t/te pillow» t/tere t/te b, Shr. IV, 1» 204. 
Bolster, rb., to make a bolster» by lying 
one nnder the other: damn tem t/ten, if ever mortal 
c.,es do sec t/rem b. more t/tan t/teir own» 0th. III» 
3» 399. 
Boit, subst., 1) a sort of arrow with a round 
bob ai {he end of it: l'll make a s/tait or a b. on't, 
Wiv. III» 4» 24 (i. e. I will take the risk, whatever 
may corne of it). a foos b. is soon s/toi, H5 III, 7, 
132. cf. As V 4» 67. 
2) any arrow: the b. ofCupid» hlids. II, 1, 165. 
"twas but a b. of nothing» s/toi ai hot/ring» Cymb. IV, 
2» 300. 
3) thunderbolt: roE'ted Jove's stout oak with /tis 
own b. Tp. V, 46. t/ty s/tarp and sulp/turvus b. Meus. 
11» 2 115. Cor. V» 3» 152. Cymb. V» 4, 95. 
4) bar of a door: wit/t mass. staples and cor- 

responsfve and fidfill5g --s, Troih Prol. 18. fo oppose 
t/te b. against m. coming 5, Lr. II, 4 179. 
5) iron to fasten chains, and hence bolts -- 
chains, fetters: la.--s enoug/t upon /tim! Meus. 
V» 350. --s and s/tackles! Tw. II» 5, 62. give me t/te 
penitent instrument to pick that b., then fi'ee for ever» 
Cymb. V, 4, 10. no --s for the dead, 205. 
Boit, rb., 1) to fetter: which shaekles accidents 
and --s up c/range, Ant. V, 2, 6. 
2) to sift: the fanned snow that's --ed by the 
northern blasts, Wint. IV, 4» 375. so finel.l --ed didst 
thou seem, H5 II, 2, 137. you must tarr. the --ing, 
Troil. I, 1, 18. ill schooled in --ed language» Cor. III 
1,322. 
Bole, sieve: H4A III» 3» 81. 
BolteCed, in blood-boltered, q. v. 
Bolting-hulCh, wooden reeeptaele for 
bolted flonr: that b. ofbeastliness» H4A II, 4, 495. 
Bombard, a large leathern vessel to earry 
llquors: gond saine blac doud looks like a foul b. that 
would shed his llquor» Tp. [I, 2, 21. that huge b. qf 
sack, 114.1 11, 4, 497. here ge lie baitin 9 of--s, when 
ge s/tould do service, II8 V, 4, 85. 
Bombast» subst.» cotton nsed to stuff out 
garments: mu sweet creature of b. H4A II, 4, 359. 
Metaphorically = fustian: wit/t a b. clrcumstance 
/torriblg stuffed wft/t epit/tets of war, 0th. I, 1, 13. 
Double sense: rated t/rem ... as b. and as linln to the 
t5ne, LLL V, 2, 791. 
BOhu; the lad. .B.: H6B II» 6» 90. III» 3» 56 etc. 
R3 III, 7, 182. 
Bona-roba, a handsolne girl (inthe cant of 
swaggerers) : we knew w/tere t/te --s were and/tad the 
best oit/rem, H4B III, 2, 26. she was t/ten a b.; dot/t 
s/te /told /ter own wellf 217 (Florio's Dictionary: 
'Buonarobba, as we say good stuff» that is, a good 
wholcsome plumcheeked wench.' Cowley, Essay on 
Grcatness: ci would neither wish that my mistress nor 
my fortune should be a bona-roba; but as Lucretius 
says, Parvula, pumilio, Z«.o[«eov «, tota merum sal.') 
Bond, 1) ligament: I tore them (the hairs) 
rrom t/telr --s, John III, 4» 70. 74. wit/t a b. of ar... 
knit all t/te Greekish ears to his tongue , Troil. I, 3, 66. 
Plural bonds  cords or chains with which one 
is bound: 9nawln9 with n teeth mg--s asunder, Err. 
V, 249. 339. to 9race in captive --s hls chariot wheels, 
Caes. I» 1, 39. Cymb. V, 4, 28 (a quibble). V, 5, 402. 
cf. -- s of death» I» 1» 117. 
Especially a moral tie: u'hereto all --s do 
me, Sonn. 117, 4. everlasting b. offellowship, lIids. 
I» 1, 85 (i. e. marriage), a weak b. holds gou, III, 2, 
268. the natural b. o.f slsters, As I, 2, 288. V, 4, 148. 
Tw. V, 159. Wint. IV, 4, 584. R2 IV» 76. H6A 
7» 20. H8 III» 2» 188. Troil. ç 2, 154. 156. Cor. 
3, 25. Caes. 1I» 1» 124. Lr. I» 2» 118. II» 1, 49. 
4» 181. 
2) obligatiou, duty: vow, b. nor space, in thee 
bath neither sting, knot, nor confine, Compl. 264. gou 
make my --s still 9reater, Meas. V, 8. mg love (as a 
mother)/tath in't a b. All's 1, 3, 194. within the b. of 
marria9e , is it excepted I should know no secrets ? Caes. 
II, 1» 280. "tls a b. in men» Tire. I, 1, 144. breathb, 9 
Hke sanctified and pious --s the better to beguile, 
tIml. I, 3, 130.*I love your majestg accordin 9 fo m.y b. 
Lr. I, 1, 95. llnew itformg b. Ant. I, 4, 84. everg 
good servant does hot ail commands: no b. but to d9 



B 

]ust ones, Cymb. V, 1, 7. he could hot but lhink lier b. 
ofchastitg quite cracked, V, 5» 207. Followed by rb: 
m.y b. rb wedlock» H8 II, 4» 40. 
3) a deed or obligation to pay a sure or 
perform a contract: sealed false --s of love» 
Sonn. 142, 7. he learned but suret.y-like lb write for 
me under tIat b. 134» 8. Iffs words are --s» Gentl. l[, 
7» 75. I am here entered in b. for.you, Err. lV» 4, 128 
(a quibble). Mids. Ill, 2» 267. Mercb. I, 3, 28.69. 
146 (s5.qle 5.). 160. 1I, 6» 6. II, 8, 41. ll[, 1, 50. 
Ill, 2» 285. 319. III» 3» 4. IV, 1, 37. 249 etc. 'l'w. 
lII, 1, -'25. R2 II, 1, 64. V, 2, 65 (Qq hand). H4A 
llI» 3» 117. OEim. l» 2, 66. Ils 1, 34. Hml. I, 2, -04 
(Qq 5ands). Cymb. Ill, 2, 37. (rb enter a b. Err. 
4, 128 and R2 V» 2» 65; rb cancel a b. R3 IV» 4» 77. 
vIcb. IlI» 2» 49. Cymb. V, 4, 28). It may corne near 
the sense ofpawn or pledge: l'll make assurance 
double sure and take a b. qf fate, Mcb. IV, le 84; and 
that of debt: I will discharge rny 5. En'. IV» le 13. 
Followed by rb: ny 5. rb the Jew is forfeit, Merch. 
III» 2» 319. 
4) claire given by such a deed» ownership: 
for wIat they bave hot that whlch they possess they 
scatter and u»loose it from tfieir b. Lucr. 136. 
in thee are all determlnate, Sonn. 87» 4. cancel his b. 
of lire, R3 IV» 4» 77. cancel and tear rb pieces that 
great b. which keeps me pale» Mcb. III, 2» 49 (i. e. 
Banquo's life). 
Bondage» 1) want of freedom, a) capti- 
vlty: and true rb b. (the hair tied up in a fillet) would 
uot break from thence, Compl. 34. I will pray, rb in- 
crease.your b. lIcas. Ill, _'2, 79. would you not suppose 
your b. happy, rb be ruade a queen? H6A V» 3, 111. 
R2 I» 3» 89. Cymb. III, 3» 44. V e 4» 3. 
b) servitude: fie held such petty b. in disdain, 
Ven. 394. the harmon.y of their tongues bath into b. 
brought my rob diligent car, Tp. Ill, 1, 41. b. is hoarse 
and may hot speak aloud, Rom. II, 2, 161. Tp. III, 1, 
89. AsV, 1, 59. All's Il, 3» 239. lll, 5, 67. Wint. 
IV» 4» 235. Caes. I» 3» 90. V, 5» 54. Lr. I, 2» 52. Oth. 
I, 1» 46. Cymb. I» 6, 73. Double meaning: let fils 
arms alone; the.y were hot born for b. Cymb. V, 5» 306. 
2) obligation» tic of duty: the vowsofwomen 
of no more bondoEqe be rb where they are ruade» than 
the. are rb thelr virtues, Cymb. 11, 4, 111. 
Bondmaid, female slave: Shr. II, 2. 
Bondman, serf» slave: Err. V, 141. 287. 
Merch. I, 3» 124. H6B I, 3» 130. Tir. IV» 1, 109. 
Caes. I, 3» 101. 113. III» 2» 32. IV, 3» 44. 96. V» 1, 
42. Ve 3» 56. Ant. III» 13 149. 
For a quibble's sake,  a man bound wlth cords : 
Err. V, 288. 
Bond-slave, the same: Tw. II» 5» 208. 
114. Oth. I, 2» 99. 
Botte, 1) the solid part of the body: rires 
wittt Ier beak on feattters» flesh and b. Ven. 56. so 
did tttis 1torse excel a common bue» in sttape, in couroEqe, 
colomb pace and b. 294. no hand of blood and b. R2 
III, 3» 79. herbe and b. of Greece, Troil. I, 3» 55. v(qour 
of b. 11I» 3 172. here lies th. heart, th. sinews and 
th.y b. V» 8, 12. tttat .you ma.y lire only in b. Tim. III, 
5, 105. a ring of posied gold and b. Compl. 45. 
wttale's b. LLL V, 2» 332. cricket's b. Rom. I» 4, 63. 
2) a piece of boue, and what is made ofit: 
a death's ttead wittt a b. in ttis mouth, Merch. 1» 2, 56. 
IV 1» 112. John IV» 3 148. FI6C 11I» 2» 125. OEroil. 

I, 3, 392. Tire. lb, 3, 535. Mcb. V, 3, 32 etc. thy 
are hollow» Meas. l, _'2» 56. th.y --s are marrowless, 
Mcb. II], 4» 94. -- by these ten --si H6B I, 3, 193 
(i. e. the ten fingers), weave thelr thread with 
Tw. Il, 4, 46 (i. e. a sort of bobbins, ruade of bouc 
or ivmT), let's Iave the tongs and the --s, hlids. IV, 
1, 32 (a musical instrument now unknown). 
3) Bones a) --- sk cleton: thy (death's) detestable 
--s, John II[ 
H4B V 4, 32. ci'. the bone face on a]lask (a death's 
head?) LLL V» 2, 619. 
b) used for the whole body»  limbs:«fill all 
th. --s with aches, ŒEp. I, 2, 370. of Ms --s are coral 
ruade, 397. m.y old --s actte, I11, 3, 2. willnever out of 
rn.y bones, V» 284. guiltless labour, wtten it lies starkl. 
in the traveller's --s, Meas. IV» 2, 70. mg --s bear 
witness, Err. IV, 4, 80. virtue's steely --s look bleak 
i 'the cold wind, All's 1, 1, 114. bave broke their sleep 
with thoughts, their brains with tare, their --s with 
industry» H4B IV» 5, 70..yon island carrions» despe- 
rate of their - s, H5 IV, 2, 39. bid them acMeve me 
and then sell my --s, IV, 3» 91. hack their --s asunder, 
H6A IV, 7, 47. I bave bobbed Ms brain more than he 
hattt beat m.y --s» Troil. 11, 1, 76. actting --s, V, 10, 
35. 51. an ache in 
ache, Rom. II, 5, 26. lfeegt upon n.y --se OEim. III, 
6, 130. if thon canst mutine in a matron's --s, Hml. 
Ill, 4, 83. -- Unintelligible: 0 thelr --s, their --s t, 
Rom. II, 4, 37 (perlmps  I should like to beat them. 
Most M. Edd. their bons). 
c) the remains of the dead: shallcurse 
--s, Lucr. 209. wtten death rn. --s with dust sttall 
cover» Sonn. 32» 2. Ado V, 1,293-. Ve 3, '2_2. AlFa II 
3, 148. OEw. I1, 4, 63. SVint. IV» 2» 6. John II, 41. 
H5 IV, 3, 98. R3 I, 4, 33. H8 III, 2» 397. Rom. IV, 1, 
82. Oth. IV, 2» 136 etc. beat hot the -- s of the buried, 
LLL V, 2, 667 (cf. Troil. II, 1, 76). 
Bone-ache, pain in the bones (lacs ve- 
nerea?): Troil. II» 3, 20. V, 1, 26. 
Boue-face, a death's head? the carved b. on a 
flask, LLL V, 2, 619 (0. and M. Edd. carved-boneface). 
Boneless, without teeth: pl«cked ny nipple 
from his b. gares, Mcb. I, 7, 57. 
Bonfire, a lire ruade as an expression of 
public joy: Vint. V, 2, 24. H6A I, 1» 153. I, 6, 
1.'2. II6B V, 1, 3. Mcb. II, 3, _'22. 0th. II, 
Bonfire-light: H4A III, 3» 47. 
Bonjour, morning salutation: wlth ]or» 
and houad we'll give .our grace b. Tit. I, 494. cf. 
Appendix. 
BonneG subst, covering for the head; worn 
by men: Ven. 339 (351 bat). 1081. 1087. Merch. 1, 
2, 81. As Ill, 2, 398. R2 I, 4, 31. tI5 IV, 1, -o24. 
Cor. 111, 2, 73. Hml. V, 2, 95. 
Bonnet, rb.» rb take off the bonnet, to 
show courtesy: those who, havng been supple and 
contrebas rb the people, bonneted, without an. further 
deed lb bave them at ail, into their estimation and re- 
port, Cor. II, 2, 30, i. e. who obtained the good opinion 
of the people by taking off their caps,.by mere cour- 
tesies, without any other me»it to gara it (them» sc. 
their estimation and repox), cf. Off-cap. 
Bonny, 1) blithe, cheerful: be .ou blithe 
and b. Ado Il, 
229. b. sweet tobin, Hml. IV, 5 187. a cherry lip 
a b. ee, R3 I, 1, 94. 



B 

2) stout, strong: ruade a preff for carHon kites 
and crows even of tne b. beast ne loved se well, II6B 
V, 2, 12. trie b. prizer of the humorous duke, As II, 3, 
8 (most M. Edd. bon.). 
Bonviile; Lord 13., H6CIV, I e 57. 
Bony, stout, strong: the b. pri:er of the hu- 
morous duke, As II, 3, 8 (O. Edd. bonng). 
Booit, subst., 1) a volume te read or write 
in: Sonn. 23, 9. Tp. I e 2, 166. I11, 2, 97. V, 57. 
Gentl. I, 1, 20. Ado 1I, 3 3. LLL I, 1, 74.87. IV, 
2, 25. Merch. IV, 1,157. Shr. 1, 2, 148. 1I, 101 etc. 
etc. the bloody b. of law 3tou shall jourself read, Oth. 
I, 3, 67. rn3t b. of son#s and sonnets, Wiv. 1, 1, 206 
(probably the Songs and Sonnets of Lord Surrey, 
printed in 1556). the b. of riddles, Wiv. I, 1,209. 
--s for good manners, As V, 4, 95. a b. of prager 
I/3 I11, 7, 98. we quarrel in prfnt, b3t the b., As V, 4, 
95 (,'dluding te Vineentio Saviolo's treatise on Ho- 
1mur and Honorable Quarrels). fights b3t the b. of 
arithmetic, Rem. I11, 1, 106..you kiss b3t the b. I, 5, 
112. without .  by menory: Tw. I, 3 28. 1I 3 
161. Troil. I1, l, 19. Rein. I, 2, 62. 
Emphatically, the bible: 1"ll be sworn on a b. 
Wiv. I, 4, 156. Meas. 11, 1 162. Merch. 1I, 2, 168. 
1'll be sworn upon ail the --s in Enland, II4A II, 4 
56. who can gire an oath? where is a b.f LLL IV, 3 
-'250. God's b. H6B Il s 3 4. here, kiss the b. (i. e 
the bottle), Tp. ll,2, 135.146.  13cil, b. and candle, 
John I11, 3, 12, i. e. the b. of offices, cf. bell. 
Sometimes, ___ aeeount-book: hls land is put 
te their --s, Tim. I, 2, 206. keep thj pen frein lenders' 
s, Lr. III, 4, 101. sucn gain tne cap of nira that 
makes "cm fine, but keeps his b. uncrossed, Cymb. 1II 
3, 26. gour neck is pen, b. and counters, V, 4, 173. 
cf. tnou thinest me as far in the devil' s b. as thou and 
Falstaff, H4B II, 2, 49. damned h, the b. of heaven 
R2 IV, 236. 
t3. qf memor!/  day-book, memorandum. 
book: l'll note .you in raff b. of memorj, H6A Il, 4 
101. blottln.your names from s of meraorff H6B I, 
l, 100» i. e. frein historical record. Vithout the 
position in the saine sense: I nave been the b. of his 
9ood acts, Cor. V, 2, 15. enrolled in Jove's own 
111, 1, 293. mark hbn and write his speeches in their 
s, Caes.l, 2, 126. shall lire witMn the b. and volume 
of m3t brain, Hml. I, 5, 103. who bas a b. of all that 
monarchs de, Per. I, 1, 94. Hence, te be in --s  te 
be in faveur: the #entleman is net in gour s, Ado I, 
1, 79. a herald, 2Sate? 0 put me in th. --s, Shr. 
1I» 223. 
Figuratively: tMs precious b. of love this unbound 
loyer, te eautify hirn, onl.y lacks a cover, Rem. 1, 3, 
87. was ever b. containing such vile marrer se fab'ly 
ound? III, 2,83. was thls fair paper this most goodl. 
b., raade te write whore upon? Oth. IV, 2, 71. in this 
b. of beaut.y (se. Bianca) John II, 485. cf. princes are 
the glass, the school, the b., where subjects' eyes de 
learn, de read, de look, Lucr. 615. poor women's faces 
are their own faults"--s» 1253. LLL IV» 3, 103. 
-Mids. II, 2, 122. H4B II, 3, 31. R3 IIl, 5, 27. Troil. 
IV, 5, 239. Mcb. I, 5, 63. ler. 1, 1, 15.  And new 
I will unclçsp a secret b. and readffou, H4AI 3,188. 
that one ml9ht read the b. of rate, H4B 111, 1 45. un- 
clasped te thee the b. even of m.y secret seul, Tw. 1, 4, 
14. Hence the following phrases: is frein the b. of 
nonour razed quite, Sonn. 25, 11. and m3t naine put in 
8chmidt, Shakespeare Lexicon. 3. Ed. T.I. 

' tne b. of vrtue, Wint. IV, 3, 131. m3t naine be blotted 
from the b. of lire, R2 I, 3, 202. tnat gu snould seal 
this lawless blood.y b. of for#ed rebellion with a seal 
divine, H4B IV, 1, 91. one writ with me in sour mis- 
fortune's b. Rom. V, 3, 82. 
Serving te denote copious language: and tire the 
hearer with a b. of words Ado I 1 309. a whole b. 
full of these carpet-mon#ers, V, 2, 32. 
2) any writing or paper: b.y that Kme will 
out b. be drawn (se. the articles of agreement) H4A 
i11 1 224. 270. a b.? 0 rare one! Cymb. V, 4, 133» 
se. a paper eontainiug the oracle of Jupiter. 
3) study» learning: l"ll te m3t . Tp. I11, 1» 
94. keep a #ood student frein his b. Wiv. 111, 1, 38. 
mg son profits nothin# in the world ai his b. IV, 1, 15. 
whlch with experimental seal doth warrant the teneur 
of my b. Ado IV, 1, 169. makes his b. thine e.yes, LLL 
IV, 2, 113. in that vow we have forsworn our s, IV, 
3, 319. finds tongues in trees, --s in the runnin 9 
brooks, As Il, 1, 16. and titrer is m3t stud.y and mg 
--s than wanton dalliance with a paramour, H6A V, 
l, 22. mit b. preferred me to the kin9, H6B IV, 7, 77. 
what, at.your b. so nard? H6C V, 6, 1. a be99ar's b. 
outworths a noble's blood, II8 I, 1, 122. 
Boom, rb., te register in a book: b. both 
mg wilfulness and errors clown, Sonn. 117, 9. let it 
be ed with the rest of thls daff s deeds, H4B lV, 3, 
50. that we ma3t wander o'er this blood.y field te b. out 
dead, and then te bur. them, H5 IV, 7, 76 (bi. Edd. 
look). 
Booifui, reading of seine M. Edd. in Ado V, , 
32; O. Edd. a whole book full of ... 
Booitish, given te books, more aequainted 
wlth books than with men and things: whose b. rule 
bath pulled fair .Enland down, H6B I, 1, 259. the b. 
theoric, Oth. I 1, 24.  lettered: thou9h 1 ara net 
b., .et I can read waitin9-9entlewoman in the sealoe  
Wint. Ill, 3, 73 (the shepherd's speech). 
Booimn, studious man, seholar: LLL 11, 
227. IV 2, 35. 
Booitmate, fellow-studeut: the prince and 
his --s, LLL IV, 1, 102. 
Booi-oath, oath ruade on the Bible: I 
out thee new te th3t b. It4B II, 1, 111. 
Boon, a faveur begged or granted: a 
maller b. than this I canner be#, Gentl. V, 4, 24. te 
9rant one b. 150. R21V,302. jou will take exceptions 
te mg b. (i. e. te the b. which l'll ask) H6C III, 2, 46. 
R3 1, 2, 219. 11, 1, 95. Tir. 1I, 3, 289. mg b. 1 make 
it that gou know me net, Lr. IV, 7, 10. Oth. II1» 3, 76. 
Cymb. V, 5, 97. 135. l'er. V, 2, 3.20. 
Boor, peasant: what wouldst thou bave, b.? Wiv. 
IV, 5, 1. let boors and franklins sa. if, l'll swear it, 
Wint. V, 2, 173. 
Boorish, rustie, vulgar: the soclet.y, which in 
the b. is cornpan3t , As V, 1, 53. 
Boot, subst., covering for the foot and 
leg; particularly worn by horsemen: Gentl. V, 2, 6. 
Shr. III, 2 45. 213. IV, 1, 147. All's Il, 5, 39. III, 
2, 6. Tw. I 3, 12. R2 V, 2, 77. H4A Il, 1, 91 
(quibble). III, 1, 68. tt4B 11, 4, 270. V, 3, 136. Lr. 
IV, 6, 177. Used by fishermen: Wiv. IV, 5, 101. 
over --s in love, Geutl. I, l, 25. 9ive me net the s, 
Gentl. I, 1 27,  de net make a laughing-stock of 
me (allusion te the torture of the boots?). 
Boom, subst., l) booty: make ner ther--s, H4A 
9 



130 

B 

Il, 1, 91 (a quibble), make b. upon the su»ner's velvet 
buds, H5 I, 2, 194. and thon nake b. of this, II6B IV, 
1, 13. 
2) profit, advantage: glce him no breath, but 
now mae b. of his dist-actlon, Ant. IV, 1, 9. vail your 
stomachs, for if is o b. ( it is of no avail), Shr. V, 
2, 176. talk no more of fli9ht, it is no b. II6A IV, 6, 
52. there is no b. R2 I, 1, 164. 
3) something given into the bargain: 
there's some b. Yint. IV, 4, 651. 690. ymmg York he 
is but b. R3 IV, 4, 65. l'Il give you b. Troil. IV, 5, 40. 
with b. Meas. Il, 4, 11 and Lr. V, 3, 301. fo b..- into 
the bargain: thou hast th!l will, aml lVill fo b. Sonn. 
135, 2. H4A III, 2, 97. H4B Iii, 1, 29. Troil. 1, 2, 
260. Mcb. IV, 3, 37. Lr. IV, 6, 230. Cmb. I, 5, 69. 
II, 3, 35. IV, 2,314. 
Grace to b., Wint. 1, 2, 80, evidently means: God 
help us! God be gracious to us! And so, too, perhaps: 
,S'aint Geor9e fo b. R3 V, 3, 301. 
Boom, rb., to put on boots: b., b., toaster 
hallow, H4B V, 3, 140. 
Boom, rb., 1) to avail: it --s ,ot fo complain, 
12 III,4, 18. it --s hot fo resist, II6C IV, 3, 59. Tran- 
sitively: if --s thee hot, Genfl. 1, 1, 28. it sImll scarce 
b. me fo say ot 9uilty, Wint. I]I, 2, 26. R2 1, 3, 174. 
H6C I, 4, 125. Tir. V, 3, 1S. Per. l, 2, 20. 
2) to present into the bargain: I will b. 
thee with what gfft beslde thy modesty can be 9, Ant. Il, 
5, 71. 
Boo-hose. spatterdashes: a ]ersey b. on tt, e 
other, Shr. 1]i, 2, 68. 
Boofless, adj., unavailing, nseless: leave 
this idle theme, this b. chat, Veu. 422. Sonn. 29, 3. 
Tp. I, 2, 35. LLL V, 2, 64. Mids. II, 1,233. Merch. 
i11.3, 20. H4A I, 1, 29. H6C l, 4, 20. I1, 3, 12. Il, 6, 
23.70. 13 Iii, 4, 104. IiSll, 4, 61. Tit.lll, 1, 75. Lr. 
V, 3. 294. 0th. I, 3, 209. Pcr. V, 1, 33. 
Boofless, adv.: Mids.li, 1, 37. II5111, 3,24. Tir. 
III, 1, 36. Caes. ill, 1, 75. Quibbling: I sent him b. 
home, H4A 111, 1, 67 (without boots, and without ad- 
vantage). 
Boo, spoil taken from an euemy: H4AI, 2, 
184. H6C I, 4, 63. Tit. I1, 3, 49. Fortune drops --les 
in »y mouth, Wint. IV, 4, 863. 
Bopeep, a play of children, consistlng in looking 
out and drawing b,ack, for the purpose of frightening 
each other: that such a in 9 should play b. Lr. I, 
4, 193. 
Bora¢hio, naine in Ado I, 3, 43. IV, 2, 12. ¥, 
1, 215. 
Border, snbst., c on fi n e: when the »torning sun 
s]mll raise his car above the b. of this horizon, H6C 
IV, 7, 81. the --s maritime lac blood, Ant. I, 4, 51. 
Border, rb., to confine, to limit: that na- 
ture, which conte»ms ifs ori9, cannot be --ed certain 

the moon with ber main toast, Wint. Iii, 3, 93. Figu- 
ratively ---to overreach, to trip up: ai tlds 
instant he --s me with some trick, H8 l, 1, 128. 
2) absoL and with a little ph --s throu9h his 
castle-wall, 12111,2, 170. those »il--paps that throu9h 
the window-baïs b. ai men" s elles, Tire. IV, 3, 116. 
Boreas, the u orth wind: Troil. I, 3,38. 
Born, see 13ear. 
Borough, a town with a corporation: 
Shr. Ind. 1, 13. II4A IV, 3, 69. H6C ii, 1,195. 
Borrow, subst., the borrowing, taking as a 
loan: yet qf your royal presence l'Il adventure the b. 
of a n, eek, "Vint. I, 2, 39. 
Borrow, rb., 1) to take upon credit (op- 
posed to lend: Vcn. 961. Lucr. 1083. 1498. Merch. 
1, 3, 62). a) absol»tcly: 'ris nmch to b. Vert. 411. 
961. beg thon or b. Err. 1, 1,154. neither leud nor b. 
Merch. 1, 3, 62.70. --ing onl/ lingers it out, H4B 
2,265. shut his bosom a9ainst o»" --in 9 prayers, Ali's 
Iii, 1, 9 (i. e. that he might lend us his assistance). 
Tire. 11, 2, 187. 
thnl. I, 3, 77. Followed by of: good dag, of ni9ht 
ww b. Pilgr. 209. the sun --s of the moon, Troil. V, 
1, 101. ŒEim. Il, 2, 105. III, 6, 17.84. IV, 3, 69. Oth. 
I, 3, 215. 
b) trans.; followed by a simple accus.: all fair 
eyes that li9ht will b. Lucr. 1083. 1498. go b. me a 
crow, Err III, 1, 80. --s money 9t God's naine, Ado 
V, 1,319 (i. e. is a beggar', his--edpurse, Merch. 
Il, 5, 51. b. me Gargantua's mouth, As Iii, 2, 238. 
H4A Iii, 3, 20. II4B Il, 1, 103. Rom. l, 4, 17. Tire. 
III, 2, 13. III, 6, 111. Hml. lll, 2, 167. Ant. Il, 2, 103. 
With of: articles are --ed qf the pïonoun, Wiv. IV, 1, 
41. we'll b. place of hbn, Meas. V, 367. Merch. I, 2, 
86. Shr. IV, 1, 107. All's III, 7, 11. R2 III, 4, 23. 
H4B V, 5, 13. C)aub. [I, 1, 5. ŒEim. Ill, 6, 22. With 
front : as if from thence they --ed all thelr shine, Ven. 
488. from whom each shiMn 9 star doth b. the beauteous 
i»oEuence, 861. Gentl. II, 4, 38. JohnV, 1, 51. Cymb. 
iii, 4, 174. 
2) to receire, to t.ake (cf. the passages above: 
Lucr. 1083. Wiv. IY, 1, 41. Meas. V, 367. Mereh. I, 
2, 86): that fo his --ed bed he make retire, Lucr. 573. 
whlch --ed fi'om this holy fire of lLove a dateless lit'ely 
heat, Sonn. 153, 5. I bepray you, let me b. ,y aïms 
a9ain , LLL V, 2, 702. youth is bou9ht more oit than 
begged or --ed, Tw. lil, 4, 3 (i. e. received as a pre- 
sent), any drop thm, --edst from thy mother, Troil. 
IV, 5, 133. 
3) to assume, to adopt: you b.tot thatface 
of seembt 9 soïrow, it is sure youï own, II4B V, 2, 28. 
if but as well I other accents b. Lr. I, 4, 1. Borrowed 
__- assumcd, usurped, hOt real: a --ed title 
hast thon bou9ht too dear II4A V, 3, 23. lay apart tle 
--ed glorles, H5 Il, 4, 79. wh.9 do you d,'ess »ne in--ed 

in itself, Lr. IV, 2, 33. robes? Mcb. 1, 3, 109. And hence --- adulterated, 
Borderer, one who dwells on a border: counterfeited, false:those--edteaïsthat Sinon 
fo defend our inland front the pilfeïing --s, II5 I, sheds, Lucr. 1549. fairlng the foul with art's false 
2, 142. --ed face, Sonn. 127, 6. ail that --ed motion seemin 9 
Bore, snbst., a hole: confined into an auger's b: owed, Compl. 327. the --ed vell of modesty, Wiv. III, 
Cor. IV, 6, 87. fill the --s qf hearin 9 (i. e. the ears) 2, 42. in these my --ed flaunts, Wint. IV, 4, 23. the 
Cymb. III, 2, 5.  the caliber: yet are they (my --ed majesty of JEnglandhere» John I, 4. hisfeathers 
words) much too light for the b. of the natter, Hml. are but --ed, 6B IIl, 1, 75. in this --ed likeness of 
IV, 6, 26. shrunk death, Rom.IV, 1, 104. take herfrom her 
Bore, rb., 1) trans, to perforate: this whole grave, V, 3, 248. this --edpassion stands for truc old 
earh may be --d, Mids. III, 2, 53. ww the ship --ing woe, Per. IV, 4, 24. 



B 131 

Boerovcr, one who borrows: the «mswer is 
s ready as a --'s cap, II4B ll 2, 125 (O. Edd. bor- 
rowed). I must become a b. of t]e dght for a dark 
Mcb. lll 1 27. elther a b. nor a lender be, HmI. I, 
3, 75. 
Bosl«y, w o o d y : my b. acrs and m uslwubbed 
down, Tp. lV 81. ou b. /dll II4A V 1 2 (O. Edd. 
Bsm, subst., that part of the body whicb 
contains the heart: ri'oto Ids sort b. ever fo re- 
move Vert. 81. wtlb ff b. raff bod heart pmts, 
4. LLL IV 3, 13. Mids II, 2 105. Merch. IV, 1, 
245. 252. As V, 4, 121. Shr. Ind. I, 11. All's IV, 1 
$4. Tw. III, 1, 132. II4A III, 8 174. R3 IV, 4, 23t. 
V 1,t. V, 2, 10. Mcb. V 1 1 etc. Also, the 
fo 1 d s o f t h e d r es s covering the breast : wlat seal 
is that, that as witlot t@ b.  R2 V, 2 5. cE and 
saffs, within her b. it (the flower) slaH dwell, Ven. 
1173. raff b. as a bed shaH lo@e tee (the letter), 
Gentl. I, 2, 114. raff lerald tlwuhts bi tly pure b. test 
them III, 1, 1. t@ letters sh«tH be delieered even 
the »dlk-wMte b. qf t@ love, 250. in ler excellent wldte 
b. these etc. Hml. II, 2, 118 ("It shonld be meutioned 
that women anciently had a pocke/ in the fore part 
of their stays, lu which they not onlv carried Iove- 
letters and love-tokens, but even thêir nmney 
materials for needlework." Nares). 
Ia a moral sense, 1) the place of tender 
affections and favor: a»d in ler b. l'llmclasp 
my heart, Ado I 1,325. a»d in Ids b. sped  latter 
.qasp, HçA Ii, 5, 38. so I miplt lire o»e lom" 
sweet b. R3 I 2, 124 (Qq rest instead of llve), the 
sons of dward sleep in Abralam's b. IV, 8, 88. sweet 
]»eace conduct Ms soul to tle b. of ood old Abraham, 
R2 IV, 103. cE le's in Artur's b. H5 II 8 10. will 
sometb»tes dlvide me fi'om your b. Ant. I1 8 2. to pluck 
tle common b. on Iris side Lr. V 8, 
2) the receptacle of secrets: to lock it 
te wards of covert b. Me. V, 10. emptyi out s 
of thelr counsel sweet, Mids. 1 1, 21. çou saH se- 
cre@ bto the b. creep of tlmt prelate, HtA I, 8, 
tlwu and » b. lencfortl shaH be twaln, Rom. 111, 
240. t@ b. s«tH partake tle secrets of » soul, Ces. 
11, 1,305. I ara in theb" s V 1, 7. you are ofler 
b. Lr. IV, 5, 
8) the seat of desires, of passions, of 
intnost thoughts and wishes: o fo yourb.; 
knock tlere, and ask ffour leart, Meas. 1I, 2 13. 
shall tlds b. udtplled dipest tle senate's courtes 
Çor. 11I, 1, 181 (some M. Edd. blsson muitude; but 
cf. H4B I, 8 08. Lr. V, 8, 40). And then = desires, 
inmost thoughts: you shag lave your b. on tlds 
wretcl, Meas. IV 8, 130. you ave your fatler's b. 
there, Wiat. IV» 4 57t. fo speak your b. fi'eely Oth. 
III 1.58. 
4) scarcely distinguishable from leart: tley whose 
çuilt withbt tleb" s lie, Lucr. 18t2. o love toward 
otlers in tlmt b. sits Sonn.  18. 2t, 7. 81, 1. 120, 
12. 138, . tle broken s Compl. 254. Tp. I1 
78. Gentl. V, 4 8. Me. I 8 8. Mids. I, 1, 27. 
II. 2. 2. 4. 50. brassy s, Merch. IV, 1, 81. 
b. All's IV, 4, 7. hardcr --s Wint. I, 2, 158. hollow 
s H5 Ii Cor. 21. All's I, 8, 131. III, 1, 8. Tw. 
5 241. 11, 1, 40. ili, 1 170. Vint. I 2 118. 238. 
I1. 2 58. John IV 1 82. HgA IV, 8, 48. HgB 111, 
8, 23. V 2 85: my --'s lord sits Hh@ in Ids arone, 

Rom. V, 1, 3 (i. e. the genius who rules mv affectionsL 
Mcb. II 1, 28. IV, 3, 2. Lr. II, 1, 128." Oth. IV 2, 
14 etc.- Adjectively, = dearest: te b. loyer of 
Ȯ lord, Merch.lli. 4, 17. w nwre tlat tlane of Caw- 
dot shall deceive out b. bterest, Mcb. I, 2, 64.  
Applied to things, 1) the surface; wle» Istrike 
my foot upon the b. of tle groun, John IV, 1, 8. fo 
»arcl so my mlles zpon ler peacefid b. R2 I1 3 93. 
Ill 2, 19. 147. Tire. 1, 1, 66. the bomuled waters 
sImuld loEt te5" --s ld9her tla tte sIores, Troil. I, 
3, 112. salis upon the b. of tle air, Rom. II, 2, 32. 
wooes the frozen b. of the wrth , 4, 101. 
2) the enelosure: to wlose flbt b. 
demned lord is doomed a l»'isoner, R2 V, 1, 3. 
3) the depth, the interior, the inmost re- 
cesses: throu91 d91Ws black b. Luer. 788. shtes 
tlrou91 tle tratsparent b. of tle deep, LLL IV, 3, 31. 
setd destruction into tlds clty's b. John II, 41. tle 
gaudy da is crept into the b. qf the sea, HbB IV, !, 
2. R3 i, 1, 4. o»e drop qfblood drawn.-om tkg coun- 
t»ffs b. IIbA I[I, 3, 54. Somehat strangely: this re- 
.wite slwok the b. qf »y console»ce, II8 I1, 4, 182 (some 
M. Edd. ri-oto IIolinsbed: bottom). 
Bosom, rb., to inelose in the heart, to 
harbour earefnllv: b. up mg counsel, you'lind it wlwle- 
so»e. II8 I, 1, !"12. 
Bosomed, adj., iatimate: you have been con- 
;unct and b. witl ler, Lr. V, 1, 13. 
Boss, to emboss, to stud: Turkey cushlons 
--ed witl pe(trl, Shr. II, 355. 
Bostvorth, place in Eugland : i B. ficld, R3 V, 
Boteh, subst, patch: fo leave o rubs 
b te work, Mcb. III, !, 133. 
Boteh, rb., to patch: 'ris hot well meded so, 
if is but --ed, Tire. IV, 8, 285. To b. up  to piece 
np unskilfully: lww ma».fruitless pranks t/ds ruffian 
hatl --ed up, Tw. IV, 1, 60 ( bas brought about 
on the most fi-ivolous occasion), devils that snçgest 
@ treasons do b. md bunçle up damnation with 
patcles, colours, II5 il, 2 115. tleff abn ai it, and b. 
tle words up fit fo tler own thouçMs, tIml. IV, 5, 10. 
Boteher, mender of old clothes: All's IV, 
3 211. Tw. I, 5, 51. Cor. II, 1, 98. 
Botehy, full of botches; 1) patched, bungled; 
2) ulcero:  le h«ttl biles .... aud those biles did 
run, did wt tle gener«d rm then? were hot tlat a 
core? Troil. 1I 1, 6 (where evidently a quibble is in- 
tended). 
Both, the one and the other: b. find each 
orner, Sonn. 42, 11. t@ registers ad tlee I b. delà, 
123, 9. Tp. I, 2, 450. IV, 1, 22. V, 149. Gentl. I, 1, 
138. 1I, 4, 121. II 5, 20. Viv. IV, 6, 16. Meas. 
1, 231. i11, 2, 33. IV, 2, 184. Err. I, 1» 56. V 169 
etc. etc. Relating to two par of a sentence: wlat 
fouI pla lad we,. .. or blessed was't we did? 
bot,  çb'l, Tp. 1, 2, 61. ww I wili believe tiret there 
are umcorns, tat ht Amtbia there is one ploe»dx .... ; 
I'H believe b. 11I, 3, 24. I received no çold, but I con- 
ëss tlat we were locked out. Tou speakest false 
b. Err. IV, 4, 108. as I ara Ids kbtsman a»d Ids sub- 
ject; stronç b. aç«tbst tle deed, Mcb. i, 7, 14. 
Joined to a substantive: ot b. sides, Shr. 1, 1, 
110. on b. sldes the lea LLL V, 2 8. tlere is ex- 
pectance lere ri-oto b. te sides, Troil. IV, 5, 146. 
tle proofs are e.rtam, Wiv. V, 5, 126. b. tle Blunts, 
9" 



132 

13 

tt4B I, 1, 16. b. t]e Sicils ad Jerusalem» It6C I, 4, 
122. b. these letters, Wiv.lV,4, 3. b. your poets, Sonn. 
83, 14. b. our inventions, Shr. 1, 1, 195 etc. 1)eculiar 
use: were you b. out mothers, All's I, 3, 169 ( the 
mother of us both), b. out remedies witMn thj help 
and ]oly p]ysic lies, Rom. 11, 3, 51 (the remedy for 
us both), fo b. your honours, Hnfl. III, 1, 42. cf. 
2, 92. havlng proceeded but by b. your wills, Cymb. 
11, 4, 56. but clay and clay differs in digniOj whose 
dust is b. alike, 1¥, 2, 5 ( the dust of both of which). 
cf. for b. out sakes, Shr. ¥, 2, 15. b. your pardons, 
Wint. V, 3» 147. b. their deaths, R3 1, 3, 192 (cf. to 
ail out sorrows, John IV, 2, 102). 
Joined to pronouns: bi] us b. Tp. 1, 2, 241. 323. 
Il, 1,306. Gentl. V, 2, 37. Wiv. l, 3, 77.80. Meas. 
V, 4. Mids. Il, 2, 41 etc. b. they, R3 IV, 4, 65 etc. 
Followed by of: b. of us, Err. l, 1, 106. Ado V, 1, 46. 
H6B III, 2, 18- ° . tt6C 111, 3, 161. Lr. III, 1, 27. 
weal a,,d woe are b. of them extremes, Ven. 987. !]ou 
b. of!]ou, Err. V, 291. 
Joined to twain: I love b. twain, Sonn. 4-'2, 11. 
I ternir b. twain, LLL V, 2, 459. 
Used for two : he mal] corne and go between you b. 
Wiv. Il, 2, 130. in b. my ees he doubly sees himself, 
in each eye one, Merch. V. 244. cf. b. the Sicils, H6C 
I, 4, 19-2. b. the Blunts, H4B l, 1,16. Cor. III, 1, 11 l 
Used of more than two persons: let hot this wasp out- 
lire, us b. to stlng, Tit. Il, 3, 132, i. e. both you and us. 
Both ... and  as well as: tutor b. to good and 
bad, Lucr. 995. 1036. Sonn. 44, 7. 117, 9. Compl. 
21. Tp. l, .'2, 83. 39-'2. V, 71. Wiv. Il, 1, 117. Meas. 
I, 1.41. I, 3, 45. Il, 4, 176. V, 477. Err. l, 1, 14. Il, 
2, 199. III, 1, 44. IV, 1, 46. IV, 3, 86. Ado IV, 1,200. 
Mereh. Iii, 5, 18. Wint. III, 2, 69. P,2 Iii, 3, 141. H5 
V, 2, 53. tt6A V, 5, 85. H6C l, 1, 87. R3 Il, 3, °2. 
III, 1, 129. H8 IV, 2,39. Ant. III, 6, 80 etc. Two ad- 
jeetives thus joined: both a present and a dangerous 
courtesy, Meas. IV, _o, 171. Two verbs: he b. pleases 
men and angers them, Ado Il, 1, 146. I b. raa!t and 
will, LLL V, 2, 714. which b. thy duty owes and our 
power clahns, All's Il, 3, 168. -- Used of more than 
two things : b. favour, savour, hue and qualities, Ven. 
747. she was_b, pantler, butler, cook Wint. IV, 4, 56. 
b. he and they and you, H4A V, 1, 107. -- The con- 
junction and omitted: b. in rime, form of the rhin 9, 
each word raade truc and good, Hml. I, 2, 209. since 
now we will divest us b. of rule, interest of territorl], 
cares ofstate, Lr. I, 1, 50. Wint. IV 4, 56. 
Both-sides double-tongued, double- 
hearted: damnable b. rogue, All's IV, 3, 251. 
Bots, small worms fotmd in the entrails of 
horses: begnawn with the b. Shr. III, 2, 56. fo give 
poor jades te b. H4A II, 1, 11. Used as an execra- 
tion: b. on it Per. Il, 1, 124. 
Bottle, 1) a small vessel to put liquor 
in: Tp. 11,,77. 97. 125. 127. 130. 156. 180. III 

2) b. ofhay=truss of hay: Mids. lV, 1,37. 
Bottle-ale, bottled aie: the J][grmidons ar 
no b. bouses» Tw. 11, 3, 29. you b. rascal, H4B 11 
4, 140. 
Boled, big-bellied: that b. slgider R3I, 3, 
242. IV, 4, 81. 
Bottom, name in Mids. I, 2, 18. L2L2. III, 1, 8. IV, 
1, 2-91. 1V, 2, 1 etc. 
Bottom, subst., 1) the lowest part of any 
' cavity: the b. poison, and the top o'erstrawed with 
sweets, Ven. 1143. ebbing men most ojen do so near 
the b. run, Tp. Il, 1, 227. Wiv. III, 5, 13. _As IV, 1, 
211. H4A I, 3, 203. H5 I, _'2-, 164. H4B ¥, 3, 57. R3 
I, 4, 28.32. Troil. 111, 3, 198. Rom. III, 5, 56. Cmb. 
II, 2, 39. Figuratively : it concerns me fo look into the 
b. of my place, Meas. l. 1, 79 (i. e. to know it through- 
out). if shall be called Bottom's dream, because it bath 
no b. Mids. IV, 1, 222. now I see the b. qf your pur- 
pose, All's III, 7, 29. I do see the b. of Justice Shallowr 
H4B III, 2, 3-94. you are too shallow, fo sound the b. 
of the af ter rimes, IV, 2, 51. Troil. III, 3, 31- 9. Cor. 
IV, 5, 209. Tit. 111, 1, 217. Rom. III, 5, 199. Mcb. IV, 
3, 60. C3anb. IV, 2, 204. Per. V, 1, 166. when .your 
lordship sees the b. of his success in if» All's III, 6, 38 
(i. e. -hen you see the whole stretch and issue of his 
enterprise), thereln should we read the very b. and the 
soul ofhope, H4A IV, 1, 50 (we should try out for- 
tune, as it were, to the lees, and there were nothing 
left to hope), we then should see the b. of all our for- 
tunes, tt6B V, 2, 78. -- l"Vow to the b. dost thou search 
my wound, Tit. Il, 3, 26-9, i. e. thou touchest upon my 
deepest grief, cf. mirth doth search the b. of annoy 
Lucr. 1109. the tent that searches fo the b. of the 
worst, Troil. Il, 2, 17. mine ear, therein .false struck 
can take no greater wound, nor tent to b. that, Cymb. 
III, 4, 118. 
2) a ship: mg ventures are hot in one b. trusted 
Mereh. I, 1, 42. with the most noble b. of out fleet, Tw. 
V, 60. John Il, 73. tt5 III Chor. 12. 
3) a low ground, a valley: west of this 
place, down in the neghbour b. As IV, 3, 79. to rob me 
ofso rich a b. tt4A III, 1,105. 
4) a ball of thread: beat me to death with a 
b. of brown thread, Shr. IV, 3, 138. 
Bottom, rb, to wind, to twist thread: as 
you unwind ber love from him, you must provide to b. 
it o me, Gentl. 111, 2, 53. 
Bottom-grass, grass growing in a deep 
valley, rich pasture: sweet b. and high delight- 
Ven. 236. 
Bottomless, 1) fathomless: 0, deeper sin 
!ban b. conceit van comprehend, Lucr. 701. Tir. III, 1, 
218. -- 2) having no bottom: or rather b., that 
as fast as .you pour affection bt, it runs out, s IV, 
1,213. 
Boueiqualt, naine in II5 111, 5, 45. IV, 8, 82. 

2,73. 87. IV» 208. 213. Wiv. ll, 2, 319. Meas. 111,2, Bough, braneh: Vert.37. Sonn. 73, 3. 102, 11. 
182. As 111, 2 211. H4A l'f, 2, 2. 6. H4B 1, 2, 237. Tp. V, 94. As Il, 7, 111. III, 2, 143. IV, 3, 105. Wint. 
Il5 III, 6, 82. H6C II, 5, 48 (leather b.). Oth. Il, 3, V, 3, 133. R2111,4,64. tt5111,2,20. Tir. 1,74 (bound 
152 (a twiggen b.). bang me in a b. like a car and with laurel --s). Tire. IV, 3, 265. Klcb. V, 4» 4. ttml. 
shoot ai me, Ado I, 1, 259 ("It appears that cats weïe IV, 7, 173. Cymb. 111, 3» 61. 
enclosed, with a quantity of soot, in wooden bottles Boult, naine in Per. IV, , 1 etc. 
suspended on a line, and that he who could beat out Bounee, rb., 1) to make a sudden leap 
the bottom of the bottle as he tan under it, and yet with some noise: he, spying ber, --d in» Pilgr. 83. 
escape its contente, was the hero ofthe sport." Dyce). when I saw the porpus how he --d and tumbled, Per. 
-- Used as a masculine: Tp. 1I, _'2, 180. I1, 1, _'26. 



B 133 

2) to be noisy, to bully, to swagger: the 
--ing Amazon, lids. 11, 1, 70 (or is it --- stout, 
plump ?) 
Bouu¢e, inte.» slap, bang: b. would a' say, 
II4B III, 2, 304. he speaks plain cannon tire and 
smoke and b. John Il, 462. 
Bouud, vb., 1) intr. to spring, to leap, to 
rebound: he leaps, he neighs, he --s, Ven. 265. 
Lucr. 11369. H4A I1, 3, 52. H5 111, 7, 13. Troil. 1, 
3, 41. Rom. I, 4, 21. these bars b. All's 1I, 3, 314. 
grief--eth where itfalls, R2 1, 2, 58. 
2) trans, to make to leap: iflrnight buffet 
for my love, or b. my horse for ber favours, H5 V, 
2, 146. 
BOUld, rb., to confine, to limit: agentle 
flood, who, being stopped, the --ing banks o'erjïows, 
Lucr. 1119. the --ed waters, Troil. I, 3, 111. whose 
veins b. richer blood than lady 131anch ? John 1I, 431. 
hozo are we par]ced and --ed in a pale, H6A IV, 
45. I could be --ed 5 a nutshell, IIml. Il, 2, 260. 
-- b'ollowed by to: to whosê high will we b. our cahn 
contents, R2 V, 2, 38 (or ilnpf, of to bind?). To bound 
t'n, in the same sense: glorif# the banks that b. them 
in, John Il, 442. this si,ffste" (check) --s in my father's 
(blood) Troil. IV, 5, 129. 
Bound» snbst. 1) leap: what rounds, what--s. 
what course» what stop he rna-es, Compl. 109. fet- 
ching mad --s, Merch. V, 73. All's Il, 3, 299. Quib- 
bliug: soar with them above a coramon b. Rom. 1,4, 18. 
2) limit, boundary: the sea bath --s, Ven. 
389. Err. Il, 1, 17. a confidence sans b. Tp. I, 2, 97. 
«bore the --s of reason, Gentl. Il, 7, 23. past the 
of patience, Mids. IIl, 2, 65. H4A I, 3, 200. leap all 
civil ---s, Tw. I, 4, 21. beyond the b. of honour, Wint. 
III, 2, 52. the --s of modesty, Rom. IV, 2, 27. above 
a common b. I, 4, 18 (quibble). the ver/utmost b. of 
all our fortunes, H4A IV, 1, 51. no end, no limit, 
measure b. Rom. III, 2, 1-°5. -- Used of the enclosing 
banks of a river: John 1I, 444. III, 1, 23. V, 4, 55. 
"fit. III, 1, 71. Tim. I, 1, 25. 
 inclosure, precinct, district: bourn, b. 
of land, tilth, vincyard, none, Tp. Il, 1, 152: roaming 
clean through the --s of Asia, Err. i, 1, 134. --s of 
feed, As I1, 4, 83. the cottage and the --s that the old 
carlot once was toaster of, III, 5, 107. all the fertile 
land witMn that b. H4A III, 1, 77. a kingdom for it 
was too small a b. V, 4, 90. forth the --s of France, 
II6A I, 2, 54. in ,your city's --s, Tire. ¥, 4, 61. 
= barrier, hinderance: bath he set --s be- 
twixt their love and me? R3 IV, 1, 21. revenge should 
bave no --s, Hml. IV, 7, 129. 
Bouud, adj., 1) ready, prepared: that she 
is b. in honour still to do what /ou in wisdom still 
vouchsafe fo say, John 11, 522. I ara b. to hear, Hml. 
l, 5, 6. both b. fo revenge, H6C Il, 4, 3. like a man to 
double business b. Hml. 111, 3, 41. we are b. to the 
lilce, Lr. Il|, 7, 11. cf. Bind p. 114. 
'2,) destined or intending to go; usually 
followed by fo: I ara b. to Persia» Err. |V, 1, 3. b. 
fo sea, 33. Merch. l, 3, 18. Shr. IV, 5, 55. All's 
5, 37.98. Tw. Il, 1, 43. Iii, 1, 85. Wint. IV, 4, 736. 
John I, 150. Cor. III, 1, 54. Cymb. III, 6, 59. /ou 
would answer ver, y well to a whipptg, if ,you were but 
b. to it, All's Il, 2, 58 ( destined to tmdergo it). 
ollowed by for: b. for raples, Tp. I, 2, 235. Hml. 
|V, 6, 10. Cymb. Iii, 6, 62. theproudfull sail ofhis 

great verse, b..for the prize of all too precious /ou, 
Sonn. 86, 2. Joiued to whither and thither: whither 
are /ou b.f All's 11I, 5, 36. Tw. Il, 1, 10. Wint. IV, 
4, 677. 736. Cymb. III, 6» 58. are ,you b. thither? 
Troil. l, 1, 118. 
Techuical use: all the voyge of their lire is b. in 
shallows and in miseries, Caes.lV, 3,221 ( delayed, 
stopped ; cf. the naval terre port-bound). 
Bounden, bound, obliged: Irest much b. to 
you, As l, 2, 98. I ara much b. to ,your majestg, 
John Il|, 3, 29. 
Botmdless, unconfined, unbridled: thyb. 
'jïood, Lucr. 653. b. sea, Sonn. 65, 1. b. tongue, Wint. 
Il, 3, 91. beyond the inite and b. reach of mercy, 
John IV, 3, 117. the desfo'e s b. Troil. Iii, 2, 89. as 
b. as the sea, Rom. II, 2, 133. b. theft in linffted pro- 
fessions, Tim. IV, 3, 430. b. intemperance, Mcb. |V, 
3, 66. b. happiness, Per. I, 1, 24. 
Bouneous, 1) liberal, munificent: Tp. IV, 
60. 103. Meas. V, 448. R3 Il, 2, 93. H8 I, 3, 55. 
Il, 1, 52. Tim. IV, 3, 167. 423. hIcb. III, 1, 98. Oth. 
111, 3, 7. Per. IV, 4, 17. bave of,your audience been 
rnost free and b. Hml. 1, 3, 93. to be free and b. to 
ber mind, Oth. 1, 3, 266. 
'2,) liberally bestowed, rich: b. largess, 
Sonn. 4, 6. b. gift, 11, 12. 
IZreely, bnt very intelligibly used in the foIIowing 
passages: we'll share a b. rime in different pleasures, 
Tire. l, 1,263. doors that were ne'er acquainted with 
theb" wards many a b. year, III, 3, 39. I greet thy love, 
hot with vain thanks, but with acceptance b. Oth. III, 3» 
470, (i. e. with fifll and unreserved acceptance, as it 
becomes a friend), let's to-night be b. at out rneal, 
Ant. IV, 2, 10 (let us hot be niggardly). 
Bottttleosly, liberally: l'll pay theê b. Tw. 
I, 2, 52. 
Bullliful, 1) li beraI: if that one be prodigal , 
b. they will him call, Pilgr. 412. b. Fortune, Tp. l, 2, 
178. As I, 2, 37. H4A Iii, 1, 168. Tim. III, 1, 11.4.'2. 
2) of rieh eontents, full of meaning: that's 
a b. answer thatjïts all questions, All's Il, .'2» 15. 
Used adverbially: and give it b. to the des'ers, 
Cor. II, 3, 109. 
lunliflly, plenteously: commend me b. fo 
his lordship Tire. III, '2., 58 (be hot niggardly in eom- 
mendations). 
lun¢.v, 1) liberality, munificence: which 
bounteous 9ift thou shouldst in b. eherish, Sonn. 11,12. 
3, 11. Gentl. 1, 1, 152. III, 1, 65. V¢iv. I, 3, 77. 
Mereh. III, 4, 9. OEw. V, 47. Wint. IV, 4, 365. R2 Il, 
3, 67. H5 Il, 2, 92. H6B V, 1, 81. R3 I11, 7, 17. H8 
III, 2, 184. Troil. IV, 5, 102. Rom. Il, 2, 133. Tire. l, 
1, 6. '2.85. 1, 2, '2.15. lIeb. IV, 3, 93. Lr. 1, 1, 53. IV 
6, '2.29. Cymb. l, 6, 78. V, 5, 98 etc. 
'2.) a liberal gift: monarchs' hands that let hot 
b. far where want cries, Compl. 41. all thy treasure, 
with his b. overphs Ant. IV, 6, 22. --les, Tire. I, 2, 
129. Ill, 2, 85. H8 III, 2, 160. 
3) hearty disposition fo do one good, active 
benevolenee: the king who had even tuned his b. fo 
shg happiness fo Mm, All's IV, 3, 1'2.. derive a libert.y 
from heartiness, from b.,fertile bosom, Wint. l, 2,113. 
I thank thee king, for thy great b., that not onlg 9ivest 
me cause to wail, but teachest me the wag ..., R2 IV, 
300. to .you this honorable b. shall belong H4A V, 5, 
26. as ttector's lelsure and .our --les shall concur 



B 

toge»ber , Troil. IV, 5, 273. the less they deserve, the 
more merit is in your b. Hlnl. Il, 2, 558. do no» abuse 
:»y ïnaster's b. by the ttndob»g of yourself, An». V, 2, 
43. l'llpayyom --les, Per. IL 1, 149. 
Bourbon; 1) /)uke o.fB.: H5 Ill, 5, 41. IV, 5, 
12. IV, 8, 82. 2) Lord B. our hi9h admb'al tI6C 
111 3, 252. 
B«udeau, town in Franee: t?iehard qf B., 
1R2 Y, 6, 33 (i. e. Iliehard II). B. stuJf, H4B II, 4, 
69. H6A IV, 2, 1. IV, 3, 4. 8.22. II8 I, 1, 96. 
Bourn, 1) limit, eonfine, boundary: b. 
bound of la»M, tilth, vbwyard, noue, Tp. II, 1, 152. 
one that fixes no b. "twixt Ms aud mine, Vint. I, 2, 
134. like a b., a pale, a shore, Troil. II, 3, 260. the 
undiseovered eoumrg.from whose b. no traveller returns 
Hml. 1I[. 1, 79..from the dread su»dt of this ehalky 
b. Lr. IV, 6, 57. l'Il set a b. how far to be beloved 
Ant. 1, 1, 16..from b. to b., reglon to regon, t'er. 
IV, 4. 4. 
2) brook: corae o'er the b., Bessy, to me, Lr. Ill, 
6, 27. 
'Bou, prepos., --- about, q. v.: Tp. i. 2, 220. 
Wiv. I¥, 6, 42. Cor. Il, 1,225. Cymb. 1V. 2, 283. 
BOII|, subst., a turn, a pass (in fencing): the 
gentleman will, .for his ho»our's sake, haie one b. with 
ymt, Tw. 111. 4, 337. rnake .your --s more violent, 
HmI. IV, 7, 159. l'll play this b. first, V, 2, 295. 
Meuaeingly: l'll haie a b. with thee, It6A I, 5, 4. 

III, 1, 5. --ed ber to the people, IV, 1, 85. my thoughts 
.. b. them to your 9raeious leave, IInd. !, 2, 56. 
e) to erush, to strain: he --ed his nature, 
Cor.V, 6, 25. that you should.fasMo», wrest or b. your 
readb»9, H5 l, 2, 14. 
d) to express by bendiug down: my knee 
shall b. my prayers to them, Ant. I!, 3, 3. 
2) intr., a) to bend, to stoop: ber voice is 
stopt, ber jobts .forget to b. Ven. 1061. heaven, it 
see»ed, to kiss the turrets--ed, Luer. 1372. the shore 
,bat o'er his wave-worn basis --ed, Tp. II, 1, 120. 
which end qf the beam should b. 131. plants »vith goodly 
burthen--i» 9, IV, 113. my legs, like loaden branches, 
b. to the earth, H8 IV, 2, 2. raff knees, who --ed but in 
raff stU-rup, Cor. II1, 2, 119. to b. la the haros, Rom. ll, 
4, 57. the .[lame o' the taper" --s tmvard ber, Cymb. 
II, 2, 20. 
to bend in tokenofsubmission: to 
sbuate, flatter, b. R2 IV. 165. why bath thy knee forgot 
to b.? II13B V 1. 161. R3 I, 3, 161. Cor. V 3, 29. 
Caes. V, 1, 42. Followed by to: b. to a new-crowned 
monarch, Merch. III, 2,49. to thee like osiers led, 
Pilgr. 60 and LLL IV, 2, 112. John III. 1. 74. H6B 
IV, 1, 125. II6C I, 4, 94. Lr. I, 1. 150. Followed by 
bcfore: thHce --ed belote me Wint. II!, 3, 24. the 
gods that Ro»ans b. belote, Caes. II, 1,320. 
b) to stoop, to sink under pressure: whose 
sinewy neck bt bat»le ne'er did b. Ven. 99. job with 

III, 2, 56. Used of dancing: ladies .... will haie a the spire qf.fortune, make me b. Sonn. 90, 3. needs 
b. with ou, ROlU. I, 5, 19 (only in the spurious Q; must lu»dit »y transgression b. 120, 3. like an ass 
the rest of O. Edd. walk about), whose back with i»gots s, Meas. I11, 1,213. wMch in 

'Bore, prepos., --- aboie, q. v.: Tp. I1, 1, 118. 
Tire. 11I, 3, 1. Mcb. III, 5, 31. Lr. 111, 1, 6. 
Bow, subst. 1) instrument to shoot arrows: 
Ven. 381. Luer. 380. LLL IX', 1, 24. 111. Mids. l, 
1, 1Gg. Il, 1, 109. fil, 2, 101. As IV, 3, 4. TroiI. 
I, 3, 3. lll, l, 1213. ]2oto. l, ŒEE, 5. Hnd. IV, 7, 23. 
Per. V, 1, 249. To bend a b. : Mids. I, 1, 9. R2 III, 
2, 116. draw your b. Shr. V, 2, 47. Lr. iV, 13, 88. a' 
drew a ffood b. H4B 1II, 2, 48. the b. is bent and 
dïawn, Lr. l, 1, 145. 
2) rainbow: thg bhte b. ri'p- IV, 80. heaeenIÆ 
b. 86. 
3) yoke: as the ox bath his b. As III, 3, 80. 
B«w, rb., 1) trans, a) to bend: a th»ee-pence 
--ed would hU'e me, H8 Il, 3, 36. you're a .young 
foolish sapli»g and must bi --ed as I would haie flou, 
l'er. le, 2, 94. and --ed ber hand to teach her finger- 
ing, Shr. 11, 151, 
b) to incline, to bend down: she --s ber 
head, the new-spru»9 .flower to smell, Ven. 1171. --s 
his vassal head, LLL IV, 3, 224. --ed his eminenl 
top to their low ranks AIl's I, 2, 43..fetdhers which b. 
the head, IV, 5,112. --i»g his head agalnst the steepy 
mount to elbnb his happiness, Tire. I, 1, 75. to the 
ground their knees they b. Luer. 1846. --ed my knee 
nnto this kb»g of smiles, H4A 1, 3, 245. b. my kne e 
belote his majesty, R2 I, 3, 47. b. a knee to man 
H6B V 1,110. should b. hls knee, H6C II,2,87. knees 
humbly--ed Rom. Ill, 1, 161. Cymb. V, 5, 19. aodb. 
this feeble ruin (my mutilated body) to the earth, Tit 
II1, 1, 203. whose heavy hand bath --ed j/ou to the 
grare, Meb. III, 1, 89. this gate ... --s .you to a raoin- 
ing's holy office, Cymb. 1II, 3, 3. necessity so --ed the 
state H4B III, 1, 73. 
Reflectively: b. themselres when he did sng, H8 

weight to re-answer, hls pettiness would b. under, H5 
III, 6, 137. if I b., they'll say it was .for .fear, H6A 
1V, 5, 29. ---s unto the grave with mickle agi, H6B V, 
1,174. who sensibly ou»dates hls senseless sword, and 
when it --s, stands up, Cor. I, 4, 54. that wMch rnakes 
me bend makes the king b. Lr. 111, 13, 11t3. 
e) to aeeornrnodate one's self: to crush 
this a little, it would b. to me, Tw. 1I, 5, 153; cf. H5 
1, 2, 14. 
Bow-lmeh. arched, erooked baek: on 
(the boar's) b. Vin. 1319. 
Bolv-|toy, flac boy with the bow, riz Cupid: 
Iom. 11, 4, 16. 
Bow-case. case for a bo: It4A I1, 4, 273. 
Bowels, 1) the entrails: wlwse b. suddenlg 
urst out, John V, 6, 30. V, 7, 31. H4A V, 3, 36. H5 
II, 1, 54. R3 1, 4, 212. Caes. V, 3, 42. Tropically: 
gnaws the b. qf the commonweahh, II6A 111, 1, 73. 
teaHog his country's b. out, Cor. V 3, 103. Considered 
as the seat of pi»y, tenderness, and of sensibility in 
general : and bids gou, in the b. of the lord, deliier 
up the crown, H5 II, 4, 102. there is no lady of more 
so.fter b. Troil. II, 2, 11. mg b. camwt Mde ber woes, 
Tit. Ill, 1, 231. thou thi»g of no b. thou Troil. II, 
1, 54. 
2) that whieh is one's own flesh and blood, 
ehildren: thine own b., whieh do eall thee sb% the 
mere effusion of thg proper loins, ào ourse the 9out ... 
çor endbg thee no sooner, Meas. II1, 1, 29. 
3) the inner part of any thing: the calmons 
ave theii b. full of wrath, John I!, 210. out of the b. 
qf the harmlçss earth, II4A !, 3, 61. rushed imo the b. 
qf the battle, H6A 1, 1, 129. rushinff in the b. of the 
French, le, 7, 42. into the .fatal b. qf the deep, R3 111. 
4, 103. into the b. of the land V, 2, 3. pourb» 9 war 



B 135 

into the b. of ungrateful Rome, Cor. IV, 5, 136. when 
some envions surge will b hls brbdsh b. swallow hlm, 
OEit. I11 1 97. 
Bower, subst. a n a r b o u r, a shady recess amidst 
rees and flowers: Ado Ill, 1, 7. Mids. IH, 1, 02. 111, 
2, 7. IV 1, 66. Tw. I l 41. II4A 11I 1,210. Cor. III, 
2 92.  a pleant habitation: sweet beaut hath no 
naine, o holyb. Sonn. 127 7. 
Bower, rb., to enclose, to lodge in a dclightful 
manncr: b. the spirlt of a fiend in mortal paradise of 
such sweetflesh, Rom. 111, 2, 81. 
Bowget, reading of O. Edd. Wint. IV, 3 20; 
flyming to avouch it; M. Edd. budget. 
Bow-haad, the hand which draws the bow»' 
or which holds thc bow? Doubtless the latter. 
Wide o" te b. LLL IV 1 135 i. e. far from the 
mark. 
Bowl, subst., l) a vessei to drink in, rather 
wide than deep: LLL V, 2 935. R3 V, 3, 63.72. II8 
k 4 39. Cacs. IV, 3, 142. 158. Ant. lll 13, 184. a 
.qossip's b. Mids. Il, 1, 47.*Rom. III, 5, 175. standing 
b. (i. e. a bowl resting on a foot) Per. 11, 3, 65; cL 
Stage-direction in II8 V, 5. 
) ball of wood nsed for play: Cor. V, 2»20. 
CDnb. 11. 1.8. tus te b. sould run Shr. IV 5 24. 
ai --s, R2 lll, 4, 3. Cylnb. 11, 1, 54. 
Bowl, rb. (rhyming to owl: LLL IV, 1, 140), 
l) trans., to roll as a bowl: b. te roundnave down 
te Mll of eaven, Hml. H, 2, 518. b) to pelt with 
any thing rolled: --ed to death wit turnips Wiv.lH, 
4 fil. 
) intr. a) to play at bowls: callenge ber 
fo b. LLL IV, 1,140. b) to more like a bowl: 
(fit (the dance of the satyrs) be hot too rough for some 
tat now little but --bg Vint. IV 4 338) 
Bowler, player at bowls: a vetT good b. 
LLL V, 2, 587. 
Boline, see Bolin. 
Bo¢sprit (O. Edd. bore-sprh) a large boom 
projecting over thc stem of a ship: Tp. 1, 2, 200. 
Bov.sf¢ig, string of a bow: e at twice 
or tHce eut C«pid's b. Ado lll , 11. oldor eut --s, 
Mids. I, 2, 114,  corne wlmt tome may. Capell: 
'When a party was ruade at butts, sarance of meet- 
ing was given in the words of that phrase ; the sense 
of the person using them being, that he would hold 
or keep promise, or they might eut hs bowstrings.' 
Bow-wow, a cT imitative of the barking of dogs: 
OEp. I 2, 382. 383. 
BoL subst., 1) a case fo holdsomething: 
Wiv. l 4, 47. All's ll 3 296. Vint. IV 4 782. Troil. 
V, 1, 12.29 (tou damnable b. of emT). Rom. V, 
45. Tire. lll 1 16. Hml. V 1 120. Cmb. lll 4 191. 
V 5 41. Per. lll 2 81. 
) b. on or of te ear  blow on the side of the 
face: I will t«e tee a b. on te ear, H5 IV 1231. 
a b. ortie ear Merch. I, 2 86. H4B I, 2, 218 (glve). 
f e took ou a b. o" te ear Meas. Il, 1,189. H6B 
IV 7 91. to tae lm a b. a th' ea G H5 IV 7 133. 
181. 
Box-free, a shrub, bnxus sempervirens: get 
e eR three into te b. Tw. ll 5, 18. 
Boy, a maie child, a lad: Tp. lll, 3,43. IV, 
90. 101. Wiv. Il» 2, 132. IV, 1, 11 etc. etc. Used  a 
word of conteml)t for young men: Ado V 1 83. 187. 
Cor.V6 101. 104. 117 etc. Familiar te in address- 

ing, or speaking of, grown persous: ten to sea, 
Tp. Il, 2, 56. Gentl. Il, 1, 54. 85. III, 1, 188. 395. 
Wiv.l,3,62. III, 1,109. Shr. IV, 1,43etc.Often  page, 
young servant: if thon seest my b. Gentl. III, l, 257. 
I keep but three men and et b. Viv. 1, 1 285. Shr. IV, 
4 8. H5 111 2, 30. R3 IV, 2, 32. "mong s, grooms 
and lackes, II8 V, 2, 18. H4B 1I, 4, 268 etc. te 
hangman --s, Gentl. IV, 4, 60. a postmaster's b. Wiv. 
V, 5, 199. -- ]ur town is troubled with unrul --s, 
Err. lll 1» g?, (allusion to the ang or roari»g boys, 
a set of young bueks who delightcd to commit out- 
rages and get into quarrels), lshall see some squeak- 
ng Cleopatra-boy m greatness, Ant. 
shall see some boy, performiug the part of Clcopatra, 
as my highness, er. 
squeaki»g- Cleopatra-boy. 
BoȢt, naine in LLL Il, 13. 0. lgl. IV, 1, 55. 
V 2, ïg. 81. 174 etc. Rhyming to debt: V,  334. 
Bo»-ish, pertaiuing to a boy-from my b. das, 
Oth. 1, 3, 132. ehildish: b. troops John V,  133. 
8oy-qullCr, boy-killer (cf. man-queller): 
Troil. V, 5, 45. 
Bos: Sir Rowland de B. Asl, 1,60. 1, 2,235. 
Brabant, dukedoln in the Low-Countries: LLL 
ll 114. H511,45. 1li, 542. IV, 8, 101. 
Brabantio, naine in Oth. 1, 1 79. 106. I, 2 55. 
l, 3, 47. 172. 
Brabble, subst., quarrel, b roil: in private b. 
did we apprehend hbn, Tv. V, 8. this pettg b. will 
undo us all Tir. 11, 1, 2. (If we leave our pribbles 
and prabbles, Wiv. I, 1, 56. pribbles and prabbles, V, 
5, 169. leave our prabbles, IV, 1, 52. keep gou out of 
prau, ls and prabbles, H5 IV, 8, 9. AIl this in the 
Welsh dialeet of Evans and Fluellen). 
Brabhleruarreller, noisy fellov: we hold 
out time too precious to be spent with sueh a b. John 
V, 2, 162. -- Naine of a yelping dog: he will spend 
his wuth and promise, like B. the hound, Troil. V, 
1, 99. 
Brace, subst., 1) couple: mg b. oflords, Tp. V, 
126. a b. of words, LLL V, 2, 524. of tongues , John 
IV, 1, 98. of dragmen, R2 I, 4, 32. ofgreghounds  
H6CII, 5, 129. of courtezans, R3 III, 7, 74. of warlike 
brothers, Troil. IV, 5, 175. of testg magistrates, Cor. 
Il, 1, 46. of the best of them, Iii, 1,244. of klnsmen 
Rom. V, 3, 295. ofharlots, Tire. IV, 3, 79. of Cgprus 
gallants, Oth. Il. 3, 31. ofunpri:able estimations, Cymb. 
1, 4, 99.  SVithout a genitive: here cornes a b. Cor. 
Il, 3, 67. -- Not infleeted in the plural: two b. of 
9reghounds, TinL 1, 2, 195. 
2) armour: 'il bath been a shiehl tw&t me and 
death';  and pobted to this b. Per. il, 1, 133 (cf. 
vantbrace). Figuratively: it (Cyprus) stands hot in 
such warlike b. Oth. I, 3, 24 ( state of defenee). 
Bra«e, xb., to strain up, to prepare: a 
drum is ready d that shall reverberate ets loud as 
thine, John V, 2, 169. 
Bracelet, ornament for the wrist: --s of 
thg haœee, Mids. i, 1, 33. amber --s, Shr. IV, 3, 58. 
bugle b. SVint. IV, 4, 224. 611. Cymb. V, 5, 20. 416. 
Bra¢h, a kind of seenting-dogs: b. Merri- 
man, the poor cur is emboss'd; and couple Clowder with 
e deep-mouthed b. Shr. Ind. 1, 17 (there is eertainly 
a eorrnption in one plaee), houad or spaniel b. or 
lgm. Lr. III, , 72. Also  biteh: Ihad rather hear 
Ladg mg b., howl b h'ish, H4A III, 1,240. truth's a 



136 B 

dog must to kennel; he must be whipped out, when the IV, 159. Wiv. I, 1, 44. IV, 2, 166. Ado II, 3, 250. V, 
lady brach mag stand by the `tire and stlnk, Lr. I, 4, I 4, 87. LLL I, 1, 166. IV, 3, 324. V, 2,_857. ]I_ech. 
125. In Troil. II 1, 126 1I. Edd. brach O. Edd. I I, 2 19. As II 7 38. IV 3 4. OEw. I 5, 13.92. Vint. 
brooeh. ] I1 3, 6. IV 4, 701. John V, 7 2. R2 V, 5, 6. IR4B IV, 
Braey, name:SirJohnB. H4AII, 4,367. [3,105. H6BI, 2,99.11I, I,339. H81II, 2, 113. Rom. 
Brag, vb., 1)intranitively; to boast: whenvirtue[ I, 3, 29 (cf. bear). Hml. I11 2, 237 etc. -- b) in the 
--ed beaut.y would blush for shame Luer. 54. lhoen.  plural : Tp. V, 59. Wiv. II1, 2, 30. III, 5 7. IV, 2, 231. 
63. LLLV 2, 683. llereh. III, 4, 69.77. John III 1, OEw. I, 3, 44. I, 5, 122. Wint. I, 2, 145. H4B 11I 1, 

122. V, 1, 50. H4B II, 4, 247. V, 3, 124. H5 III, 6, 
160. V 1, 6. V, 2, 144. Oth. II, 1,225. Having of 
bcfore the thiug boasted: b. hot of thy might, Ven. 
113. Wiv. III, 3 212. Err. Ill 2, 16. hlcb. lI 3, 101. 
Lr. V, 3, 280. Having to before the person to whom 
the boast is ruade: art thou --ing to the stars, hlids. 
III, 2, 407..you bave heard him b. to .you he will Tw. 
III4, 348. to b. unto them, thus I did; Cor.Il,2, 151. 
ollowed by a clause: nor shall Death b. thou wan- 
derest in hls shade, Sonn. 18, 11. Gentl. IV» 1, 69. 
Ado V, l, 60. 
In two passages it is evidcntly used in a good 
sense,  to talk with pride, to bc justly proud: Ve- 
rona --s of hin to be a virtuous .youth, Rom. I 5, 69. 
conceit, more rlch in matter than b words --s of his 
substance hot of ornament, 1I, 6, 31. 
2) transitively: .your --edprogen/, Cor. I» 8 12. 
he --s his service, Cymb. V, 3, 93. 
lrag, subst., boast: Caesar's thrasonlcal b. oj 
'I came, saw, end overcame,' As V, 2, 34. H5 111, 7 
83. Troil. IV 5, 257. Tir. 1 306. Cmb. III 1 23. 
V 5. 176. 
lraggardism, boastfalness: Gentl. 1I, 4, 164. 
lraggart, boaster: AdoV 1, 91. 189. LLL V, 
, 545. lIerch. 111, 2, 261. All's IV 3 370. 37. H5 
11, 1 64. Cor. V 6, 119. Rom. 1II, 1, 105. Tire.IV, 
161. lIcb. IV, 3, 231. Lr. 11, 2, 133. 
lra$iess, nuboasted: if it be so, .yet b. let 
be, Troil. V, 9, 5. 
Braid, adj. deeeitful: since Frenehmen are so 
b. marry that will, I live and dle a mald, All's IV 
2, 73. 
lraid, rb, 1) to weave, interlaee: Ms --ed 
hanging mane Ven. 271. slackbj --ed in loose ne#ll- 
gence, Compl. 35. 
2) to reproaeh: 'twould b..yourselftoo near for 
me to tell it, Per. I 1, 93. 
Brin, subst., the soft mass inclosed in 
the sktll; nsed, with one restriction, indiscritni- 
nately in the singular and plural : bave I lald my b. in 
the sun and dried it? Wiv. V, 5, 143. to sear me to 
the b. R31V, 1,61 (Ff--s). our--" s flow (i. e. our tears) 
Tire. V, 4, 76..yet ha" we a b. that nourshes out nerves, 
Ant. IV, 8, 21. his --s are forfeit to the next tile that 
falls, All's IV, 3, 216. l'll never belleve a madman 
till I see his s Tw. IV, 2, 1:26. make a quagmire of 
.your mingled --s» H6A I, 4, 109. I ara cut to the 
Lr. IV, 6, 197 etc. 
The plural alone used in the phrases to beat out, 
to dash out, to knock out a person's bralns: hIeas. IV, 
3, 58. As IV 1, 98. All's III, 2, 16. Wint. II 3, 139. 
I:t6A IIl l, 83. Troil. II 1, 111. III 3 304. Tit. V, 
3, 133. Rom. IV, 3, 54. Tire. l, 1, 193. IV, 1, 15. 
Oth. IV, 2, 236. Cymb. IV, 2 115. cf. when the 
were out, the man would die, Mcb. III, 4, 79. 
Considered as the organ of thought; a) in the 
singular: a drunken b. Ven. 910. ber troubled b. 1040. 
1068. Lucr. 460. Sonn. 77 11. 86, 3. 108, 1. 

19. Oth. II, 3, 35. The plural, of course, used with 
reference to several persons: how are our --s beguiled, 
Sonn. 59, . Wiv. III, l, 122. Mids. V, 4. Wint. III, 
3, 64. But also the singalar: women's gentle b. could 
hot drop f orth such giant-rude invention, As IV 
treated as a sing.: Ails III, 2,16. Hml. IlI,l,182.Lr. 
Liver, b. and heart, these soverei#n thrones, Tw. I, 
I, 37. to.you, the liver, heart and b. of .Britain, Cymb. 
V, 5, 14. 
7"o be beaten with s -- to be mockcd" Ado V, 
4, 104. there has been rauch throwlnff about of--s, 
Ilml. Il, 2, 376, i. e. much satirlcal controversy. 
A drff b.  a dull brain, a brain incapable of 
thinking: As Il, 7, 38. Troil. I, 3, 329. cf. have Ilaid 
my b. in the sun and dried it 2. Wiv. V, 5 143. 0 heat, 
dr up rny --s, Hml. IV, 5, 154. to sear me to the b. 
R3 IV, 1, 61 ( to dcprive me of thought), cf. Dry. 
Falstaff's reasoning in It4B I¥, 3, 105 tests on quite 
another physiological theory. 
A hot b., Wint. IV, 4, 701  an inventive fancy; 
cf. such seetMng --s, such shaplng fantasles, hlids. V, 
4. a false creation proceeding ri'oto the heat-oppressed 
b. leb. I1, 1, 39. -- .Boiled --s Vint. 11I, 
hot-headed fellows. 
llrain, rb., 1) to kill by bcating out the 
'brains: there thou maffst b. him Tp. I11, 2, 96. 1 
could b. Mm with his ladff's fan, H4A II, 3, 24. Figu- 
ratively,  to defeat: that--ed m.ypurpose, lIeas. 
V, 401. 
2) to eoneeive in the brain, to understand: 
such stuff as madmen tongue and b. hot, Cymb. V, 4, 
147. 
BrainCd, adj., endowed with a brain: f 
the other two be b. like us, the state totters, Tp. III, 
2, 7. 
Brainford (lI. Edd..Brent.ford), place in Eng- 
1and: Viv. IV, 2, 78.88. 100. 179. IV, 5, 28.120. 
Brainish, bralnsick: and in tis b. appreen- 
$on kills the unseen good old man, Hml. IV, 1, 11. 
lBrainlcss, stupid: te dull b. Ajax, Troil. 
3, 381. 
Brain-lmn, sku11: H6B IV, I0, 13. 
BrainosicK, mad: b. rude des,re, Lucr. 175. 
H6A IV, 1, 111. H6B 11I 1, 51. V, 1, 163. Troil. 1I, 
.'2, 122. T[t. V, , 71. 
BrainsicKly, madly: you do unbend.your noble 
strenMh , to thlnk so b. of thinffs, llcb. II, o, 46. 
llrale, thieket: round rlslng hillocks, --s ob- 
scure and rough Ven. 237. hostlng to feed ber fawn 
Md in some b. 876. kennelled in a b. 913. Pilgr. 126. 
lIids. II, 1, 227. III, 1, 4.77. 110. III, .'2, 15. IR6C III, 
1, 1. the rough b. that virtue must go through, H8 
75.- Some run from brakes of Ice, and answer none, 
and some eondemned for a fault alone, bleas. II, 1, 39, 
a passage, as it seems hopelessly eorrupt. Some M. 
Edd. write breaks of ice, others brakes of vice. So 
mueh is eertaln, that the idea hidden in the words 
brakes of 1ce mu_st be antithetieal to a fault alone. 



B 137 

Brakenbury, naine in R3 I, 1, SS. 105. I, 4, 66 ] Brass, an alloy of copper and zinc: pew- 
(Ff. ah keeper, kceper). V, 5, 14 (Sir tobert B.). ter and b. Shr. I1, 358. b. cannon, H5 III, 1, 11. b., 
Bramble, blaekben.y bush, and in general a ] cur! offerest me b.? IV, 4, 19. trumpet, send thl/ b. 
roug'h priekly shrub: the thornl/--s and embra- voice .... TroiL I, 3, 257. a leafofb. Tir. IV, 1, 102. 
vin 9 bushes, Ven. 629. han9s odes upon hawthorns and Serving for tablets to write on, and henee a sym- 
eleçles on --s, As III, 2, 380. bol of imperishable memory: with characters of b. 
Bran, the h usks separated from the flour by Meas. V, 11. sincenor b. norstonenorparchmentbears 

bolting: to di»e and sup with water and b. Mcas. IV 
3, 160. fast a week with b. and water» LLL I, 1, 303. 
vhaff and b. ŒEroil. I, 2, 262. 1eave me but the b. Cor. 
I, 1, 149. meal and b. to9ether he throws, III, 1, 322. 
ature hath meal and b. Cymb. IV, 2, 27. 
Braneh, subst., a shoot of a tree: As IV, 2 
5.*Wint. IV, 4, 115. R2 I11 4, 63. H6A 11, 5, 12. 
It6C IV, 6, 34. V, 2, 14. H8 IV, 2, 2. V, 5, 54. Per. 
I1, 2, 43. V Prol. 6. Figuratively,  arm: ruade 
thl/ body bare of ber two --es, ŒEit. Il, 4, 18. Particu- 
larly nsed as a simile for children and descend- 
ants: the --es of another root are rotted, Lucr. 823. 
lopped the b. H6C Ii, 6, 47. wh!W9row the --es now 
the foot is withered? R3 il, 2, 41. cf. 12 I, 2, 13. 15. 
Cymb. V 4, 141. V, 5, 454. Hence: rny low aad 
humble naine to propagate with an!Wb. or image of thy 
state, All's Il, 1, 201. as a b. and member of this 
fo!lait!W, H5 V, 2, 5. that from his loins no hopeful b. 
na sprb,9, II6C Iii, 2, 126. 
= part, article, partieular: itisab, and 
parcel of mine oath, Err.V, 106. that violates the small- 
est b. herein, LLL I, 1, 21. in ever!/ lineament, b., 
shape, and form, Ado V, 1, 14. the Sisters Three and 
such --es of learning, Mereh. II, 2, 66. hot to break 
peaee, or an!/b, of it, H4B IV, 1» 85. an act bath three 
--es, HmL V, 1, 12. this fierce abrid9eme»t bath to it 
circumstantial es, Cymb. V, 5, 383. Used, with 
speeial propriety, of the ramification of a pedi'ee: 
he sends !Aou this most memorable line, b, ever!/ b. trul!/ 
demonstrative tI5 II, 4 89. 
Branvh, rb., to shoot out: there rooted be- 
twixt them then such an affection, which cannot vhoose 
but b. now, Wint. I, 1, 27. 
Branched, adorned with needlework represent- 
ing flowers and twigs: in mlWb. velvetgown, Tw. Il, 
5, 54. 
Branvhless, destitute, bare: if I lose mlL honour, I lose rnyself : better I were hot !Curs than 
!Aours so b. Ant. III, 4, 24. 
Band, subst., 1) a bnrning pece of wood: 
Ew. V, 171. Mids. V, 382. R2 V, 1, 46. H6B I, 1,234. 
Cor. I¥, 6, 115. Caes. III, 2, 260. III, 3, 41. Lr. ¥, 
3, 22. 
2) Cupld's toreh: Cupid laid biA his b. and fell 
asleep, Sonn. 153, 1. 9. his heart-lnflamin 9 b. 154, 2. 
two winkb 9 Cupids» nicel!/ dependin 9 on their --s 
Cymb. II, 4 
3) mark of infam, y, stigma: ml/namerecei- 
res a b. Sonn. 111 5. Wint. II, 1, 71. Cor. Iii, 1,304. 
Brand, rb., to stigmatize: Luer. 1091. R3 
IV, 4, 141 Qq. where should be 9raven). H8 III, 1, 
128. Hml. IV, 5, 118. Lr. I, 2, 9. Ant. IV, 14 76. 
Brandish, to shake, to flourish: never b. 
more reven9eful steel, R2 IV, 50. if I b. an!Wthln 9 but 
a bottle, H4B I, 2, 236. b. l/our crl/stal tresses in the 
,kl/ H6A I, 1, 3. hls --ed swovd 10. IV, 7, 6. Mcb. 
I, 2, 17. V, 7, 13. 
Brandon. ,_çir William B.: R3 V, 3 22. 27. ¥, 
, 14. 

hot one (example), Wint. I, 2, 360. lire in b. H5 IV, 
3, 97. H8 IV, 2, 45. hold up hi9h in b. TroiL I, 3, 64. 
Emblem of hardness and strength: and b. eternal 
slave to mortal rage, Sonn. 64, 4. 65, 1. 107, 14. as 
if this flesh were b. impre9nable , R2 III, 2, 168. walls 
ofbeaten b. Caes. I, 3, 93. bind them b* b. Per. III, 1, 
3.- Denoting insensibility and obduracy: unless 
mlWnerves were b. or hammered steel, Sonn. 120, 4. 
van anl/ face of b. hold longer out, LLL V, 2, 395. 
Brassy, hard as brass, pitiless: b. bosoms 
and rough hearts of flint, Merch. IV, 1, 31. 
Brai, terre of contcmpt for a child: Err. IV, 4, 
39. "Wint. Il, 3, 92. 163. III, 2, 88. H6A V, 4, 84. 
H6C I, 3, 4. V, 5, 27. 13 I, 3, 194. III, 5, 107. Cor. 
IV, 6, 93. Tit. V, 1, 28. Cymb. II, 3, 124. 
Brave, adj., 1) vtliant: hast thou kill'd Mm 
sleeping? 0 b. touch! Mids. III, 2, 70. b. conquerors, 
LLL I, l, 8. V, 2, 671. Merch. Il, 2, 12. All's Il, 1, 
16. H6A I!, 1, 28. iii, 2, 101. 134. IV, 3, 34. H6B 
IV, 8, 21. H6C IV, 1, 96. V, 7, 8. Tit. I, 25. Mcb. 1, 
2, 5. 16. Cymb. I, 1, 166 etc. etc. 
2) becoming (in speaking of things) gallant 
(of persons), such as one ought to bc : l'll devise thee 
b. punishments for him, Ado V, 4, 130. wear ml/dagger 
with the --r grave, Merch. I!I, 4, 65. what a noble 
combat hast thou fought between compulsion and a b. 
respect! John V, 2, 44. I have thrown a b. defiance in 
King Henry's teeth, It4A V» 2, 43. this is most b. that 
I must, like a whore, unpack ml/ heart wlth words, 
HmL Il, 2, 611. what's b.» what's noble, let's do it, 
Ant. IV, 15, 86. their b. hope, bold ttector, Luer. 1430. 
mlWb. spirit! OEp. I, 2, 206. the JDuke of ,]Iilan and his 
b. son, 438. his more --r dau9hter , 439. l/ou are 9entle- 
men of b. mettle, Il, 1, 182. 0 b. monster, lead the 
i wal/, II, 2, 192. b. Iaster Shootl/, the 9reat traveller, 
Meas. IV, 3, 18. this is a b. fellow, "Wint. IV, 4, 202. 
the societg of !Cut b. father, V, 1, 136. l'll be a b. 
jud9e , II4A I, 2, 73. that's ml/ b. bol/, Cor. V, 3, 76. 
b. lords» 'rit. IV, 2, 136. ml/b..Egl/ptians , Ant. III, 13, 
164. st at the last, she levelled at our purposes, V, 
2, 338. 
3) fine, splendid, bautiful: sec the b. dalL sunk in hldeous nOht , Sonn. 12, 2. wear their b. state 
out of memor!/, 15, 8. youth like summer b., a9e like 
wlnter bare, lilgr. 160. a b. vessel, OEp. 1, 2, 6. it 
carries a b. form, 411. that's a b. 9od and bears 
celestial liquor, II, 2, 122. he were a b. nwnster indeed, 
if thel/ were serin his tail, Iii, 2» 12. he bas b. utensils, 
which, when he bath a house he'll deck withal, 104. 
so b. a lass, 111. 113. this will prove a b. kin9dom to 
me, 153. 0 b. new world, V, 183. these be b. spirits, 
261. full merril!/ bath this b. mana9e , this vareer, been 
run, LLL V, 2, 482. 0 tht's a b. man! he writes b. 
verses etc. As III, 4, 43. b. attendants, Shr. Ind. I, 
40. a --r choive of dauntless splrits did never float..., 
John II, 72. a --r place in mlWheart's love bath no 
man than l/ourself 1-14A IV, 1, 7. b. death, when prin- 
ces die with us, V, 2, 87. when shell we 9o to Cheap- 
side? marr!h presently. 0 b.! tI6B IV, 7, 137. er. 



138 

B 

138. welcome to tlds b. town of York, II(3C [[, 2, 1. 
thelr b. pavillons, Troil. Prol. 15. is hot that a b. 
man? l, 2, 202. this b. o'erhanging firmament IIml. 
Il, 2, 312. this is a b. noht to cool a courtezan, Lr. 
III, 2 79. from thls most --st vessel o.f the world 
struck the main-top, Cymb. IV, 2, 319. 
lae, rb., 1) to display bravery, to 
carry a threatening appearance: havefou9ht 
wltlt equal fortune and continue a ---b»g wm', All's 1. 
2, 3. art corne in --ing arms, R2 Il, 3, 112. 143. 
Followed by a supcrfiuous if: Lucius and l'll go b. 
it at the cort, Tit. 1V, l 122. 
Mosflytransitive, to defy, to oppose, to 
bully: so rich a thi»g, --ing compare, Lucr. 40. to 
b. him (rime) when he takes thee hence, Soun. 12, 14. 
b. hot me, Shr. IV, 3, 126. --d in m5e own bouse, 111. 
that faced and --d me b this nanner so, V, 1, 124. 
my state is --d with ranks of forelgn powers, John 
IV, 2, 243. darest thou b. a nobleman, IV, 3, 87. to b. 
me, II4B I1, 4, 232. how I ara --d and must pet:force 
endure it, II6A 11, 4, 115. b. death bff speakin, IV, 7, 
25. thou wilt b. me with these sauoj terres q. II6B IV, 
10, 38. Tit. Il, 3, 126. IV, 2, 36. 137. Caes. IV, 3, 
96. Oth. V, 2, 326. Ant. IV, 4, 5. 
2) to make fine and splendid: thou (viz 
the tailor) hast --d manj men, Shr. 1¥, 3, 125. he 
should have --d the east an hour ago, R3 V, 3, 279. 
It must bc left undecided, in which of these two 
sigoifications the following passages arc to be undcr- 
stood : shall a beardless boy ... b. our fields, John V, 
1, 70; and: when traitors b. the field, R3 IV, 3, 57. 
One acccptation is supportcd bv the mmlogous use 
of the verb to become (q. v. sub 3; cf. besides: the 
foc vaunts in thefieM, R3 V, 3, 288); the other by 
a similar expression tu tI5 IV, 2, 36: out approach 
shall so much date the Jïeld that England sh«ll couch 
down infear attd ield. It must however, be borne in 
mind tiret in this latter passage the word date is uscd 
wifl peculiar propriety, being a technic,l terre of 
falconry. 
lrae, snbst., display of valour, defiance, 
thrcatening: I will 7mt bear these --s of thine, 
Shr. III, 1, 15. there end thy b. and turn thy fice in 
peace, John V, 2, 159. where" s the Bastareçs --s, and 
Charles his gleeks? tI6A III, 2, 123. this b. shalloft 
make thee to bide thy head, Troil. IV, 4, 139. to bear 
me down with --s, Tit. Il, 1, 30. 
lravely, 1) valiantly: he b. bro«clted his 
boilb»g bloody breast, Mids. ¥, 148. he's b. taken heïe 
All's III, 5, 55..full b. hast thou fleshed thy maiden 
sword, H4A V, 4, 133. H4B Il, 4, 54. H5 III, 6, 77. 
R3 V, 3, 312. Troil. III, 3, 213. Cor. V, 3, 117. 
Mcb. V, 7, 26. La-. IV, 6, 202. Cylnb. ¥, 4, 72. 
2) in , becoming manncr, so as to excite 
the cry: well done ! bravo!" : b. the figure of thls harp. 
hast thou performed, TF. II1, 3, 83. tight atd gare 
and b. rlgged, V, 224. was't well doneq, b., ny dili- 
gence, V, 241. "twas b. done, Ado V, 1, 279. swears 
brave oaths and breaks them b. As III, 4, 45. and 
revel it as b. as the best, Shr. IV, 3, 54. steal mvay b. 
All's Il, 1, 29. awaff, and leace ber b. II, 3, 216. b., 
coraglo! Il, 5, 97 (--- well donC), b. cotoEessed and 
lamented by the king, Vïnt. ¥ 2, 93. 0 b. came we 
q/T John V, 5, 4. the t'rench are b. in their battles set ' 
II5 IV, 3, 69. she takes upon ber b. at first dash, 
II(3A l, 2 71. tucelle bath b. plaffed herpart» III, 3, 

88. when I hm'e been dry and b. nmrchb9, H6B IV, 
10, 15. sec !tou do it h. Tit. IV 3, 113. here we 
sec most b. Troil. 1, 2, 19S. now thou diest os b. as 
Titbffus, Caes. V, 4 10. do b., horse! Ant. I, 5, 22. 
how b. thou becomest thy bed, Cymb. 11, 2, 15. a piece 
of work so b. donc» 11, 4, 73. 
The passages snb 1. may, indecd, all be taken in 
the same sense. 
Bravery, 1) display of valour, ostenta- 
tion, bravado: corne down with femfid b. Caes. v, 
1, 10. the h. of his grief dld put me into a towering 
passion, thnl. V, 2, 79. 
2) act of d e fi au c e, state of defiancc : upon 
llcious b. dost thou corne to start my quiet, Oth. I, 1, 
100 (Ff knavoT), the natural b. of your isle, Cymb. 
III, 1, 18. 
3) splendor, finery: hlding thy (the sun's) b. 
$onn. 34, 4. where outh, and cost, and witless b. 
keeps, Mcas. 1, 3, 10. his b. is hot o.f m.y cost, As 11, 
7, 80. with scmfs and fans and double change qf b. 
Shr. IV, 3, 57. 
iral, rb, 1) to be at discord: whose ad- 
vice bath o.ften stilled my --iog discontent, Mcas. IV, 
1, 9. his dicislons» as the rimes do b., are in three 
heads, tI4B 1, 3, 70. 0 --in love! 0 locin hate! 
ROln. I, 1, 182. 
2) to qnarrel: though she strlve to try ber 
strength, and ban and b. Pilgr. 318. Err. IV, 1, 51. 
LLI 111, 1. 10. Shr. 1, 2, 188. IV, 1,209. IV, 3, 10. 
]23 1, 3, 324. ' 
3) to be elatnorous, to be loud: what a 
--ing dost thou keep, tI4A 11, 2, 6. what are you 
--ing here, |I4B Il, 1, 71. lu a somewhat nfilder 
sense: the brook that --s along this wood, As I1, 
32. -- To b. down -- to throw doyen by peals of 
eannon: till their soul-fearing clamours hare --ed 
down the Jtbty ribs of tlds contemptuous cit!h John 
II, 383. 
iral, subst. 1) a row, squabble: but he is 
a devil la private b. (- single combat, duel), 
111, 4, 259. be gone, good ancient: this will grow to 
a b. anon, I[4B 11, 4, 187. we shall much disgrace 
with four or rive most vile and ragged foils, right iii 
disposed in b. rhliculous, the naine of Agincourt, Iii» 
IV Chor. 51. none basely slab in --s, Tit. 1, 353. 
three civil --s, bred of an alry word, Ron. 1, 1, 96 
(Ff broils), if we meet, we shall hot scape a b. 111, 1. 
3. 148. 194. put by this brbarous b. Oth. 11 3, 172. 
256. 
2) quarrel, altercation: hls sportswerehin- 
dered b9 th9 --s, Err. V, 77. with th 9 --s thou hst 
disturbed out sport, Mids. 11, 1, 87. q_'w. V, 364. H5 
IV, 8, 69. II6A 11, 4, 124. Tit. IV, 3, 93. 
3) a Freneh danec: LLL 11, 9. 
avle, in Night-brawler, q. v. 
]an, 1) a fleshy mass: the b. buttock, 
All's IL 2, i9. that damned b. shall pl«.y JDame ,l[or- 
timer H4A II, 4, 123.*//«rry ,lIonmouth's b., the hulk 
Sir John, H4B I, 1, 19. 
2 the museulous arln'- and n m. vantbrce 
put this withered b, q_'roil, l, 3 297. to hew th.y tar- 
get from th 9 b. Cor. IV, 5, 126. the --s of Hercules, 
Cymb. IV, 2, 311. 
]awn', fl e shy, mus cul ousz his (the bear's) 
b. sides, Ven. 625. 
]ta»', subst., the sound of a truml, et: 



B 139 

wlt arh-resound[ trampets" dreul .  I, 
3, 135. 
BCa)-, rb., to sound like a trumpet: --ing 
trumpets and loud chuclish drums, John 111, 1, 303. 
when ever room bath bla:ed wkh lights and --ed wkh 
miustrelsy Tire. Il, 2, 170. the kettle-drum and tcumpet 
tus b. out te trhtmph o] Ms pledge, thnl. I, 4, 11. 
Braze to harden: f damned custom ave hot 
d it (your heart) so tat it is proof . . ., Hml. Ill, 4 
37. [bave so often blushed fo acknowledge h5u that 
ow I ara --d to it, Lr. l, 1, 11. 
Braze,t, ruade of brass: liced reglstered upon 
o»" b. tombs, LLL l, l, 2. wkh his (the bell's' kon tongue 
and b. mouth, John III, 3, 38. a b. canstick, H4A 
1,131. b. 5uages, ll6B l, 3, 63. b. cannon, Hml. I, 1, 
73. b. trumpet, R2 III, 3, 33 and Troil. IV, 5 7; and 
hcnce: trumpeters, with b. dia blast ou the city's ea G 
Ant. IV, 8, 36. 
Figuratively = extremely strong, imprcgnablc: 
looed them (the winds)fort theS" b. caves, Il6B III, 
89. that t# b. gares of earen tay ope, II6C Il» 3, 40. 
vert tou enr5"oned wit a b. wall, Il, 4, 4. 
Brazen.faee, impudent pcrson: Viv. IV 
141. 
Brazen-faeed, impudent: Lr. II, 2, 30. 
B,'azier, artisan who works in brass: 
sould be a b. by Ms ce, H8 V, 4, 42. 
B,'eaeh, 1) the space betwccn thc sevcral parts 
of a solid bodv parted by violence: she crops the stalk, 
and in te b. àpears green dcoppbg sap» Ven. 1175. 
patces set Ton a little b. John lV, 2, 32. Figura- 
tire]y, = a wound a hurt: makes more gashes 
where no b. shouM be, Ven. 1066. a b. tat craves a 
quick expedient stop, tI6B HI, 1,288. where tMs b. 
now Dz our fortunes ruade me«y readil be stopped, V, 
2, 82. te very b. wereout I[ector's great spS'k fleiv, 
Troil. 1V, 5, 245. Ms gashed stabs looed like a b. 
nature, Mcb. Il, 3, 119. cure tMs great b. in bus abused 
nature, Lr. IV 7, 15 (some of thcse pasmges may as 
well be taken in the second signification). 
2) a gap in a fortification: to »ke the b. 
and enter this sweet chg, Lucr. 469. wit£ te b. your- 
selves ruade, All's l» 1,136. to corne qff te b. zvkh is 
pike bent, H4B Il, 4, 55. pourlng like te ride Dzto a 
b. H5 I, 2, 149. once more mto te b. IH, 1, 1. III, 
1. 22. 116. III, 6, 76. tI6A Il, 1, 74. Ill 2, 2. Rom. 
I 4, 84. Oth. I, 3, 136. 
3) the rupt«re, difference: yet tere is no 
great b. H8 IV, 1,106. t]iere's fidlen between him and 
my rd an unDzd b. Oth. IV, 1, 238. nuptial 

Pi2 111, 2, 175. V, 5, 85. II4A II, 4, 590.59. H4B II, 
4, 258. IISV, 1, 9. H6AIll, 2, 41. Cor.l, 1,25. Tire. 
1, 2,48. Lr.V, 3,94. Per. l, 4,41.95. God's b.! it 
makes me nad, Rom. I!1, 5, 177. 
2) food in general: workfor b. Mids. III, 2, 10. 
eating the bitter b. of banlshment, R2 III, l, 21. full 
of b. Hml. III, 3, 80 (cf. Ezekicl 16, 49). buys b. and 
clot]tes, Oth. IV, 1, 96. 
Bl'ead-¢hilper, one who chips brcad: II4B 
11, 4, 342; cf. 258. 
Bl'ead|h, l) the extent from side to side: 
the length and b. Ado V, l, l l. lhnl. V, 1, 119. requi- 
tal fo a ab"s b. XViv. IV, 2, 4. she bears some b. EIa'. 
III, 2, 114. as broadas if bath b. Ant. 11, 7,48. 
2) wideness, extcnt, distance in gcneral: 
if there be b. enough 5 the world, I will hold a long 
distance, All's 111, 2 26. that blood wMch oved the b. 
of all this isle, John lV, 2, 99. the spacious b. of tMs 
division (wider than the sky and earth) Troil. V, 2, 
150. e will repent the b. of his great voyage, Per. IV, 
1, 37. 
Breal, vb., impf. brake: Vcn. 469. Err. V, 48. 
II4A 1, l, 48. R3 III, 7, 41. Usnally broke: Wiv. 1, 
, 125. I, 4, [61. Err. V. 149. Ado II!, 5, 42. LLL 
111,118. Asl, 2, 135. II, 4, 47. Tw.V, 188 etc. etc. 
Partic. broke (never adjectiely belote a noun), f. i. 
Sonn. 143, 2. 152, 3. Pilgr. 32.41. Tp. lll, l, 37. IV, 
99. Wiv. I, 1, 115. Meas. I1. 4, 126. V, 218. Err. I, 
2, 50. V, 169. Ado 11, 1,310. V, 1, 139. LLL V, 2, 
440 etc. Or broken: Lucr. 1758. Sonn. 61, 3. Compl. 
254. Pi]gr. 40. 172. Gentl. ll, 5, 19. Il, 6, 11. Ado 
II, 3. 245. LLL III, 71. As 1, 1,134. I, 2, 150.:11, 1. 
57. III, 5, 102. IV, 3, 155 etc. etc. 
I) trans. 1) to rend apart, to crack: --eth 
hls rehT, Ven. 264. his girths, 266. broken glass, Lucr. 
1758. Pilgr. 172. --ing rin9s a-twah, Compl. 6. 
--5 9 the5" contents (i. e. tearing the papers), 56. b. 
ber vlr9in-knot , Tp. IV, 1, 15. bas broke hls arrows, 
99. l'Il b. my stoff, V, 54. the seal, Gentl. lI1, 1,139. 
broke bread, Wiv. I, 4, 161 and Ado 111, 5, 42. Meas. 
I1, 4, 126. Err. Il, 2, 140. IV, 3, 31. Ado V, 1, 139. 
189. As I, 2, 135. Il, 4, 47. [11, 5. 102'2. Shr. I, 2, 267 
(b. the ice). II, 149. III, 2, 48. Vint. 111, 2, 130. R2 
I1, 2, 59. II. 3, 27. II4A I1, 4, 238. H6B 1, 2, 26.28. 
IV, 1, 42. tI6CV, 4, 4. R3V, 3,341. Cor. l, 1,210 
etc. fo b. one's back = to strain or dislocate it with 
too hcavy a bnrdcn: Tp. II1, 1, 26. ll6B IV, 8, 30. 
It8 I, 1, 84. slse broke ber brow  bruized her ibre- 
head, Rom. 1, 3, 38. to b. the head  to crack the 
skin of the head, so that the blood comes: Viv. 1, 1, 

(---- divorces) Lr. 1, 2, 162 (only in Qq).  125. Tw. V, 178. 188. tl4Alll, 1,242. tI4BII. 1, 97. 
4) infraction, violation: te bnpious b. of 1111,2,33. ti5111,2,42, fo b. the pate: Err II, 1 78 
holy wedlock vow, Lucr. 809. two oaths" b. Sonn. 152, II. 2, 220 111, 1.74. All's 11, 1 68 the scnce: Ërr" 
5. your b. of promise, Err. IV, 1, 49. b. of honour, il, 2, 79. the eost'ard: LLL III, 1. roken limb, As I: 
LLL Il, lï0. of lcs, t/5 IV, 1, 179. II6B+II, 4, 613. I 1,134. I, 2, 150. H4B IX', 1, 222. Tir. V. 3, 72. b. 
it (the compact) sho+dd be put to no apparent like- [your neeks, H6A V, 4, 91. b. mg shb+, LLL III+ 118. 
lihood of b. R3 11, 2, 136. oto" b. ofdtttg, HSII, 2, 69. J Rom. I, 2, 53. we b. the sinews of out plot, Tw. 11, 5, 
ofthe perce, l, 1, 94. ofez+stom, tml. 1, 4, 16. Cymb.  83. -- To b. a lance  to enter the lists: H6A III, 

IV, 2, 10. offaith, Cymb. III, 4, 27. 
5) the breaking of waves, the surf: took me 
f«om the b. of the sea, Tw. II, 1, 23. 
Bread, 1) food madc of eorn: an honest 
maid as ever broke b. Wiv. I, 4 161. I love hot the 
humour of b. and cheese, Il, 1, 140. Meas. I, 3, 53. 
III, 2, 195 (brown b.). Ado III, 5, 42 (an honest soul, 
as ever broke h.). As III, 4, 15 (the toueh of hol b.).* 

2, 50. 
Metaphorically : to b. the heart  to kill with grief: 
Lucr. 1239. Compl. 254 (the broken bosoms). Cor. 1, 
1,215. Lr. Ill, 4, 4 etc. --- to die: the, y will b. the5" 
hearts but they will effect Wiv. 11, 2,323. almost broke 
my heart with extreme laughter, Tit. V, 1, 113. -- 
charms l'Il b., Tp. V, 31 (expression taken from the 
magie wand), her sobs do ber btendments b. Ven. 222. 



140 

B 

the ult. liad hot 5een broken, R3 IV, 4, 380. cf. H4B 
IV, 5, 69. 
2) Vo shatter in pieces, vo barrer down: 
out windows are broke down in every street, H6A ill, 
1, 84. liunger brolce stone walls, Cor.I, 1,10. 4,16. the 
doors'ar broke Hml. IV, 5 111.  Vo disperse, 
in speaking of a misty vapour: Pilgr. 40. 
3) toburstthrough, to open by violence: 
hec brother's ghost his paved bed would b. e. V, 
440. he s the pale, Err. I1, 1, 100. Vo b. his grave, 
Vint. V 1 42. ow bas te ass broke te wall, ŒEim. 
IV, 3» 354. te mad mothers with teir owls do b. the 
louds, H5 III, 3, 40. Used of an my: all out ranks 
are broke H5 IV, 5, 6. H6C II, 3 10. te ar*y broken, 
Cymb. V 3, 5. -- Joined with ope aud up : s ope 
hec locked-up eyes Lucr. 446. broke open my lodge, 
Wiv. I, 1 115. Err. 111, 1, 73. Cor. 111, 1, 138. b. up 
te sea Wint. III, 2 132. b. up tc gates, H6A 1 3 
13. gosts b. up teir graves, H6B 1, 4, 22. b. up tMs 
(sc. a Ictter), hierch. I1.4, 10. To b. up, in the sense 
of Vo carre: Boyet you caa carre; b. up tMs capon 
(sc. a lever), LLL IV 1, 56 (cE the French poulet 
love-lette0. 
4) to open, Vo make a disclosure of: b. 
thy mbd Vo me, H5 V, 2, 265. we shall ,ect, and b. 
out nin at rge, H6A i, 3, 81. b. a- word wkh you, 
Err. lll 1 75. b. this enterprise Vo me Mcb. I, 7, 48. 

b. the cause of out expedlence Vo tlie quecn, Ant. 1, 2, 
184. the --ing o.fso great a thing, V, 1, 14. -- As in 

Shr. I, 2, 267, to break tlie ice is  to open the mat- 
ter, to pave the way, so in Wiv. III, 4, 22 b. thelr 
talk  open their conversation (ci'. Troil. III, 3, 215). 
5) vo interrupt: b. tlie parle, Tir. V, 3, 19. 
you liacc nozo a broken banquet, H8 1, 4, 61 ('ith a 
double sense)..ou have brokc iV, Troil. IH, 1, 53. a 
tearlng groan did b. tlie naine of Antony, Ant. IV, 14, 
31 (cut iV in two). Vo b. a person's sleep - to keep 
one waking, and to be waking: my slumbers sliould 
be broken, Sonn. 61, 3. liave roke teir sleep whh 
touglits, H4B IV, 5, 69. Cor. iv, 4, 19. b. hot /our 
sleeps for tat, End. IV, 7, 30 (don't be uneasy). 
To b. off  to discontinue, to leave off, Vo cut 
short: brae off" liis lave lutent, Ven. 469. b. off 
song, hier. IV, 1, 7. wMch was broke o.ff; V, 218. b. 
qff'your conference, John Il, 150. b. the story off, R°2 
V, 2, 2. brke o.ff our business, H4A l, 1, 48. H5 I, 1 
90. tt6C Il, 2, 110. R3 iii, 1,177. with patience calm 
thc storm, wMlc we bethSk a means Vo b. it off, H6C 
111, 3, 39, i. e. to make iV cease. 
To b. up  to dismiss, to adjourn: like a school 
roke up, H4B IV, 2, 104. b. up the court, H8 II, 4, 
240. b. up tlie senate till anotlier tlme, Caes. Il, 2, 98. 
b. we out watcli up, Hml. I, 1, 168. 
6) Vo violate, Vo infringe, not vo keep: 
b. an article, LLL I, 1, 134. your bidding, All's II, 5, 
93. a compact, H6A V, 4, 164. custom, lIerch. I, 3, 
65. liis da., lierch, l, 3, 165. faitli, hlerch. V, 253. 
honesty, Wint. I, 2, 288. John V, 2, 8. H6C IV, 4, 30. 
R3 IV, 4, 386. vo b. onc's fast, a)  to eat meat in 
the time of fasting: John l, 235; b)  Vo breakfast: 
Gentl. II, 4, 141. Err. i, 2, 50. H6C Il, 2, 127. a 
liest, Tp. III, 1, 37. liours, Genfl. V, 1, 4. a law, R3 I, 
4, 205. 215. an oatli, Sonn. 152, 6. Gentl. IV, 4, 135. 
LLL l, 1, 66. V, 2, 355. 440. R2 IV, 214. H6C I, 2, 
16. I, 4, 100. Il, 2, 89. III, 1, 79. thc peace, Ado il, 
3 202. Hç.A I, 3, 58. the possession of a royal bed 

R2 Iii, 1, 15. promise, As IV, 3, 155. sanctuar.y, R3 
III, 1, 47. seasons, R3 l, 4, 76. rime, All's II, 1, 190. 
R2 V, 5, 43. trotli, LLL I, 1,66. V, 2, 350. trut, Sonn. 
41, 12. vows, Sonn. 152, 3. Pilgr. 32.41.42. Gentl. 
Il, 6» 11. liids. I, 1, 175. Ant. I, 3, 31 (tliose raoutli- 
ruade vows, wliicli b. tliemselves in swearlng), one's 
word, Err. III, 1, 76. H4B Il, 3, 10. 
The person, Vo whom a vov or promise is hot 
kept, adjoined with the prepos, vo: all oatlis tat are 
broke Vo me, R2 IV, 214; or with the prepos, with: 
--ing faitli witli Julia, Genfl. IV, 2, 11. aIce liim with 
fait Aegle b. Ms faith, hIids. Il, 1, 79. b. an oatli with 
thee, Merch. V, 248. Vo b. promise with liim, ŒEw. Il, 3, 
137. liath witli Talbot broke liis word, H6A IV, 6, 2. 
hast tliou broken faitli whh me, It6B V, 1, 91. b. an 
oatli with liim, R3 IV, 4, 378 (Qq by liim). And with- 
out an object: Iwould hot b. witli lier, Wiv. lll, 2, 57, 
i. e. I would not b. my word Vo hec. cf. Mcrch. l, 
3, 137. 
7) Vo crush, Vo weaken, Vo impair: an 
old man, broken with the storms of state, II8 IV, 2, 21. 
I shall b. my wlnd be out of breath, H4A 11, 2, 13. 
pt, rsy fi, solence shall b. his wind with fear and horrid 
flight, Tire. V, 4, 12. floods of tears will drown 
oratory, and b. my very utterance, Tit. V, 3, 91. is hot 
your voice broken? H4B 1, 2, 206. a broken voice (i.i. 
trembling with emotion) IInfl. Il, 2, 582. and klssing 
speaks, whh htst.ful langt,age broken» Ven. 47, i. e. 
trembling with lustful desire. 
Hence = to rame, vo make docile: thou canst hot 
b. ber Vo the lute, Shr. Il, 148. thou wantest --ing, Err. 
Ill, 1, 77. 
8) Vo b. a jest  Vo crack a joke: you b.jests 
as braggarts do their blades, Ado V, 1, 189. Vo b. a 
jest upon the company, Shr. IV, 5, 72. --s scurrile 
jests, Troil. l, 3, 148. And similarly: he'll but b. a 
comparison or two on me, Ado Il, 1, 152. I may bave 
some odd qulrks and remnants of wlt broken on ne, Il, 
3, 245. 
9) leculiar uses: a poor earl's daughter is unequal 
odds, and therefore nay be broke without offence» H6A 
V, 5, 35,  broken vith; the omission of whh being 
perhaps caused by the following wlthout. Hell itself 
--s out contagion Vo this world, Hml. III, 
vomits forth, quite like the German ausbrechen; but 
Ff. and M. Edd. bave breathes out. So he b. iv Çais 
word) hot behlnd, Err. III, 1, 76 (= break wind). 
Break any breaking here, Err. III, 1, 74. 
10) The partic, broken in differont significations 
easily explained by what precedes : a broken mouth 
a mouth with gaps in its teeth, All's Il, 3, 66. broken 
neats  meats half eaten, remnants of victuals: Lr. 
Il, 2, 15. cf. a broken banquet, H8 I, 4 61. broken 
tears, Troil. IV, 4, 50, i. e. tears breaking forth. I 
nake a broken deliver. of the business, Vqnt. V, 2,10, 
i. e. a fragmentary report, having many gaps in iv. 
Ia broken JEnglish, H5 V, 2, 264. 265; in a language 
consisting only half of English. .Broken music 
music on stringed instruments («the terre originating 
probably from harps, lutes, and such other stringed 
instruments as were played without a bow, hot having 
the capability Vo sustain a long note Vo its full dura- 
tion of rime." Chappell): this broken 
sides, As i, 2, 150.Styour answer in broken music, H5 
V, 2, 263. here is good broken music, Troil. III, 1, 52. 
II) iutrans. 1) to part in two, Vo burst, 



B 141 

to open: the berr.y --s before it sta;neth, Ven. 460. ] would not b. ri'oto thence, Compl. 34. Err. V, 149. As 
have a care the hone.bag b. hot, Mids. IV, 1, 16. if111, i, 40. R2 11, 1,281. H6A 1, 4, 44. H6C 11, 1, 75. 
one (point) b. Tw. I, 5, 26. rny glrdle b. H4A III, 3, I R3 I, 4, 9. tears which b. from me perforce, Lr. 1, 4, 
171. b. thou in pieces, II6A V, 4, 92. like a glass dld[ 320. wherefore --s that s(qh from the inward of thee? 
b.  the rlnsmg, H8 I, 1, 167. rm d hlgh-blown pride I Cymb. III, 4, 5. And without the idea of violence,  
brok.e under me (like a bladder) 111, 2, 862. where-'to escape, to corne from, to quit: anon did 
aganst m grained ash an hundred tlmes bath broke, this b. from ber, Vqnt. III, 3, 27. an. accent --ing 

Cor. IV, 5, 114. the impostume that inward --s, Hml. 
IV, 4, 28 ; cf. and when it --s, I fear will issue thence 
the foui corruption etc. John IV, 2, 80. the arm.--ing, 
. husband Mes hbn home, All's IV, 4, 11, i. e. dis- 
banding. 
Used of the heart and heart-strings: Ven. 336. 
Luer. 1716. Compl. 275. Shr. IV, 3, 78. Wint. III, 2, 
175. 12 ll, I, 228. H6B 111, 2, 320. H6CII, 5, 78. 
R3 IV, 4, 365. Tir. Ill, 1, 60. Rom. III, 2, 57. Abso- 
lutcly: 0 b., o b.! Ant. V, 2, 313. 
Flak darkness --s within the east, R3 V, 3, 86, 
.- dissolves, disperses. And hence, in the same sense, 
applied to the contrary: the da, or the rnorning --s, 
John V, 4 32. H5 IV, 1, 88. H6B II 2, 1. Rom. Ill 
5 40. Caes. Il, 1» 101. Oth. III, 1, 34. 
2) to burst, to discharge itself: his pas- 
sion is so ripe, it needs must b. John IV, 2, 79. b. into 
extremit. of rage  Err. V, 48. b. into some rnerr. pas- 
sion, Shr. Ind. 1, 97. to b. into this dan9erous argu- 
ment, John IV, 2, 54. sin 9atherin 9 head will b. into 
corruption, R2 V, 1, 59. to b. into this woman's mood, 
H4A I, 3, 237. broke into a 9eneral prophec., H8 l, 
1, 91. do hot b. into these deep extremes, Tit. III, 1, 
216. from ancient grudge broke to new rnutlnd, Rom. I 
Chor. 3. To b. forth: his malice "gainst the lad d will 
suddenl. b. forth, As I, 2, 295. diseased nature --s 
forth in strange eruptions, H4A 1[I, 1, 27. --ing forth 
in riots, Lr. I, 4, 222. dour letters did withhold our 
--ing forth, Ant. lll6,79. To b. out: b. out into tears, 
Ado I, 1, 24. such --ing out of rnirth, LLL V, 1, 121. 
b. out into a second course of rnisehief, H5 IV, 3,106. 
into ajîame, H6AIII, 1, 191. into terres of rage, H6C 
I, 1,265. lest the new healed wound of rnallce should 
b. out, R3 I1, 2, 125. dou will b. out, Troil. V, 2, 51. 
b. out to bitterest enrnit., Cor. IV, 4, 17. rnature for the 
violent --ing out, IV,3, 27. --s out to savage rnadness, 
Oth. IV, 1, 56. rMght b. out and swear, Cynb. IV, 2, 
140. Hence = to take rise : such a deal of wonder is 
broken out withln this bout, Wint. V, 2, 26. lest parties 
b. out, Cor. III, 1, 315. tMs will b. out to all out sot- i 
rows, John IV, 2, 101 (turn to our sorrow). 
3) to force one's way: to break in, ElW. III 
1, 80. 98. H6A l, 1, 119. II, 1, 71. H6B III, 2, 278. 
YI6C I, 1, 8.29. b. into his son-in-law's bouse, H6B 
IV, 7, 117. IV, 10, 35. b. within the blood d bouse of 
lire, John IV, 2, 210. broke out to acqualnt .ou with 
this evil, John V, 6 24. llfe looks through and will b. 
out, H4B IV, 4,120. --s like a tire out of his keeper's 
arms, H4B I, 1,142. within thls rnile b. forth a hundred 
springs, Tim. IV, 3, 421. break loose, Err. V, 169. 
liids, fil, 2 258. H4B I, 1, 10. I rnust from this 
enchanting queen b. off, Ant. I, 2, 132. one of ber 
feathered creatures broke awa., Sonn. 143 2. I will 
hot b. away, En'. IV, 4, 1. b. among the press, H8 V, 
4 88. love ---s through, Ven. 576. through the flood- 
gares --s the silver tain, 959. Sonn. 34, 5. Shr. IV, 
3, 175. H4A I, 2 226. H6B IV, 8 24. Rom. Il, 2, 2. 
he --eth from the sweet embrace, Ven. 811.874. on 
what occasion b. those tears from thee Lucr. 1270. 

from th. tongue , John V, 6, 14. ]ou hm'e broken from 
his liking, Wint. V, 1, 212 (bave aeted against his 
will). 
4) to fall to pieces, to lose strength or 
validity: all bond and privilege of nature, b.! Cor. 
V, 3, 25. no bargains b. that are hot thls dag ruade, 
John I11, 1, 93. midst the sentence so ber accent 
that twlce she doth egin ere once she speaks, Luer. 
566 (The passage in Ant. V, 1, 14 may be taken in 
this sense as well as in that of opening, communi- 
cating). 
Especially  to become bankrupt: he cannot 
choose but b. Merch. III, 1, 120. broken bankrupt, As 
11, 1, 57. R2 11 1, 257. H4B V, 5, 128. Rom. IIl 2, 
57. Tim. IV, 2, 5. V, 1, 10. Cymb. V, 4, 19. 
5) to fali out: are the d broken? Gentl. 11, 5, 19. 
if cannot be the Volsces date b. with us, Cor. IV, 6, 48. 
With a quibble: the broken rancour of your hfgh-swob 
hearts, but latel. splintered .... , R3 11, 2, 117. 
6) to open, to make a disclosure; with to or with 
before the person, and of or about before the thing: 
then after to ber father will I b. Ado 1, 1, 328. now 
will we b. with him, Genfl. 1, 3, 44. I will b. with fier, 
Ado I, 1,311. Ihave broke with herfather, 11, 1,310. 
bave broken with the king, H8V, 1,47. let us hot b. with 
hlm, Caes.ll, 1,150. I ara to b. with thee of some affairs, 
Gentl. 111,1, 59. and instantl. b. with dou of it, Ado 
2,16. l faintlg broke with thee of Arthur's death, John 
IV, 2, 227. b. with .our wives of .our departure, H4A 
I11, 1,144. to b. wlth him about it, Adoll, 1 162. to b. 
with him about 13eatricë, III, 2, 76. 
7) to spread by dashing, as waves: thelr (the 
waves') ranks began to b. upon the galled shore, Lucr. 
1440. the --ing 9ulf Err.ll, 2,128. on the --in 9 seas, 
12 I11, 2, 3. 
8) to b. off= to discontinue to speak: do 
hot b. offso, Err. I, 1,97. lIids.V,98. JohnlV, 2, 235. 
H6BII, 2,77. 111, 1,325. R3111,7,41. Caes.ll, l,ll6. 
Hml. I, 1, 40. Lr. V, 2, 262. 
lrealt, subst: the b. of dag  the dawn: ere 
the b. of da., Lucr. 1280. at b. of dard, Sonn. 29, 11. 
Meas. IV, 1, 3. Mids. 111, 2 446. V, 408. 429. Mereh. 
111,2,51 (in b. ofda). V, 29. lom. I11, 3, 168. Per. 
II1, 1, 77. 
l]reaRer, transgressor: --s of their own 
behests, Lucr. 852. a 5. ofproverbs, H4A I, 2 132. 
ofthe law, H6A I, 3, 80. 
llrealtfast, subst., the first meal in the day: 
Tp. V, 164. Gentl. Ill, 1,329. V, 4, 34. Wiv. IIl 3, 
246. H4A Il, 4, 116. Il1, 3, 193. H5 Il, 1, 12. III, 7, 
156. H6BI,4,79. R31V,4, 176. H8111, 2,202. Tire. 
I, 2, 78. IV, 3, 336. Ant. lI 2, 184. Per. lV, 6, 131. 
llrealt.neœelt, a dangerous business: to do't 
or no, is to me a b. Wint. I, _'2, 363. 
llrealt-lrOmiSe, a person who breaks his promise: 
will think .ou the rnost pathetical b. As IV, 1, 196. 
llreat.vow, a person who breaks his vows: that 
dail. b., he that wins of all, John 11, 569. 
llreas, subst., 1) the part of the body be- 



142 

B 

tween the neck and belly, in men and beasts: 
broad b. Ven. 296. his back, hls b. 396. 648. 1182. 
Lucr. 439. 1122. Pilgr. 382. Sonn. 153, 10. Tp. III, 
3, 47. LLL IV, 3, 173. 185. Mids. Il, 2, 146. Mcrch. 
IV, 1: 252. II6A L 5, 10. III, 3, 87. Cor. Il, 2, 126 
etc. etc. tngglng fo be victors, b. to b. H6C Il, 5, 11. 
Tropically: date sailupon hec (the sea's) patient b. Troil. 
I, 3, 36. t/te light»ffng seemed fo open the b. qf heaven, 
Caès. I, 3, 51. coq,jure from the b. of peace such bold 
hostilitg, tI4A IV, 3, 4:. 
2) the dngs of women: ler --s, like icory 
globes, Lucr. 407. Souu. 130, 3. Cor. l, 3, 43. Mcb. 
1,5,48. when thou sucked'st hec b. II6AV,4,28. Tire. 
IV, 3, 178. 
3) the heart: lest the deceicln harmony should 
run into the quiet closure o.f ny b. Vert. 782. or tdrant 
.folly lnrk bi gentle --s, Lucr. 851. dnmb presagers of 
m! speaking b. Souri. 2 , 10. 109, 4. fo phffsic .your 
cold b. Compl. 259. TI). 1, _9, 288. Gentl. V, 4, 7. if 
»y b. had hot been ruade of faith, Err. 111, 2: 150. klsses 
the base ground t.ith obediem b. LLL IV, 3,225. stlrs 
good thotghts in anti b. of strong authoritd, John 11, 
113. IV,2,73. what his b. forges, that his fougue mnst 
.vent, Cor. 11I, 1, 25S. 0 n.y b. thy hope ends here, 
llcb. IV, 3, 113. 197. 
4) musical volte: the fool bas an excelle»t b. 
OEw. 11, 3, 20. 
Bveas, rb., to stem: an --ed the surge, 
il, 1,116. the huge bottoms, --ing the loft. surge, 115 
111 Char. 13. 
Bveast-deep. as high as the breast: set him b. in 
earth. Tit. V, 3, 17,0. 
Bveasplae, armour for the breast: what stronger 
b. than a henri untalnted! It613 111, 2, 23_9. 
]Bveah, 1) the air inhaled and ejected: 
Ven. 189.444.474.929. Lucr. 400. 1666. Sonn. 130, 
8. Pilgr. 37. Tp.!,2,326. Gentl. 11 3, 32. 111,1327. 
Err. 11I, 2, 135. As Epil. 20. LLL V, 2, 267. Cor. 1, 
1,61 etc. ïhe follox ing passages may serve to explain 
some of the following significations: life's but b. Per. 
I, 1,46. a b. thou (life) art, lIeas. I11, 1, 8. cf. lIerch. 
111, 2, 298. All's IV, 3, 62. then others for the b. of 
words vespect, Sonn. 85, 13. raff vow was b. Pilgr. 37. 
scarce think their words are natural b. Tp. V, 157. 
gentle b. of .yours raff sails must fill, Tp. Epil. 11. as 
there co»es light.from heaven and words.from b. Mens. 
V, 225. the sweet b. of.flatter! conquers strife, Err. 111, 
2, 28. with bated b. and whisperbg humbleness, Merch. 
I, 3, 125. sa ara 1 driren b d b. of hec renown, 
V, 5, 7. words of sa sweet b. composed, Hml.lll, l,98. 
2) a single respiration: if is a l(fe b death, 
that laughs and weeps, and all but with a b. Ven.414. 
he »'ould kiss .you twenty with a b. II8 I 4, 30. 

bnost dead for b. Mcb. I, 5, 37.* keep yourselces in b. 
q'roil.V, 7, 3. I ara scarce b b. Lr. ll, '2, 57. out of b. 
Err. IV, 1, 57. Mids. 11 2, 88. Ïw. 111, 4: 152. Ant. 
111, 10, 25. 
4) a gentle exercise, causing a qulcker respi- 
ration: he hopes it is no other but for.your health and 
your digestion sake an after-dinner" s b. Troil. 11, 3,121. 
«ither (fight) to the uttermost, or else a b. IV, 5, 92. 
5) life: fo make more ve»t for passage of hec b. 
Lucr. 1040. ruade tue stop n,!t b. 180. blds hi» possess 
his b. 1777. !ou still shall lice where b. toast breathes, 
Sonn. 81, 14. the b. thou gicest and takest, Phoen. 19. 
thed'll suck out b. Err.lL2, 194. the endeacour of this 
present b. LLLI, 1, 5. fly away, b. Tw.11,4,54. when 
.your first queen's agaln in b. Vint.V, 1, 83. in the vile 
l».ison of afflicted b. John III, 4, 19. f earing dying pa.ys 
death servile b. R2 III, 2, 185. ere thou .yleld thy b. 
t I6A IV, 7, 24. pledges the b. of h5n in a dlcided draght, 
Tire. I, 2, 49. pay his b. to rime, Mcb. IV, 1, 99 etc. 
,lly b. and blood! Lr. Il, 4, 104. cf. John IV, 2, 246. 
6) words, language: permit a blasting and a 
scand«lous b. to.f«ll on hOn, Mens. V, 122. that with 
th b. hast killed m chiht, AdoV, 1, 272. charge their 
b. agafiist us, LLLV, 2,88. b, the concerse of b. 745. 
la b. sa bitter on .your bitter foe hIids, lll, 2, 44. 168. 
commends and courteons b. Merch. Il, 9, 90. John II, 
148. 111,1,148. R21,3,215. 111,3,33. IV. 128. Troil. 
l, 3, 244. Rare. III, 1,161. Lr. l, 1, 61. Oth. IV, 2, 5 
etc. beg their stinking --s ( voices) Cor. Il, 1, 252. 
Used of singing: utterfig such dulcet and ltarmonious 
b. Mids. Il, 1, 151. sa sweet a b. fo sing, Tw.II, 3,21. 
-- Of the sound of trumpets: makc all out trumpets 
speak, gice them all b. lIcb. V, 6, 4. 
7) a thing without substance, a t ri fl e: a dream 
a b., afroth o.ffleetingjoy. Luca-.212. a dream ofwhat 
thou wert a b., a bubble: R3 IV, 4, 88. rather than she 
will baie one b. of hec accustomed crossness, Ado 1I 3, 
184. cf. a b. thou art, 5leas. 111 1, 8. 
8) the free air in motion: their (the damps') 
exhaled unwholesowe --s make sick the life of purity, 
Lucr. 779. when summev's b. their masked buds dis- 
doses, Sonn. 54, 8. wished hb»self the heaven's b. 
Pilgr. 234. John IV, 1, 110. V, 4, 33. Mcb. I, 6, 5. 
Per. I, 1, 99 etc. 
Breathe, 1) to respire, to draw in and th'ow 
out the air: panting he lies and --th b hec face, Ven. 
62. sa long as men eau b. and eyes eau sec, Soun. 18, 
13. while Stephano --s at's nostrils, Tp. 11, 2, 65. no 
slghs but of m!--9g, Merch. I11, 1, 100. fo b. upon 
m.y love, Gentl. V, 4, 131. 
Transitively: his breath -- th lire b hec, Ven. 474. 
b. life into a stone, All's 11, 1, 76. I b. free breath, 
LLL V, 2, 732. b. in.fection, H6A 111, 2, 287. b. foul 

Ilence -- a very short time: one minute, nay, contaglous darkness, IV, 1, 7. here could I b. n.y soul 
one qtdet b. of rest, Johnlll,4, 134. allowing film a b., I into the air, H6B 11I, 2, 391._b. slghs, Tw. II, 2, 40. 
a little scene» to monarchize, R2 111, 2, 164. a nlght is [ H6B 11I, 2, 345. that 1ma! b. m! last in wholesome 
but small b. and little pause fo tmswer matters of this ] counsel, R21I, 1,1 (double sense). --d his latest gasp, 
consequence, H5 II,4, 145. glve me saine b., saine little ] H6C 11, 1,108. a]1ontague bath -- d his last, V, 2, 40. 
pause, R3 1V, _9, 24. [ breathless b.forth power, &nt. II, 2 237. The abject 
3) the state or power of breathing freely,/denoting the result: with out sighs we'll b. the welkin 
opposed to a state of exhanstion: how hast thon lost dbn, Tir. 111, 1,212. 
thy b. Err. IV, 2, 30. that no man might draw short b.[ 2) to make a single respiration: belote 
to-day but I aud Htrry Iomnottth, H4AV,2,49. pause, I ou can b. twlce, Tp. IV, 45. I bave hot --d almost 
and take thy b. H6AIV, 6, 4. stops he now for b.? R31 si,ce I dld sec it, En'. V, 181. whilst we b.. take rime 
IV,2,45. take thy b. Troil. lV, 5, 192. give me b. Tire. I fo da hlm dead, H6C I, 4, 108. " 
11,2,33. drink fo 11amlet's better b. Hml. V, 2,282.[ 3) to take breath, to test from action: 



B 

143 

1ree rimes they --d, II4A I, 3, 110. when you b. in 
jou» waterin9, !!,4, 17. b. a while, aud ten fo it a9ain , 
275. give me leave to b. awhile V,3,46. we b. too &g, 
V,4 15 ( we try too long; c£ bcee£ing), st and 
b. mv£ile, 47. gh'e t£e £ouse f Lancaster leave to b. 
H6CI, 2 13. I lay me down a little while to b. !!,3, 2. 
now b. we, 6, 31. b. gou, m#.fi-ieuds Cor. !, 6,1. Tran- 
itively,  to let take breath: to b. his bloodied horse 
II4B !, 1, 38. 
4) to take exereise: siek for in 9 and ex- 
ploit, All's I, 2, 17. "tis the 9 time of dag with me, 
IIml. V, 2 181 (the time of taking a walk), here is a 
ladg that wants b 9 too (i. e. daneing) Per. !1, 3, 
101. Reflcetively: thou wast created for men to b. 
themseh, es upon thee, All's !!, 3, 271.  ;çhe partieiple 
breathed ( the Freneh mis en halehe )  in fidl 
career, in the fnll display of strength: I ara hot get 
well breathed, As I, 2, 230. as sw as breathed stags , 
Shr. Ind. 2, 50 (cf. the adj. breathed). 
5) to blow, to pass as air: when whds b. 
sweet, Compl. 103. the air s upon us here most 
sweetl, Tp. !I, 1, 46. IV, 173. Tw. l, 1, 6. Rom. IV, 
3.34. Ilml. IV, 7, 67. C3-1nb. 1, 3, 3. how uffl night 
cornes -- i» 9 ai his heels, Troil. V, 8, 6. a warmth s 
out qfher, Per. III. 2,94. Transitively : hell itsef s 
out contagion  IIml. 111.2, 407 (Q'I breaks). 
6) to lire: how eau m ,[use want subjeet to 
Jurent, while thou dost b. Sonn. 38, 2. where breath 
most s, 81, 14 (quibble). u'hen he d, he was a 
»tan, LLL V, 2, 668. here let us b. Shr. !, 1, 8. John 
Il, 419. III, 2 4. V, 4 36. H6A V, 4 127. IV 2 31. 
It6B 1. 2, 21. R3 1 1 21. 161. I, 2 140. III, 7 25. 
Ant. !11, 12, 14 etc. do In6t b. a man, H6C !!!. 1 82. 
cf. the plainest ereature that d upon this earth a 
Christian, R3 !!!, 5, 26. Double sense: and mereg 
then will b. withh yom" lips like man new ruade, Meus. 
I1.9, 78 (to lire and to speak). 
7) to speak, to utter; a)trans.: b. if in mi»e 
car, Gentl. !11, 1 239. d a secret vow Merch. III, 
4, 27. 0 hear me b. mg 1oEe, Wint. iv, 4, 371. let the 
chureh b. ber eurse on ..., John !11, 1, 256. we d 
ur eounsel IV, 2,36. b 9 to his breathless excellence 
the beense of a vow, iV, 3, 6. bg all the blood that 
ever.furg d, V, 2, 127. V, 7, 65. R2 !, 1, 173. !, 3, 
153. 173. 257. !!, 1, 8. !!!, 4, 82. R3 !, 3, 286. Rom. 
!. 1, 117. Tire. !!!. 5, 59. Hml. 11, 1, 31. Lr ', 3, 143. 
Oth. IV, 1. 281. To b..forth: thns s she forth ber 
spire, Lner. 762. --ed forth the souud that said I 
haie,' Sonn. 15, 2. To b. out: wat he s out his 
breath drinks up again , Ltter. 1666. raff soul the faith- 
fidlest qeri»gs bath d out, Tw. V 117. b. out iu- 
veetives It6C 1, 4, 43. IV, 1, 112. 
b) intrans.: speak, b., discuss, Wiv. IV, 5, 2. this 
b 9 courtesg, Mereh. V. 141 ( eotrteous words). 
t9 9we in 9 to m#pmTose  Ant. l, 3, 14. the #outh 
gou b. o] Hml. !1, 1, 44. cf. Tw. !, I, 6 and see Sound. 
Brealhe,l, adj., endowed with breath: a 
man so b. that certain he would fight 'om morn till 
night , LLL V, 2,659. would gou not deem it b.? Vint. 
¥, 3, 64. b. as it were to an untb'able and eontinuate 
goodness. Tire. !, 1, 10. that need to be revh.ed and b. 
in me, H4B IV, 1, 114. I will be treble-shewed, hearted, 
b. Ant. 111, 13, 178 (er. brthe 4.). 
realher, 1) one who lires: when ailthe s 
of this worM are dead, Sonn. 81, 12. Iwœel ehide no 

b. in the world, As111,2,297. she shows a bodj rather 
than a lire, a statue than a b. Ant. III, 3, 24. 
2) one who utters sth.: noparticular scandal 
once ean toueh, but it eonfounds the b. bleus. IV, 4, 31. 
Brealhhg, sttbst. (er. fo breathe) stop, d elay: 
tiil af ter mang accents and del«gs, untimelj --s, sick 
and short assajs, Luer. 1720. gou shake the head at 
so lou 9 a b. Ado Il, 1,377. 
ilreallfig--hile, time snffieient for draving 
breath, a verv short rime: bud and be blasted in 
a b. Vert. 11-1"2. eannot be quiet searee a b. R3 l, 
3, 60. 
lreahless, 1) bcing out of breath: Ven. 
541. Mids. !!, 1, 37. H4A !, 3, 32. Tire. V, 4, 10. 
Caes. 1, 3, 2. Lr. 11, 4, 31. Aut. !!, 2, 237. 
2) lifeless: here b. lies theking, II4AV, 3 16. 
V, 4, 137. John IV, 3, 66. R2 V, t;, 31. II6B 111, 2, 
132. 
re¢io¢i, place in V'ales: R3 IV, 2, 126. 
lree¢, thc garment worn by men over the lower 
part of thc body; once hOt inflected: that jou might 
ne'er bave stolen the b. from Lancaster II6C V, 5, 24 
(i. e.usurped the authority of your husband). Breeches: 
Gentl. !!, 7, 49. 8hr. !11, 2, 44. John !11. 1, 201. H8 
!, 3» 31. Lr. 1, 4, 190. Oth. !1 3. 93. though in .his 
place most toaster wear no --es, ll6B 1, 3, 149 (htve 
hOt the authority due to the husband). 
lree¢, rb., 1) to cover as with breeches, to 
sh e a t h e: theb" da99ers un;nannerl. --ed with 9ore, 
Mcb. Il. 3, 122. 
2) to ïlog: if .ou forget jour quies, gour quaes, 
and ffour quods, gou must be preeehes, Wiv. iV, 1, 81 
(Evans means to sav breeehed). I ara no --bt 9 seholar 
in the sehools, Shr.'lll, 1, 18 (i. e. no sehoolboy liable 
to a flogging). 
Breed, b. (impf. and partie, bred), I) trans., 
1) to begct; properly and fignratiely ( to pro- 
duee, to cause): whieh bred more beautj in his a,,gr J 
e.es Ven. 70. tMn 9 like a man, but qf no woman bred, 
214. 167. 444, 742. 753. Luer. 411. 490 499. 690. 
872. 1188. 1837. to b. another thee, Sonn. 6, 7. 108, 
13. 111,4. Gentl. V, 4, 1. Ado lll 1, 11. LLLI, 2, 
106. Mereh. !11, 2, 63.96. All's I, 1, 154. !, 3, 151. 
Tw. !11, 4, 207. Wint. V, 1, 12 (the sweetest eompa- 
nion that e'er man bred his hopes out qf). John !, 124 
(this ealf bred'om his eow). H4A !. 1, 11. H4B iV, 
2, 74 (to b. thispresentpeaee). II6A !. 2, 30 (O.Edd. 
Ireed. M. Edd. bred). !!1, 3, 11. IV, 1,193. V, 5, 4. 
II6B !, 3, 210. H6C Il, 2, 12l (the wound that bred 
this meetb9), l;J, I!1, 3, 68. R3 I, 4 110. IV, 4, 424. 
II8 I, 1, 182. Tir. !1, 3, 146 (eveT mothe» --s hot 
sons alike). V, 3, 62. ROIII. !, 1, 96. CŒEes. V, 3, 101. 
Mcb. 111, 4, 30. Oth. !11, 4, 73 (the worms that did b. 
the silk). Ant. 11, 7, 29. Cymb. IX', 2, 35. -- Reflective- 
ly: that polic. may b. itself so out of ch'cumstance, 
Oth.lll, 3, 16 (ma)- flnd origin and food in accidents). 
IlCl bred  of good extraction : a gentleman weIl 
bred and o.f good name It4B !, 1, 26. true bred  
genuine: V, 3» 71. m.y hounds are b«ed out qf the Spar- 
tan k5d, Mids. IV, 1, 124. she is not bted so dull but 
she can learn, Merch. II1, 2 164 (so stnpid by nature). 
the dalnties that are bred in a book, LLL IX', 2, 25 
(Nathaniel's speech). Bred out = degenerated : out 
mettle is bred out, It5111, 5, 29. the strain o.f man's 
bred out bto baboon and monkej, Tire. 1, 1,259. 
2) to bring np: a Bohemiau born, but here 



144 

B 

nursed up and bred, biens. IV, 2, 135. hlerch. II, le 3. 
As I, 1» 4. 11. 114. 11, 7, 96. IV, 1, 179. Tw. l, 2, 2 °. 
Lr. I, 1, 98. Cymb. I, 1, 42. 145. Often -- to kcep, 
to fced: his horses are bred better As It It 11. a 
servant that Ire bred» Lr. IV» _o, 73. one bred of altos 
and fostered wlth cold dishes, Cymb. II, 3, 119. rnust I 
be nnfolded with one that I hare bred? Ant. Vt 2t 171. 
which malWboth b. thee and still test thlne» Wint. III, 
3, 48 (furnish thee with the menus of education). 
ou are so stronfll/ in mlWpurpose bred that ail the world 
besides methlnl:s are dead, Sonn. 112, 13 (so kept and 
harbom'ed in my thoughts). 
Il) intr., 1) to beget children, to pair, to 
be fruitful: biWlaw of nature thon art bound to b. 
Ven. 171. a --ing je»met, 260. n.y ewes b. hot, Pilgr. 
246. the spring is near when çreen çeese are a breed- 
inç, LLLI» 1, 97. would hot a pair of these bave bred? 
Tw. III, I e 55. desire to b. biWme, Wint. lV, 4, 103. 
0 blessed --inç sun, Tire. IV, 3, 1. the earth feeds 
and --s biWa composture, IV, 3, 444. Used of money 
bringing interest: I make if b. as fast, hlcrch. 1, 3, 
97. Figuratively: "ris such sense, that mlWsense s 
with it, Mens. Il, 2, 142 (i. e. many thoughts are 
awakened by it in me). there is no measure in the 
occasion that --s» therefore the sadness is without limit 
Ado I» 3, 4. 
2) to be produced, to havc birth: here 
never shines the sun» here nothin 9 --s unless the ni9htll/ 
owl or fatal raven, Tit. 1I, 3t 96. where thel/ most b. 
and haunt» the air is delicate» Mcb. I, 6, 9. Tropieally, 
to grow» to arise» to develop itself: ad- 
vice is sporting while infection --s, Luer. 907. heavens 
rab 9race on that which --s between them» Tp. lllt le 
76. thereof the raging tire of fever bred, Err. V, 75. 
what malWchance or b. upon our absences Wint. I t t 12. 
what is --in# that chan#eth thus his rnanners» 374. 
what better marrer --s for !Cu, John 11I» 4 t 170. so 
will this base and envions discord b. H6A II1 t 1 t 194. 
sec what --s about ber heart» Lr. III» 6» 81. much is 
--in#, Ant. I, 2» 199. 
Breed, subst. 1) offspring: nothb 9 '9ainst 
time's scl/the can rnalce defence save b. Sonn. 12» 1t. 
Figuratively» -- interest: when did friendship take 
a b. ofbarren metal ofhisfi'iend? Merch. 1» 3, 135. 
2) rae e: twice fifteen thousand hearts of JEn#land's 
b. John I1, 275. this happl/ b. of men, R2 I1, 1» 45. 
roiCl kb#s, feared biWtheir b. 52. (horses) of the best 
b. in the northt II8 Il t  4. Rome» thou hast lost the b. 
of noble bloods» Caes. I t 2, 151. O worthiness of nature ! 
b. ofgreatness! Cymb. IV» , 5. In H6A I» » 30 M. 
Edd. bred. 
Henee  family» extraction: blaspheme his 
b. llcb. IV» 3» 108. 
3) sort, kind: are these the b. of wits so won- 
dered ai? LLL V, , 266. this courtesl/ is hot of the 
ri#ht b. Hml. 111, » 327. he and rnanl/ more of the 
sarne b. that I know the drossl/ a#e dotes on» V» 2» 197 
Ff. bevl/). 
Breed-bate, (cf. bate) one who causes quar- 
tels: no tell-tale nor no b. Wiv. I» 4» 12. 
Breeder, 1) one who begets: when the work 
of generation was between these woolll/ s in the act e 
herch. I t 3» 84. whl/ wouldst thou be a b. of sinners 
Uml. III» It 123. Perhaps in the following passage 
ado: as loathsome as a toad amon#st the fairest --s 

of out clime» Tit. IV, 2, 68; but this may be  people 
who are of the faircst breed or race. 
2) femalc: the fait b. that is standing biW(sc. a 
mare), Ven. 282. the unbacked b. 320. l/ou love the 
b. better than the male» H6C Il, 1, 42. 
3) author: tlme is the nurse and b. of all good, 
Gentl. III, I e 243. the b. of mlWsorrowt H6C 111» 3» 43. 
bath been b. of these dire events» Tir. V, 3» 178. 
Breeding, 1) the bringing up, nurtnre: 
she had her b. at mlWfather's charge» All's II, 3» 121 
(cf. llt 2» 2). Lr.l, 1»9. let us swear that l/ou are worth 
l/our b. H5 I11, 1, °-8. did these bones cost no more the 
b. but fo plal/ at log9ats with 'cm? Hml.V, 1,100. who 
deserved so long a b. as hls whlte beard came to, Cymb. 
V, 3, 17 (- who deserved to lire so long as to breed 
his long 'hite beard). 
2) education: l/ou are a çentleman of excellent 
b. Wiv. 11, 2, 234. hlerch. 11, 7, 33. As III, 2, 31. II1, 
3, 85. Tw. III, 4, 204. V,331. Wint. lV,4,591 (7417). 
V, 2, 41. H4B 11, 2, 39. H$ IV, 2, 134. La'. 111, 1» 40. 
V» 3» 143. Oth. I t 3» 240. Cymb. IV» 4» 26. IIence  
good manners: 'ris mg b. that glves me thls bold 
show ofcourtesl/t Oth.ll»l»99. And --- knowledge 
instruction: mlWb. was as l/our hghness knows, 
Cymb. Vt 5, 339. 
3) in the language of low people» as it seems.  
descent, extraction: of what havinç, b. Wint. 
IVt 4t 741. honest 9entleman» I know hOt l/our b. H4B 
V» 3t 111. 
Breese, gadfly: the herd bath more annol/ance 
biWthe b. than biWthe tl#er, Troil. I, 3, 48. the b. upon 
ber, like a cow in ,lune» Ant. 111» 10t 14. 
Breff - b r i e f, in the language of Captain Jamy, 
H5 IIlt 2, 126. 
Brentford, see Brainford. 
B'etagle (O. Edd. lritaine and lrittaine), a 
province of France: John 1I, 156. 301 etc. R2 II, 1, 
285. tt5 1I, 4, 4. H6B 1, 1, 7. R3 V, 3, 324. 
Breton (O. Edd. Britaine and Brlttaine)» native 
of Bretagne: R3 IV, 3» 40. IV» 4, 523. V, 3, 317. 
333. 
Brei¢.v, shortness: imitate the honourabe Ro- 
mans in b. H4B II, 2, 135. the rude b. and dischar9e 
of one (sigh), Troil. IV, 4, 43. b. is the soul of wit, 
ttml. II 2» 90. 
Brew, to make beer; absolutely: I wash, 
wrin9, b., bake etc. Wiv. I, 4, 101. Transitively: she 
--s 9ood ale, Genfl. 111» 1,304. the proverb 'Blessing 
of l/our heart, l/ou b. 9ood aie»' 306. Comieally used 
of sack: 9o b. me a pottle of sack» Wiv. 111» b, 29. 
Fignratively, --- to eontrive, to prepare, to 
temper: that sunshine --ed a shower for him, H6C 
11, 2» 156. i.f I could temporize with mlWaffection, or b. 
if fo a weak and colder palate» Troil. IV» 4» 7. she drinks 
no other drink but tears, --ed with ber sorrow, meshed 
upon ber cheeks, Tit. III, 2» 38. our tears are hot l/et 
--ed, Meb. 11, 3» 130. The gerund or participle in a 
neuter sense: another storm --in 9, Tp. 1I» 2, 19. there 
is some ill a --in 9 towards mlWtest, iIerch. II, 5» 17. 
Brewage, drink brewed: l'll no pullet-sperm 
in mlWb. Wiv. 11I, St 33. 
Brewer, one who makes beer: a--'s horse 
H4A I11» 3» 10. he that 9ibbets on the --'s bucket, 
H4B III» 2, 289. --s mat their ruait with water» Lr. 
III» 2t 82. 
Brew-house, brewery: Wiv I11, 3» 10. 



Brlareus, the fabulous giaut with a hundred 
hands: a gout.y B. Troil. I, 2, 30. 
Bribe, subst., a preseut ruade to corrupt 
a persou: H6B I11, 1, 104. 109. H6C III, 2, 155. 
Cor. 1, 9, 38. Caes. IV, 3, 3. 24. InWiv. V, 5, 27 
O. Edd. brib'd buck, M. Edd. bribe uck; cf. bribed. 
Bribe, vb., to wiu, to seduce: therefore bath 
she --d the JDest5ies to cross the workmanshlp of 
2Vature, Veu. 733. mark how 1"ll b. Sou, Meas. II, 2, 

authorlty, Meas. II, 2,118. rnaes beaut. b. in goodness, 
111, l, 186. sta.y, IV, l, 45. rime, Ado 11, l, 375. b. as 
the lightning, hiids. 1, l, 145. a tedious b. scene, V, 56. 
with all b. and plain conveniency, Merch. IV, l, 82. 
li_fe, As 111, 2, 137. to teach .you gamut in a --er sort, 
Shr. 11I, l, 67. a thousand businesses are b. in hand, 
John IV, 3,158 (must be speedily dispatched), b. rnor- 
tality, H5 I, 2, 28. a b. span (sc. of time), H8 III, 2, 
140. night, Troil. IV, 2, ll. farewell, Cor. IV, 1, l. 

145. John 11, 171. Tim. 1, 2, 244. sounds, Rom. 11I, 2, 51. out, out, b. candle (i. e. lire) 
Brihed, adj. ruade a bribe: dlvide me like a Mcb. V, 5, 23. when I came back --for this was b. 
b. buck, Wiv. V, 5, 27 (cf. deformed, disdained, enforced, If oue them close lo9ether , Oth. 1I, 3, 237. postures 
stained etc. in an active seuse).* beyond b. nature, Cymb. V, 5, 165. the --est end, Ant. 
Briber, that which wins, prevails with IV, 15, 91. this 5. world, Tire. IV, 3, 253. 
a p.: his service doue were a sufficient b. for his lire, To be b. = 1 ) to spend little time in sth. : we 
Tire. 111, 5 61. must be b. Wiv.lll, 3,.8. John IV, 1, 35. R3IV, 3, 57. 
Briel, burned clay for the use of builders: a Troil. IV, 5, 237. Lr.V, 3, 245. 2) to use few words: 
garden circummured with b. Meas. IV, 1, 28. the --s, I hope she will be b. llids. V, 323. fo be b. llereh. 1I, 
H6BIV, 2, 157. a b. wall, IV, 10, 7. Wint. IV, 4 818. 2, 140. Tw. I11, 4, 174. R2 II1, 3, 10. R3 I, 4 90. 

Brichlayer, mason: tt6B IV, 2, 43. 153. 
Brldal, nuptial festival: such observanc.y as 
3îts the b. Oth. 11I, 4, 150. 
Adjectively: b. bed, Johnll,491. Rom. 11I, 5, 202. 
V, 3, 12. b. chamber, Shr. IV, 1,181. b. day, H6C 11, 
2, 155. b. dinner, Shr. 11I, 2» 221. b..flowers Rom. 
IV, 5, 89. 
Bride, subst, a woman uewly married or 
about to be married: lIeas, l[I, 1, 84. As V, 4 
184. Shr. Il, 398. III» 2,94. 153 etc. V, 2, 42. All's Il, 
5, 28. Johnlll, 1, 209. H6AV, 3 152. H6BI, 1,252. 
H6C III, 3, 207. 225. IV, 1, 7 etc. Tir. l, 319 etc. 
Rom. I, 2 11. III, 5, 116. IV, 5, 3.33. Tire. l, 1,123. 

Hml.ll, 2, 92. be b.: Viv. 11, 2, 81. lIeas. V, 26. Ado 
IV, 1, 1. R3 Il, 2, 43. IV, 2, 20. be curst and b. Tw. 
III, 2, 46. Pollowed by wilh: I will be b. with .you, 
Wiv. Il, 2, 187. R2 III, 3, 12. 13. -- Without be: b., 
short, quick, Wiv. IV, 5, 2. b., I pra.y .you, Ado III, 5, 5. 
That's the breff and the long, H5 1II, 2, I26 (cap- 
tain Jtuny's speeeh), that is the brief and the tedious 
of it, All' Il, 3, 34. 
In b. = in few words: desb'es to know in b. the 
grounds and motives, Compl. 63. open the rnatter in b. 
Geutl. I, 1, 135. Err. I, 1, 29. H6C IV, 1, 89. In b., 
absolutely, ---- in short: in b., to set the needless process 
b.y, hIeas. V, 92. Ado V, 4, 105. As IV, 3, 143. Shr. I, 

Oth. II, 3, 180. Per. I, 1, 6. 11I Prol. 9. 1, 40. 216. IV, 3, 156. John 11, 72. 267. R3 V, 3, 87. 
Bride, vb.; to b. it=to play the brid.e: shall Rom. I, 3, 73. Hml. II, 2,68. Lr. IV 3, 24. In ver.y 
sweet -Bianca practise how to b. it? Shr. III, 2, 253. b. Mereh. Il, 2, 146. 

Bride.bed, marriage-bed: Mids. V, 410. 
Hml. V, 1,268. 
Bridegroom, a man newly married or 
about to be married: lqerch. III, 2, 52. As V, 4, 
184. Shr. 11I, 2, 5. 153.248 etc. H4A I, 3, 34. Troil. 
IV 4, 147. Rom. III, 5, 146. IV, 1, 107. IV, 4, 27. V 
3, 235. lIcb. I, 2, 54. Lr. IV, 6,202. Ant. lV 14» 100. 
]Bridge, 1) a building raised over water for the 
convenience of passage: Ado I, 1,318. H4AIV,3, 70. 
H5 111, 6, 2. 4.14.93. 100. H6A I, 4, 67. H6B IV, 4, 
49 (ondon b.). IV, 5, 3. R3 III, 2, 72. Lr. II1, 4, 58. 
2) the bony part of the nose: down with 
the nose, down with it flat; take the b. quke awa.y of 

.Brief : in brief, in short: b., I recovered him, 
As IV, 3, 151. John V, 6, 18. Per. I11 Prol. 39. 
Used adverbially: it were a grle so b. to part with 
]ou, Rom. III, 3, 174. 
Brief, subst., 1) a letter: bear this sealed b. with 
win9ed baste to the lord marshal, H4A IV, 4, l. 
2) any short writing, a note, a summary, 
abstract: I will make a prief of it in ny note-book, 
Viv. I, 1,146 çEvaus' speech), lherc is a b. how rnan.y 
sports are rlpe, lVIids. V, 42. the hand of rime shall 
draw this b. into as huge a volume, John 11 103. thls 
is the b. of moneg, plate and jewels, I ara possessed of, 
Ant.V, 2, 138. 

him that .... , Tire. IV, 3, 157. 3) a short account: she told me in a sweet 
Brigenorlh, place in England : H4AIII, 2,175. verbal b., it did concern gour highness, All's V, 3, 137. 
178. Unintelligible passage: whose ceremong shall seem 
Bridger, female naine: Wiv. 1I, 2, 11. hIeas. I11, expedient on the now born (or borne?) b., All's 1I, 3, 
2 83. Far. II1, 1, 31. 186 (solne intpp.: contract, licence of marriage). 
Bridle, subst., rein: Ven. 37. Err.ll, 1, 13. Shr. Perhaps simply the letter is meaut, dispatched by the 
IV 1, 83. eountess to Heleu in I1 2, 66, which the king may 
Bridle, vb., 1) to govern, to restrain: Err bave got notice of dm'iug his conversation with Ber- 
11, 1, 14. H6B I, 1, 200. IV» 7, 112. H6C IV 4 19. train. 
2) to put a bridle on: mine was hot d, H5 Brielly, 1) in few words, concisely: show 
III, 7, 54. me b. how, Ado lI 2, 11. As 111, 2, 53. John lI 52. 
Brief, adj. (compar. briefer, Shr.IIl, 167; superl. H4B IV, 1 54. H5 V, 2, 73. Cor. III, 1,285. Rom. I, 
briefest, Ant. IV, 15, 91), short (but never used of 3, 96. Caes. llI 3, 11. 17. 26. 27. Lr. IV, 6 233. 
spaee, not even in It8 111 2 140 and Mcb. V, 5, 23) : 2) in short: b., I do mean to mezke love to Ford's 
this b. abridgement of m.y will I make Lucr. 1198. wife, Wiv.l, 3, 47. II 2» 208. Ado V, 1, 250. Mcb. Il, 
rn.y woes are ledious, though m.y words are b. 1309. 3, 139. 
nor can I fortune to b. minutes tell, Sonn. 14, 5. b. 3) lately: 'ris hot a mlle; b. we heard thelr drums, 
hours, 116, 11. out dates are b. 123, 5. a little b. Cor. I, 6, 16. 
lilehmidt, [hakespeare Lexieon. 3. Ed. T. 1. 10 



146 

B 

4) quickly: b. die thdr joy that place them on 
the truth of gb-ls and bo.ys, C_ymb.V,.5, 106. and tbne 
that is so b. spent with .your fine jancms qualntl.y eche, 
l'er. I11 lrol. 1.'2. Sometiraes  without hesitation» 
without further ceremony: go put on th. defences. 13., 
sire Ant. IV» 4, 10. therefore b. tield ber, for she muse 
overboard, l'er. 111, le 53. 
Briefness, 1) shortness, tartuess: I hope 
the b. of .your answer rnade the speediness of .your 
return Cymb. Il, 4» 30. 
2) quickness: b. and fortune, work! Lr.II, 1»'2.0. 
in feathered b. sails are filled, Per. V, 2, 15. 
Brier, a prickly plant, a wild species of the 
rose: each envious b. his wear# legs dolh scralch, Ven. 
705. Tp. IV, 180. Err. Il, 2, 180. Mids. Il, le 3. lll, 
1,110. III, 2» 29. 443. V, 401. As I» 3» 12. All's IV 
4, 32. XVint. IV, 4, 436. Cor.III,3, 51. ïit. Il, 3, 199. 
Tim. IV, 3, 422. o fco I out like the red rose on triumphant 
6. Mids. 111, 1, 96. f'om off this b. pluck a whlte rose 
wlth me» It6A 11, 4, o0 (= rose-bush). 
Bright, shining, luminous, elear, spleu- 
did: the b. sua, Veu. 485. I18 V, 5, 51. the b. track 
ofhis.fier.y car, R3V,3, 20. R21II, 3, 67. rnoon, LLL 
V 2, 205. star, Vcn. 815. 862. Luer. 13. Mids. 111 
'2_, 60. All's I, 1, 97. H6A 1, 1, 56. I, 2, 144. bearns 
All's V, 3, 34. R3 I e o, .68. dag, Luer. 1518. I16B 11, 

(fortune's) ra and b. Troil. I, 3, 47. the b. of ber check 
would same those stars, Rora. 11 2, 19. 
Bright-shil|il|g : b. daff, H6C V, 8, 8. 
Brightsome, only in the spurious True Tragedy 
20, 49. 
Brim, edge» rira: on the brook's green b. l'ilgr. 
80. th. banks with pioned and twilled --s, Tp. I¥, 64. 
bring me but fo the ver.y b. of if (the cliff) Lr. IV, 1, 
78. his bonnet, under whose b. Ven.1088. fo rnake the 
combg hour o'er.flow wilh joy and pleasure &'own the 
b. All's 11, 4, 48. willfill tlz.y wishes fo lhe b. Ant. III, 
13,18. a cup slored uato the b. l'er. Il, 8» 50. (b. fulness 
v. brirnfulness). 
Brimful, full to the top: out legions are b. 
Caes. IV, 3, 215. ollowed by of: b. ofsorrow, Tp.¥, 
14. his eje b. of tears, H4BIII, 1,67. b. of fear, Oth. 
Il, 8, -°.14. 
Brimfulness: wilh anple and b. qf his force, 
Hb I, 2, lb0 (O. and M. Edd. in two words). . 
Brimstone, sulphur: lo put tire in /our heart, 
and b. in /our liver, Tw. lll,2, 22. ['ire and b.! (used 
as mn exccration): Tw. Ils b» b6. 0th. 1¥, 1, 245. 
Brinded, spottcd: thrice the b. cat halh rnewed» 
Mcb. IV, 1, 1. 
Brine, 1) sale water: he shall drink nought 
but b. Tp. 111, 2, 74. whil)ped wilh wire, and stewed in 

4, 1. Caes.ll, 1, 14. Ant. V, '2., 193. heaven, H5 t'roi, b. Ant. 11, 5, 65. 
2. e.ve, Ven. 140. Lucï. 1213. Sonn. 1, 5. 20, 5. 43, 2) the seR: phmged in the foandng b. Tp. I, 2, 
4. Mids. I1, .'2, 92. R2 III, 3» 69. weapons or swords, 211. an the b. andcloud# billow kiss the rnoon, l'er.III, 
Luer. 1432. John IV» 3, 79. R2 III, 2, 111. 0th. I» 2» 1 45. 
59. glass, l'ilgr. 87. pearl, 133. gold, Merch. V, 59. 8) used of tears: showers ofsilver b. Lucr. 796. 
Tire. IV» 8, 383. rnetal» H4A I, 2, 236. hair, R3 1, 4, the b. that seasoned woe had pelleted in tears Corapl. 
58. Troil. IV, 2, 118. rnade Lud's town wilh rejoicing 17. 'ris the best b. a rnafden can season her praise in, 
rires b. Cymb. 111, 1, 82 etc.  b. Phoebus, Wint. IV, Ail'si, 1, 55. e.ye-offendbg b. Tw.l,l,30. what a deal 

" 8 
4, 124. Apollo, LLL IV, 3, 343. Diana» Per. I11,o, 2 • 
angels are b. IIcb. IV» 3, 20-. cf. Rom. Il, 2, 26 and 
H8 IV, 2, 88. 
Hence  of splendid beauty: th.y b. beaut.y, 
Lucr. 490. I tell lhe da., to please him thou art b. Sonn. 
28» 9. 147, 13. Pilgr. 87. she is too b. fo be looked 

of b., Rom. 11, 3, 69. 
Brine-pit, a sait spring: the fresh sprinffs, 
--s, Tp.l,2,338. and rnade a b. with out bltter tears, 
Tit. 111, 1, 129. 
Bring (impf. and partie, brought). 1) to fetch, 
to lead from another place to where a p. is: Fortune 

against, Wiv.ll,2,254. so qulck b. thbzgs corne fo con- bath rnlne enemies brought fo thls shore, Tp. 1, 2, 180. 
fusion, Ilids. I, 1, 149. 111, 2, 60. since ber rime are was hither brouffht with child, 269. 11,1, 134. 11,2,74. 
111 8 48 IV, 37 V, 188 240 etc. etc. being so hmd 
colliers counted b. LLL IV,3,267. thou wilt show more , , • • • " 
b. and seern more virtuous when she is gone, As 1, 3, 83. fo me that broughtyour rnind ( delivered your raessage) 
I will be b., and shine in pearl and gold, Tit. I1, 1, 19. Gentl. 1, 1,147. fo b. word» Erï. IV, 3, 
And --illustrious, glorious: wisdom wishes 138 etc. (cf. word). And then fo b. alone in the sense 
to appear rnost b. when it dolh fax itselfi hleas. I1, 4, of to tell, to inform: who --s back fo him, Hml. 
78. Trot had been b. with farne and hot with tire, Lucr. V,2,'2-04. b. me how he takes rny death, Ant. 1¥, 13, 10. 
1491. b. faine, H6A IV, 6, 45. honour, H4A I, 3, 20,'2. Under the sarae head the following passages muse 
be registered: tou tub the sore, wlten .ou should b. the 
Troil. i1I» 3, 151. 
Likewise - cheerful, gay: be b. and jovial, plaster, Tp. 11, 1, 139. cursed hours wMch forced 
Mcb. 111,2,28. rn.y fanc.y, more b. in zeal than the devo- rnarriage would bave brought upon ber, Wiv. V, 5,243. 
tion which cold lips blow fo thelr deities, Troil. IV, 4, wltereas he frorn John of Gaunt doth b. Ms pedlgree 
28 (bat here the simile may be a burning flarae). (_- derive), H6A II, 5, 77. be brought agabzst me at 
Used adverbially: she reflects so b. Lucr.376. shine nt.y trial-da.y, H6B 111, 1, 114. cf. this complabtt we b. 
b. Sonn. 55, 3.65, 14. LLL IV, 3, 30. Ilids. V, 278. All's V, 8, 163. l'Il b. ndne action on the proudest 
hlerch. V, 1. Shr. IV, 5, 2.4.5. Wint. V, 1, 95. H5V, Shr. 111, '2., 236 (cf. action), she shall b. him that which 
2, 172. burn b. H6BV, 1,3. Tit. I, 324. Rom.l, 5,46. he hot dreams of(se, as a dower) Wint. IV, 4, 179. 
Brightl|}llrllilig-" b. Tro.y, Tit. lll, 1,69. 2) to conduct, to lead, to accompany: 
Brighten, fo make bright or illustrious: let me b. thee where crabs grow, Tp. Il, 2, 171. canst 
for .ours (sc. honour), the God of heaven b. itl 11413 b. me to the part.? 111,2,67. the prize l'Il b. thee 
- fo, IV, 205. and thlther will I b. thee, Gentl. I, 1, 55. 
I1, 3, 17. 
Brightly, with a elear light: sMnes b. hlerch, till the last step bave brought me fo rrn!t love, 11, 7, 86. 
V, 94. Tit. IV, .'2, 90. give leave that we rna.y b. you something on lhe way, 
Brightness, elear light, splendor: swear Meas. le 1, 62. cf. shall Ib. thee on the wa#? Winto 
that b. doth hot grace the day» Sonn. 150» 4. in ber 1¥, 3, 122. l'll b..you thither, rn.y lord» Ado III, .'2, 3. 



B 147 

he ranlc o.f osers --s .you fo the place, As IV, 3, 81. 
let me b. thee fo $taines, H5 Il, 3, 2. b. me but out al 
#ate,Cor.lV, l, 4 7. Caes.I, 3,1.b.Mmawag, Oth.V,2, 337 
(Ff. without him). the --hg home o.f bell and burial, 
(i. e. the solemn interment) Hml.V, 1,256. 
ïgtu'atively: b. truth fo liçht Lucr. 940. 
ri'oto the feelin# o.f ber own grief brouçht bg deep 
surmise of others" detriment, 1578. 1'll b. thee fo the 
present business, Tp. I, 2,186. bath bto bondaçe brouçht 
mg too diligent ear, III, 1, 42. the sbz bath brouçht gou 
fo this shame, hIeas. 11, ,3, 81. he woulà never b. them 
to ii#ht, 111, 2, 188. fo b. thee to the çallows, Merch. 
IV, 1,400. till I bave brouçht him fo his wits a#ain, 
Err. V, 96. thou --est me out of tune, As i11, 2, 262. 
.you b. me out ( put me ont) 265. and b..you .]rom i 
a wilà l?ate fo a Kate conformable, Shr. 11, 279. now 
we are undone and brouffht fo nothinç, V, 1, 45. fo 
which title açe cannt b. thee, All's I1, 8, 209. b. 
particulars fo a total (= sttm up the items) Troil. I, 
2, 124. 
3) to prevail on, to cause, to make: b. 
ber to tr. wit raain-course, Tp. I, 1, 38 (Store': 'b. ber 
to. T T with maicourse;' to b. fo being a terre of 
navigation,  to check the course of a shp), he that 
--s ang m«m fo answer it tiat breaks his hand» Err. 
IV, 3, 31. the mi.qhtiest space infortune nature --s fo 
job like likes, All's I, 1, 237. he was brouffht fo this 
bg a vain prophecy, H8 I, 2, 146. in which .you brou#ht 
the kinff fo be.your servant, III, 2, 315..you b. me to 
do, and then.you flout me too, Troil. iV, 2, 21. we should 
b. ourselves fo be monstrous members, Cor. Il, 3, 13. 1 
cannot b. mg tonffue fo such a pave, 56. and fo such 
wondrous doin# brou#ht Ms horse, Hml. 1 V, 7, 87. I will 
b. thee to hear, Lr.I,2,184. I could as well be brouffht 
to knee his throne, Ii, 4, 216. which brou#ht them fo be 
lcanented, Ant. V, 2,366. b. it fo that, ii, 5, 33,  make 
it mean that. 
To brinff fo pass  to do, to effect: we do hot 

14. hIcb. I, 7, 72. Aut. I, , 113. ter. V, 1, 105. And 
in general,  to produce: b. forth eternal numbers 
Sonn.38, 11.72, 13. 103, 1. Tp.V, 170. II4B I, 1,178. 
-- 2) to bring to light: fo b.forth this discoverg, All's 
V, 3,151. have brought forth the secret'st man of blood, 
Mcb. III, 4, 125. -- 3) to speak, to utter: ifthat the 
praised himself b. the praise forth, Troil. I, 3, 242. -- 
4) to produce on thc stage: on this unworthg sca.ffbld 
lo b. forth so great an object, II5 Prol. 10. Antong 
shall be brouglt drunken forth, Ant. V, 2 219. 
To b..[orward  to raake to stand forth: ror- 
thumberland arrested hin at ]'ork and brought him 
(orward to his answer, H8 IV 2, 13. 
To b. in, 1) to bear or carry from without to 
¢ithin a certain precinct: --fiW wood in, Tp. II, 2, 
16. a foolish knlçht that gou brouçht in here, çw. I, 3, 
16. fo b. you in ayain (se. into your place of lieute- 
nant) Oth. 111, 1, 53. III, 3, 74. Fortune --s in some 
boats that are hot steereà (--- into the port) Cyrab. 
IV, 3, 46. Espeeially used of things wanted and re- 
quired: look you b. me in the names of some six, Meas. 
ii, 1, 286. if I b. in your Rosalind, AsV,4,6. brouffht 
in marrer that should feed this fire, John V, 2, 85. 
shall b. this prize in ver.y easil., H4B Ill, 1, 101. such 
a miffhtg sure as never dld the clerffg ai one rime b. in, 
H5 i, 2, 135. proclaimed reward to him that --s the 
traitor in R3 IV, 4, 518. -- 2) to bring to a person's 
assistance: fo thg sensual fault lb. in sense, Sonn. 85, 
9..your own wisdom --s in the champion lonour on 
m. part, All's IV, 2, 50. ltad ]'ork and Somerset brouffht 
rescue in, H6A iV, 7, 33. -- 3) to produce, to lay he- 
fore a p.: everg to»#ue --s in a several talc, R8 V, 8, 
194. at mang tines I brouffht in mg accounts, Tim. Il, 
2, 14_ o. b. in the evidence, Lr. iii,6,37.  4) to bring 
about, to introduce: four happg da.s b. in another 
moon, Mids. I, 1, 2. the whirliffiff of rime --s in 
revenffes, Tw. V,885. l witness fo the rimes that brouffht 
them in, W'int. IV, 1, 12. didst b. in wonder to wait on 

know what's brought fo pass under the profession of treason, H5 11, 2, 109. b. in cloudj night, Rom. ili, 
fortune-tell5zg, Wiv.IV,2 183. a thbg not in his power 2, 4. 
rob to pass, Merch I 3 93 ef ass 
 . . • , , ( .P ). [ Tob. lowtob, down, toweaken, toredueeto 
1o o. asteep  to hall to sleep: a nurse's song ofl misery: horses journeg-bateà and brought loto» H4A 
lullabg fo b. ber babe asleep, Tir. 1I, 3, 29. brought a [ IV, 3, 26. we are not brought so low but we van kill a 
bed or to ed  delivered- Tir. 1¥, 2, 62. 154. [flg, Tir. II1 2, 76. brought low bg Ms own heart» Tire. 
4) to give birth: a dearer bh'th than thisMslove / IV, 2, 37 (cf. /ow. 
had brou#ht, Sonn. 32,11. to b.false #enerations, Wint.  /'o b. ff --- t clear, to proctu'e to be acquitted: 
11,1,148. brouffht thee fo this world Cor.V,3,125 (cf. I know a wa.y ... will b. me off affain, HSIII, 2, 220. 

b. foth). 
The use of the ord in connexion ith certain 
adverbs is easily explained by what precedes: 
To b. about  to accomplish by a rotation: until 
the twelve celestial si#ns bave brouffht about the annual 
reckoninff, LLL V, 2, 808. the $/earlg course that 
this dag about, John Iil, 1, 81. ere the six .years van 
vhmge their moons and b. their times about» R2 I, 3, 220. 
how mang hours b. about the dag, H6C II, 5, 27. 
To b. down  to loxver, to humble, to rednce: 
--s down the rate qf usance, Mereh. i, 3, 45. fo b. me 
down must answer for gour raising, All's ii, 3 119. b. 
down rose-eheeked gouth fo the tub-fast, Tire. IV, 3, 86. 
brought them down a#ain, Ier. IV, 2, 17. 
To b. forth, 1) to give birt.h to: she haà hot brought 
forth thee, Vert. 203. 9reen plants b. not forth their 
Iilgr. 284. b. forth more islands, Tp. II, 1, 93. 162. 
lil, 2, 113. Wint. II, 3, 65. R2 Ii, 2, 64. H5 V, 2, 48. 
]:[6C V, 6, 50. I3 II, 2, 67. Cor. V, 3 126. Caes. iI 1, 

To b. on  to induce: when we wouM b. him on 
fo some confession æ Hml. Iii, 1, 9. = to cause to corne: 
it is love" s sprin, and these (tears) the showers to b. 
it on, Ant. I11, 2, 44. 
To b. out : to b. forth; a) to beget: let it (thy 
womb) no more b. out bçrateful man, ']:im. IV, 3, 188. 
b) to produce: if1 make not this cheat b. out another, 
V'int. IX, ", 3, 129. e) to bring to light: the rime will 
b. it out, Lr. V, 3, 163. d) to show, to naine: b. 
out that is but woman's son van trace me in the tedious 
wags of art, H4A Iii, 1, 47. 
To b. up  1) to emse to advanee near: b. up the 
brown bills, Lr. IV, 6, 91. 2) to more, to dispose: b. 
him up fo likbç, Wiut. IV, 4, 544. 3) to feed, to en- 
terrain, to edncate: one that I brouçht up of a pupp.y, 
Gentl. IV, 4, 3. those ... 1 brouçht up fo attend m. 
sons, Err. I, 1, 58. Ado I, 1 241. Shr. i, 1, 14. I, 2, 
87. H6BlV, 2, 113. Tir.V, 1,84. Hml. il_O, 11. Per. 
1¥, 2, 14. 1 bave brou#ht him up ever siuce he was 
10  



148 B 
tlree years old, Shr. V, 1, 85. leaven lath brouglt ,ne .Brtane, as in 285). H6C II» 6, 97. IV, 6, 97. R3 IV, 
up to be your dauglter' s dower, All'slV,4» 19 (perhaps 4» 529 (O. Edd. Brittaine). 
- ruade me corne here), cf. brin91ng-uP. 2) Britain: Cymb. I, 4, 77. 
To b. under  to overcome, to subdue: hot tle British, belonging to Britain: Lr. fil,4,189. 

least of all tlese maladies but in one minute's fight --s 
beauty under» Ven. 746. 
Finally, to be witl a p. to brlng  to give him a 
sound lesson, to bring him to reason, to overcome 
him; 'ith a lascivious sense, hen spoken to women. 
To be wil a p. without that apposition is an am- 
bious expression as it may mean 'to joln' in 
a friendly sense as well as to fight to combat 
(cf. lVit). The addition of o bring gives it exprely 
the latter signification: lIl be with you, nlece by and 
b. To bring» uncle A, a token from Troilus. Troil. 
I, 2, 305. 
riuer, he ho brings or that which brings: 
b. of tat joy, hIids. V, 20. te first b. of unwelcome 
news H4B 1 1, 100. safed te b. Ant. IV, 6, 26. 
rini-forth, achievement: let im be but 
testimoMed in Ms own bringings-forl and e sall 
appear to te envious a scolar , a slatesman and a 
soldier hIeas. Ill 2, 153. 
rinin-up education: a ood b. Gentl. 
4, 74. Shr. 1, 1 99. a plague on my b. H4A Il, 4, 547. 
rinish, having the taste of salt; used of 
tears: te b. pearl çi. e. ars) Lucr. 1213. Compl. 284. 
ber b. tears, H6CIII, 1 41. of the sea: wen some 
envlous surge will in is b. bowels swallow Mm, Tit. 
III, 1 97. 
rink edge, margin: I ave no strengt to 
pluc tee to the b., Tit. Il, 3, 241. ou surprise me fo 
te very b. of tears, Tim. V, 1, 159. 
rise, see breese. 
risk, 1)nimble» sprightly: tese most b. and 
gddy-paced tes, Tw. Il, 4, 6. cheerl, bos, be b. 
awile, Rom. l, 5 16. 
2) smart trim: to see Mm sMne so b. and smell 
• o sweet, H4A I 3, 54. 
3) full of fire, spirituous: a cup ofwine 
tat's b. andfine, H4B V, 3, 48. 
risky, the same in the scm'rile poetry of Elute: 
most b. juvenal, hIids. ]Il, 1, 97. 
risle, subst., the stiff hair of swine: 
Vert. 625. Tw. I, 5, 3. 
ristle, çb., to erect as the s-ine does 
its hair: boat wil d air, Mids. ll 2, 31. dot 
dogged war b. Ms anry crest, John IV, 3 149. b. up 
te crest of youl, H4A l 1, 98. b. ty courage up, 
II5 Il, 3, 5 (Pistol's speech), wit Ms Amazonian cin 
e drove te d lips before Mm, Cor. Il, 2, 96 ( 
bearded). 
risily, thick set with bristles: b. pikes 
(sc. e bristles of the boat) Vert. 620. seaves borne 
on te bief wt wte and b. beard, Sonn. 1, 8. 
risiol (O. Edd. Brtow, except R2 II, 2, 135), 
town in England: R2 Il, 2 135. Il, 3, 164. III, 2 142. 
H 1, 3, 271. H6B III, 1,328. 
riain, the country of the English: LLL 
IV, 1, 126. 's isle H6B l, 3 47. tI8 l, 1, 21. Cb. 

4, 21. IV, 6, 256. Cymb. II1, 5, 65. V, 5, 480. 
llriton (O. Edd..Britain), native of Britain: Cymb. 
1,4, 28. I, 6, 67. fil, 1, 33. III, 5, 20. IV, 2, 369 etc. 
Adjectively: the B. reveller, 1,6, 61. a .B. peasant, V, 
1, 24. 
llriitle, fragile: as glass is, b. Pilgr. 87. 172. 
R2 IV» 287. 288. b. life, H4A V, 4, 78. glass, R3 IV, 
2, 62. 
B¢adl, rb., 1) to spit: brnging rebelllon 
on hls sword HSV Chor. 32. l'Il b. tlte tadpole on 
rapier's point Tir. IV, 2, 85. 
2) to tap: if 1 would b. tlte vessels of ,ny love, 
Tim. Il, .o, 186. /le brave 0 --ed ltis boiling bloody 
breast, hIids. V 148. 
3) to let out to shed: tMs blow slouldb. 
dearest blood» II6A III, 4, 40. H6B IV, 10, 40. H6C 
ll 3, 16. 
4) to set abroach (q. v.), to set Ioose, to 
begin: I will continue tlat 1 --ed in jest, Shr. I, 2, 
84. a portent of --ed mischief to the unborn rimes, 
H4AV, 1, 21. what bath --ed this tumult b»t th!/ pride? 
II6C I1, 2, 159. that for ber love such quarrels ma# 
be--ed, Tir. 11, 1, 67. the busiaess she bath --ed ia 
the state, Ant. I, 2, 178. 180. 
Followed by to,  to give the first hint or im- 
puise: whether ever I did b. this business to #out 
,najest#, II8 II, 4, 149. 
ilroad, 1) wide, extended from side to 
side: b. breast Ven. 296. buttock, 298. Adol, 1,31s. 
All's IV, 7, 57. H6A I, 3, 36. Troil. 1, 3, 27. Rom. 11, 
4, 8i Ant. Il, 7, 48. 
vast, extensive: b. ,nain, Sonn. 80, 8. till 
• readin it disoerse to nouoht, H6A 1, o, 135. 
b sp g :. « . .. 
world is b. and wtde, Rom. Ill, 3» 16. TropcalI? • 
Ionours deep and b. wlerewhh your majest.y loads 
out Iouse, lIcb. I, 6, 17. 
3) puffed with pride: infull asproudaplace 
as b. Aclilles, Troil. I» 3» 190. 
4) plain, evident: proves tlee far and wlde a 
b. goose, Rom. Il, 4 91 (Ff. abroad). 
5) free, unrestraincd: as b. and general as 
tle casing ab' hlcb. III» 4, 23. from b. words ... 
3lac&ff lives in disgrace, III, 6,21. his pranks Iave 
been too b. fo bear witl, Hml. III» 4, 2. 
Used adverbially: b. awake  -«ide awake, Tir. 
Il, 2, 17 ,,Ff. only awakeL with all Iis cH,nes b. blown 
(_- full-blown)» Hml. III, 3, 81. w/io can speak --er 
than Ie that Ias no bouse» Tire. III» 4, 64 ( more 
freely). 
lroad-fro,ted, having a large forehead: 
b. Caesar Ant. I, 5, 29. 
llroadside, discharge of all the guns on 
one side of a ship:fear we --s? H4BII, 4, 196. 
llroad-spreading, spreading widely: hfs b. 
leaves, R2 llk 4, 50. 
Bro¢as (O. Edd..Broccas), naine in R2V, 6, 14. 

I, 4, 1. 179. I, 6, 113• I1, 4, 19.45. V, 1, 20 etc. in l]ro¢ll, badger; used as a terre of reproach: 
the B. court» Cymb. Il, 4, 37 (cf. on Lethe war liber marry, bang thee» b. Tw. Il» 5, 114. 
banks, tome gares» Af tic sun). Ancient orthography llrogue, wooden shoe: Cymb. IV, 2, 214. 
makes no distinction between .Britain, Bretagne and Broil, subst., 1) tumult, noisy qnarrel 
.Briton, q.v. contention: leave tMs peeish b. H6A III, 1, 92. in 
Britany, 1) Bretagne: R2 I b 1, 278 (O. Edd... this civil b. H6B IV, 8,46. stop» or all willfall in b. 



B 149 

Cor. III, 1, 33. when wasteful war shall statues overturn, 
md --s roof out the work of masonry, Sonn. 55, 6. 
civil--s, tI6AI, 1, 53. take delight in --s, I11, 1, 111. 
iV, 1 185. H6C V, 5 1. R3 !I, 4» 60. Rorn. I, 1 96 
(Qq. brawls). Lr. V, 1, 30. 
2) war, combat, batle: new --s to be corn- 
menced in strands afar remote, II4A !, l, 3. the tidings 
vf this b. brake off our business, 1, 1, 47. rnoved with 
emorse of these outrageous --s, H6A V, 4, 97. the 
vaunt ond firstlings of those --s. Troil. Prol. -'27. their 
soldier» emd being bred 5 --s, Cor. 111, 2, 81. say to 
the king the knowledge of the b. as thou didst leave 
IIcb. 1, _o, 6. feats of b. andbattle, 0th. !, 3, 87. 
Broil, vb., 1) trans, to cook over eoals: Shr. 
IV, 3, 20. Cor. IV, 5, 201 (Ff. boiled). 
2) intr. to suffer extrerne heur, to sweat: 
where bave /ou been --ing? H8 IV, 1, 56. In the 
ïollowing passage: that will physic the great M'yrmidon, 
çt'ho --s iI loud applause, Troil. I, 3,379, if may rnean 
who basks in the sunshine of applause, even to hroil- 
ing,' or: 'who is basted with applause as rneat with fat: « 
Brole, to do the business of a procurer: 
etnd--.s with all that «tu in such a suit eorrupt ..., 
ll's III, 5, 74; or that of a pawnbroker: redeemfrom 
--ing pawn the blemished crown, R2 11, 1,293. 
Brolenly, in a broken and incorrect language: 
to heor /ou eon.fess if b. H5 V, 2, 106. 
Broler, agent, negotiator: they say Ca erafty 
knave does need no b.,' H6B I, 2, 100. Especially a 
procurer, a go-between: vows were ever--s to 
defillng, Cornpl. 173. a 9oodly b. Gentl.l,2,41. (corn- 
rnodity) that sly devil, that b. John II, 568. thls bawd, 
this b. 582. to play the b. H6C IV, 1, 63. hence, b., 
lackey, Troil. V, 10, 33 (sorne M. Edd. broker-lackey). 
fils vows are --s, I/ml. I, 3, 127. 
Brole'-beveen, pro curer: Troil. III, 2, 211. 
Broo¢h, subst., a jewel worn in the bat or 
elsewhere: LLL v, 2, 620. Wint. IV» 4, 610. II413 II, 
4, 53. just like the b. and the tooth-pick, which wear 
hot now, All's I, 1, 171. 
Figuratively, = ornarnent: love to ichard is 
a strange b. in this all-hating world, R2 V,5, 66. he is 
the b. indeed and gem o.f all the nation, Hml. IV, 7, 94. 
In Troil. !I, 1, 126 (I will hold m.y peace when 
Achilles" b. bids me, shall 17) rnost M. Edd. write 
brach ; but the sense of the old text rnay be : shall I 
hold rny peaee when any of Achilles' appurtenances 
bids rne, f. i. his brooch, which )-ou resernble indeed 
in serving to set hirn off? 
Brooeh, rb, to adorn .as with a brooch: hot 
the imperious show of Caesar ever shall be --ed with 
me, Ant. IV, 15, 25. 
Brood, subst., the hatch, the young birds 
Iaatched at once: doves will peck in safeguard of theb" 
b. YI6C Il, 2, 18. Cor. V, 3» 162. Used of men: bring 
forth brave b. Tp. III, '2., 113. a b. of traitors, H613 V, 
1 141. Typhon's b. Tir. 1V, 2, 94. Tropic.'dly: all that 
b. (of vices) fo kill, Lucr. 627. make the earth devour 
ber own b. Sonn. 19, 2. the hatch and b. of rime, H4B 
III» 1, 86. -- To sit on b. -- fo ponder: there's 
something in Ms soul» o'er which his melanchol. sits on 
b. Hrnl. 111, 1, 173. 
Brood, rb., to sltas on eggs: and birds sit--in9 
in the SHOW, LLL V, 2, 933. 
Brooded, adj, furnished with brood, having a 
brood to guard: 5 despite of b. watcloEul dag, 1 

would into thy bosom pour rny thoughts, John III, 3, 5- °, 
i. e. the da)- that is on its guard like a heu attending 
her chickens. 
Broolt, assurned narne in Wiv. (Ff. Broorn): 
1 224. il, 2, 150. 157. III» 57 58. V, 5, 114 etc. etc. 
Quibble in Il, _o, 157. 
B.ook, subst., small natural strearn of vater: 
Ven. 162. 1099. Pilgr. 43. 75. Tp. IV, 128. V, 33. 
Wiv. il, 2, 157. hIids. II, 1,84. hlerch. II, 7, 47. V, 96. 
As II, l, 16. 32.42. III, 2, 305. Shr. Ind. 2, 52. H6B 
III, 17 53. H6C IV, 8, 54. Tirn. IV, 3, 225. Hml. IV, 7, 
167. t:lyfng at the b., II6B Il, 1, 1  hawking at 
water-fowl. 
B,'ool, rb., to bear, to endure: a woeful 
hostess s hot merry guests, Lucr. 1125. to b. this 
patiently, Gentl. V, 3, 4. my business cannot b. this 
dalliance Err. lV, 1, 59. LLL lV 27 34. Shr.l, 1, 117. 
John III, 1 36. H4A IV, 1, 62. V, 4, B6. 74. 78. H5 
V Chor. 44. H6B I, 1, 170. IV, 9, 45. V, 1, 92. H6C 
1,1,5. 1112,18. V, 6,27. R311I, 7» 162. IV, 4158. 
Tit. II, 1, 77. Tire. III, 5 117. fo b. well--- to put up 
with: b. such disgraee well, As I, 1,140. ill: how iii 
we b. his treason» H6A IV, 1, 74. b that /ou b. it iii, 
it makes him worse, R3 !, 37 3. Corning near the sense 
of to like: thls shadowy desert l better b. thanjïou- 
rishing peopled towns, Gentl. V 4, 3. how --s your 
grace the air? R2111, o_, 2. whom lï'enr. ne'er could b. 
H6A I, 3, 24. how bath /our lordship --ed imprison- 
ment? R3 !, 17 125. 
Followed by a clause : if they eau b. I bow a knee 
to man, H6BV, 1, 110. By an iufinitive: b. to be com- 
raanded, Cor. 1, 1, 266. would bave ed the eternal 
devil fo keep his state in Rome, Caes. 1, 2, 159. 
Broom, besoin: I am sent with b. belote, hlids. 
V, 396. 
B'oom, narne assamed by Ford, according to Ff. 
Qq. Brook, q. v. 
B'oo m-grove: thy--s, whose shodow the dismssed 
bachelor loves, being lass-lorn, Tp. IV, 66; c¢:tainly 
not groves or woods of genista, which would be non- 
sense, but perhaps woods overgrown with genista, 
»athless woods. 
]h'oomstaff, handle of a broorn: af length 
they came fo the b. to me, H8 V, 4, 57 (this seems to 
rnean: they carne within a broornstaff's length of me). 
Broflm (cf. barley-broth, hell-broth, snow-broth) 
liquor in which flesh isboiled: mywindcool- 
ing my b. Merch. I, 1, 22. suced out --s, C).rnb. IV, 
2, 50. 
]h'ohel, house appropriated fo the prn'poses of 
prostitution: Tim. IV, 1 13. Hml. II, 1, 61. Ll-. I, 
266. III, 4, 99. Per. V Prol. 1. 
B'ohel-honse, the sarne: Ado I, 1,256. 
B'oher (plural indiscrirninately brothers and 
brethren) 1) one born of the sarne father and rnother: 
Pilgr. 104. Tp. I» 1, 66. I, 2, 66.67.75.92. 118. 122. 
127 etc. etc. Plur. brothers: Gentl. IV 4, 4. WL-. IV, 
-'2,52. H4BIV,4 43. V, _o, 46. H5 IV» 1, 24. IV3»60. 
H6C Ill, 2, 109. 116. IV, 1, 58. V» 4, 35. R3 l» 2, 96. 
Tir. I, 287. V» 3, 100. Tirn. IV» 3 3. Ant. II, 2, 150. 
C)-mb. IV 2, 3. Phtr. brethren: Ado II» 1, 67. H4B IV, 
47 26. H6C I, 3, 25. Troil. II, 2, 190. Tir. I, 89. 104. 
146. 160. 348. 357. V, 1, 104. 
3. - half-brother: R3 V, 3, 95. 
2) -- brother in law: Err. II,2, 154. I!I,?25. 
As V, 2, 20. 8hr. V, 2, 6. H4A 1, 3, 156. R3 l, 3» 62,. 



I50 

B 

IV, 4, 316. Caes. Il, 1, 70. IV, _o, 37. 39. Lr. IV 5, 1. 
are the --s 19arled? Ant. 111, 2, 1. 
3) term of endcarment for ri-tends : 'int. l, 2, 4. 
H5 I¥ Chor. 34. IV, 1, 87. H8 V, 4, 66 (--s). sworn 
b. _Ado I, 1, 73. ]Vint. IV, 4, 607. H4A Il, 4 7. H4B 
III, 2, 345 (cf. swear), the.ç s]ook hands and swore 
--s, .As V, 4 107. m.y sworn b., t]e people» Cor. Il, 3, 
102. cf. m. b. general» the commonwealth, H4B 1¥ 
1 94. 
4) fellow-creature: thisguiltwould seem death- 
wort]ty in thy b. Lucr. 635. we cannot w«Oh out b. 
with ourself hIeas, ll o 126. would call 
fools hierch. I, 1, 99. amongst my brelhren mortal» II8 
111, 2, 148. 
5) associute, colleague: myb. Angelo, hleas. 
III2,219. rny b. justice, 267. thy b. cardinals, H8111, 
2, 57. ]ou a b. of us (i. e. a peer), V, 1, 107. good 
b. Tire. III, 4, 7. I hold you but a subject of this war 
hot as a b. Lr. V 3, 62. cf. 6ï. Plural brothers: 
co-mates and--s in exile, As ll, 1,1. hbn (the mayor) 
and all his --s, H6C IV, ï, 34. here corne out --s, Tim. 
V, 2, 13. my of my --s of the state, 0eh. I, 2, 96. 
.Brethren : my friends and brethren in these great aff airs, 
It4B IV, 1, 6. t)e nayr and all his brethren, H5 V 
Chor. 25. R3 fil, 7, 44. H8 ¥, 5, 71. brethren and 
sisters of the hold-door trade, Troil. V, 10, 52. some 
certain of your brelhren, Cor. II 3, 59. Especially 
kings calling each other brothers: Wiut. IV, 2, 26. 
V, 1, 141. V, 3, 5. John Il, 547. III, 1, 161. II5 I, 
6) a member of a religions order: a b. 
of your order, hIeas. I, 3, 44. I ara a b. of gracions 
order» lll 2, 231. a barefoot b. Rom.¥» 2 5. Syno- 
nymous to friar: Meas. III, 2 14. 
Followed by of: b. of Gloster, II6C I¥, 5 16. R3 

!at threatening b. Shr. V .op 136. smoot]ed --s, H6A 
ll], 1, 1.'24. The word passes by almost imperceptible 
degrees into thc ïollowiug signification. 
2) the forehead; the ingulir and plural forms 
nsed indiscriminately: she kissed his b., his cheek, his 
chin, Vert. 59. 339. Sonn. 33, 10. Gentl. I» _'2, 02. Err. 
I1 o 138. LLL IV, 3 185. V, .'2, 392 (hold 
he'll swoon). As 111, 3, 62. $Viut. I, 2» 149. Tw. V, 
249. R3 IV, 1, 60. Rom. I, 3, 35 etc. prit mg eye-balls 
in thy ,death's) vault_y --s, John I11, 4, 30. w]o hase 
hot in thy --s an eye discernmg tlme honour, Lr. I 
.'2, 52. Figuratively: out cannon shall be bent against 
t]e --s of tMs resisting town, John 11 38 (i. e. the 
walls), on t]te b. o'the sea stand ra»ks of people, Ofl. 
I1 1 53 (i. e. on the shore). 
3) the whole countenance: t]tou canst hot 
sec one wrinkle in my b. Vert. 139. to cloak offences 
wlth a cunning b. Lncr. 749. to nask their --s and 
lffde their infamy, 794. t]te lig]tt will show, charactered 
in ,y b., the story of sweet c]tastit.'s deca., 807. O 
carre not with thy hours ny loce's f«ir b. Sonn. 19,9. 
rime delves the parallels in beauty's b. 60, 10. there is 
written in your b. honest. and constancy Meas. IV 
163. speak tou this with a sad b. Ado l, 1, 185. if 
in black my lad.y's --s are decked, LLL 1V, 3,258. 
where falr is not 19raise cannot rnend the b. lV, 1, 17. 
till o'er theb" --s ... sleep .. doth creep, lIids, lll 
364. sees llelen's beauty in a b. of JEgypt. ¥ ll. 
what damned error, but some sober b. will bless if, 
Merch. lll 2 78. speak, sad b. and true maid Aslll, 
I 2, 227. by the stern b. IV 3 9. the wrinkles in rny 
--s, II6C ¥, .'2, 19. 'ris but the pale reflex qf Cynthia's 
b. Rom. III, 5 -'20. Figuratively: out.face the b. of 
braggbg horror, John V, 1, 50. here walk 1 in t]e 
black b. of night, V, 6, 17. 

I, 8, 62. of JEngland, John II, 547. III, 1, 161 (cf.of). Sometilnes  aspect, appearance: bythis 
13rethren trisyllabic: Tit. I, 89. 348. 357. face, this seeming b. of justice did he wia the hearts 
llrotherhood, 1) quality and love of a of ail, H4A IV» 3 83. like a gallant in the b. ofyout]t, 
brother: finds b. in thee no sharper spurf R2 I, 2 H6B V, 3 4. though all things foul would wear the 

9. I-I5 II, 1 114. I-I6C IV, 1 55. R3 1, 1, 111. II, 
1 108. 
2) association corporation: degrees in 
schools and --s in ckies, Troil. ], 3» 104. Religi o us 
order: bymy b.! Rom. ¥, ,'2, 17. 
Brother-in-law, brother of a man's wife: 
R2V 3, 137. H4A I, 3, 80. Father of a man's 
daughter-in-law: Wint. IV 4 720. 
Brother-like, adj. beeoming a brother: 
this is b. H6C V, 1, 105. 
Brother-]oe brotherly affection: H8 V» 

--s of grace, Mcb. IV, 3, 23. to be contracted i, one 
b. of woe, I-Iml. I, o, 4 (cf. a b. of rnuch distraction, 
Wint. I  149). 
Brow-boussd, erowned: b. wilh the oak Cor. 
11, 2 102. 
Brocart, adj. of a dusky eolour: b. bread 
lIeas. 111 2 194. b. and white bastard, III, 2» 4. H4A 
II, 4» 82. b. furze, Tp. I 1, 71. paper, lleas. 
thread, Shr. IV 3» 138. hair Wiv. I, 1, 48. Adollb4 
14 (er). Aslll, 4, 9 (--er). Ant. III, 3.. 35. III, 11, 
14. heads, Cor. II, 3, 20. she is too b. Ado I, 1, 174. 

3 173. er than ber brother» As IV, 3, 89. as b. as hazelnuts» 
Brotherlr adv.» as beeomes a brother: I Shr. II, -'256. the b. wench, H8 I11, .o, 295. a b..faour, 
speak but b. of him, As I, 1, 162. to use .çour brothers Troil. I 2, 101--105. -- a b. bill (cf. bill) H6B IV, 
b. H6C IV, 3, 38. I love thee b. Cymb. IV, 2, 158. 10, 13. Lr. I¥ 6, 92 a kind of halbert, whose naine 
Brow, 1) the arch of hair over the eye: is ofuncertain origin). 
the right arched beauty of the b. Wiv. II1» 3 60. to sit Substantively: though grec do somethlng rningle 
and draw his arched --s, Airs I, 1, 105. his louring with our.çounger b. Ant. IV, 8 20. 
s o'erwhelming his fait sight, Ven. 183. 490. Ado Brownist, adherent of a sect founded in the 
Ili, 5 14. LLL III, 198. As 111 5 46. Wint. II» 1, 8. reign of Queen Elisabeth by RobertBrown: I had 
even here, between the chaste unsmirched b. of rny true [ lier be a 13. as a politician» Tw. II1 2» 34. 
nothe% I-Iml. IV, 5 119. To bend one's brow or brows Browny, somevhat brown: his b. locs, 
( to frown): Lucr. 709. Pilgr. 311. John IV» 2» [ Compl. 85. . . _. 
90. H6A ¥, 3, 34. H6C V, 2, 29-. bliss in ou," brows' I Browze, to ni_bbl_e: --n.g of w, $j m. t I,3, 
bent, Ant. I, 3, 36 (= in out look: cf. bent), a b. 1 69 (cf. of). the barks oJtreestmu --ast, Ang.l, 
unbent, Lucr. 1509. To knit one's brow or brows: I Intr.: there is cold meat i the cave; we'll b. on 
II6B I o» 3.1I[. 1» lb. H6C II _'2 0. III, _'2 82. unknit[ that, C'ltb. III 6 38. 



151 

Bruise, rb., 1) to hurt by a contusion: 
throw th naine against the --ing stones, Gentl. I, 2, 
111. I --d rn shin, Wiv. I, 1, 294. falling from a 
hi.ll, he was o --d, II4A V, 5, 21. Applied to defen- 
sve arms» = to dint: --d arms, Lucr. 110. R3 I, 
1, 6. his --d helmet, H5 V Chor. 18. --d pleces, Al:t. 
IV: 14, 4_'2. The saine sense in the folIowing pass,es: 
we thouht hot good to b. an injur.y till it were full 
ripe» H5 III, 6, 129 (to ope1: ,'m alcer by squeezing 
it). Palamedes sore hurt and --d, Troil. V, 5, 14. 
theg .,net fiance bg and scarcel.y b. Lr. V» 3, 148 
(thoug'h it seems herc to be  to hurt, to wound in 
general). 
2) to crnsh, to grlnd, to destroy: let us 
$e keen and rather eut a little than fall and b. to death, 
lIeas. II, 1, 6. a wretched soul, --d with adverMt.y, 
Err. II, 1, 34. b. me with scorn, LLL V, 2, 397. b. ber 
.flowerets with the armed hoofs of hostile paces, H4A 
1, 1, 8. leads ancient lords to bloody battles and to 
--ing arms, III, _'2, 105. d underneath the .yoke of 
t.yranny, R3 V, 2, 2. put n their hands thj --btg b'ons 
of wrath, ¥, 3, 110. his contempt shall hot be --bg to 
.you, when he bath power to crush, Cor. I1 3 210. the 
law shall b. him, Tim. II1, 5, 4. that the --d heart was 
piereed through the ear, Oth. I, 3» 219. 
Bruise, subst., hurt, contusion: whh gre.y 
hairs and b. of mamj da.ys, Ado V, 1, 65. that feel 
the s ofthe da.ys before, H4B 1¥, 1, 100. IIurt in 
general: the soverelgnest thbzg was parmaceti for an 
bward b. H4A I 3 58. 
Brttit. subst., rumor: 17C IV, 7, 64. Troil. V, 
9 4. Tim. V, 1, 196. 
Bru|t, rb., to announee with noise: b3t this 
reat clatter one of greatest note seems --ed, lleb. V, 
7, 22. the kin's rouse the heavens shall b. again, Hml. 
I, _'2, 127. 
Henee = to report, fo noise abroad: Ms 
death beng --ed once, H4B 1, 1, 114. thou art no less 
than faine bath --ed, It6A I1» 3» 68. 
Brundusum, town in aucient Italy: Ant. I!I» 
7, 22. 
Brun, heat of an onset, violent shoek: in 
the b. of seventeen battles, Cor. Il, 2, 104. 
Brush, ubst., the aet oï stripplng off: 
bave with one winter's b. fell from thelr boughs and 
left me open, bare for everg storm» Tire. IV, 3, 264. 
17ence, as synonymous to brulse,  hurt, inj ury: 
forgets aged contusions and all b. of rime, H6B V, 3, 
8. tempt not.yet the --es of the war» Troil. ¥, 3, 34. 
l]rush, rb., 1) to tub with a brush: --es 
Ms bat, Ado III 2, 41. thelr blue coats --ed, Shr. IV, 
1, 9 to strlp off: as wicked dew as e'er mg 
wther --ed wlth raven's feather from unwholesome 
fen Tp. I, 2, 321. 
Brute, adj., bestial, brutal: it was a b. part 
of Mm, Hml. III, 2» 110. 
Brutish, bestial: wouldst gabble like a thhzg 
most b. Tp. I 2, 357. as sensual as the b. sthg itself, 
As II, 7, 6. b. wrath 1{3 II, 1, 118. Ojudgment» thou 
art Jïed to . beasts, Caes. 1II 2, 110. unnatural» de- 
tested, b. villain, Lr. I, 2 82. 
Bruus: 1) the elder B.» Lucr. Arg. 18. Lucr. 
1734. 1807. H5 II 4, 37. Cor. I 1, 220. III 1 187. 
Tir. IV, 1, 91. Caes. I, 2, 159. I, 3, 146. 
2) the younger B.: Mcrch. I, 1» 166. U6B IV, 1» 

I 136. Caes. I, 2, 32 etc. IIml. II!, 2, 109. Ant. II, 
13. III, 2, 56. lII 11, 38. 
3) Decius (Decimus) 13.: Caes. l» 3, 148 etc. 
ubble, subst., small bladder of water: 
the b. reputation, As Il, 7, 152. like --s in a late- 
disturbed stream, H4A II 3, 62. a dream of what thou 
wert, a breath a b. R3 IV, 4, 88. the earth bath 
as the water bas, lIcb. I, 3, 79. do but blow them to 
their trial, the --s are out, Hml. V, 2, 202. 
Hence  cheat, humbug: OE gour lordsMp 
find hlm not a hilding, hold me, no more in gour respect. 
On mg lire» m.y lord, a b. Ail s III, 6, 5. 
Bulfl»le, rb., to rise in bubbIes: (ber blood) 
--inff from ber breast, Lucr. 1737. where I bave seen 
corruption boil and b. Meas. V, 320. a --ing fountàin, 
Tit. !1, 4, 23. Mcb. 1V, 1, 11.19. 21.26. 
l]ubuIle, a corrupt word, formed by captain 
Fluellen half of carbuncle, half of bubo, probably 
meaning a red pimpIe: hlsface fs all--s, H5 lII 6,108. 
Buei, 1) the male of the ïallow deer: 
Wiv. V, 5, 27. Troil. III, 1 127. Svmbol of cuckol- 
dom: Viv. III, 3, 167. Err. III, l, 76-. a b. ofthefirst 
head, LLL IV, 2, 10 (Return from t'arnassus, 1606: 
a buck of the first .year, a fawn; the second.year, a 
pricket; the third .year, a sorrel; the fourth .year» a 
soare; the .fifth, a buck of the first head; the sixth 
.year, a complete buck'). 
2) linen in washing: she washes --s here at 
home, H6B IV, 2, 51 (= she is a laundress). 
l]uck-baskef, a basket for linen to be washed: 
Wiv. lIl 3, _'2. Ill 5» 88. 90. 145. V» 5, 117. 
l]u¢ie, vessel to draw water out of a welh 
John V, 2, 139. R2 IV, 185. H4B V, 1, 23. the 
breu,er's b. It4B III, 2, 283. 
l]ucltng, washing: throw foul lhen upon 
as if it were going to b. Wiv. III, 3, 140. 
Bu¢ltingham, 1) eouuty of England: H6C 
8, 14. ) 1)uke Humphre.y of .B., a) H6B I, 1, 69. 
172. I, 372. 116. I, 4, 58. II 1, 165. IV» 8, 20. 
V, 1, 15 etc. H6C I, 1, 10. b) Henr.¢ Duke of.B. 
t13 I, 3, 17 etc. etc. H8 I1, 1, 107. alluded to: I, 
195. e) the son of the latter: H8 I, 1, 115. 199 etc. 
III _'2, 56. 
Bu¢ile, subst., instrnment of metal to fasten 
parts of dress: Troil. !II, 1 163. Ant. I 1, 8. 
Bu¢ltle, rb., 1) to fasten with a buekle: 
Wiv. V, 5» 76. Shr. III, 2, 46. Johu I! 564. R3 II1» 
7 228. V, 3, 211. TroiI. V, 3, 46. A1t. IV» 4, 11. 
he that --s Mm in mg belt, H4B I, 2, 158. he cannot 
b. hls dlstempered cause withln the belt of rule, lIeb. 
V, 2, 15. Hence to b. in  to confine: the stretchlng 
of a span --s in hls sure of age, As II1, 
a waist mostfathomless with spans and bches Troil. 
II, 2, 30. 
2) intr. (probably from thc phrase: to turn the 
buckle behind) to join in close fight: in slngle 
combat thou shalt b. with me, H6A I, 2, 95. all out 
general force might with a salhj of the ver.y town be 
--d with, IV, 4, 5. hell too strong for me to b. with, 
V,3, 28. Iwill hot band.y wlth thee word for word, but b. 
with thee blows twice two for one, H6G I 4, 50. 
3) to bow: whose fever-weakened joints» like 
strengthless hinges, b. under lire, 1/413 I, 1, 141. 
Bu¢ltler, shield: 1/4AII,4 186 (cf. sword-and- 
buckler). 1 give thee the --s ( I yleld thee the 
victory) Ado V, 2, 17. 



B 

Buckler, vb., to shield, to defend: l'Il b. 
thee against a milllbn, Shr. I11, 2, 241. the guilt of 
murder --s thee, H6B I11, 2, 216. b. falsehood wlth a 
pedlgree, H6C I11, 3, 99. 
Bucklersbury, a sta'eet of London chiefly iuha- 
bited by druggists: smell like JB. Wiv. III, 3, 79. 
Bueitram, coarse linen stiffened with glue: 
H4A I, 2, 201. II, 4, 213. 217. 227. 228. ?36. -°43. 
thon sa!A, thon serge, ha`y, thon b. lord, H6B IV, 7, 28. 
Buei-washiug, laundry: Wiv. III, 3, 166. 
Bud, subst., 1) unexpanded flower: Vert. 
416. Lucr. 848. Sonn. 1, 11. 18» 3. 35, 4. 54, 8. 
99» 7. I)ilgr. 13,'2. Gentl. I, 1, 4'2,. 45.48. Ado 
1, 59. LLL V, 2, 295. Mids. I, 1, 185. 11, I, 110. 
Il, 2, 3. IV, 1, 58.78. Shr. V, 2, 140. Tw. 11, 4, 114. 
John III, 4, 82. H4B I, 3, 39. H5 I, 2, 194. H6B 
111, 1, 89. Ilom. I, 1, 158. I, 2, 29. Il, 2, 121. Ant. 
III, 13, 40. Cymb. I, 3, 37. Per. V lh-ol. 6. 
2) the shoot of a plant: make concelve a 
bar of baser kind by b. of nobler race Wint. IV, 
4, 95. 
Bud, rb., to put forth buds or gems: Ven. 
1142. Lucr. 604. Sonn. 95, 3. 1)ilgr. 171. Shr. 
5, 37 (.young --ing virgiO. H4A V, 4, 72. wlticlt 
--ed out, H8 I, 1, 94 ( bas corne to light). 
Budge, (O. Edd. bouge, boudge) to stir: they 
cannot b. till your release, Tp. V, 11. sit .you down, 
you shall hot b. Hml. III, 4, 18. 
blostly --- to give way, to flinch, to flee: 
my conscience sys: Launcelot, b. hot. B., says the 
fiend. JB. not, says ny conscience, Mereh. 11, 2, 20. 
l'll hot b. an inch, Shr. Ind. 1, 14. a foot he will hot 
b. a foot, H4A 1I, 4, 388. II6A I, 3, 38. henoe we will 
hot b. H6C V, 4, 66. the`y did b. from rascals worse 
than the`y, Cor. I, 6, 44. I will hot b. for no man's 
pleasure, Rom. I11, 1, 58. must I b.? must I observe 
`you? Caes. IV, 3, 44 (i. e. must your caprices make' 
me quMl?) 
Budget, one who gives way: let the first b. 
die the other's slave, Cor. I, 8, 5. 
Budget, subst, leathern bag: and bear the 
sow-skin b. Wint. IV, 3, 20 (rhyming to avouch 
O. Edd. bowget). 
Budget, part of the interjection mure-budget, 
enjoining secrecy: I corne to ber and cr.y 'mure'; she 
cries 'budget', Vriv. V, 2, 7. 10. V, 5 210. 
Buff, leather prepared fi'om the skin of the I 
buffalo; used for the dss of sergeants and catch-  
poles: a fellow all in b. Err.lV,2,36. he's b a suit l 
of b. which "rested him, 45. is hot a b. jerkin a most 
sweet robe of durance? H4A 1, 2, 48.52. 
Buffet, subst., blow: I could divide m`yself and 
go to s, H4AII, 3» 35. the blows and --s of the 
world, lIcb. 11 b 1, 109. fortune's --s and rewards, 
Hml. 111, 2, 72. stand the b. with knaves, Ant. I, 4, 20. 
Buffet, vb., 1) absol., to beat, to box: hot 
a word of hls but --s better than a fist of France, 
John II, 465. this civil --b9, H4A 1I, 4, 397. if I 
mi9ht b. for my love, H5 V, 2, 146. 
2) trans, to beat: --s himself on the forehead, 
Wiv. IV, 2, 25. did b. thee, Err. II, 2, 160. we dld b. 
if (the torrent) with lust`y sinews, Caes. I, 2, 107 (cf. 
beat, Tp. 11, 1, 114). 
Bug, bugb e a r : f ear boys with --s, Shr. 1,2,211. 
- lhe b. which `you wouldfright me with, Wint. I11, 2, 93. 
Warwick was a b. that feared us all, H6C V, 2, 2. 

sueh s and gobllns, Ihnl. V, 2, 22. are grown the 
mortal --s o' the field, Cymb. V, 3, 51. 
Bugbear, frightful objeet, walking 
spectre: would he hot let it sleep . a b. take him! 
Troil. IV, 2, 34. 
Bugle, 1) hunting horn: AdoI, 1,243. 
2) bead of black glass: b. bracelet, 'int. 
IV, 4, 224. your b. eyeballs, As III, 5, 47. 
Build, (impf. built, R3 III, 1, 73. Mcb. ].4, 13. 
Per. Prol. 18. builded, Compl. 152. partie, built, Sonn. 
119, 11. 123, 2. Gentl. III, 1, 15. Wi. II, 2, 224. 
R'2 Il, 1, 43 etc. builded, Sonn. 124, 5. Ant. III, 2, 30) 
1) to frame, to erect, to construct; 
absol.: when we mean to b., we Jïrst survey tlte plot, 
H4B 1, 3, 41. 48. b. tltere, carpenter, Troil. ]Il, 2, 53. 
Tim. IV, 3, 533. Hml. V, 1, 46. Frequently used of 
birds making their nests: sparrows must hot b. in his 
ltouse-eaves, lIeas. 11I, 2, 186. Merch. Il, 9, 29. Wint. 
IV, 3, 23. R3 I, 3, 264. Ant. II, 6, 28 (cf. IV, 12, 3). 
Figuratively: sltall love in --ing grow so ruinons? 
Err. III, 2, 4. (s tlte cernent of our love, to ]ceep it --ed, 
Ant. III, 2,30. cf. Sonn. 119, 11. 124, 5). ifI mistake 
b those foundatlons which I b. upon, Wint. 11, 1, 101. 
an habitation giddy and unsure bath he that --eth on 
the vulgar heart, H4B I, 3, 90. a prett# plot, well chosen 
to b. upon, H6B I, 4, 59. 
b) trans. : experlence for me man`y buhcarIcs --ed, 
Compl. 152. ber chamber is built so shelvfig, Gentl. 
III, 1,115. Wiv. 11, 2, 224. R2 11, 1, 43. H4B I, 3, 59. 
1-I5 I, 2, 198. IV, 1,317. II6B IV, 7, 41.1-{3 11I, 1, 69. 
73. Tit. IV, 1, 59. Hml. 111, 2, 141. Lr. Ill, 2, 90. 
in (= on; cf. in) thy shoulder do I b. m`y seat (--- 
throne), H6C II, 6, 100. b. nests, Ant. IV, 12; 3. b. 
his statue, Per. 1I lrol. 14. hls apparel is built upo» 
his back, H4B 11I, 2, 155 (i. e. hangs upon him as on 
a rack). Similarly: this jewel holds his --ing on 
arm, I)er. 11, 1, 162, - still hangs on my arm. To b. 
up : th`y pyramlds built up with newer might, Sonn. 123, 
2. this Antioch Antiochus the Great built up, Per. I)rol. 
18. Figuratively: 'ris oui.y fortune thon disdainest in 
ber, the whlch I can b. up, All's II, 3, 125. 
The tropical use extends ver T far: rubzed love, 
when it is built anew, Sonn. 119, 11. it (my love) was 
--ed far fi'om accident, 124, 5. who--s his hopes in 
ar of `your good looks, R3 11I, 4, 100; cf. Troil. IV, 
5, 109. to b. his fortune, Tim. 1, 1, 143; cf. Tw. 11I, 
2, 35. nor b. `yourself a trouble out of his scattering 
and unsure observance, Oth. III, 3 1501 cf. H4B 
1, 110. from this moment I b. on thee a better opinion, 
Oth. IV, 2, 208. bath built Lord Cerimon such strong 
renown as tlme shall ne'er deca`y, Per. I11, 2, 47. will 
it serve for an`y model to b. misehlef on? Ado I, 3, 48. 
on that ground l'Il b. a holy descant, R3 I11, 7, 49 (-Ff 
make), b. their evils on the graves of great men, H8 
11, 1,67. on whom I built an absolute trust, Mcb.l,4,13. 
2) to trust, rely: to b. upona foolish woman's 
promise, Wiv. I11, 5, 42. if on m.y credit `you dare b. 
so far to make `your speed to JDover, Lr. 111, 1, 35 (cf. 
above: Wint. 11, 1, 101. H4B 1, 3, 90). 
Buildlug, subst. 1) construction, frame: 
I ara a worthless boat, he of rail b. Sonn. 80, 12. 
2) edifice: Lucr. 944. Gentl. V, 4, 9. Err. l, 
13. H6B I, 3, 133. Tit. V, 1, 23. Tire. 111, 4, 65. Mcb. 
11, 3, 74. Cymb. IV, 2, 355. Per. 11, 4, 36. Figura- 
tively: the strong base and b. of m,y love» Troil. IV» 



B 153 

.'2, 109. the --s of ms faney, Cor. Il, 1, -°16. Lr. IV, 
2, 85. 
Bulli, 1) trunk, body: Ier Ieart ... beating 
fier b. Lucr. 467. smotlered it witliin mg panting b. 
R3 I, 4, 40. to slatter all his b. and end Iis being, 
IIml. Il, 1» 95. 
2) Especially largeness ofthe body, great size: 
oll the more il seeks to Mde itsel.f, the bigger b. it shows 
Tp. III, 1, 81. n.y authorit.y bears of a eredent b., 
Meas. IV, 4, 29 (i. e. great credit), she is spread of 
lote into a goodly b. Wint. II, 1, 20. grew by our feedlng 
to so great a b. H4A V, 1, 62. eare l for the limb, the 
thewes, the stature, b. and big assemblance qf a man? 
114B III, 2, 277. that such a keech ean with his very' 
b. take up the rays of the beneJïcial sun, H8 I, 1, 55. 
though the oreat b Achilles be thu ,uard Troil IV 4 
lo0. cannot cover the monstrous b. of this ingratitude 
with any sire of words, Tire. V, 1, 68. grow in thews 
and b. 11nfl. I, 3, 1.'2. who with half the b. o'the world 
played as lpleased, Ant. III, 11, 64. Used of ships: 
.or shallow draught and b. unpri.:able, Tw. V, 58. 
hallow boats.., wlth those of nobler b. Troil. I, 3, 37. 
light boats sall sw(, though greater --s draw deep, 
II, 3, 277 (Q and M. Edd. hulks). 

1, .07. III, _'2, 17. R3 V, 3, _'24"2. it is proof and b. 
against sense, Hml. III, 4, 38. 
Brun, subst., buttocks: Meas. 1I, 1, 228. llids. 
II» 1, 53. Tire. I, 2, 237. 
2) naine in Meas. II» 1» 2.'27. 
Bum-baily, a subordinate officer employed in 
arrests: Tw. III, 4, 194 (most M. Edd. bum-bailoE}. 
Bumbard, see JBombard. 
Bump, protuberance: upon its brom a . as 
big os a yung cockeres stone, Rom. I, 3, 53. 
Bunch, 1) a cluster: vlnes with clustering es, 
Tp. IV, 112. b. ofgrapes Meas. II, 1, 133 (naine of 
a room). 
2) number of things tied together: ab. 
ofradish, H4A II, 4, 205. --es ofkeys, H4B I, 2, 44. 
Bunch-ba¢Ked (Q2 sq. and most M. Edd. hunch- 
backed) crook-backed: R3 l, 3, 246. IV, 4, 81. 
Bang, a low terre for a sharper: away, you 
cutpurse raseal! you filthy b., oway? H4B II, 4, 138. 
Bung-hole, the hole at which a barrel is filled: 
Hml. V, 1,226. 
[ngle, to make or mend clumsily; with 
up: botch and b. up damnation with patches, H5 II 
2» 115. 

3) a part of a building juttiag out: stalls, Bunling, the bird Emberiza miliaria: I 
--s, windou, s, Cor. 11, 1,226. stand behind tMs b. Oth. took this lark for a b. All's II, 5, 7. 
" ' " içil'l' l'!û: " -. • _ . .: 
I1 2 172. 192. H6C I1 5 126. Troil. ) l, 60. V [ Buràen or Burihen (lu O. Edd. nmre frequently 
7, 10. 12. Tir. V l, 31.  burteO, subst, l) load: Lncr. 735. Sonn. 23, 8. 
 Taarus one ofthc twelve signs ofthezodiac:  Tp. I, 2, 156. IV, 113. Meœeh. IV 1 95. As II 7 
Tir. IV 3, 71. 167. III, 2 341. Wint. I, ?, 3. I1 3. 206 John IL 
Bull-bearmg, bearlng a bnll: b. lilo Trod. 1I 92. 145. R2 I, 3 200. H4B V 2 55. H5 I 2, 201. 
3, 258. H6B III, l, 298. IV, 8, 30. H6C 11, 1, 81. R3 III, 7, 
Bull-beeves, beef: they want theS"porrldge and 229. IV, 4, 113. H8 Il, 3, 43. III, 2» 384. Rom. I, 4, 

theirfat b. H6A I, -0, 9. 
Bull-¢alf, male cal f: 114A Il, 4, 287. h'ame 
of one of Falstaff's reeruits: 114B III, -0 183 etc. 
Bullen, fmnily naine of the second ife of 11enry 
VIII: Sir Thomas --'s daughter, H8 I, 4, 92. Are JB. 
1II, 2, 36. 87. 88. (his candle burns hot clear, III, _'2, 
96. 'There may be a play intended on the word JBullen, 
which is said to bave been an ancient provincial name 
for a candle.' Stauntou). 
Bullel, ball to load guns: Veu. 461. Pilgr. 
328. LLL II1 65. V, 2, 261. John II, 227.412. H4B 
II, 4, 124. 127. IV 3 36. H5 IV, 3, 105. 116A IV, 
7, 79. quips and sentenees and these paper --s of the 
brain Ado Il, 3, 249. 
Bullock, castrated bull, ox: so theysell--s, 
Ado II, 1, 20.'2. a goodyoke of --s, H4B III, -0, 42. 
Bully, a brisk dashing fellow: discard, 
b. lercules, cashier, Wiv. l, 3, 6. said I well b. 
leetor? 11. m.y hand, b.; thou shalt bave egress and 
regress, Il, 1, 225. bless thee» b. doetor, II, 3, 18.29 
etc. b. knlght, IV, 5 17. what saffest thou,